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Exam Code: HPE2-T27 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
HPE Synergy Solutions
HP Solutions teaching
Killexams : HP Solutions teaching - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE2-T27 Search results Killexams : HP Solutions teaching - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE2-T27 https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : HP Set to Promote Distance Learning

Hewlett-Packard (HP) has announced the launch of BeOnline programme in collaboration with Classera, the leader in learning management systems, and Mirai, a learning innovations group focusing on learning strategy and digital pedagogy.

In line with the most exact regional governments’ directives for distance learning, the programme aims to support schools and universities in establishing a fully-fledged virtual learning environment, by providing expertise and tools at no cost.

BeOnline programme gives schools access to the full ecosystem needed for a comprehensive remote learning environment, promotes pedagogical consultancy for online education provided by Mirai; a robust learning management solution from Classera, and HP’s information technology (IT) consultancy on the required infrastructure. These services will be provided to schools until the end of the academic year at no cost. Classera and Mirai will help education providers by curating online learning pathways including the creation of a complete virtual school set-up that includes digital lesson plans, virtual assignments, e-attendance, e-assessment among other support functions. Besides IT consultancy, HP will provide schools with the HP LIFE program – a set of 32 modules on business and technical skills for youngsters. The trio said in a statement that the modules would be available online and students could self-pace the courses and receive certificates on completion.

BeOnline is part of HP’s commitment to improving the learning outcomes for 100 million people globally by 2025 and run focused pedagogy-oriented programs to deliver on its education and sustainability goals – Classroom of the Future, HP Learning Studios, Digital School Awards, HP LIFE and HP Teaching Fellows.
Commenting on the launch of BeOnline in the region, Vice President and Managing Director of HP Inc.

Africa said: “Access to means of technology is now a key part of daily life for many people living in Africa. The world has changed and the way we work, study and interact has altered forever. This program is designed to help schools to quickly adopt distance learning, even in times where various countries are faced with uncertainties for the near future. Today, technology can support new styles of learning. PCs and tools designed for education can offer students flexibility of time, place, and pace of learning, whether in or out of the classroom, or in a blend of environments. Technology can not only engage students and Improve learning outcomes, but also help to equip them with the skills they need for the future.”

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2020/04/16/hp-set-to-promote-distance-learning/
Killexams : HP to Equip Educators with Digital Tools

HP has launched the HP Innovation and Digital Education Academy (IDEA) in collaboration with Intel and Mirai Partners, an education innovation consultancy.

The newly launched programme offers teachers and educators in Nigeria the opportunity to create digital capabilities based on educational frameworks from leading international universities.

Senior Education Business Lead for the Middle East, Africa and Eastern Europe at HP Inc., Mayank Dhingra, said: “Education is among the worst hit sectors from the pandemic. At the same time, it is one of the most promising sectors that – if we get it right – can reap the benefits of this new way of learning. In fact, we can now reach even more people than we ever did before. While the technology is advancing fast, there is a constant need to innovate to remain resilient. Hence, we need to make sure that teaching staff are able to acquire the right skills to take advantage of blended and digital learning solutions, which is why we have partnered with Mirai and Intel to launch HP IDEA.”

“This programme is exciting as it is focused on pedagogy rather than based on specific product. This way we can equip educators with the latest tools and best practices in teaching and learning, which in turn will enable better learning outcomes,” he added.

Director General, Office of Education Quality Assurance, Lagos State Ministry of Education, Abiola Seriki-Ayeni, said: “The teacher is the singular and most important individual in the education ecosystem and this partnership is a welcome development at such a time as this. Being an educator myself, this program would deliver teachers and educators the needed opportunity and expertise to be digitally inclined, acquire the right skills for a blended and digital learning solution and navigate new territories as they balance in-person, online, and hybrid learning. We are working closely to onboard our teachers to Improve their capacity which would, in turn, reflect on our students’ learning outcome”.

Co-founder of Mirai, Christine Nasserghodsi, said:“We have been supporting schools in their response to COVID-19 since February. What began as a crisis response has evolved into a long-term approach to teaching, learning, leadership, and the use of digital tools and resources. Effective distance and hybrid learning require innovation and a deep understanding of learning design, one aspect of which is the use of technology. No one is better equipped to shape the future of education than teachers and school leaders. That is the core value of the HP IDEA program which we have translated into a year-long program for select schools.”

The program is mapped against and delivers on United Nation’s Sustainability Development Goals (SDG’s), the Continental Education Strategy for Africa (CESA) objectives, the Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA) and the Ministry of Education goals for UAE. The academy also incorporates world class research and frameworks from Harvard Graduate School of Education and University of Michigan.

Mon, 27 Jun 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2020/11/19/hp-to-equip-educators-with-digital-tools/
Killexams : Product Focus: Classroom Collaboration Tools

Product Focus: Classroom Collaboration Tools

Sponsored by

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Interactive WhiteBoard (IWB) as Collaboration Tools

IWBs or "a smartboard" (SmartBoard™ is actually just a trademarked brand name of IWBs, there are many manufacturers such as 3M, DYMO (Mimio), Hitachi, HP, Lenovo, Panasonic, eInstruction, and more) is a white or marker board that has been designed and manufactured to be projected on by a projector and used as an input device. IWBs typically build in one or more of the following technologies:

  • Resitive touch
  • Infrared (IR) touch (also called IR scan)
  • Electomaganetic pens
  • Touch-free camera-based

IWBs, when used with a projector and computer, allow users to interact with a presentation right on the whiteboard as well as control their computer from the whiteboard (which is typically mounted on the wall or on a rolling floor stand). IWBs are sort of like a giant graphics tablet. IWBs are great for teaching and collaboration as they allow instructors to annotate and capture notes during a presentation or even videoconferencing. If used with an audience response system (also known as "clicker") presenters can directly get feedback by polling their audience or giving quizzes during their presentation.

Alternatives to IWBs:

1) Interactive Projection

There are some projectors with built-in Interactive whiteboard technology, which turns the projector screen surface or wall (whatever they are projecting on) into an interactive surface. Both Epson and InFocus were the first to bring this technology to market (InFocus was this first to bring it to market in late 2009 but Epson was not far behind with their solution in spring 2010) but now there are units from Optoma, ViewSonic, Hitachi, BenQ, Dell, and, Luidia, Boxlight as well. Some of the solutions, like Epson’s, are pen-based which means you need to be at the board or screen, while others are wand-based, which means you can interact from almost anywhere in the room within 30 to 40 feet. Like interactive whiteboards, these solutions work similarly to graphics tablets or optical mice in that they work off a digital grid. Once the projector and pen or wand are calibrated, the user can interact with, annotate, create, and more with the presentation content.

2) Touch displays

Touch capable LCD or plasmas are offered by most of the display manufacturers like Samsung, NEC, Sony, HP, Planar, ViewSonic and ELO. This displays work like any other large format display (30" or larger) but they have the added feature of touch screen just like an iPhone or Droid. The largest single display is 82" offered by Samsung but users can also utilize multiple smaller screens to make an interactive video wall. For instance four 55-inch touch screens in a 2 high x 2 wide tile would yield a 110-inch diagonal touch screen. The combinations are endless.

Some of the manufacturers, like Samsung and Infocus, even offer units specifically for education as alternatives to IWBs, but in theory any touch monitor can deliver you the same capabilities as a traditional IWB.

Collaborative devices/solutions for IWBs

There are numerous add-on collaborative products that are both pen-based and tablet-based that can be used with existing projectors to allow you to interact with your presentations. Some of these require you to be at the whiteboard and some work from anywhere. Ebeam from Luidia has a device you mount to a traditional whiteboard and using a Ebeam pen interactive on the whiteboard. The Q300 Mirrorboard is a 10-inch wireless screen or slate that allows users to see what is being projected on a large format display and interact with it from up to 30-feet away from the receiver (which is hooked to the computer). This allows teachers to walk around the room and not even have to face the board to see what they are doing. There are many different types of interactive whiteboard devices available from manufacturers like Avermedia, Luida, Optoma, Hitachi, eInstruction and more.

The database presented here offers products that GovConnection sells specifically for the education market.


Virtual Ink Mimio Interactive

Virtual Ink Mimio Interactive

mimio Interactive is a portable and low cost device that attaches to any whiteboard (up to 4'x8' in size), connects to your PC and when used with a projector, allows you control your desktop applications and documents directly from the board.

With the included ergonomic mimio Mouse stylus, controlling your interactive whiteboard has never been easier. The mimio Mouse stylus has a teflon tip to glide across any surface and two integrated buttons with user selectable functions, such as hover and right-click.

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Panasonic Panaboard 83", Interactive Multi-Touch

Panasonic Panaboard 83", Interactive Multi-Touch

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that helps you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes active, visual-based teaching and learning that make the classroom fun for both teacher and students. By connecting a PC with Internet access and a projector, you can bring the huge amount of information available on the Web or any information on your PC right into your classroom. Panasonic's Elite Panaboard opens the door to a kind of active, visual-based education.

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Panasonic UB-8325 Interactive Whiteboard with USB Interface

Panasonic UB-8325 Interactive Whiteboard with USB Interface

White-"bored"? We've got just the solution. Panasonic's UB-8325 Interactive Panaboard will energize your meetings, keeping your audience focused and your ideas flowing. Complete with an abundance of interactive technological advancements, the benefits of the UB-8325 are without bounds.

Save written and projected notes from the board directly into your PC. Remote PC operations lets you control your Windows applications from your host PC. Easy-to-install utility software includes an electronic pen used in the same way as a computer mouse. Pen strokes can be recorded, captured, saved and replayed on top of PC applications. Experience a real time global teleconference solution using the Microsoft NetMeeting software platform. Draw ideas from all of your resources around the world simultaneously.

