Simply study and remember these HP5-H07D PDF Questions questions

Each and every candidate that go through the HP5-H07D exam feel that, HP5-H07D test questions are altogether different from the HP5-H07D digital book and course books. We have viewed this issue in a serious way. We have gathered the most refreshed, most recent, and legitimate HP5-H07D Exam Questions and made an information base to assist up-and-comers with breezing through tests with excellent grades.

Exam Code: HP5-H07D Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Delta - Sales Essentials of HP Workstations
HP Workstations testing
Killexams : HP Workstations testing - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP5-H07D Search results Killexams : HP Workstations testing - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP5-H07D https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : HP releases testing tool for agile development teams

It’s no secret that agile has dramatically sped up the software development life cycle. But faster development means less time to test, and with the rise of mobile, it also means tests have to done at a larger scale. To help simplify and speed up testing in the agile world, HP is releasing a new performance testing solution.

“We see a large percentage of our customers doing some form of agile methodology; they may not be doing pure agile, but they are doing some form of it,” said Genefa Murphy, director of mobile product management, analytics and user experience at HP. “The goal of StormRunner Load is to really help teams who are looking for agile solutions and who also want to leverage the cloud.”

(Related: HP focuses on mobile and cloud testing in ALM revamp)

Unlike HP’s LoadRunner and Performance Center, StormRunner Load is exclusively focused on Web and mobile and is hosted in the cloud, instead of being an on-premises solution.

“As enterprises continue to migrate applications and solutions to the cloud, they need to ensure that the performance of their applications will not degrade as the volume of uses increases,” Raffi Margaliot, general manager of application delivery management at HP, said in the company’s announcement. “HP StormRunner Load is designed specifically to help agile teams deliver scalable, high-performing cloud-based modern apps while also helping them capitalize on their existing investments in HP.”

According to Murphy, StormRunner Load’s most attractive features are that it is smart, simple and scalable.

Smart: The test offering features built-in analytics to give users the ability to understand anomalies and problems in real time. “This helps teams be more efficient, helps them to create a better communication path between the development and performance teams, and hopefully helps them with those goals of trying to release quicker,” Murphy said.

Simple: The goal of StormRunner Load is to have a very simple design that allows users to create a load test in 10 minutes, according to Murphy. “The UI and user experience are built to be very simple and straightforward,” she said. “In addition, it has built-in how-to guides that can help guide customers.”

Scalable: “We really built this to be able to essentially scale through a million virtual load tests,” Murphy said. “We worked with a lot of customers who applied this through our beta and got very good feedback in terms of the time that it took them to set up those tests and then to actually execute them at a large degree of scale.”

Wed, 14 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://sdtimes.com/agile/hp-releases-testing-tool-agile-development-teams/
Killexams : HP's Latest Enterprise VR Workstation Is a Backpack

As VR (virtual reality) looks to transform itself into an increasingly more mobile (aka convenient) experience HP has debuted a novel solution to the wires and tethers associated with VR today – a backpack.

At SIGGRAPH 2017, HP announced the HP Z VR Backpack, a 10-lb, wearable PC with enough horsepower for both experiencing and creating VR content. While it is easy to imagine the entertainment potential of the Z VR, HP has made it clear that it wants its new wearable PC to be catalyst for bringing more robust VR experiences to business and enterprise first and foremost. Safer simulation and training, virtual walkthroughs for architectural design, and better collaboration in virtual environments for product designers, are just a few of the use cases cited by HP.

At its core the Z VR Backpack is a Windows 10 PC with an Intel Core i7 processor, 32 GB of SDRAM, a Nvidia Quadro P5200 GPU, and up to 1 TB of internal storage. It measures in at 13.11 x 9.29 x 2.39 inches and weighs 10.25 lbs according to specs released by HP. The backpack is powered by a 55Whr lithium-ion battery and features two, external portable 74 Whr hot-swappable batteries. The Z VR can also be docked and serve as a desktop PC.

If you've had a chance to try VR for product design you know that the cords and wires can make for a very cumbersome (and potentially unsafe) work experience, particularly with multiple users operating in the same physical space. Without some sort of handy rig overhead to manage the wires and someone to spot you and hold the cords connecting your headset and controllers to the workstation, it only takes a few turns before you end up wrapped in cable clutter.

Placing VR into a backpack form factor goes a long way in addressing the cable clutter issues, but in hands-on demonstrations at SIGGRAPH it feels like comfort is still a big issue. At 10 lbs the backpack itself is not terribly heavy, but it is just heavy enough to be noticeable and one wonders how it will play out with extended use – particularly if adapted to more physically demanding tasks like entertainment (live-action shooting games) or design sessions that require prolonged standing.

The other issue, which to be fair is completely outside of HP's control, is the weight of the headset. The latest version of the HTC Vive weighs in at just over a pound. That may not sound significant but it becomes very noticeable when it's attached to your moving head (also consider a pair of studying glasses only weighs about 30-40 grams). Anyone that has ever worked out will tell you that adding a total of about 11 lbs to your bodyweight can have a significant impact.

But headsets are only promising to get lighter. Kopin, a manufacturer of lightweight displays, recently unveiled a reference design, codenamed Elf VR, that will used patented microdisplay panels to create a VR headset the company estimates will be about 50% lighter than headsets currently available.

The move to untethered VR with internal tracking must also be considered. Oculus and HTC have promised the next generation of their headsets will be wireless and companies including Microsoft and Qualcomm are working with partners to deliver untethered headsets as well. A lightweight, wireless headset that delivers the same fidelity as a tethered headset could make the placement of a workstation entirely irrelevant.

Depending on how long it takes for wireless VR products to roll out wide, HP's backpack could catch on with customers too impatient for untethered solutions. We'll have to wait and see whether the backpack PC becomes a standard or a footnote, but for now it may offer a good intermediary step toward fully free VR.

What do you think of HP's VR Backpack solution? Let us know in the comments.

Chris Wiltz is the Managing Editor of Design News.  

Sun, 25 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.designnews.com/electronics-test/hps-latest-enterprise-vr-workstation-backpack
Killexams : How to Test the Cooling Fan in an HP Notebook

Marissa Robert graduated from Brigham Young University with a degree in English language and literature. She has extensive experience writing marketing campaigns and business handbooks and manuals, as well as doing freelance writing, proofreading and editing. While living in France she translated manuscripts into English. She has published articles on various websites and also periodically maintains two blogs.

Sat, 15 Jan 2022 15:41:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://smallbusiness.chron.com/test-cooling-fan-hp-notebook-48920.html
Killexams : HP Elite Dragonfly G3 Review Wed, 21 Sep 2022 00:28:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/hp-elite-dragonfly-g3 Killexams : The best laptops for video editing © PC World

Video editing is one of the most strenuous tasks you can put your PC through, so when you’re shopping for the best laptop for video editing, you’ll want to make sure you’re loading up with some heavy hardware firepower. You don’t necessarily need the absolute highest-end gear, and the processor and graphics inside the notebook are just part of the equation. Simply buying a gaming laptop and calling it a day might be enough if you’re just casually streaming or creating videos, but serious video editors will also want to take into account the quality of the display and port selection, among other factors.

