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Exam Code: HP2-Z32 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Implementing HP MSM Wireless Networks
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Killexams : HP Implementing guide - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP2-Z32 Search results Killexams : HP Implementing guide - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HP2-Z32 https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : Are There Ninjas in YOUR Boardroom? How To Prevent Being Blindsided

A ninja (忍者?) or shinobi (忍び?) was a covert agent or mercenary in feudal Japan who specialized in unorthodox warfare. The functions of the ninja included espionage, sabotage, infiltration, and assassination, and open combat in certain situations…

--Source: Wikipedia

Former HP CEO Leo Apotheker was ousted after 11 months in his role.

Jack Griffin, the former CEO of Time, Inc. after five months.

And Michael Woodford, former CEO of Olympus , was shown the door 3 weeks.

While each case in different, one fact remains the same: these CEOs didn’t manage their Board. Instead, they were blindsided. The Board behaved in a way the CEO hadn’t anticipated, he was considered non-crucial to the success of the company, and it was sayonara from there.

Boardroom Ninjas are becoming more prevalent. And they’re blindsiding CEOs more often.

The three most common reasons for Boardroom Blindsiding are:

1-CEO/Board conflict isn’t discovered and dealt with immediately.

2-Board members have differing agendas.

3-Board members provide varying value.

Yes, as the CEO you report to the Board. And you can manage Boardroom Ninjas efficiently and effectively by becoming a Boardroom Samurai.

Their covert methods of waging war contrasted the ninja with the samurai, who observed strict rules about honor and combat.[2]

--Source: Wikipedia

Ninja bad. Samurai good. Ok, let’s move on.

Know Your Ninjas

A ninja succeeds because they are efficient, effective, and unseen. You’ll do the same, yet you’ll use candor to be so upfront and visible that the result will either be disarming while building trust and respect. Boardroom Ninjas are sneaky and destructive. Boardroom Samurais are transparent, ask the tough questions, and continuously monitor progress.

First, ask the following questions of each Board member in a private one-on-one meeting (not as a group).

1) What is most important for the company over the next 2 years: ensuring long term profitability or increasing short term revenue growth?

2) What sacrifices should we make now to [based on the answer above: ensure long term profitability/increase short term growth]?

3) Are you getting the info you need at Board meetings to help us increase shareholder value and guide the company’s growth? If not, what would you additional info would you like to receive?

4) How specifically would you like to see me grow as a leader?

5) How specifically would you like to see our key executives grow as leaders?

6) What should our top 3 priorities be this quarter? This year? Next year?

From the above you’ll learn:

  • The Board member’s own agenda for the company
  • Any grievances the Board member has with you or your executive team (plus where they want to see performance improvement)
  • How much value the Board member will be bringing in the future

Prevent Or Neutralize Attack

Connect with the leader. Every Board has a tribal leader, and it may be someone not in the Chairman or Lead Director role. Who is the leader of your Board? If you have a potential executive exit, or are considering a new key strategy or alliance, let them know first. Then ask their advice. This engages their ego and emotions.

When you engage someone’s ego and emotions two terrific benefits result: first, they want to be the wise advice giver, so they’ll tell you what they’d do were they in your shoes, and second, they will be invested in your following their advice. Ask their help in implementing their advice and check in with them on your progress.

Check in twice annually. If you check in with your Board members twice annually (see Know Your Ninjas above) you’ll significantly reduce the chances of Boardroom Blindsiding. Then follow up so they see progress.

Report well. Provide high visibility to your Board via clear and concise reporting, and short info updates between Board meetings (5 bullets on progress and wins, 5 bullets on opportunities/concerns). At the end of this blog you'll find a very high level framework for Board reporting for a software company. Yours will vary, but the key is to identify and report consistently on key success metrics for your Board can easily monitor the business progress at each meeting.

The key is to continually build and manage the Board’s confidence in you, and to ensure you only spend about 3-5% of your time on Board management. Your value is in building the company, not preventing attacks.

What are your Board management challenges?

Where have you succeeded with tricky Board issues?

Christine Comaford combines neuroscience and business strategy to help CEOs achieve rapid growth and create high performance teams. Follow her on twitter: @comaford. Her current NY Times bestselling book is entitled SmartTribes: How Teams Become Brilliant Together.

 Join her tribe and get free webinars, neuroscience resources, and more by clicking here.

SAMPLE FOR BOARD REPORTING (Simplified, I admit!)

For each department:

- Goals achieved last quarter

- Goals not achieved last quarter and why

- Goals to be achieved this quarter

Details per department:

Sales/Business Development:

- Deals closed and high level terms of each deal

- Spec for ideal client/partner in each client/partnership category

- Sales strategy

- Why deals were lost: Did the sale go to a competitor? Who? What was their

proposition and why was it better than ours? Was the sale lost because a new

decision maker joined the fray? Why didn’t we know about this in advance?