Panaboard Mode lets you increase efficiency and reduce meeting time by simply writing on the board and printing out the information for easy distribution. Whiteboard Mode helps you distribute consistent information by using the power of your PC to save meeting notes and then send the information electronically via email or to a printer. Projector Mode allows you to interact with projected images while controlling Windows applications directly from the board for convenient and practical analysis.

Included colorful electronic pens track meeting notes and important words to emphasize critical issues in color. The screen displays crisp data and video images with minimal light reflection. A built-in printer allows for materials to be distributed to the audience in seconds.

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ViewSonic Ebeam Edge eBeam Edge Interactive Projector/Whiteboard Solution by Luidia

ViewSonic Ebeam Edge eBeam Edge Interactive Projector/Whiteboard Solution by Luidia

If you walked into a classroom where ViewSonic's PJ-PEN-002 eBeam Edge For Education was being used you're realize almost instantly what was going on. What you might not realize is how it was going on.

You know what a whiteboard is. There must be one in just about every classroom in America. Although they're far less common than ordinary whiteboards, you might know what an interactive whiteboard is too.

With an interactive whiteboard, a computer and a projector you can display PowerPoint slide shows, computer-based lessons and other programs on the board and navigate through them, manipulate them and annotate them. With many you can save your work along with your notes in a variety of file formats.

eBeam for Education turns any ordinary whiteboard into an interactive whiteboard. Here's how it works:

After you've installed the software into your Mac or PC you connect your computer to your USB-equipped projector. (Cable available separately) Then you place the eBeam receiver on the edge of your whiteboard. It's less than eight inches long (200 mm) 1.6 inches (41 mm) wide and less than a half inch thick (10.5 mm). If you have a metal-edged board you can attach it magnetically. Otherwise you can use the included mounting brackets. Run the included 16 foot (4.87 meters) long USB cable from the receiver to your computer and you're ready to go.

Once you're set up you can project PowerPoint and Keynote slideshows, lesson plans, and other computer-based learning materials. Pick up the stylus and navigate, annotate and manipulate what's on the board just as you would with an actual interactive whiteboard.

The eBeam system includes a complete package of software that makes your eBeam even more valuable. Included in the software is eBeam Scrapbook, a multi-media organizer for gathering, preparing, presenting, and sharing your content.

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Hitachi StarBoard FX-TRIO-77 Whiteboard

Hitachi StarBoard FX-TRIO-77 - Whiteboard - infrared - wired - USB

The key to the FX-TRIO interactive whiteboard is a multi-touch surface. Use your finger, stylus or electronic pen to annotate on the whiteboard and easily navigate through computer applications, websites and multi-media content. Up to three users can operate the board and perform the same task simultaneously. Moreover the hard electronic-free surface of the FX-TRIO makes it almost unbreakable and usable as a dry-wipe whiteboard.

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Panasonic 55 in x 65 in Panaboard - Plain Paper Model with USB Interface Port

Panasonic 55 in x 65 in Panaboard - Plain Paper Model with USB Interface Port

Connect your meetings, brain storming sessions, scheduling and training with this 55" by 65" plain paper Panaboard. It features a 35.4" by 55.1" panel size with four endless type panel surfaces and includes one non-glare screen for projectors. File Document Management System software easily archives, retrieves and disseminates your meeting notes. For your convenience, this Panaboard can be wall-mounted or used with the mobile floor stand (sold separately).

This model comes standard with Document Manager and Document Viewer utility software. Meeting content that appears on the Panaboard screen can become your meeting minutes with notes through the Document Viewer feature. Using Document Manager, you can quickly and easily file and distribute the meeting minutes by converting the file into common electronic file formats, including BMP, TIFF, JPG, PNG and PDF.

With the included Printer Driver, this Panaboard can also work as a PC printer. If you need to print documents during a meeting, the built-in Plug and Play USB port makes it easy to print out your documents right from the Panaboard. In addition, with the included TWAIN driver, you can scan the image on the Panaboard screen as image data to your computer with just one click. You can also control the Panaboard operation right from your computer.

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Virtual Ink MimoTeach Interactive System

Virtual Ink MimioTeach Interactive System

The MimioTeach interactive system transforms any dry erase board into a fully interactive whiteboard. The patented infrared and ultrasound sensor technology fits neatly into a small, unobtrusive bar that attaches easily to a board. Combine it with a projector and computer, and it becomes a fully interactive system. Lightweight yet durable, the MimioTeach system is easy to handle and transport.

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Hitachi StarBoard WT-1 Interactive Wireless Tablet

Hitachi StarBoard WT-1 Interactive Wireless Tablet

The WT-1 Interactive Wireless Tablet's compact and portable design allows you to comfortably control your computer and present up to 30 feet away – even while standing up. Whether you're in the boardroom or in a meeting, you can quickly jot down notes – from mathematical formulas to flow charts. Easily mark up Word documents, PowerPoint presentations, and highlight information with digital inks. Then, reorganize your notes and recall them later to share with colleagues. Skip the frustration of trying to set-up a wireless connection. The WT-1's Radio Frequency technology takes the guess work out of pairing devices and easily connects to your computer. The integrated rechargeable battery provides up to 16 hours of wireless operation and can be charged via USB.

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Mitsubishi Bundle XD250U-ST Portable DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

Mitsubishi Bundle XD250U-ST Portable DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

  • 2700 ANSI lumens / 2000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1024 x 768 Max Resolution
  • 4:3, 16:9 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included, Blackboard mode, Whiteboard mode / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes (1) XD250U-ST DLP projector and (1) eBeam Edge.

In the past, attempting to show large projected presentations in small rooms could prove quite difficult, as a projector would need to take up a lot of desk space in order to show a sufficiently large image. Thanks to the short throw projector from Mitsubishi Electric however, this problem is a thing of the past. Requiring only an 83cm distance to deliver a 1.5m projection image, the XD250U-ST can be placed right at the edge of a table top, eliminating the loss of workspace commonly associated with conventional projectors. The XD250U-ST's lightweight and compact design also makes it ideal for sales presentations on the move or easy transfer between classrooms.

Great images in limited area aren't the only thing going for the XD250U-ST, as it also features an outstanding range of value-added functions. The built-in 10W speaker effectively eliminates the need for an external audio system in small rooms, while the "Audio Mix" feature allows the user to connect two audio inputs to the projector (e.g. a microphone and DVD player) and control each of the input volumes separately. The projector can be connected to a local area network for remote monitoring and control, and the visual PA feature allows messages to be simultaneously broadcast to multiple Mitsubishi projectors on the network. Low operating costs are also a standout feature of the XD250U-ST, with a staggering lamp life of up to 6000 hours ensuring far fewer lamp changes, and a filter free design meaning less downtime for maintenance.

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Optoma TW675UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector

Optoma TW675UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector, 3200 Lumens

  • 3200 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3, 16:10 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX675UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX675UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Mitsubishi Bundle XD221U-ST(D) 3D-Ready DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

Mitsubishi Bundle XD221U-ST(D) 3D-Ready DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge

  • 2000 ANSI lumens / 2000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1024 x 768 Max Resolution
  • 4:3, 16:9 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included, Blackboard mode, Whiteboard mode / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes (1) XD221U-ST(D) 3D-Ready DLP Projector and (1) eBeam Edge.

At last, a multimedia projector that goes right to the front of the class. The XD221U-ST DLP 3D-ready projector takes classroom presentations to a new level, with ultra short-throw capabilities, sharp image reproduction, incredibly quiet operation, low cost of operation and more.

With the XD221U-ST multimedia projector instructors no longer worry about casting a shadow on the whiteboard or face the bright glare of the projector. An ultra-powerful short-throw lens can project an amazing 60-inch diagonal image from a distance of just 33-inch, an asset whether the room is large or small.

Near-silent 26 decibel operation in low mode ensures that the XD221 doesn't compete with the presenter. A high-volume, 10 watt built-in speaker eliminates the need for an external speaker. The optional microphone reproduces the presenter's voice loud and clear in real-time while the audio mix feature enables the microphone's audio to lay over the sound from another input source.

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Panasonic 77" Diagonal Interactive Board with MultiTouch

Panasonic 77" Diagonal Interactive Board with MultiTouch

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that helps you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes active, visual-based teaching and learning that make the classroom fun for both teacher and students. By connecting a PC with Internet access and a projector, you can bring the huge amount of information available on the Web or any information on your PC right into your classroom. Panasonic's Elite Panaboard opens the door to a kind of active, visual-based education.

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HP TeamBoard Resistive Touch 4:3 62" x 50" Interactive Whiteboard

HP TeamBoard Resistive Touch 4:3 62" x 50" Interactive Whiteboard

TeamBoard RT (4:3) Interactive Whiteboard for Business with Finger Touch Interactivity. Combining state of the art resistive touch (RT) technology with award wining EVS projection and dry-erase surface, TeamBoard RT is an industry-leading learning solution. TeamBoard RT comes with a detachable controller that easily slides on and off for simple upgrading or replacement.

The interactive whiteboard is easy does it with TeamBoard RT 4:3 – robust construction, reliable finger-touch interactivity, a guaranteed-to-clean surface, and an integrated Action Bar that needs no special pens or parts. TeamBoard is a global leader in the interactive whiteboard market. TeamBoard's award-winning interactive whiteboards are designed to accelerate learning by increasing engagement, improving retention and fostering an enthusiasm for learning. TeamBoard RT has been designed with today's classroom in mind.

TeamBoard RT (4:3 aspect ratio) models are user-friendly interactive whiteboards. You do not have to worry about losing any proprietary gadgets, pens or tools. All features are controlled with the touch of a finger. The standard 4:3 aspect ratio is familiar and compatible with most existing projectors and computer set ups.

The low-glare VersaSurface is perfectly suited for projection. The image can be viewed from any angle and seat in the room. The matte-white surface ensures that there will be no visible hot spots or glare–even without dimming the lights. TeamBoard's award wining Versa presentation surface is a unique dry-erase writing and projection surface. The VersaSurface is guaranteed-to-clean; even permanent marker, if used by mistake, is easy to erase.