A lot of notebooks have come through our test labs in our quest to find the best laptops. This has give us a comprehensive view of the laptop landscape and helps us identify laptops that fit the unique needs of video editing. Take a look at our recommendations below, followed by buying advice and information on how we test our laptops for video editing purposes. You may also want to check out our roundup of the best laptop deals to scout for discounts on content creation notebooks. We update it daily with the most recent sales.

Updated 10/10/2022 to include the Dell Inspiron 16 as our new pick for best battery life. For more info, check out our review below.

1. Dell XPS 17 (2022) – Best laptop for video editing

© PC World

Pros

・Solid performance for the price

・Massive, bright, colorful display

・Offers four Thunderbolt 4 ports

・Long battery life

Cons

・Heavy and thick

・Mediocre keyboard

・Lacks USB-A, HDMI, or Ethernet

・RTX 3060 is the quickest available GPU

MSRP: $2,799 Best Prices Today:

$2949.99 at Best Buy

|

$2999 at Micro Center

We consider the Dell XPS 17 the ultimate content creation laptop, so it’s no surprise to see this atop our list of the best laptops for video editing. The Intel 12th-gen Core i7-12700H processor and Nvidia GeForce RTX 3060 inside deliver plenty of punch for intense edits, while a 1TB SSD delivers top-notch storage performance for moving big projects around.

The XPS 17 also includes crucial extras coveted by video editors, such as an SD card reader, Thunderbolt 4 ports aplenty, and a luscious 17-inch touchscreen panel with 3840×2400 resolution, and a more productive 16:10 aspect ratio. Dell even managed to cram all these niceties into a relatively portable-for-its-class 5.34-pound design that can run for 11 hours before needing a charge—improving upon the previous XPS 17 version by over one hour.

Read our full

Dell XPS 17 (2022)review

2. Dell XPS 15 9520 – Best screen for video editing

© PC World

Pros

・Stellar OLED display

・Chassis is rugged and gorgeous

・Booming audio

・Roomy keyboard and touchpad

Cons

・15.6 < 16 inches

・Underwhelming battery life

・Webcam is behind the times

・Limited ports

MSRP: $2,299 Best Prices Today:

$1849.99 at Best Buy

|

$2299 at Dell

The Dell XPS 15 9520 has a stunning OLED display and with its latest Intel Core i7-12700H CPU and GeForce RTX 3050 Ti graphics, it has become one of our favorites for content creators and video editors. To add to an already impressive system, the rugged and beautiful all-metal enclosure is just the cherry on the top of a premium-quality cake.

Despite it being a 15-inch laptop, it is a bit heavy to carry on an everyday commute, and it lacks some of the ports that come with the XPS 17 model. But the gorgeous OLED display is the star of the show, and it doesn’t let you down with a 3456X2160 resolution, 16:10 aspect ratio, and ultra vivid and accurate colors.

Read our full

Dell XPS 15 9520review

3. Asus Zenbook Pro Duo 15 OLED UX582 – A great video editing laptop with two screens

© PC World

Pros

・Dual OLED screens are a boon for mobile content creation

・Great keyboard and extra-loud speakers

・Includes a backpack, palm rest, ergonomic stand, and stylus

Cons

・Small trackpad that hates lefties

・Dual-screen software takes some getting used to

・Tech specs slightly underperform comparable laptops

MSRP: $2999.99 Best Prices Today:

$2,399.99 at Amazon

|

$2626.99 at Best Buy

Now for something completely different. The Asus Zenbook Pro Duo 15 OLED UX582 packs abundant firepower, including a high-end overclockable Core i9 chip, GeForce RTX 3070 graphics, 32GB of DDR4 memory, and a fast 1TB NVMe SSD. It also has a 15.6-inch 4K OLED panel that shines at a bright 440 nits while covering 100 percent of the DCI-P3 color gamut—a serious screen for serious content creators. But the truly interesting part is the secondary 14-inch 3840×1100 OLED screen situated above the keyboard. Windows counts it as a second monitor and you can use bundled Asus software to put it to all kinds of helpful tasks, such as using it as a trackpad or summoning a panel of touch controls for some Adobe apps.

The Zenbook Pro Duo 15 OLED is basically a portable high-end PC workstation, though the lack of an SD card reader may prove irksome. You can always buy an external SD reader and slap it into one of the laptops dual Thunderbolt 3 ports, though. You should also strongly consider a cheaper version than our review model on sale for $2,400 at Amazon. It switches out the high-end overclockable Core i9 chip for a Core i7 chip, and drops the memory down to 16GB. It should still be plenty speedy for video editing but costs significantly less.

Read our full

Asus Zenbook Pro Duo 15 OLED UX582review

4. Razer Blade 14 (2021) – Best ultra-portable laptop for video editing

© PC World

Pros

・It performs capably in AAA games

・The QHD panel looks great

・It’s exceptionally quiet

Cons

・AC adapter is heavy at 1.7 pounds

・Razer products are pricey

・No Thunderbolt 4 support

Best Prices Today:

$2,341.44 at Amazon

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$2799.99 at Razer

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$2899.99 at Adorama

If pure portability is essential, consider the Razer Blade 14. This ultra-thin laptop measures just 0.66-inch thick and tips the scales at a mere 3.9 pounds, making it significantly smaller than most laptops with video editing chops. But Razer didn’t skimp on the firepower, loading the Blade 14 with AMD’s 8-core Ryzen 9 5900HX flagship CPU, Nvidia’s 8GB GeForce RTX 3080, a 1TB NVMe SSD, and 16GB of memory.

You’ll give up some perks in exchange for the Blade’s portability though: The 14-inch IPS-grade screen comes factory calibrated, but tops out at 2560×1440 resolution. 4K video editing is off the table, though the laptop supports the full DCI-P3 color gamut. Razer’s notebook also lacks an SD card slot. But if you need a fierce rig that can chew through edits and renders then slip easily into your bag, the Blade 14 is worth considering.

Read our full

Razer Blade 14 (2021)review

5. Dell Inspiron 16 – Best laptop for battery life

© PC World

Pros

・Roomy 16-inch 16:10 display

・Long battery life

・Competitive application performance

・Comfortable keyboard and huge touchpad

・Quad speakers pump up the jams

Cons

・Lone GPU upgrade is lackluster

・Can’t go bigger than 512GB SSD

・Large screen can feel awkward in tablet mode

MSRP: $1,249.99 Best Prices Today:

$1249.99 at Best Buy

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$1249.99 at Dell

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$1379.00 at Amazon

If it’s battery life that you’re concerned about, the Dell Inspiron 16 should cover you just fine. When we ran our battery benchmark, which cycles through a series of tasks and videos until the laptop dies, the Inspiron 16 lasted a marathon 16.5 hours on a single charge. That should allow you to edit to your heart’s content while out on the road. Due to the battery, it isn’t the most portable, however, weighing in at a substantial 4.7 pounds.