Client Care:

- # of inquiries responded to for the month, % breakdown of clients vs. prospects

- Average time to resolution on each client inquiry

- % of clients who have contacted client service repeatedly and how often

- Strategy for up-selling/down-selling/cross-selling in this function

Engineering:

- Technology used, integration issues, expertise needed

- Scalability, robustness, extensibility proof

- Testing approach, hosting/co-location approach and vendor

- Release schedule and key features per release

Marketing:

- Lead generation and qualification: the sales funnel (leads being pursued) and the

amount of time it takes a lead to move into the sales pipeline (and become a

prospect), time it takes a prospect to become a client

- Client acquisition, retention, optimization (up-selling) strategies

- Key marketing activities: mailings, conferences, trade shows, press coverage

recent past and upcoming

- Product management issues, if any

- Web site revs upcoming and high level details

Finance/Talent:

- Stock options to be approved for issuance

- Head count (perm and temp) today and projected for quarter

- Burn rate today and ramping over next 3 quarters

- Any current or potential employee issues

- Balance Sheet, P&L, Statement of Cash Flows

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 07:57:00 -0500 Christine Comaford en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/christinecomaford/2012/06/04/leo-apotheker-jack-griffin-michael-woodford-beware-the-boardroom-ninja-and-prevent-being-blindsided/
Killexams : Is there a need for sustainability-focused channel programmes?

As words go, sustainability is not one of the most graceful or mellifluous there is – not that it matters in an industry which makes a habit of deploying clunky, cumbersome, unwieldy, mangled words and phrases to try to describe its own innovations and trends.

Still, sustainability is an increasingly popular and common word across all industries, including IT, creating something of a zero-emission sustainability bandwagon.

A lot of zeal for sustainability is driven by customers. A latest review of print vendor sustainability by Quocirca found that more than 80% of customers said it was important that vendors offered sustainable products and services, and that they demonstrated a reduction in their environmental impact.

Print vendors are a good place to start, but they are not the be-all and end-all. People might concentrate on print and copier devices because they can see and feel the end product, and there’s an immediate physical product that they can assign an environmental cost to in terms of paper and print.

But the focus on sustainability programmes is not taking place in isolation among print vendors. It’s also being highlighted by those operating in other IT product and services areas, especially due to customer demand.

“We are seeing a growing number of customers align themselves with organisations that prioritise sustainability,” says Neil MacDonald, UK and Ireland channel director for HP Inc.

“Not just because its the right thing to do, but because its good for business as well. Strong environmental performance lends itself to competitive advantage, and the measure of success for every company today is tied to empowering progress for the planet and its people – if you are not acting as a pioneer now, you will be passed by very quickly.”

MacDonald claims that HPs commitment to its sustainable impact has become a difference maker for the business, driving more than $3.5bn in new sales. “It’s becoming a competitive advantage in our goal to be the most sustainable and just technology company by 2030,” he adds.  

And there are plenty of vendors happy to discuss their sustainability efforts. Richard Wells, Epson UK head of office print sales, argues that in the face of organisations considering their ecological and corporate social responsibility (CSR) approaches, “channel partners selling Epson products are future-proofed, as we already offer products with sustainability benefits at their core and they see this as a great advantage”.

Similarly, Greig Millar, general manager for sales, services and solutions at Brother UK, says the vendor has “worked closely” with partners over the past few years to demonstrate the sustainability of its technology, services and business to customers.

“This is becoming more crucial as green credentials are given increased weighting, by up to 40% in some cases, especially in tender processes that we work with our partners on,” he notes, adding that channel players are becoming more commercially incentivised to engage with vendors that have a clear green agenda, particularly for winning over large corporate and public sector customers.

Tackling refillable cartridges

This all sounds very encouraging, but as Janis Kemers, vice-president of print and supplies for Europe at Tech Data, says: “Sustainability is the big elephant in the room in the print industry.” The industry has been seen as polluting for decades in terms of generating huge amounts of CO2 just through shipping cartridges, not to mention associated plastic and electronic waste.

Kemers believes there’s a feeling that vendors are not driving proactive sustainability programmes, and instead seem to be more reactive. Too often, the conversation is about offsetting, instead of reducing. The refillable movement stands out as a way to try to Boost sustainability.

“Epson is leading the crowd in Europe,” says Kemers, “and has been committed to the strategy over the past four to five years.” Primarily, sustainability has been aimed at the consumer and small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) level – Canon is starting to do something similar, while HP is looking at it but has yet to push it.

Remanufactured cartridges are increasingly being looked at because of a push in the European Union to do so, but nothing has been agreed between member states yet. Nevertheless, corporates and governments are making more demands for remanufactured cartridges in their tenders, which is translating into market demand.

“Corporate resellers are coming to us asking for remanufactured cartridges,” says Kemers, adding that it’s not a simple process because there’s no clear definition and understanding of remanufactured versus newly built. It can also be as expensive to provide a remanufactured cartridge as a new one. In any case, Kemers believes there’s currently no role for the channel in the remanufactured business.