TeamBoard RT's removable controller allows for quick upgrades and replacements. There is no need to wait for a technician to visit nor will you be burdened with the responsibility of having to send back your interactive whiteboard should you experience technical difficulties.

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Optoma TX665UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector

Optoma TX665UTi-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector, 3000 Lumens

  • 3000 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX665UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX665UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Hitachi iPJ-AW250N Interactive Ultra Short-Throw WXGA Projector

Hitachi iPJ-AW250N Interactive Ultra Short-Throw WXGA Projector, 2500 Lumens

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • UHP Lamp
  • 3 Years Warranty

Project a clear image in any classroom or conference room with Hitachi iPJ-AW250N. It features an Ultra Short Throw lens which will project an 80" image at 10" from the edge of the projector. This not only prevents shadows caused by obstructions but also means no shadows and no light shining in the presenter's eyes.

For better performance, both an IR sensor and Ultra Sonic technology are used. This increases reliability as well as eliminating lag time from pen to projection for a more natural writing experience.

Digital connectivity allows for highest image quality from your HD device.

Perfect Fit 2 allows the user to adjust the four corners and four sides of the image one by one. This feature helps correct geometrical and complicated distortions. Some geometric limitations apply.

Template function projects lines onto the screen, making it easier to write on a whiteboard or blackboard.

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InFocus IN3916 Interactive Projector

InFocus IN3916 Interactive Projector, 2700 Lumens

  • 2700 ANSI lumens / 3200:1 Contrast Ratio / 1920 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:10, 16:9, 4:3, 5:4 Image Aspect Ratio
  • Remote control, Keystone correction, Dual speakers, Speakers Included / 5 Years Warranty

Engage your audience with an IN3916 interactive projector instead of a cumbersome and expensive interactive whiteboard or smartboard. Turn any surface into an engaging, collaborative interactive workspace. It's like an interactive whiteboard without the board.

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3M 65" Digital Board

3M 65" Digital Board

This innovative digital whiteboard allow you to electronically capture notes to save and distribute instantly. The board electronically captures notes in color which you can then save, print, or e-mail in various file formats instantly, including: ESB, JPEG, TIFF, HTML, PDF, vector PDF, BMP 256 color, WBD, PowerPoint (ppt and pps), and metafile (emf). You can import files from most business programs (including Excel and Word), annotate and save changes. A Playback feature allows you to review all drawings on the board, including erased items. Designed for long-term durability with a porcelain enamel surface over steel design, the board will be your preferred note-taking tool for years to come.

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HP TeamBoard RT 85" 16:10 WhiteBoard

HP TeamBoard RT 85" 16:10 WhiteBoard

The TeamBoard RT 16:10 TMWM7450EM offers a robust construction, reliable finger-touch interactivity, a guaranteed-to-clean surface, and an integrated Action Bar that needs no special pens or parts! It also brings you compatibility with the latest projectors, with full widescreen functionality that offers 20% more interactive workspace than a standard interactive whiteboard. TeamBoard is a global leader in the interactive whiteboard market. Inspired by teachers, students, professionals and facility experts, TeamBoard's interactive whiteboards are designed to accelerate learning by increasing engagement, improving retention and fostering an enthusiasm for learning. TeamBoard has been designed with today's classroom in mind. It provides the power of interactivity to learning–made easy.

TeamBoard RT models are the most user-friendly interactive whiteboards. You do not have to worry about losing any proprietary gadgets, pens or tools. All features are controlled with the touch of a finger. The low-glare VersaSurfacetm is perfectly suited for projection. The image can be viewed from any angle and seat in the room. The matte-white surface ensures that there will be no visible hot spots or glare–even without dimming the lights. TeamBoard's award wining Versa presentation surface is a unique dry-erase writing and projection surface. The VersaSurface is guaranteed-to-clean; even permanent marker, if used by mistake, is easy to erase. TeamBoard RT's removable controller allows for quick upgrades and replacements (usually within 24 hours). There is no need to wait for a technician to visit nor will you be burdened with the responsibility of having to send back your interactive whiteboard should you experience technical difficulties.

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Sony Bundle SW125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

Sony Bundle SW125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

  • 2600 ANSI lumens / 3800:1 Contrast Ratio / 1400 x 1050 Max Resolution
  • 16:10 Image Aspect Ratio / LCD Display / UHP Lamp
  • Single speaker, Speaker Included, Remote control, Keystone correction / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes the VPL-SW125 WXGA projector and the Ebeam Edge interactive projector/whiteboard solution.

The VPL-SW125 WXGA projector is an ideal choice for close projection applications in the corporate and educational markets. The model has a low brightness mode which reduces power consumption and extends the lamp lifetime to approximately 6000 hours, which means lower operating costs across the board.

Excellent contrast, consistent colour stability, high picture quality and longer durability will Improve visibility and enhance teaching quality. This projector is easy to install in small or difficult spaces, and has easy to operate controls.

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Panasonic Panaboard 83" Interactive Whiteboard

Panasonic Panaboard 83" Interactive Whiteboard

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that helps you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes active, visual-based teaching and learning that makes the classroom fun for both teacher and student! Panasonic and the elite Panaboard open the door to a kind of active, visual-based education.

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Panasonic Panaboard 63" Whiteboard, USB

Panasonic Panaboard 63" Whiteboard, USB

This advanced color Panaboard supports a variety of business situations with a wide range of functions. You can save the information written on the board onto a PC, an SD memory card, or USB flash memory, and distribute it as electronic data to your colleagues from a PC, all in color. Operation is done using easy-to-understand icons. Panaboard gives you maximum power in presentations and conferences.

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ViewSonic PJD7383i Short-Throw XGA DLP Interactive Projector with Speaker

ViewSonic PJD7383i Short-Throw XGA DLP Interactive Projector with Speaker, 3000 Lumens

  • 3000 ANSI lumens / 2000:1, 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1024 x 768 Max Resolution
  • 4:3, 16:9 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Keystone correction, Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included / 3 Years Warranty

The PJD7383i is an advanced short throw DLP projector which includes BrilliantColor technology to produce more vibrant colors, while the high brightness and contrast ratios make this projector shine in virtually any lighting situation.

The PJD7383i delivers 3000 lumens with a 1024 x 768 XGA native resolution. Priced at just a fraction of the cost of a traditional 77” interactive white board, the ViewSonic iProjector provides ultimate flexibility for interactive learning.

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Hitachi StarBoard Link EZ Interactive Whiteboard System

Hitachi StarBoard Link EZ Interactive Whiteboard System

StarBoard Link EZ turns any dry erase board or surface into a fully functioning Interactive Whiteboard. Easy to set up. Easy to use. Attach your StarBoard Link EZ system to any flat surface, connect it to a computer, connect the computer to a projector, a quick set-up routine and you are ready to start teaching with a fully functioning IWB.

StarBoard Link EZ secures to any flat surface in minutes to transform a static wall into an interactive environment. The size of active area is adjustable, from 45'' if the surface is limited, to 90'' for the rooms where a bigger size of projection and work space is required. Use your finger, stylus or any object to easily navigate through activities, websites, and multi-media content. Use your finger to annotate, fist to scroll and two fingers to erase or zoom in and out.

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Mitsubishi Bundle EW230U-ST DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

Mitsubishi Bundle EW230U-ST DLP Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution

The issue of presenting in environments with limited projection space can now be eliminated with the EW230U-ST. This native WXGA projector is equipped with an ultra-powerful short-throw lens that can project an amazing 60-inch diagonal image from a distance of just 63cm from the screen. With such an amazingly short projection distance, previous concerns about presenters casting their shadow on the screen are now eliminated.

The EW230U-ST is a WXGA projector with 1280 x 800 pixel resolution specially tuned to screen aspect ratios that support the shift towards wide-screen computer monitors. It reproduces a display area 1.3 times that of conventional XGA projectors, ensuring full compatibility with wider screens and eliminating the need for left-right screen adjustment. Depending on the software installed, dual-screen projection, such as simultaneously viewing the menu and previews, is possible. DVD images can also be reproduced directly without requiring signal compression, thus providing sharper, clearer images.

The EW230U-ST is equipped with a built-in LAN (RJ-45) terminal for remote operation when connected to a network. Additionally, when used with Crestron software, integrated control of up to 250 projectors including power on/off control, message display on multiple projectors and confirmation of lamp service hours is possible using RoomViewTM/e-Control applications.

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Hitachi 17" StarBoard T-17SXL Interactive Pen Display

Hitachi 17" StarBoard T-17SXL Interactive Pen Display

The T-17SXL is a compact, ergonomic, pen-driven, SXGA resolution 17-inch LCD display provided with the StarBoard Software suite of presentation and collaboration tools. The T-17SXL raises the bar in tablet presentation technology with a 17-inch LCD display screen that boasts SXGA resolution, excellent color and contrast, and a thin screen that assures natural, accurate operation. Other technological innovations include built-in video pass-through permitting the connection of projectors and computers with the StarBoard system without requiring an external video splitting amplifier.

Eight hardware function buttons permit full screen operation without requiring constant use of on-screen menus. The T-17SXL is connected to a standard PC via USB link and comes with a smoothly adjustable tilt stand.

Perhaps the most powerful innovation is the inclusion of the latest in the StarBoard suite of professional presentation and collaboration software. StarBoard Software's intuitive, icon-driven interface enables presenters to easily operate in a whiteboard mode or to annotate right over Windows applications or digital video on the display. Collaboration software lets the T-17SXL easily communicate with other StarBoard systems and allows for simultaneous viewing and annotation by multiple systems connected either locally or across the Internet.