It’s rather inexpensive, but for the price you will have to make sacrifices. It sports a Intel Core i7-1260P CPU, Intel Iris Xe graphics, 16GB of RAM, and 512GB of SSD storage. While that should get the job done with most video-editing projects, it does lack storage capacity, so you will need an external drive if your saving video files. What really makes this laptop shine though, is the outstanding battery life which is an often overlooked aspect of mobile video editors. And as a bonus perk, it also comes with a surprisingly robust quad speaker system. For ports, you’re getting two USB Type-C, one USB-A 3.2 Gen 1, one HDMI, one SD card reader, and one 3.5mm audio jack.

Read our full

Dell Inspiron 16 2-in-1review

6. MSI GE76 Raider – Best gaming laptop for video editing

© PC World

Pros

・12th-gen Core i9-12900HK simply sings

・New “AI” performance mode greatly moderates fan noise.

・1080p webcam and good mic and audio makes for decent video conferencing PC

Cons

・Third iteration in the same body

・MSI Center is confusing and cluttered UI

・Painful pricing

MSRP: $4,200 (Core i9, RTX 3080 Ti) Best Prices Today:

$4200 at Adorama

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$4200 at MSI

If you’re looking for the most raw firepower possible, on the other hand, nothing burns through video edits faster than a big, heavy gaming laptop. The MSI GE76 Raider chewed through the Adobe Premiere test in UL’s Procyon benchmark faster than any other notebook thanks to its burly 14-core Intel Core i9-12900HK chip, an Nvidia RTX 3080 Ti tuned for a blistering 175 watts, and ample interior cooling. It even has an SD Express card reader hooked into the PCIe bus for high-speed card transfers. One downside to using last year’s model was its gamer-focused 360Hz 1080p display, but the higher-end version of this year’s 12UHS added a 4K, 120Hz panel that, while not tuned for content creation, should satisfy video editors much more, especially with its spacious 17.3-inch screen size. You sure pay for all that firepower, though.

Read our full

GE76 Raider 12UHSreview

7. HP Envy 14 14t-eb000 (2021) – Best budget laptop for video editing

© PC World

Pros

・Good value for the money

・Fantastic battery life

・Quiet fan, with no detectable performance throttling

・Thunderbolt 4 support

Cons

・Slightly quirky keyboard layout

・Webcam’s signature feature is ineffective

MSRP: 950.99 Best Prices Today:

$950.99 at HP.com

You’ll need to spend up for heftier hardware if you want the fastest possible video edits and renders, but not everyone can afford to. If you want a solid, basic content creation laptop that won’t break the bank, check out the HP Envy 14. The entry-level GeForce GTX 1650 Ti GPU and Core i5-1135G7 processor aren’t barnburners, but they’ll get the job done, and at roughly $1,000 the price is certainly right. The 14-inch 1900×1200 display features a 16:10 aspect ratio for improved productivity, along with factory color calibration and 100-percent sRGB support (though not DCI-P3). Better yet, the HP Envy 14 includes crucial SD card and Thunderbolt ports, and it runs surprisingly quiet too.

Read our full

HP Envy 14 14t-eb000 (2021)review

8. Asus ROG Zephyrus S17 – Another gaming laptop that's great for content creation

© PC World

Pros

・Excellent CPU and GPU performance

・Robust and innovative design

・Comfortable and customizable keyboard

Cons

・Trackpad requires some pressure

・Very high price

MSRP: $2,200 (base unit) up to $3,700 (review unit) Best Prices Today:

$2,442.00 at Amazon

|

$3699.99 at Asus

|

$3699.99 at Costco

The Asus ROG Zephyrus S17 is a video editor’s ultimate dream. This laptop features lightning-fast GPU and CPU performance plus a stunning 17.3-inch 4K display with a 120Hz refresh rate. The rugged all-metal chassis, six speaker sound system, and customizable keyboard really adds to the premium experience as well. Better yet for video editors, it also includes an SD card slot and Thunderbolt ports galore. However, you’re going to pay out the nose for it. If you’ve got a flexible budget and you won’t settle for anything other than the best of the best, the Zephyrus S17 is truly the bees knees.

Read our full

Asus ROG Zephyrus S17review

9. XPG Xenia 15 KC – Powerful portability, with minor caveats

© PC World

Pros

・Very light

・Very quiet

・(relatively) very fast

Cons

・Subpar RGB

・Just barely adequate audio

・SD card reader barely adequate

MSRP: 1999 Best Prices Today:

Not Available at Amazon

When it comes to powerful laptops, many, if not most, of them are pretty bulky and heavy, often tipping the scales at five or six pounds. Well, that’s not the case with the XPG Xenia 15 KC. It weighs a little over four pounds, which is fairly lightweight for a laptop that’s capable of delivering zippy performance across the board. Plus, it runs very quiet. According to our review, it “rarely makes noise under normal use.” That’s impressive, as most gaming laptops tend to sound like a rocket blasting off. If you’re looking for something that’s both quiet and portable, the Xenia 15 KC is an excellent choice, though its 1440p display and relatively slow SD card reader performance may make some content creators balk.

Read our full

XPG Xenia 15 KCreview

What to look for in a laptop for video editing

The most important thing to look for in a laptop for video editing is its CPU and GPU. The faster your hardware, the faster your edits, essentially. In addition to subjecting all of the laptops above to our usual battery of benchmarks, we also ran the UL Procyon Video Editing Test on several high-powered laptops to see which hardware performs best for this sort of work. The benchmark tasks Adobe Premiere with importing two different video projects, applying visual effects such as color grading and transitions, and then exporting it using H.264, H.265 at both 1080p and 4K.

Right-click and select “open in new tab” to see in full resolution. © PC World Right-click and select “open in new tab” to see in full resolution.

Gordon Mah Ung / IDG

The best performance came from big, heavy laptops running Intel’s 11th-generation processors, though notebooks with AMD’s beefy Ryzen 9 processors came in just behind, with 10th-gen Intel chips still putting up a respectable score. They’re not in the chart above, but newer Intel 12th-gen laptops run even faster still. The best-performing laptops all paired modern Intel CPUs with Nvidia’s RTX 30-series GPUs, which isn’t surprising as both companies have invested a lot of time and resources into optimizing their Adobe performance.

The GPU matters more than CPU in Premiere Pro, though things reach a point of diminishing returns very quickly. Notebooks wielding top-tier RTX 3080 graphics are indeed faster at video editing than laptops with more modest RTX 3060 graphics, but not by that much. If you look at the scores from the Dell XPS 17 9710, its GeForce RTX 3060 Laptop GPU is maybe 14 percent slower than the fastest RTX 3080 in the MSI GE76 Raider. That’s not a lot, especially when you consider how big and thick the GE76 Raider is compared to the Dell laptop.

In general, having any sort of discrete graphics is preferred, with at least an RTX 3060 recommended for serious video editing.