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Optoma TW675UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with ST Mount

Optoma TW675UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with ST Mount, 3200 Lumens

  • 3200 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3, 16:10 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX675UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX675UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Samsung 65" 650TS-2 E-Board Touch Solution, Full HD LCD Touch Display with Speakers

Samsung 65" 650TS-2 E-Board Touch Solution, Full HD LCD Touch Display with Speakers, Black

The Samsung 650TS-2 LCD Touch Screen display features fast and accurate touch sensitive infrared (IR) technology. With a fast screen response time, you can get the information you need with just the touch of a finger.

The touch-sensitive display is protected by a sheet of protective glass, so your touchscreen display will deliver information for years to come. Full HD 1920 x 1080 resolution allows you to display the highest resolution content.

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Panasonic UB-T780BP 77" 4:3 Interactive Electonic Whiteboard

Panasonic UB-T780BP 77" 4:3 Interactive Electonic Whiteboard

The elite Panaboard is an advanced educational tool that lets you grab students' attention. It makes it easy to create effective, eye-catching teaching materials and it promotes a style of active, visual-based teaching and learning that makes the classroom fun for both teacher and students. By connecting a PC with Internet access and a projector, you can bring the huge amount of information available on the web or any information on your PC right into your classroom.

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Panasonic Panaboard 76" Whiteboard, USB, Color

Panasonic Panaboard 76" Whiteboard, USB, Color

This advanced color Panaboard supports a variety of business situations with a wide range of functions. You can save the information written on the board onto a PC, an SD memory card, or USB flash memory, and distribute it as electronic data to your colleagues from a PC, all in color. Operation is done using easy-to-understand icons. Panaboard gives you maximum power in presentations and conferences.

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ViewSonic PJD7583wi WXGA Short-Throw DLP Interactive ProjecProjector

ViewSonic PJD7583wi WXGA Short-Throw DLP Interactive Projector, 2500 Lumens

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 2000:1, 3000:1 Contrast Ratio
  • 16:10, 4:3 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included, Keystone correction / 3 Years Warranty

The PJD7583wi is an advanced short throw DLP widescreen projector which includes BrilliantColor technology to produce more vibrant colors, while the high brightness and contrast ratios make this projector shine in virtually any lighting situation. The PJD7583wi delivers 2500 lumens with a 1280 x 800 WXGA native resolution. The short throw lens allows it to project a 95" image, from a distance of just 1 meter, and built-in interactivity lets you turn any surface into an interactive white board.

Priced at just a fraction of the cost of a traditional 77" interactive board, the ViewSonic iProjector provides ultimate flexibility for interactive learning. With 120Hz/3D ready support, a host of display options such as display over RJ-45, USB Plug ‘n Play, and PC-less thumb drive, your content comes alive and encourages the entire class to be more engaged in the learning process.

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Sony Bundle SX125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

Sony Bundle SX125 Short-Throw 3D LCD Projector with Ebeam Edge portable Interactive solution

  • 2500 ANSI lumens / 3800:1 Contrast Ratio
  • LCD Display / UHP Lamp
  • Remote control, Single speaker, Speaker Included / 3 Years Warranty

This bundle includes the VPL-SX125 XGA projector and the Ebeam Edge interactive projector/whiteboard solution.

The VPL-SX125 XGA projector is an ideal choice for close projection applications in the corporate and educational markets.

This model has a low-brightness mode which reduces power consumption and extends the lamp lifetime to approximately 6000 hours, which means lower operating costs across the board.

This projector is easy to install in small or difficult spaces, and has easy to operate controls.

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InFocus IN3914 Interactive Projector with Speakers

InFocus IN3914 Interactive Projector with Speakers, 2700 Lumens, Black

  • 2700 ANSI lumens / 3200:1 Contrast Ratio / 1920 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:10, 16:9, 4:3, 5:4 Image Aspect Ratio
  • Remote control, Keystone correction, Dual speakers, Speakers Included / 5 Years Warranty

Engage your audience with an IN3914 interactive projector instead of a cumbersome and expensive interactive whiteboard or smartboard. Turn any surface into an engaging, collaborative interactive workspace. It's like an interactive whiteboard without the board.

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Optoma TX665UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with Mount

Optoma TX665UTiM-3D Ultra Short Throw Interactive Multimedia Projector with Mount, 3000 Lumens

  • 3000 ANSI lumens / 3000:1 Contrast Ratio / 1600 x 1200 Max Resolution
  • 16:9, 4:3 Image Aspect Ratio / Digital Light Processing (DLP) Display / P-VIP Lamp
  • Remote control, 3D, Speakers Included, Dual speakers / 3 Years Warranty

Now you can make your conference room or classroom an interactive learning environment without the cost or complication of installing an electronic whiteboard. The Optoma TX665UTi-3D, an XGA ultra short-throw multimedia projector with interactive 3D function, upgrades plain whiteboards and screens (or even a bare wall) into an immersive learning experience. The high-performance projector and pen combination integrates the features that educators and business presenters need to meet today's day-to-day demands and tomorrow's emerging technologies.

With high brightness, contrast and sharpness, the TX665UTi-3D engages the audience by producing crystal clear images that keep audiences connected. The ultra short-throw design minimizes shadows, while the sleek styling hides cables from view. This fully-loaded projector delivers an all-in-one solution that meets your needs.

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Virtual Ink PAD WIRELESS INTERACTIVE TABLETWRLS

Virtual Ink PAD WIRELESS INTERACTIVE TABLETWRLS

mimio pad interactive stylus pen

USB mini-B cable

USB RF wireless receiver

Pen tip extractor tool with 2 replaceable pen tips

Rechargeable Nokia type battery

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Hitachi FXTRIO-88W Whiteboard

Hitachi FXTRIO-88W Whiteboard

Students absorb concepts better when they can hear, see and touch them. Eliminate distractions and dive right into your lessons with the FXTRIO interactive whiteboard. Use your finger or a stylus to easily navigate through activities, websites, and multi-media content that connects with today's digital learners.

Transform lessons into creative opportunities to inspire imaginations with a library of interactive tools that allow you to make notes, draw diagrams, and illustrate your point with digital ink. Have students collaborate on the board simultaneously with the FXTRIO's multi-touch technology.

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3M 78" Digital Board

3M 78" Digital Board

This innovative digital whiteboard allows you to electronically capture notes to save and distribute instantly. The board electronically captures notes in color which you can then save, print, or email in various file formats instantly, including: ESB, JPEG, TIFF, HTML, PDF, vector PDF, BMP 256 color, WBD, PowerPoint (ppt & pps), and metafile (emf). You can import files from most business programs (including Excel and Word), annotate and save changes. A Playback feature allows you to review all drawings on the board, including erased items. Designed for long-term durability with a porcelain enamel surface over steel design, the board will be your preferred note-taking tool for years to come.

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Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:43:00 -0600 en text/html https://campustechnology.com/directory/list/classroom-collaboration-tools/classroom-collaboration-tools-home.aspx
Killexams : Will The Real UNIX Please Stand Up?
Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie at a PDP-11. Peter Hamer [CC BY-SA 2.0]
Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie at a PDP-11. Peter Hamer [CC BY-SA 2.0]
Last week the computing world celebrated an important anniversary: the UNIX operating system turned 50 years old. What was originally developed in 1969 as a lighter weight timesharing system for a DEC minicomputer at Bell Labs has exerted a huge influence over every place that we encounter computing, from our personal and embedded devices to the unseen servers in the cloud. But in a story that has seen countless twists and turns over those five decades just what is UNIX these days?

The official answer to that question is simple. UNIX® is any operating system descended from that original Bell Labs software developed by Thompson, Ritchie et al in 1969 and bearing a licence from Bell Labs or its successor organisations in ownership of the UNIX® name. Thus, for example, HP-UX as shipped on Hewlett Packard’s enterprise machinery is one of several commercially available UNIXes, while the Ubuntu Linux distribution on which this is being written is not.

When You Could Write Off In The Mail For UNIX On A Tape

The real answer is considerably less clear, and depends upon how much you view UNIX as an ecosystem and how much instead depends upon heritage or specification compliance, and even the user experience. Names such as GNU, Linux, BSD, and MINIX enter the fray, and you could be forgiven for asking: would the real UNIX please stand up?

You too could have sent off for a copy of 1970s UNIX, if you'd had a DEC to run it on. Hannes Grobe 23:27 [CC BY-SA 2.5]
You too could have sent off for a copy of 1970s UNIX, if you’d had a DEC to run it on. Hannes Grobe 23:27 [CC BY-SA 2.5]
In the beginning, it was a relatively contiguous story. The Bell Labs team produced UNIX, and it was used internally by them and eventually released as source to interested organisations such as universities who ran it for themselves. A legal ruling from the 1950s precluded AT&T and its subsidiaries such as Bell Labs from selling software, so this was without charge. Those universities would take their UNIX version 4 or 5 tapes and install it on their DEC minicomputer, and in the manner of programmers everywhere would write their own extensions and improvements to fit their needs. The University of California did this to such an extent that by the late 1970s they had released it as their own distribution, the so-called Berkeley Software Distribution, or BSD. It still contained some of the original UNIX code so was still technically a UNIX, but was a significant departure from that codebase.

UNIX had by then become a significant business proposition for AT&T, owners of Bell Labs, and by extension a piece of commercial software that attracted hefty licence fees once Bell Labs was freed from its court-imposed obligations. This in turn led to developers seeking to break away from their monopoly, among them Richard Stallman whose GNU project started in 1983 had the aim of producing an entirely open-source UNIX-compatible operating system. Its name is a recursive acronym, “Gnu’s Not UNIX“, which states categorically its position with respect to the Bell Labs original, but provides many software components which, while they might not be UNIX as such, are certainly a lot like it. By the end of the 1980s it had been joined in the open-source camp by BSD Net/1 and its descendants newly freed from legacy UNIX code.

“It Won’t Be Big And Professional Like GNU”

In the closing years of the 1980s Andrew S. Tanenbaum, an academic at a Dutch university, wrote a book: “Operating Systems: Design and Implementation“. It contained as its teaching example a UNIX-like operating system called MINIX, which was widely adopted in universities and by enthusiasts as an accessible alternative to UNIX that would run on inexpensive desktop microcomputers such as i386 PCs or 68000-based Commodore Amigas and Atari STs. Among those enthusiasts in 1991 was a University of Helsinki student, Linus Torvalds, who having become dissatisfied with MINIX’s kernel set about writing his own. The result which was eventually released as Linux soon outgrew its MINIX roots and was combined with components of the GNU project instead of GNU’s own HURD kernel to produce the GNU/Linux operating system that many of us use today.

It won't be big and professional like GNU" Linus Torvalds' first announcement of what would become the Linux kernel.
Linus Torvalds’ first announcement of what would become the Linux kernel.

So, here we are in 2019, and despite a few lesser known operating systems and some bumps in the road such as Caldera Systems’ attempted legal attack on Linux in 2003, we have three broad groupings in the mainstream UNIX-like arena. There is “real” closed-source UNIX® such as IBM AIX, Solaris, or HP-UX, there is “Has roots in UNIX” such as the BSD family including MacOS, and there is “Definitely not UNIX but really similar to it” such as the GNU/Linux family of distributions. In terms of what they are capable of, there is less distinction between them than vendors would have you believe unless you are fond of splitting operating-system hairs. Indeed even users of the closed-source variants will frequently find themselves running open-source code from GNU and other origins.

At 50 years old then, the broader UNIX-like ecosystem which we’ll take to include the likes of GNU/Linux and BSD is in great shape. At our level it’s not worth worrying too much about which is the “real” UNIX, because all of these projects have benefitted greatly from the five decades of collective development. But it does raise an interesting question: what about the next five decades? Can a solution for timesharing on a 1960s minicomputer continue to adapt for the hardware and demands of mid-21st-century computing? Our guess is that it will, not in that your UNIX clone in twenty years will be identical to the one you have now, but the things that have kept it relevant for 50 years will continue to do so for the forseeable future. We are using UNIX and its clones at 50 because they have proved versatile enough to evolve to fit the needs of each successive generation, and it’s not unreasonable to expect this to continue. We look forward to seeing the directions it takes.

As always, the comments are open.

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Jenny List en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2019/11/05/will-the-real-unix-please-stand-up/
Killexams : Former CT educator eyes private school for LGBTQ students

NEW HAVEN — Thirteen years after onetime school principal and Ansonia “Teacher of the Year” Patricia “Patty” Nicolari began trying to create a school that would be a safe space for gay, lesbian and transgender students, its time finally may have come.

More than a decade after the previous effort stalled, the idea is back — with a full head of steam — in slightly different form, with a full board of directors and a Community Advisory Council both now in place.

This time around, Nicolari, 64, envisions what she proposes to call “PROUD Academy” as a private school supported by donations that would build an endowment. The previous effort would have been a state-supported charter school.

PROUD Academy incorporated in June 2021 and has applied for nonprofit status, she said. The goal is to open as a school, most likely in New Haven, with 120 students to start, in September 2023.

If PROUD Academy were to become a reality, it would be the fourth such school specifically for LGBTQ+ youth in the nation, Nicolari said.

The others are Harvey Milk School in New York, which was founded in 1995, The Alliance in Milwaukee, which was founded as a high school in 2005 and added a middle school in 2008, and Magic City Acceptance Academy in Homewood, Ala., she said.

Nicolari, who lives at City Point, recently was named executive director of PROUD Academy Inc., which has other people involved on the board of directors.

The latest effort came about as Nicolari was working in a mentoring program that was part of the Governor’s Prevention Partnership, and she got a referral from the state Department of Children and Families that included three transgender children, along with others who were LGBTQ, all of whom were in foster homes, she said.

One thing that is unique about PROUD Academy — an acronym for “Proudly Respecting Our Unique Differences” — is that many of the people trying to make it happen know what it’s like to face bullying, intimidation and pressure in school.

Nicolari had been a teacher for 15 years when she came out as a lesbian in 1997. That spurred both an outpouring of support and encouragement in her life, as well as some blowback from people who had a problem with her sexual orientation, she said.

The board of directors and the Community Advisory Council are a mix of gay, straight and transgender people.

“It’s very exciting” and “it is exciting to be on the ground floor,” said board President Kassandra Hernandez of Madison, philanthropic engagement manager for New Reach of New Haven, which works with people experiencing homelessness. She said she met Nicolari at a Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce event.

“It was something I thought was very important,” said Hernandez, 28, who grew up in Arizona and Connecticut and works with LGBTQ+ kids “who are being rejected by their families.”

There are particularly high suicide rates among LGBTQ+ youths and that “needs to be addressed,” Hernandez said.

PROUD Academy board Vice President Chelsea Reid, 29, a college friend of Hernandez who also lives in Madison and is operations manager for New Reach, ran into Nicolari at the Middletown Pride Festival, where Nicolari had an informational table.

“I think the idea of safety” for kids coming to terms with their sexual identities “gets taken for granted very often,” said Reid, who remembers who own feelings and experiences growing up gay in New York City in the 1990s.

In Reid’s case, her immediate family was accepting, “but I also am a Black female from the West Indies, where it is still illegal,” she said.

Ironically, one of the things that stalled the previous effort was a new wrinkle in Nicolari’s own identity.

“The reason this school didn’t happen” then “was because after 28 years of relationships with women, I fell in love with a man,” Nicolari said.

That led Nicolari to ask herself, “Who am I now?” with a period of introspection that followed, she said.

Time went by “and I just let it go by the wayside,” said Nicolari, who spent 28 years involved with women and now more than 10 years with men. She now considers herself to be bisexual.

Others on the board of directors include Secretary Henrietta Small, Treasurer Ayanna Belton, Brandon Iovene, Devonne Canaday, Barbara Duncan, Michael Fiorello, a Stratford English teacher, and John Rose, former city corporation counsel during Mayor Toni Harp’s administration, Nicolari said.

Among those on the Community Advisory Council are Newhallville Alder Devin Avshalom-Smith, D-20, who is transgender; retired openly gay Staples High School Principal John Dodig; writer and retired openly gay former Staples soccer coach Dan Woog; and Patricia Clissia-Lanzaro of Shelton, mother of a 13-year-old trans boy.

“The part that resonates most with me is Patty’s desire to service a lot of LGBTQ kids who are kicked out of their homes,” said Avshalom-Smith, 33, who came out as a lesbian while a high school student at Northwest Catholic High School at age 16 and realized she was destined to be a he at age 17 or 18.

“It was not easy,” Avshalom-Smith said. “I faced a lot of scrutiny from my peers, teachers. It was definitely a very challenging time in my life. ... I think it would possibly have been helpful to be in an open and affirming space where I didn’t have to face stigma.

“The key words for me are ‘open’ and ‘affirming’ ... so that they can focus on things like their studies and self-esteem rather than worrying about things like criticism,” he said. “Everybody’s personal journey to finding their sexual identity is unique. ... No one person is the same.”

For Clissia-Lanzaro, who is on the PROUD Academy Parents Committee — and has been having trouble finding a competent counselor for her trans child, Vincent, who goes to Shelton Intermediate School — “I just love the idea of having a school that works with kids like my kid.”

She wants Vincent to be PROUD Academy’s first student.

“There are not a lot of counselors that work with transgendered kids, or LGBTQ kids,” said Clissia-Lanzaro, who works as a case manager for Community Action Agency in New Haven.

How long has Vincent, who was born with a female identity and the name Valentina, known that he was destined to be male?

“I think he always did — always,” Clissia-Lanzaro said. “Ever since he was little, he never wanted to wear dresses or girls’ clothes — ever. He always played with his brother’s toys and his brothers trucks ... and he wanted to wear boys’ clothes.

“When kids played house as kids, all the girls wanted to have a wife and a baby,” she said. “Vincent had a wife and a dog. ... He was always a boy at heart.”

Vincent initially came out as gay at age 11, and “I think he did suffer a lot when he was 11.”

When he moved on to intermediate school, “he went completely looking like a boy.”

But “some of the kids continued to call him (Valentina) and said, ‘I met you as Valentina and you’re always going’” to be that, she said.

Being in a school like PROUD Academy “would make all the difference” in Vincent’s case, Clissia-Lanzaro said. “First of all, he would feel at home” with other children and staff “to help guide him, help him navigate this world. He would have a support group, people that experience the same things ... every day.”

Nicolari said the goal is to set up and endowment and make use of foundation funds. She also said there are many two-income LGBTQ couples with no kids who might be willing to help.

“Our hope is that 60 percent of the kids will go tuition-free and 40 percent will pay the tuition,” which is expected to be about $37,000 a year, “which is the average private school tuition,” Nicolari said.

Iovene, 22 — the youngest member of the board of directors — grew up gay in Higganum and just graduated from Southern Connecticut State University with a degree in English. He didn’t come out as gay until January of his senior year.

Now living in North Branford, he will begin work soon as an intern at Southern’s SAGE (Sexuality and Gender Equality) Center.

Iovene was introduced to Nicolari through his grandmother, a real estate agent.

When he entered college, “I thought about going into teaching but thought that as an openly effeminate, queer man” it might be difficult, Iovene said.

When he heard about PROUD Academy, he saw it as another way to educate people.

“I like to make waves because I see it as a wave to make positive change,” he said.

“Growing up as a closeted queer person ... was challenging, to say the least,” Iovene said. Even after he came out, he faced “hatred and bigotry and a lot of unintentional ignorance.”

“As dramatic as this might sound, I truly believe that something like PROUD Academy would be a solution for a lot of life-or-death situations,” Iovene said.

“Growing up and ... knowing that you are different from those around you ... that is a really challenging experience,” he said.

Having a school like PROUD Academy “can save lives.”