Video editing is very workflow dependent however. Your particular task and tool might be more CPU intensive, or lean more on the GPU than Premiere. If so, adjust your priorities accordingly. The selections above should all be great well-rounded options, however. Intel and Nvidia have spent years building up tools like Quick Sync and CUDA, respectively, and many video editing apps can see significant speed boosts because of it. AMD hardware does fine for video editing, but we recommend sticking to Intel and Nvidia unless you have a strong reason otherwise, especially if your workflow relies on their vendor-specific software optimizations.

If you’re transferring video from a camera, an SD card port (like this one on the Dell XPS 17) is essential, unless you’re comfortable plugging an SD card adapter into a high-speed USB or Thunderbolt port. © PC World If you’re transferring video from a camera, an SD card port (like this one on the Dell XPS 17) is essential, unless you’re comfortable plugging an SD card adapter into a high-speed USB or Thunderbolt port.

Gordon Mah Ung/IDG

It’s not all about the internals though. PCWorld video director Adam Patrick Murray stresses that an ideal laptop for video editing includes an SD card reader for grabbing video off a camera. He also recommends opting for a notebook with a 4K, 60Hz panel over the ultra-fast 1080p panels often found on gaming laptops that would otherwise be ideal for video editing. You need a 4K panel to edit 4K videos well, and blazing-fast refresh rates don’t mean anything for video editing like they do for gaming. If color accuracy matters to you—it might not if you’re only creating casual videos for your personal YouTube channel, for example—then support for the full DCI-P3 color gamut is also a must, along with Delta E < 2 color accuracy.

You won’t often find those sorts of specs listed for (or supported by) gaming laptops, but dedicated content creation laptops should include that information. That said, if you want the fastest possible laptop for video editing that can also satisfy your gaming proclivities, you can always pair that burly gaming laptop with a color-accurate external monitor for creation tasks.

If you’re looking for a more general purpose notebook, be sure to check out our guide to the best laptops for picks for every budget. You may also find solid laptops for video editing for cheap in our roundup of the best laptop deals, which we update daily with the latest sales.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 04:02:11 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/the-best-laptops-for-video-editing/ar-AA133MDL
Killexams : HP Envy 16 Review Mon, 10 Oct 2022 02:32:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/hp-envy-16 Killexams : The Best Desktop Workstations for 2022

Workstations are the sharpest tools in the desktop world, purpose-built for everything from professional photo and video editing to scientific analysis, computer-aided design (CAD), and Hollywood-level computer-generated imagery and 3D rendering. These specialized computers are available for nearly any budget, from not much more than a normal desktop to well above the sticker of a sports car.

Anyone using extra-tough software (decidedly not something as simple as Microsoft Office) or looking for a highly reliable PC for intensive tasks should consider a workstation over a traditional desktop.

Before you go workstation shopping, you should know they can be some of the most confusing computers to purchase because of their sheer configurability and a knack for offering options you've probably never heard of. Below is a breakout of our top picks among workstations we've tested. Following that is a buying guide that delves into all aspects of workstation buying, including professional-grade graphics cards, error-correcting memory, workstation-class CPUs, and warranty considerations.


Desktop Workstations 101: How to Buy the Right One

The central processing unit (CPU) is the lifeblood of any computer. This chip—or chips, as workstations can have more than one—is vitally important for complex tasks. Reference a CPU's core and thread count (both Intel and AMD high-end processors can handle two simultaneous computing threads per core) for a basic estimation of its processing power.

The least powerful CPUs you'd find in a workstation would have four cores apiece, while top-end ones can have 32 to 64 cores. Processors with higher core and thread counts are better for multitasking and especially long-running tasks like video encoding, though one with fewer cores and a higher clock speed or operating frequency (measured in gigahertz or GHz) may be more responsive for general use.

An AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPU with the box next to it

Today's true workstation-CPU families are the Intel Xeon and AMD Ryzen Threadripper and Threadripper Pro lines. The Threadripper has taken the market by storm by delivering more cores and threads per dollar than Xeons. Intel has responded by slashing prices, but the value edge still lies with AMD. The current Threadrippers top out at 64 cores.

The chips' weak point is that they're harder to find in workstations from major vendors such as Dell, HP, and Lenovo, where Intel remains by far the dominant choice. That may be poised to change a bit, though. In the summer of 2020, Lenovo announced an exclusive deal with AMD, in the launch of a ThinkStation model using a new line of workstation-minded Threadripper chips, the Threadripper Pro. We tested Threadripper Pro in the first Lenovo model to host it, the ThinkStation 620, and found it quite impressive. AMD has since released several Threadripper Pro chips to retail, working on a new socket and platform using the TRX80 chipset. (We later tested a 64-core version of it in a 2022 version of Threadripper Pro, which we linked to in the previous paragraph.)

It's not uncommon to see Intel Core and Core X-Series, as well as AMD Ryzen chips, offered in entry-level workstations. Truth be told, workstation CPUs are based on the same essential technologies as their civilian desktop counterparts. It's possible for a non-workstation CPU to perform just as well, if not better, assuming similar core and thread counts, though workstation CPUs scale to much higher core and thread counts. That said, there are reasons beside sheer performance to choose a workstation CPU.

A workstation desktop's insides exposed

One of those reasons is support for error-correcting code (ECC) memory. This type of RAM automatically corrects the tiny amount of data corruption that occurs in standard or non-ECC memory. This corruption is inconsequential for everyday use, but it's unacceptable in scientific, architectural, and financial fields where every decimal place matters.

Another mark in favor of workstation CPUs is the potential for high memory ceilings. Most desktop CPUs typically support anywhere from 32GB to 64GB of memory, with top-end chips just starting to support 128GB. That may sound like a lot compared to your laptop's 8GB or 16GB, but it's pocket change when you consider that some workstations can support 2TB (2,048GB) of memory or more. Simply put, workstation CPUs are a necessity when extraordinary amounts of memory are required. Similarly, workstation CPUs typically support more PCI Express lanes, a useful specification if many high-speed devices (such as multiple graphics cards for GPU-based compute, and PCI Express-based solid-state storage arrays) need to be connected.

Multi-CPU support is another capability that lies solely in the realm of workstation CPUs. The highest-end workstations can support two processors. It's expensive territory that you'd probably visit only if you need an extreme number of cores (more than can fit on a single CPU) and don't want to invest in a second computer. Ever-increasing CPU core counts have mitigated, but not eliminated, the need for what's known as symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) scenarios.

A workstation CPU is the only choice if you need the advantages described above. A non-workstation CPU will otherwise offer a better value, though some desktop workstations may not give you a choice between, say, Intel's Xeon line and its Core family.


Understanding Workstation Graphics: Professional-Grade GPUs and ISV Certifications

No desktop workstation would be complete without the option for a dedicated graphics processing unit (GPU) or graphics card, as opposed to the relatively humble integrated graphics built into many CPUs. The use of a GPU can vary from simple photo editing to complex CGI and parallel processing. The more graphically intense the operation, the more powerful a GPU you'll need.