Woog, who 30-some-odd years ago was one of the first openly gay high school coaches in the country and wrote the book, “Schools Out,” on gay issues in schools, ran into Nicolari at the Norwalk Pride celebration in June.

“We caught up and she told me what she was doing with PROUD Academy,” said Woog, who for 22 years co-ran a youth program at Norwalk’s Triangle Community Center. “Immediately, I said, ‘I want to be involved.’”

Having a school like PROUD Academy could have a “dramatic” effect on education in the state, he said.

“As good as some schools are and as good as others are becoming, it’s still not easy to be an LGBTQ youth,” Woog said. “Some have issues at home, some have issues at school and you can’t reach your potential ... if you can’t concentrate at school.”

School “is where they become who they are. If they have to spend a large amount of their social energy” dealing with bullying or other forms of non-acceptance, “they’re not going to fully participate and they’re not going to get out” of school what they need to, he said.

“I’m proud that Connecticut is the next place” where a school for LGBTQ+ kids may sprout, he said.

mark.zaretsky@hearstmediact.com

Sun, 10 Jul 2022 14:51:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thehour.com/news/article/Former-CT-educator-eyes-private-school-for-LGBTQ-17293506.php?t=306d2c52b6&src=nwkhppromostrip
Killexams : Teen Financial Illiteracy Is a Big Problem. Two Morgan Stanley Advisors Have a Solution.

When it comes to saving and investing, many teens don’t know where to begin, and their parents don’t always have the answers. 

That general truth gave two Morgan Stanley advisors in Boston an idea. They’re tackling the growing problem of teen financial illiteracy by offering free multi-week teaching sessions to anyone in this age group several times a year.

Danene Cronin got the idea for the program after repeatedly being asked by friends and clients how to teach teens about financial matters. 

Photography by Caitlin Perry

“Parents want to deliver this education at home, but it’s almost like talking about with sex with kids. They don’t know where to start, how much to tell them, and what is age-appropriate,” says Danene Cronin, a financial advisor with Morgan Stanley’s Armstrong Group, who spearheads the program.

When it comes to teens and financial literacy, the numbers are dismal. A notable 74% of teens said they don’t feel confident in their personal finance knowledge, according to a study last year from Greenlight, a fintech company that offers debit cards and investment tools to children. Around the same percentage of teens—73%—said they wanted to learn more.

Many young people are learning about financial Topics through apps designed for this purpose or sometimes from online sources that may not always provide reliable advice.

Cronin and her business partner, Christine Armstrong, took a different approach. They began offering an in-person, free program in 2020 for teens who want to learn about money matters. It came about after Cronin was thinking of ways to impart financial knowledge to her own daughter and was repeatedly being asked by friends and clients how to best approach the difficult task of helping teens make smart financial decisions. 

The program is designed for teens between the ages of 12 and 18 and consists of seven lessons on Topics such as introduction to the markets, the importance of saving, philanthropy, and keeping personal information safe. Each session runs 45 minutes to an hour, depending on how many questions she fields. At the end of every session, there’s a worksheet containing a practical application of the day’s lesson. So, for example, the teens might be asked to calculate savings rates under different scenarios, or they might be guided to create a philanthropic mission statement.

To fill the first cohort, Cronin and Armstrong sent emails to clients inviting them to spread the word among their children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and others who might want to participate. Since then, Cronin has run the program about 10 times with 10 to 20 participants each. Ahead of each new cohort, they market to about 200 families. Cronin also teaches financial literacy to a group of 10 to 15 home-schooled pre-teens and teens, an initiative that came about at a client’s request.

While the sessions have moved online due to Covid, the program continues to work well, Cronin says, because of the ability to have interactive discussions. “I feel like they are even more comfortable behind a screen and we get lots of questions,” she says. “There’s lots of interaction.”

Based on the program’s success, Cronin says there are plans in the works to offer a similar cohort for young professionals. It will also be free and will include sessions on entrepreneurship and taxes. 

Armstrong says the duo plans to continue these types of programs free of charge. “This is something we want to do. It helps educate, provides a service and we all learn,” she says.

Their work could be especially consequential given that about $60 trillion in assets is slated to transfer from primary clients to their heirs within the next two decades. Meanwhile, a mere 13% of heirs retain their parents’ advisor after receiving their inheritance, according to Cerulli Associates. 

“Next-gen planning is very important. We work with the kids, the parents, the grandparents, the great-grandparents. This allows us to get to know the next generation even earlier to establish a really strong relationship,” Cronin says.

The program has also helped the team solidify good relationships, and Armstrong said she expects the efforts will result in a “modest uptick” in new clients over the next few years. “Our primary purpose today is in providing education and support,” she says. 

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 10:17:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.barrons.com/advisor/articles/teen-financial-literacy-morgan-stanley-armstrong-group-51657822530?mod=hp_minor_pos24
Killexams : “The question is whether many cities will be habitable”

We will likely see a hybrid of both technology-based solutions and nature-based solutions. City planning will become more important than ever, especially as we expect even more extreme weather and sea levels to rise further. There is enormous value and benefit from nature-based solutions, but nature takes time. Technology solutions, like data gathering and monitoring systems are useful defence mechanisms, which can deliver nature time to build its solution.

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 05:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.db.com/what-next/responsible-growth/cities/the-question-is-whether-many-cities-will-be-habitable/index?language_id=31kid=wn.stageGHP.Mueller.en
Killexams : USING E-BOOKS IN SCHOOL:

21st Century Classroom: Transforming the Textbook

In 21st century classrooms, blackboard chalk is on the endangered list, the pop quiz has been replaced with clicker questions, and bowling alley technology (overhead projector transparencies) has disappeared, thanks to digital projectors and document cameras.

But if you’re going to point to any aspect of the classroom that still hasn’t covered much ground on its trip into the 21st century, it has to be the textbook. This ubiquitous accessory has been beset by editorial controversy as we have seen recently in Texas; has seen consistently high price increases of an average of six percent per year; and still inspires parental derision for the outdated information often portrayed.

And then there’s the matter of weight. The heft of textbooks was the subject of a 21-page report written in 2004 in California for the state’s board of education. According to researchers, the combined weight of textbooks in the four “core” subjects (social studies, math, reading/ language arts, and science) ran, on average, from eight pounds at the first grade level to 20 pounds at the 11th grade level. Legislation to mandate weight limitations quickly followed in that state.

As this comparison of two school districts on opposite sides of the country and economic spectrum illustrates, in a world rich with alternative methods of delivery of content exemplified by digitized conversation, Google books, the Kindle and iPad, the textbook is the next classroom object worthy of transformation.

Realigning the Budget with Netbooks

“Everyone has a different 1:1 approach,” says Gary Brantley, chief information systems officer for the Lorain City School District. “Ours was to eliminate the books.”

Lorain City Schools is located in a city 35 miles from Cleveland. The district has 18 schools and 8,400 students. By moving to digital delivery of textbooks Superintendent Cheryl Atkinson saw an opportunity to address several larger district challenges than simply replacing outdated texts. A majority of families are low-income; its schools were struggling to meet yearly academic progress measures; and the district had just come out from under a state-mandated “fiscal watch.”

And, recalls Brantley, Atkinson was sincerely concerned about the weight of the textbooks being hauled around by the kids in her schools.

That was the atmosphere under which initial discussions began, he says. The district quickly realized that adopting a 1:1 program with digital textooks at the heart of the initiative could reduce textbook expenses and help bring students into the 21st century. “We’re an inner city school district,” says Brantley. “We saw this as a way to level the playing field for our kids and deliver them equal access and opportunities with technology.”

After a pilot program in 2007 and 2008, the district went after a federal grant to partially fund a full rollout to 9th and 10th graders for the following year. In January 2009, the district used federal Title 1 and Ohio state educational technology grant funds to lease Dell Inspiron 910 netbooks. The following year that program was expanded to 6th, 7th, 8th, and 11th grades, and the district switched to Acer Aspire One AOD150-1577 netbooks. This fall the district hopes to add 12th graders to the program.

The publishers the district is working with on the program are the traditional ones: Pearson Prentice Hall; Holt McDougal; and McGraw-Hill/Glencoe. They have provided versions of the texts, Brantley says, that go beyond simply being a PDF of the book. “It’s interactive. For example, if you have someone like Martin Luther King or John F. Kennedy in a history book, you can click on a picture, and it will tell you information about [that person] or [you can] do a search from the book to get more information about that particular person.”

Brantley is quick with numbers. He says that for 2,600 math books—the number of texts needed for grades nine through 12—the cost was going to be about $182,000. That’s $70 per book. The e-book edition for that same math book was about $15,000. The savings on that one text alone covered a large part of the expense of that first rollout of digital textbooks. The savings don’t stop there. An English textbook was priced at $163,673.05 for 2,475 books—about $66 per book. The digital version of the same volume was a fourth of the cost—$36,554.45.

Explains Brantley, Superintendent Atkinson “was very persistent” that the district find a content provider for the program, even if it wasn’t one of the three or four big textbook publishers. The publishers were willing to try the program in pilot mode. “A lot of trust was built on both sides to make this happen,” he says.

Now, says Brantley, students don’t have to travel to labs to gain access to computers. “Basically, there’s a lab in every classroom. Every kid is using that netbook as a textbook and as a computer.”

Brantley knows the technology is making an impact. “I think it’s pushed us a long way. It’s allowing the students to become a lot more creative in what they do and how they do it. It’s also leveled the playing field. A lot of these kids don’t have computers or internet access at home. Because the books are loaded on the hard drive, [Superintendent Atkinson] has given kids the ability to work on things they’d only have access to in a limited time within the classroom or in the lab.”

Although Brantley says student testing scores have gone up, he can’t confidently point to quantifiable results tied directly to the digital textbooks. “We brought different pieces of technology into the district in the same period, so we have to let the program run for a little while,” he explains.

“But Why Do We Care?”

The Campbell Union High School District, next door to San Jose in California’s Silicon Valley consists of six sites, five of which have been designated by the state as excellent. During the 2009-2010 school year, they performed a pilot program to experiment with the replacement of textbooks with e-readers. Director of Technology Charles Kanavel and his IT team of five distributed 270 Sony Reader Touch model PRS-600s into English classes across the district’s sites.

“These kids get technology. They go home and look at YouTube all day. An e-reader isn’t that hard for them,” Kanavel explains. The goal of the pilot was to get a “true sense of what’s it like for the everyday student to use one of these things in terms of wear and tear and what they wanted to see on the device.”

The effort was spurred by the Williams Settlement, Kanavel says. That California statute calls for California schools to have sufficient educational materials and conditions to meet curriculum standards. In order to meet standards of currency, textbooks need to be replaced every seven years—an expensive proposition in a district with 8,000 students. “It’s $180 for a biology textbook. That’s just one. With e-readers and how ubiquitous they’ve become,” Kanavel recalls asking, “Why do they need to carry 80 pounds worth of books around, when we have the technology to do this differently?”

But that initial test might never have come about if Kanavel hadn’t persisted in trying to woo Sony to participate in the proof of concept, a process that took seven months. The Campbell director focused on Sony because of its durability, price, and open platform. “Kindle, if you drop it, it’s game over,” he says. “With the Nook you have to buy everything from Barnes & Noble. The [Apple] iPad with 32 or 64 Gb, that’s $600 to $800. With one iPad, I can get four e-readers from Sony at around $200 each.”

But persuading the manufacturer to pay attention to education’s needs wasn’t an easy sell. Kanavel, who has a background in investment banking, studied the company’s financial reports and figured out how many e-readers had probably been sold through its nearby Silicon Valley area store, the largest Sony store in the United States.

When he approached the company about doing a test, it replied, “Yeah, yeah, yeah, interesting. But why do we care?” In response, he used this argument: “You sold 14,000 at the Valley Fair store in a three month period. Those are respectable numbers. But realistically, our district is 8,000 kids. You’d sell me 8,000 units. Then I’d have to buy a quarter of that every year forever. Once I start on it, I can’t get off.” He also pointed out that Campbell was only a medium-sized district. “Take San Jose Unified —55,000 students right next door. That would make your store numbers look like nothing. And there are 32 districts in Santa Clara County alone. Think of the entire country. Then they started caring.”

Once Sony was on board, the next hurdle was the textbook publishers trying to safeguard the pricing model, according to Kanavel. He estimates that a single school might have 300 copies of a particular book. On average the textbook will cost $120 on the low side and $180 on the high side. That’s a total outlay of $36,000 to $54,000 for a single textbook in a single school in the Campbell district.

For English classes, however, many of the books contained classic works of literature that are now in the public domain and available on various digital book websites. “Shakespeare is Shakespeare. The guy’s not writing a new version,” Kanavel says. He has been able to make a deal with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for some digital textbooks in PDF format; but others—particularly novels —came from the Sony Reader Store; on Project Gutenberg (a good source for Shakespeare, he says); and via the OverDrive School get Library.

The challenge faced by textbook publishers, he points out, is that they have to change their business model. Kanavel wants to set up a site license with the publishers, but so far those negotiations are still on-going, and, besides, many still have to convert their textbooks into the epub format.

But the financials, as this former numbers guy points out, still work out nicely for the district. “For example, historically we have paid $9 a book for paperback copies of Macbeth and 70 to 80 percent of them come back unusable at the end of the year. Now with the e-reader, that replacement cost goes to zero.”

On average 15 out of every 100 books in the district need to be replaced because they’re damaged, lost, or stolen. Often, the same student loses multiple books when he or she loses a backpack. “If you’re a parent, you have to pay to replace all of those books. If your student loses a history book, biology book, math book, and English book, that’s about $600,” Kanavel says. “If they lose an e-reader or it breaks, you pay for the replacement cost of the e-reader —$200 -- then we just get the content.” This, he adds, “has long-term implications for budgeting and funding.”

So far, Kanavel says, the pilot has been successful with students. “They’ve taken good care of them. I’ve only had three break out of 270, which is pretty good.” He plans to add an additional 200 e-readers to the district for the next school year. “One thing I’ve been very focused on with this pilot is offsetting the cost of textbook replacement with this device and making it easier on the kids.” He believes the district is on the right track.

Teachers and students are discovering other advantages. The e-readers have built-in dictionaries. If a reader has a visual impairment, text can be upsized quickly. Users can annotate, draw, and take notes—something that’s forbidden with traditional textbooks. When the year is over, the kids will return the devices, and that added material can be wiped from the hard disk.

But e-readers still aren’t perfect, he adds. First, not every book is available in a digital format. He cites a high school classic, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, as an example. Many textbooks have already been put on CD, but those are designed to be used in a PC. Publishers haven’t made huge inroads into converting their materials into the standard epub format that works with the major e-readers. But Kanaval is hopeful those gaps will diminish with time.

With the expected expansion of the pilot, negotiations with Sony continue. “We’ve proven that the kids can take care of them. The technology does work,” Kanavel says. “The next thing is to get Sony to build something bigger—an eight and a half by 11 inch format. And there are a lot of features that we don’t use. We’ve given them feedback on those things. There may be ways to cut cost by eliminating feature sets that can help them balance the cost of manufacturing.”

Textbook Smackdown

So given the experiences of these two districts—and others—how does a standard textbook stack up against an e-book? If a publisher needs to repair the mistakes introduced in the text, as happened with math books issued in Sacramento County in spring 2010, it won’t have to arrange to destroy the outdated books and incur shipping costs for the new ones; it can correct the errors and electronically distribute new versions of the content. In the face of a quickly evolving business model, publishers will be forced to adjust their pricing schemes—no doubt, to the advantage of the districts. In the matter of weight— well, the Acer netbook comes in under three pounds, and the Sony device is a little over 10 ounces. Those are metrics anyone can use no matter how much digital content sits on the devices.


Building the E-Book Structure

Although every e-book initiative shares common aspects—hardware, bandwidth, content, and professional development—how the program unfolds in your district will be unique. For example, should you connect e-readers to the internet?

In order to have a successful 1:1 implementation, you need hardware, bandwidth, content, and teacher professional development and buy in. But each district will be unique in its approach to implementing each aspect and the entire program. The question of when in implementation a district allows connection to the internet is a case in point. Campbell Union High School District in Silicon Valley wants students to stay on task as it implements e-books. Therefore, the Sony Reader Touch devices being used there don’t include web access. Although Sony does make a model of its e-reader that includes WiFi, according to Director of Technology Charles Kanavel, the decision to leave that feature out helps simplify the transition teachers have to make in integrating the device in the classroom.

“If I’m a teacher and I have these new devices in class, it affects my lesson planning,” he explains. “Without administrative control of access to the internet, some smart kid will make the thing text another e-reader. Then once that kid knows, all the kids will know. In class, instead of reading, they’re texting each other, surfing MySpace, and doing everything else. Have I just disrupted an entire class with this device? So let’s get the adoption in first. Let’s get the hurdles out of the way surrounding usage of content, usage of technology, and how it integrates into your standards in the classroom. Once that’s outlined, then we’ll figure out how to do WiFi.”

That absence of web access has also streamlined professional development. The district had 270 devices, which it handed out in English classes spread fairly evenly across its six sites. To ensure that the pilot wouldn’t get put on the back-burner by teachers uninterested in using the ereader, Kanavel had the principals at those sites nominate teachers to participate who were a “little bit tech savvy.”

From there, his IT team called teachers in for a demonstration of the Sony product they’d be using with their students. “That was it,” he says. “Maybe 30 minutes of Q&A with teachers, and off we went. The devices aren’t that complicated. You turn it on, pick your book, turn to the page, and that’s it.”

To make sure the program is on track, Kanavel has been doing evaluation of it in “real time.” “It’s not something we threw out there and said we’ll come back to you in six months. Every couple of weeks I’m pinging these teachers. They have direct lines back to me. As they’ve noticed things, they’ve emailed me.” Along with that, device maker Sony has put out surveys for the users too.

It’s Complicated

What complicates implementation of digital content in a 1:1 program is when the device being deployed is used for other purposes too. That’s the case at Lorain City School District in Ohio, which has distributed Acer netbooks to 9th, 10th, and 11th grade students. The goal there is to deliver its students access to technology and the wider world it can deliver. Many don’t have computers or an internet connection at home. Therefore, Chief Information Systems Officer Gary Brantley has chosen to implement WiFi on the devices.

The devices, which cost about $300 with software and maintenance, are loaded with a gigabyte of RAM, a 150 Gb or 160 Gb hard drive, an Intel Atom processor, a webcam, Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Office, a couple of calculators, 802.11 b/g WiFi, and, of course, digital textbooks.

Teachers have an interest in educating students about social networking, so, although access to the internet is filtered, the devices do allow access to sites such as Twitter, and Facebook. But that, says Brantley, “is being carefully monitored.”

Also, connectivity is necessary for implementation of CompuTrace, a program from Absolute Software that provides a service for tracking down lost, stolen, or missing devices. “We were finding that we were spending a lot of money replacing textbooks,” Brantley explains. “Now, we actually are spending less. If CompuTrace doesn’t find the netbook within 60 or 90 days, they pay for it. I can tell you they have found every single one.”

To simplify operations, the district uses only two images for the netbooks. Every middle school book in use is on every middle school netbook; and the same with all high school books. That approach, says Brantley, makes IT’s work easier since they don’t have to worry about granular inventory or “fool around” with what books any given student should be able to access.

The district has tackled the challenge of teacher acceptance from multiple sides. First, there was a teachers’ union aspect. Would it promote the change in teaching approaches necessary for success? To gain support, Brantley took the head of the union to a 1:1 conference to show her what could be done. After that, he says, “She came on board for the professional development piece.”