Lower-end workstations may offer gaming-class Nvidia GeForce and AMD Radeon GPUs. These can run professional apps from Autodesk and Adobe, but they may not be ideally suited for the job, and that's where the graphics vendors' professional-grade silicon—Radeon Pro for AMD, and RTX A series (formerly Quadro) for Nvidia—come in.

These cards may not appear all that different from their gaming cousins in appearance or general specifications, but the difference—and the reason for their often much higher prices—comes down to software and driver support. The drivers that accompany professional GPUs are exhaustively tested for compatibility, stability, and performance in specialized professional apps.

An Nvidia workstation graphics card seen inside a PC

This is where the concept of independent software vendor (ISV) certifications comes into play. Most major workstation vendors will advertise ISV certification for specific apps such as Autodesk's AutoCAD and Maya or Dassault Systemes' SolidWorks. The ISV certification guarantees that the workstation is optimized and will work properly for a given program.

Just because a workstation doesn't carry an ISV certification, or the certification doesn't specify the app you're using, doesn't mean the app won't work. In fact, it most likely will. However, if you're in a line of work where guarantees are required, and you want an ironclad, up-front promise that the system is built for running a given application "just so," then your shopping list will be limited to ISV-certified workstations.

An Nvidia RTX A Series graphics card inside of a desktop

An up-and-coming concept in the workstation world is a more generic GPU driver that is built around maximizing compatibility with creative apps. Nvidia is already doing this with its Nvidia Studio Driver, which works on both GeForce and Quadro GPUs. The driver doesn't offer guaranteed compatibility like an ISV certification, but it's tested against creative software from popular vendors. (A list of apps is published on the driver get page.)

Let's get back to hardware. A low-end GPU is usually more than enough for photo editing, though video editors might want to step up to a midrange model with 6GB or more of display memory for 4K (or higher) source footage. If you're working with complex 3D models in product design, engineering, or other simulations, you'll generally want to invest in as powerful a GPU as possible, with 8GB or even 16GB of onboard memory. A GPU that isn't powerful enough may have trouble rendering onscreen models and wireframes.

It's common for workstations to support multiple GPUs, though caution should be used here. Adding a second graphics card to your workstation won't have much (if any) effect on performance if your application in question doesn't support multi-GPU environments, so it's important to verify your favorite apps first. As in gaming rigs, you're frankly better off buying the fastest single GPU you can afford. Explore a multi-GPU scenario only if your needs go beyond that.


Understanding Workstation Storage Options and Interfaces

Desktop workstations will offer, at the minimum, the same storage options as traditional desktops, including M.2-format solid-state drives (SSDs), 3.5-inch SATA hard drives, and 2.5-inch SATA SSDs. They also offer other storage technologies and interfaces that are useful in specialized scenarios.

One of these is the U.2 interface SSD, which is typically the size of a traditional 2.5-inch hard drive. The U.2 format offers higher capacities than M.2 drives since it provides more real estate for housing memory chips. Most U.2 drives use the PCI Express bus for data transfer, over which U.2 supports four lanes, but the interface can also be used for SATA and SAS drives. The latter stands for Serial Attached SCSI, another kind of storage interface typically found only in high-end workstations and servers. A SAS drive is typically used in data center or enterprise scenarios where maximum uptime and reliability are required.

Another kind of drive offered in high-end workstations is a PCI Express solid-state drive that plugs into a full-size PCI Express expansion slot on the motherboard, looking something like a low-profile graphics card. These drives offer higher capacities and better cooling than M.2 drives. Some drives in this format aren't drives at all, but caddies that hold multiple M.2 drives, useful in a scenario where the workstation's motherboard doesn't have enough M.2 slots on it.

Hot-swappable drives are a server-grade technology sometimes available in high-end workstations. These take the form of externally accessible 2.5-inch or 3.5-inch bays whose drives can be pulled out of the workstation and swapped while the system is running. They're useful if having tons of local storage is key or if you need to transport your data to another computer. Hot-swapping can also allow a failed drive in a RAID array to be replaced without downtime.

A Dell workstation with a hot-swappable hard drive

So which interfaces and storage formats are best? There is no simple answer to that question. It depends on the usage scenario. For bulk storage where speed and response time isn't critical, 3.5-inch SATA hard drives offer the most gigabytes per dollar. For reliability and better response times, it may be worth upgrading to a SAS drive, but the ever-decreasing cost of solid-state storage continues to make it more attractive than traditional hard drives. (See our SSD vs. HDD: What's the Difference? article for a rundown.)

A Samsung SSD 980 stick resting on a table

The operating system, however, should be installed on an SSD for maximum performance. It's also worth paying the premium for solid-state storage for general purposes if your workflow involves studying and writing large amounts of data, as with 4K and 8K video editing. Look for PCI Express drives that support the Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) protocol for maximum throughput.

Everything discussed so far in this section involves internal storage. If being able to detach your storage quickly or take it with you is important, Intel-based workstations typically offer the option for add-in cards with one or more Thunderbolt 3 ports. The Thunderbolt 3 interface supports up to 40Gbps (or four lanes) of bi-directional throughput. Fast external storage drives and RAID arrays connected via Thunderbolt 3 can perform just as well as PCI Express drives connected internally.

Finally, there's network storage. The workstation's built-in Ethernet jack(s) may not provide enough bandwidth for storage demands, so you may see enhanced network interface cards (NICs) that provide high-speed Ethernet connections up to 5Gbps. Built-in Ethernet connections typically top out at 1Gbps.


Workstation Form Factors and Expansion

It pays to invest in a workstation that's more powerful than your current workload demands, so it will support your workflow in the long term. Take note of your workstation build; have you maximized its component choices? If so, it makes sense to step up to the next model so you have breathing room for upgrades.

For example, while you might not currently need more than 64GB of memory, it's nice to have the ability to expand to 256GB later. Storage limits aren't quite as set in stone, as storage capacity continues to grow in a given form factor, but you'll still want to ensure the workstation can handle your future storage needs, internally or externally.

An HP Z2 Mini G9 Workstation sitting on a desk

The upgrade potential of a workstation is related to its physical design. Tower-style workstations based on traditional form factors, such as full ATX or Extended-ATX (E-ATX), have the most upgrade potential since they can house standardized parts, allowing for nearly any kind of component upgrade. By contrast, mini desktops and all-in-one designs (with the workstation in the base or back of a monitor) can greatly limit your upgrade options down the line and tend not to be the most cost-effective investments.

An Asus ProArt Mini PC sitting on a table

The GPU (or GPUs) in most workstations should be upgradable, provided the GPU is of a standard format such as a PCI Express card. The main concern with a GPU upgrade is whether the workstation's power supply can handle it. If your graphics needs may increase, think twice before opting for a lower-wattage power supply in your build, as you may end up needing to upgrade that if you add a more powerful GPU.


Connections: Which Ports Do You Need in a Desktop Workstation?

Nearly all workstations will have the types of ports you'd find on a normal desktop, including USB, video-out connectors, network connections, and audio jacks.

However, nonstandard or uncommon ports may be required depending on your workflow. Older or specialized equipment may still require serial or PS/2 connectors, while other workflows may require video input. Higher-end workstations usually offer any manner of add-in cards to provide functionality like this. Such cards can usually be added after purchase, though you should verify with the workstation maker that this is the case if you aren't configuring the system with add-in cards from the get-go.

An array of workstation ports

The Thunderbolt 3 cards mentioned above are ideal for more than just adding external arrays of high-speed storage. Their high bandwidth makes it possible to connect devices such as external GPU enclosures.


Which Operating System Should You Get in a Workstation?

The apps you run will largely determine your choice of operating system, though you still might have a debate if your apps are cross-platform. Cost is always at the forefront. There's no such thing as a cheap macOS-based workstation, so you'll be looking at a Windows or Linux machine if you're spending less than the $5,000 starting price for Apple's sole standalone workstation model, the 2019 Mac Pro or the equally pricey iMac Pro (which starts at the same price). Both are in need of an update, as they haven't gone over to M1 or M2 processing. The Mac Pro tower is as high-end as workstations get, offering Xeon CPUs from eight to 28 cores, up to 1.5TB of memory, and one or two AMD Radeon Pro GPUs. It's an excellent example of a purpose-built desktop workstation, but we'd expect an eventual replacement. Arguably, the 2022 M1 Ultra-based Apple Mac Studio could suffice as one, for many Mac users,.

While Windows and macOS dominate mainstream desktops, it's common for workstation vendors to offer Linux installs or support. The supported distros such as Red Hat or Ubuntu vary, but the allure is the same. Unlike macOS and Windows, most Linux distros won't require you to pay for an operating system license, and many powerful software tools are available, often at reduced or no cost.

Something to note about Windows workstations is that Microsoft offers an upgraded and Xeon-optimized version of Windows 10 called Windows 10 Pro for Workstations that incorporates many features found in Windows Server operating systems. It's naturally more expensive, so save your cash with a regular Windows 10 Pro license unless you need them.

One other factor in operating system choice is hardware support. If you need (or prefer) Nvidia GPUs, you can count out the Mac Pro or iMac Pro, as Apple offers them only with AMD Radeon Pro graphics cards. Windows and Linux workstations offer the widest latitude when it comes to choosing hardware. Also be mindful of any special hardware you need for your workflow, such as video-capture cards that may not be usable under certain operating systems. Apple's Boot Camp software can be used to run Windows on a Mac, but there's no official way to do things the other way around.


Business and Security Considerations With Workstations

Business and enterprise workstation buyers should be conscious of their needs for remote-management support and general device security. Intel tends to be the strongest on this front with its vPro platform, which is readily available on its Core and Xeon CPUs. AMD's alternative is Ryzen Pro on the mainstream Ryzen chips.

True workstations are designed for around-the-clock operation under stressful conditions. Their internal components are more robust than a normal desktop's, especially the power supply and motherboard. Their cooling systems are also more advanced so the workstation can keep its temperatures under control during nonstop operation.

The Corsair One gaming desktop seen from above

If long-running tasks are part of your workflow, look for a workstation that isn't just a consumer or business PC with workstation components, as is often the case with lesser-priced models. Standalone workstation models are purpose-built and won't share much with their non-workstation brethren.

Manufacturers usually include workstations in their business- or professional-level support departments. This practice will vary with smaller vendors that may not offer separate support for consumer and business PCs. Regardless of the vendor, new workstations will come with a limited warranty that covers hardware defects for at least a year. It's sensible to invest in at least a three-year warranty on workstations over $1,000; you'll want to get at least that much time out of your investment.

A Lenovo ThinkStation P330 workstation PC seen from an angle

Adding accidental damage coverage should be done at discretion; it might be a negligible expense next to the cost of a tricked-out workstation. Other warranty add-ons include enhanced support with rapid response times, including onsite service. The latter is almost always worthwhile, not only to minimize downtime but to save your workstation from the rigors of shipping if repairs are needed. Large workstation towers are especially vulnerable to damage in transit, regardless of how well they're packed.

All told, the total cost of any extended warranties and coverage generally shouldn't exceed 20% of the computer's price. This is rarely a problem when buying an expensive workstation, as even top-tier warranty coverage shouldn't run more than a few hundred dollars.


Where to Buy a Workstation

Workstations are best purchased directly from the vendor or an authorized retailer. This ensures you can get a system configured to your specifications, with a clear line of communication for sales and after-sales support. If you're going through a retailer, verify that any extended warranties or services are honored by the workstation vendor.

Think of a workstation as a longer-term investment that should expand to handle changing workflows. Start by choosing a software platform (macOS, Linux, or Windows) and then find a suitable model. Mac users have limited choices, but Linux and Windows fans have a slew of vendors to choose from. Only major vendors are likely to offer ISV certifications, if those are required for your work, and they'll also offer more comprehensive warranty and onsite support options.

An HP Z2 Tower Workstation seen from an angle

When it comes to hardware, choose components that match your workflow, but don't overspend. Opting for pricey ECC memory when it's not needed, for example, won't have any real benefit. You can also pinch pennies by going with a gaming-grade GeForce GTX or RTX GPU and using an Nvidia Studio driver, though there's no replacement for a professional GPU when it comes to compatibility and stability with creative apps, especially if you'll leave your workstation running around the clock crunching data or media.

Refer to the paragraphs above for the finer details on workstation buying. All told, your purchase should be a hybrid of your current and future needs, as a workstation definitely isn't an impulse buy, nor the kind of computer you'll buy often.


So, Which Workstation Desktop Should I Buy?

Below is the spec breakout of our favorite desktop workstations tested within the last year or two. They should get your shopping started with a look at the shapes, sizes, and capacities available. Now, good luck and get cracking.

Mon, 10 Feb 2020 05:49:00 -0600 en-gb text/html https://uk.pcmag.com/desktops/124834/the-best-desktop-workstations
Killexams : Rewritten OpenGL drivers make AMD’s GPUs “up to 72%” faster in some pro apps
Rewritten OpenGL drivers make AMD’s GPUs “up to 72%” faster in some pro apps
AMD

Most development effort in graphics drivers these days, whether you're talking about Nvidia, Intel, or AMD, is focused on new APIs like DirectX 12 or Vulkan, increasingly advanced upscaling technologies, and specific improvements for new game releases. But this year, AMD has also been focusing on an old problem area for its graphics drivers: OpenGL performance.

Over the summer, AMD released a rewritten OpenGL driver that it said would boost the performance of Minecraft by up to 79 percent (independent testing also found gains in other OpenGL games and benchmarks, though not always to the same degree). Now those same optimizations are coming to AMD's officially validated GPU drivers for its Radeon Pro-series workstation cards, providing big boosts to professional apps like Solidworks and Autodesk Maya.

"The AMD Software: PRO Edition 22.Q3 driver has been tested and approved by Dell, HP, and Lenovo for stability and is available through their driver downloads," the company wrote in its blog post. "AMD continues to work with software developers to certify the latest drivers."