The next aspect was putting together programs and teams for professional development. Since the district has an “early release” day once a week, “that’s the block of time that increasingly is being dedicated to helping teachers learn how to integrate the technology into their classes. Gaining traction in that area is a longer haul,” Brantley admits. “It takes a while to get teachers on board with this.”

Next up for the Lorain district: implementation of a teacher recognition program and some type of graduate credit to motivate the teachers to try out new methods of instruction.

An area where Brantley has seen success is having the kids teaching the teachers. “That’s one thing that we’ve been trying to push,” he says. “Don’t be afraid to let the kids show you something as well. It becomes a collaborative effort.”

Challenges have surfaced in two IT areas. First, the sheer number of new devices has put a strain on Brantley’s department, which has 10 employees. “We’ve doubled the number of computers in the district but didn’t add one staff member,” he says. Second, IT has to be able to supply technical support to students in a timely manner. “Turnaround can’t be longer than a day. Even though we have spares, we still have to turn around these machines really quickly, so kids aren’t left without their books.”

But these burdens aren’t slowing down the district’s dreams. Brantley says eventually the netbook and digital textbook program could be expanded to every student in the district, from the fourth grade up.

Sat, 09 Jul 2022 04:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://thejournal.com/pages/cdwg/21st-century-classroom_e-books.aspx
Killexams : Distance Learning Bridges the Digital Divide in Higher Education

Digital equity has long been a hot course for K–12 schools. But small, rural colleges and universities have also had to tackle the issue to ensure their students enjoy the same resources and opportunities as students in urban locations and large institutions.

In Anderson, S.C., Forrest College attracts students from rural areas as far as an hour’s drive away. In the past, if students couldn’t make it to campus because of transportation issues or a sick child, they missed out on class. But now, distance-learning solutions enable them to attend class wherever they may be. Students simply Skype in and watch lectures live, or they may ask an instructor to record class sessions using lecture capture technology so they can be viewed later.

“Whatever students see in the classroom, the students can see at home,” says Scott Peterson, Forrest College’s administrative dean and IT services manager.

Making the Rural Landscape High Tech

Rural colleges face a number of challenges, according to Randy Smith, president of the Rural Community College Alliance. They lack the large population base and resources of urban areas, which translates to a smaller pool of potential faculty members and fewer mass transit options.

Faculty shortages, especially in fields such as nursing, welding and culinary arts, are a huge issue. “It takes a unique person with an advanced degree and teaching experience who wants to live in a rural area,” says Smith, whose organization advocates for the country’s 589 rural and tribal colleges and their 3.4 million students.

Photo by Ian Curcio

Transportation is also an issue, particularly for students living in remote areas with little or no public transportation.

“The majority of students drive an average distance of 25 miles one way to get to class,” says Smith, who is also president of Sisseton Wahpeton College in Sisseton, S.D.

Broadband is a great equalizer. Most, if not all, rural colleges today have the fast internet connections they need to provide not only Wi-Fi on their campuses, but also online and distance-learning courses. That gives students increased learning opportunities and more convenient access to education, Smith says.

“For the most part, we have as much technology as urban colleges,” he adds.

Finding Creative Classroom Solutions with Ed Tech

Rural colleges find a variety of ways to support distance learning. Some equip classrooms with high-end video conferencing equipment and high-definition displays on main and satellite campuses. That way, if the main campus is too far away, students can go to a distance-learning classroom at a satellite campus to watch lectures and interact with faculty at the main campus, says Smith.

Some rural colleges are beginning to solve their teacher shortage by hiring faculty in urban areas who then teach students remotely through distance-learning classrooms.

“You can have local lab assistants, but the experienced faculty members could be located a thousand miles away as long as they have a good internet connection and a webcam,” Smith says.

Forrest College offers distance learning another way: letting students attend class remotely with the Skype for Business app from Microsoft Office 365. The college is accredited as a brick-and-mortar institution, Peterson says, but it lets students log in to class from home on those occasional days they can’t get to campus.

About a year and a half ago, Forrest College purchased HP EliteOne 800 all-in-one desktops for each classroom. Instructors share their desktops with students and, through the classroom PC’s built-in webcam and microphone, students can watch lectures live from home and participate in discussions.

“During regularly scheduled class times, they can see their instructors online on Office 365. They hit a chat window, hit ‘screen share’ to make themselves available, and the instructor can launch them into Skype,” Peterson says.

Photo by Ian Curcio

Providing Flexibility for Students

Forrest College also outfitted classrooms and a computer lab so that faculty can deliver more interactive, multimedia-rich presentations.

Peterson’s team equipped one classroom with an Epson BrightLink interactive projector and another with an Epson PowerLite projector, a Steelcase ēno interactive whiteboard and an Epson document camera. A computer lab that’s used for instruction now has a 70-inch Vizio LED TV.

When faculty teach in those rooms, students at home can see the instructor and his or her presentations through multiple windows on a home computer screen. If students choose, instructors can project their faces on the projector screen or TV in front of the class, so the rest of the students can see them.

If absent students can’t log in live, instructors can record lectures using Microsoft’s OneNote application or the Epson projectors and share them with students on Office 365, Peterson says.

The remote-learning feature and lecture capture technology are important because they provide flexibility to students, many of whom are working parents or depend on others for transportation to class. “We serve a community in need,” says Peterson.

Over the course of a year, more than 80 percent of students, on average, will take advantage of the video conferencing option to ensure they don’t miss any classes, he says.

Remote Lectures via Video

Hillsdale College in Michigan is a different type of rural college. Most students are not locals; in fact, only 35 percent of its 1,451 full-time students are from Michigan. The rest are from throughout the United States and 13 other countries.

Broadband access is not an issue at Hillsdale College. The institution is a point-of-presence location for two service providers, so it has fast, redundant internet access.

About 15 years ago, the college ran fiber to every building, says Network/Systems Manager Pat Chartrand. Today, it has a Brocade network with 10-gigabit speeds at the core and 145 Aruba IAP-105 and AP 225 access points in all staff, faculty and classroom buildings. More than 200 Ubiquiti Networks APs are deployed in residence halls. Students and faculty now have plenty of bandwidth to access the learning management system and other educational apps, Chartrand says.

Hillsdale College doesn’t offer online classes for credit, but in spring 2016, it invested in high-end Lifesize Icon 600 video conferencing equipment for staff meetings and distance-learning opportunities. The technology brings remote guest speakers to campus and lets professors continue teaching when they travel, Chartrand says.

Pat Chartrand manages the network and systems at Hillsdale College, which uses video conferencing to bring remote guest speakers to campus. Photo by Adam Bird/AP

The college installed the Lifesize equipment in the president’s office, a conference room, a college-owned hotel and conference center, and the Kirby Center, a satellite campus for graduate students in Washington, D.C.

The conference room features four 55-inch LG LED displays, enough screen real estate for students to see a speaker alongside a PowerPoint presentation. The speaker connects using a tablet or notebook computer webcam, while on campus, a Lifesize pan-tilt-zoom HD camera lets the speaker see the students.

This past fall, a guest lecturer taught a class session to 10 students at the conference room for the first time — and it went perfectly. “That was probably the first of many to come in the future,” Chartrand says.

Streamlined Connectivity Opens Up Access

Most rural community colleges offer online courses, Smith says, and their flexibility makes them popular among the many students who are working adults. Casper College, a community college in Casper, Wyo., has increased its online offerings in exact years. Its course mix now includes seven online-only degrees.

To ensure campus connectivity is as fast and streamlined as its urban counterpart, Casper College IT Director Kent Brooks has focused on beefing up the campus broadband, Wi-Fi and portfolio of online tools. Since 2011, the college has boosted its internet speeds from 25 megabits per second to 1 gigabit per second. It also increased the number of Wi-Fi access points nearly tenfold in the past six years, from 49 APs in 2010 to about 450 in 2016. Among other benefits, Medical Lab Technology students can now access standardized course content online using Google Chromebooks.

Brooks also launched a web portal to simplify access to applications. A single sign-on connects students to email, the learning management system, student information systems and other online educational materials.

“For equity, it’s about being able to handle students who want to log on to multiple devices on campus and allowing them to access content anytime they want,” Brooks says.

Sun, 26 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Wylie Wong en text/html https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2017/02/distance-learning-bridges-digital-divide-higher-education
Killexams : Podcast Series: Innovations in Education

SILVER SPRING, MD (July, 2022)—Tennessee’s Maury County Public Schools (MCPS) announced it has deepened its multiyear collaboration with Discovery Education, the worldwide edtech leader whose state-of-the-art digital platform supports learning wherever it takes place. In latest phase of this long-term partnership, eight K-8 schools hosting the district’s summer learning initiative are integrating a suite of award-winning, flexible, digital resources into instruction to create enriching, real-world learning experiences that connect students to the world around them while preparing them for future success. 

MCPS is a pre-K-12 school district in Southern Middle Tennessee operating 21 schools, one virtual academy, one non-traditional high school, and one alternative school. MCPS employs more than 900 teachers and 500 staff members who serve nearly 13,000 students. Each summer, the district hosts a special summer learning session offering participating K-8 students unique support and opportunities. MCPS teachers and educational assistants work with small groups of students to provide targeted, focused instruction every day, providing an engaging opportunity to boost participants’ learning. 

This year’s summer learning program was designed to support reading and math enrichment. provide opportunities for organized play, and offer fun, hands-on science, technology, reading, art, and mathematics activities. To support these goals, MCPS sought a flexible multi-disciplinary platform that met the state’s STREAM (Science, Technology, Reading, Arts, Math) requirement for summer school programs across the state and whose utility would last beyond this initiative. Following a careful review of available resources, the district selected the following resources from Discovery Education: …Read More

Sat, 22 Jun 2019 22:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.eschoolnews.com/tag/it/
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