AMD says the OpenGL driver rewrite in its 22.Q3 professional GPU drivers will bring big benefits to pro apps that rely on the older graphics API.
Enlarge / AMD says the OpenGL driver rewrite in its 22.Q3 professional GPU drivers will bring big benefits to pro apps that rely on the older graphics API.
AMD

Using a Radeon Pro W6800 workstation GPU, AMD says that its new drivers can Strengthen Solidworks rendering speeds by up to 52 or 28 percent at 4K and 1080p resolutions, respectively. Autodesk Maya performance goes up by 34 percent at 4K or 72 percent at the default resolution. The size of the improvements varies based on the app and the GPU, but AMD's testing shows significant, consistent improvements across the board on the Radeon Pro W6800, W6600, and W6400 GPUs, improvements that AMD says will help those GPUs outpace analogous Nvidia workstation GPUs like the RTX A5000 and A2000 and the Nvidia T600.

A full list of compatible Radeon Pro-series GPUs is available in the 22.Q3 driver's release notes; in addition to desktop cards, the driver is compatible with the mobile GPUs in a variety of laptops from Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Panasonic. AMD didn't show any performance numbers for Radeon Pro GPUs older than the 6000 series, though presumably, all GPUs supported by the new drivers will see at least some benefit.

The OpenGL API is old, but it's still in relatively wide use among older games (the PC version of Minecraft being one prominent example), in professional apps, and as a rendering backend for game console emulators, among other places. AMD also rewrote its DirectX 11 drivers earlier this year, though the performance gains in most games were generally much smaller than the improvements provided by the new OpenGL drivers.

Fri, 30 Sep 2022 05:56:00 -0500 Andrew Cunningham en-us text/html https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2022/09/rewritten-opengl-drivers-make-amds-gpus-up-to-72-faster-in-some-pro-apps/
Killexams : Norwegian Cruise Line drops COVID-19 testing, vaccination and masking. Should you take a cruise without these? Experts weigh in.

President Joe Biden has said the pandemic is over, despite more than 300 people dying from COVID-related illness every day. Now cruise lines, which experienced severe disruptions during the early days of the COVID-19 outbreak and, in some cases were stranded offshore due to ports refusing them permission to dock due to coronavirus outbreaks onboard, are relaxing their health protocols.

Norwegian Cruise Line, one of the largest cruise lines in the world, said Monday that passengers will no longer be required to show they are vaccinated against COVID-19, show the results of such a test, or wear a mask. The new policy goes into action Tuesday. Harry Sommer, chief executive of Norwegian Cruise Line  NCLH, +1.15%, cited “significant, positive progress in the public-health environment.”

“Health and safety are always our first priority; in fact, we were the health and safety leaders from the very start of the pandemic,” Sommer said in a statement. “Many travelers have been patiently waiting to take their long-awaited vacation at sea and we cannot wait to celebrate their return.” Ships also have new protocols, including more sanitation, upgraded air filtration and enhanced health services.

Would you take a cruise?

“I would not go on a large cruise ship that did not have reasonable COVID prevention measures, and a good contingency plan for dealing with illness,” said Dr. Andrew Pavia, chief at the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Utah. “A lot of passengers on cruises fall into high-risk groups, and medical care and evacuation are challenging.”

“We could argue about what is enough prevention,” Pavia told MarketWatch. “Vaccination seems to be the minimum standard. It won’t prevent introduction and spread but will reduce the likelihood of severe consequences. Testing is another fairly easy ‘slice of the Swiss cheese.’ With other measures in place, routine required masking could be relaxed.”

Would Dr. Luis Ostrosky, a member of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, take a cruise that did not require vaccination, a COVID-19 test or masks? “No. Masking, testing and vaccination are the minimum mitigation measures/safety standards to make cruising successful. It’s easy how fast we forget those days of rapid transmission in cruise ships and ships having trouble finding a port to dock,” he said.

‘If you get sick early in your trip, it’s going to be a long and miserable trip.’

— Dr. Preeti Malani, University of Michigan

“If you get sick early in your trip, it’s going to be a long and miserable,” Dr. Preeti Malani, an infectious diseases physician at the University of Michigan and a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, told MarketWatch. “We’ve come so far in vaccines and treatments. The idea of going on a cruise two years ago? It felt like it would never happen. You couldn’t even imagine getting back to restaurants.”

Malani doesn’t rule out taking a cruise, but advises caution. “Being vaccinated gives high protection against poor outcomes, but it does not protect you against infection,” she said. “On the cruise, you can control how much exposure you have, but if you go with a family you can’t control what they do. If your family isn’t careful and you’re hanging out together, you could get exposed.”

Make sure you have an insurance plan, preferably one that covers being transported to a hospital if necessary. “Get travel insurance, especially if you have pre-existing conditions,” Malani said. “COVID isn’t the only threat to your health. You can eat in outdoor dining areas. It doesn’t mean the risk is zero. If you are in a crowded indoor space in one of their bars, you’re probably going to get exposed to people.”

Is the pandemic over?

Experts believe that the pandemic is not over. Ostrosky advises caution, especially as summer draws to a close: “As much as we want it to be, the pandemic is not anywhere near over. The world is still registering nearly 200,000 daily cases, and the U.S. is still having over 300 people dying every day. Our vaccination and boosting rates are less than ideal, new variants continue to emerge and the proverbial winter is coming.”

Pavia agrees. “I don’t even think President Biden thinks the pandemic is ‘over.’ Notwithstanding his reputation for speaking off the cuff, it is hard to communicate how best to make decisions as the disease slowly and unpredictably changes in the direction of becoming endemic.” He added: “I have not learned how to define the end of a pandemic until you are looking backwards.”

As of early Friday, the coronavirus had killed 1,062,130 Americans, according to data aggregated by Johns Hopkins University. There were 20,686 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in the U.S. early this week. On Monday, the CDC dropped its country-by-country COVID-19 travel-health notices that it began issuing early in the pandemic.

“The pandemic is at a point where we can move forward and do all the things we think are important,” Malani added. “COVID today is completely different to COVID two years ago.”

Read more:

CDC drops COVID-19 traveler health notices for individual countries

Are cruises fun again? COVID rules have been eased, but some things may never go back to the way they were.

‘The pandemic is over,’ Biden says in ’60 Minutes’ interview

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 13:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/story/norwegian-cruise-line-drops-covid-19-testing-vaccination-and-masking-should-you-take-a-cruise-without-these-experts-weigh-in-11664844775?mod=hp_minor_pos27
Killexams : 2023 Nissan Z Performance Manual First Test: Compromised but Still Intriguing nissan z Full Overview

Pros

  • Retrotastic style
  • More power than before is always better
  • Comfortable ride

 Cons

  • Heavier, and you feel it
  • Dull responses
  • Nowhere as refined as Supra

When Nissan finally redesigned its Z sports car this year, the bar for the 370Z's replacement had lowered to mere microns off the floor. The old Z was available for sale continuously since 2009, receiving only minor upgrades along the way. We're not going to say "any new-ish car with four wheels and the shape of a sports car" would have sufficed, but the 2023 Z's job was relatively straightforward. Thankfully, Nissan exceeded most expectations with the new Z, delivering a sport coupe so stylish, so powerful, and so affordable as to almost make you forget the underlying platform is … effectively still the same as the ancient 370Z's.

We Found the Beef

You probably won't detect the connection to yesterday's 370Z unless you peek at the new Z's curb weight and notice the car's unusually tall cowl. Both are the direct result of Nissan recycling the 370Z's sedan-based platform; its bones were shared with the Infiniti G37, a larger vehicle that, when scaled to the Z's smaller footprint, betrayed its more upright structure. They can even trace their roots back to the two-decades-old 350Z. Reinforcing this architecture to its present, admirably stiff state required adding bracing and, thus, mass. Our Performance trim, stick-shift 2023 Nissan Z weighs 3,519 pounds, about 100 pounds heavier than a 2017 370Z we tested years ago.

Some of that extra cheddar comes from the new-to-Z, if not exactly all-new, VR30DDTT twin-turbo 3.0-liter V-6 engine. Borrowed from the Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 models, this engine spits out a Toyota Supra-beating 400 hp and 350 lb-ft of torque. Those figures are well beyond the 370Z's 332 hp and 270 lb-ft, generated by a tractor-like 3.7-liter naturally aspirated V-6, and they eclipse the last-generation 370Z NISMO variant's 350 hp and 276 lb-ft. However, contending with quite a bit more Z in the metal, the twin-turbo V-6's impact on the 2023 Z's performance is muted. We managed to scoot the new model to 60 mph in 4.9 seconds, a few tenths of a second quicker than non-NISMO previous-generation 370Zs and on par with the 350-horse NISMO variants. Toyota's lighter, until-now-automatic-transmission-only Supra is about a second quicker to 60 mph.

In practice, the VR30DDTT engine pulls strongly and with a refinement the old VQ engine could only dream of. The engine now spins without vibration and puts out pleasing guttural noises; by contrast, the previous Z's VQ engine behaved, sounded like, and felt like a truck engine. We noticed the six-speed manual's shift lever still bucks around when getting onto or quickly off the throttle, but it's the only notable physical manifestation of the engine's work. As before, there is no "sport" mode for the Z, only a satisfying physical button to the left of the steering wheel for defeating traction and stability control, and another alongside the shifter for the rev-matching S-Mode function. The manual transmission (a nine-speed auto is optional at no cost) is generally satisfying to use with rev-match on or off, but the throws are longer than in a GR Supra manual, and the decently weighted, springy clutch pedal has a long stroke.

New-Age Power, Old-School Moves

Nissan is adamant we should not view the Z as a "track car," which on the surface seems strange, because the Z is a 400-hp, rear-wheel-drive sports car that, as tested here, comes with a Performance trim option. That designation includes a new clutch-type locking rear differential, bigger Akebono front brakes, and lightweight 19-inch Rays wheels. Why its maker would deem a car set up this way as unwelcome on a track, even for an amateur track day, would normally be a head-scratcher. But it makes sense in the way the Z drives; it's soft, comfortable, even. The body leans in corners, dives when you hit the brakes, and goes on-plane when you goose the twin-turbo V-6.

We piloted the Z around a short, winding circuit at our testing venue, and found it entertaining for precisely, we think, the reasons Nissan feels it shouldn't have been there. The weightier forced-induction V-6 pushes the Z's weight distribution forward relative to the 370Z, such that 57 percent of its mass presses through the front tires. Along with the suspension's general compliance, this makes for an oversteery experience as you near and pass through the handling limits. But thanks to the body lean, even novices can figure out how much grip remains in reserve. On our skidpad, the Z hung on for a 0.93-g average, matching the previous-gen NISMO variant. Toyota's GR Supra has similar roll compliance, if not quite as much, and has higher limits while being snappier at the limit, making it less friendly for would-be drifters.

Of course, more than mere fun goes into a car's track-worthiness, and there's no getting around the Z's braking power. While it's fine on, say, a fast road, we noticed the binders fading after a few laps of our course. This aspect alone would make us hesitate to track the Z on a regular basis if we owned it, unless we addressed the issues via aftermarket components. Nevertheless, we recorded a 110-foot best stop from 60 mph, right in line with the lighter Supra.

Do You Zee Now?

Given the 2023 Nissan Z's lack of hardcore abilities or intent, most customers likely will be served just fine by the base model that costs $10,000 less than this Performance version. You get the same engine and the same general goodness, minus a few performance parts the Z doesn't put to particularly good use, anyhow—well, aside from that locking differential, which comes in handy when sliding the car around.

More to the point: Even in Performance trim, the Z lives in an interesting corner of the market; it costs a few thousand bucks less than an equivalent six-cylinder Toyota GR Supra—the base Z even undercuts the entry-level four-cylinder Supra—and may even be cross-shopped against V-8-powered Mustangs and Camaros, four-cylinder BMW 2 series Coupes, and maybe even BMW's two-seat Z4 roadster (the Supra's German cousin). On the other hand, it's priced in premium hot hatch territory, making it a less practical but similar-performing alternative to enthusiast models such as VW's Golf R, Honda's Civic Type R, and the new Toyota GR Corolla.

The fact this car puts up numbers akin to the old 370Z's tier-above NISMO variant shows this redesign brought improvement, even if the rest of the non-numbers-focused experience relaxes. And therein lies the rub: We think a softer-edged, more road-focused sports car is novel and worthy of praise in today's age of ever-stiffening suspensions and Nürburgring development laps. It's too bad, however, that behind its appealing tuning, the Z feels old in other ways that don't show up in the objective test results.

There's geriatric Nissan switchgear from previous generations interspersed among the new displays; the interior trim went abuzz over rougher roads, despite the soft ride; and there's still that old-timey driveshaft windup that clunks its head up when shifting amongst lower gears at city speeds. A truly all-new car could have addressed these shortcomings, all of which carryover from the 370Z. Instead, Nissan gives enthusiasts more power and slightly better performance, more style, and a fresh touchscreen. There's somehow still some charm in that.

Looks good! More details?
2023 Nissan Z Specifications
BASE PRICE $41,015
PRICE AS TESTED $53,610
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, RWD, 2-pass, 2-door hatchback
ENGINE 3.0L Twin-turbo direct-injected DOHC 24-valve 60-degree V-6
POWER (SAE NET) 400 hp @ 6,400 rpm
TORQUE (SAE NET) 350 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm
TRANSMISSION 6-speed manual
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 3,519 lb (57/43%)
WHEELBASE 100.4 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 172.4 x 72.6 x 51.8 in
0-60 MPH 4.9 sec
QUARTER MILE 13.5 sec @ 105.3 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 110 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.93 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 25.3 sec @ 0.74 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 18/24/20 mpg
EPA RANGE, COMB 328 miles (est)
ON SALE Now
Thu, 06 Oct 2022 08:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.motortrend.com/reviews/2023-nissan-z-performance-manual-transmission-first-test-review/
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