The great realisation

According to Quocirca, there is a need for sustainability-focused channel programmes to drive all-important channel engagement. While most vendors are happy to encourage partners “to incorporate sustainability into customer messaging”, only one has a dedicated channel sustainability programme.

Michael O’Hara is managing director at DataSolutions, which has placed a strong emphasis on sustainability and helped to launch Techies Go Green – a movement of IT and tech-oriented companies committed to decarbonising their businesses.

“[Channel partners] are waking up to the fact that sustainability is no longer a buzzword – it is an environmental, economic and social driver of change affecting all our lives in every way possible,” says O’Hara. He dubs this the “great realisation”.

But he warns that there is no quick fix. “This isnt a problem that is going to disappear with one or two actions by any business. It will require collective action by vendors, reseller partners and customers, and it will take time – many years, in fact,” he says, adding that Techies Go Green signatories are leading from the front when it comes to sustainability, but they “are more the exception than the rule”.

As for what channel partners should do to advance their sustainability credentials, O’Hara says: “Start by measuring your business’s carbon footprint – you cant reduce what you havent measured. This will also help to develop a roadmap and action plan to become more sustainable over time.”

Apathy vs demand

Is the dearth of channel sustainability programmes down to channel apathy or something else?  

“I think it reflects a lack of interest from channel partners caused by a lack of financial commitment from customers,” says OCF sustainability officer Mischa van Kesteren.

“[Customers might say they want sustainable solutions], but they dont buy them. I have, on more than one occasion, designed more energy-efficient solutions than competitors and lost out to more wasteful solutions that offered greater raw performance but lower performance per watt. Intel designed a wholeLrange of low wattage CPUs [central processing units] which nobody bought, so it dropped them. 

There’s a reason why vendors and customers are the ones making the most noise about sustainability. “We cant be first movers on sustainability until customers start making it a competitive advantage,” says van Kesteren.

“I would say it is starting to get that way from asoftperspective where talking about it and making suggestions is gaining traction. However, we cant integrate it into our solutions to a great extent until customers start rewarding that decision with their business, which they arent, at least in our market. I do think this will change in the next year or two, however.”

“We can’t be first movers on sustainability until customers start making it a competitive advantage”
Mischa van Kesteren, OCF

Is there anything partners should do to try to give sustainability programmes more of a channel focus?

“We could do more in terms of requesting what would be helpful for us in that area,” says van Kesteren. “For me, that would be tools that generate carbon footprint information easily, and also being able to select a range of delivery options that might be more sustainable such as rail freight, even if it means longer lead times. Also trying to condense deliveries as much as possible to reduce miles covered by delivery vehicles.”

The proposal to make deliveries more environmentally efficient is something mooted by Tech Data’s Kemers regarding print cartridges. With managed print services it is possible to predict which cartridges will run out in a week and which will need to be replaced in three months’ time. He suggests putting all the replacements into a single delivery to make for a smaller carbon footprint.

Partners need to avoid being caught in a pincer movement between customers eager to burnish their sustainability credentials, but not so enthusiastic about paying for the privilege and for vendors anxious to use environmental concerns as another way to sell their equipment and services.

Jostein Birkeland, principal technologist of sustainable transformation at HPE, cites IDC research which predicts 75% of enterprises will expect sustainability to be included in request for information (RFI) proposals by next year as a reason for partners to become more engaged.

“There are tangible business advantages for the channel in implementing sustainability programmes and supporting customers in their sustainability efforts,” he says. “Faced with resource limitations, supply chain constraints and high energy prices, organisations that are aligning their tech strategies with sustainability initiatives are growing stronger, more resilient and more able to accelerate a data-first digital strategy.”

He admits that while sustainability has become a key consideration for many channel players, “it is not a standard yet”, adding that the seemingly slow adoption in the channel space has different reasons, such as the fact that pressure from purchasers is directed to manufacturers, not the channel.

Also, channel partners are smaller companies than IT corporations, with fewer resources and fewer years of experience in sustainability practice, says Birkeland, and this is a cue for vendors that partners are looking to them as a key source for guidance on sustainability.

A disconnect on engagement

Louella Fernandes, research director at Quocirca, says there is a “disconnect” between vendors and the channel when it comes to sustainability.

“Given that [sustainability] is becoming a higher priority, the channel will need to be better engaged,” she says, citing the example of HP Inc’s reports on the growing proportion of B2B sales it attributes to sustainability. 

The HP Amplify channel programme is a bid to extend that advantage to partners, although Fernandes is not in a position to say whether it has driven an increase in business. “I would agree that there is probably a lack of interest from channel partners at this stage, and that is something vendors will need to address,” she adds.

Commenting on Amplify, HP’s MacDonald says: “Over 80% of our channel revenue comes from UK partners that have signed a pledge with HP that taps into HPs knowledge, training and resources to assess and Boost their sustainability performance while optimising sustainability-driven sales.” Describing it as “a strong and encouraging start”, he adds that the vendor is focused on “ensuring sustainability is at the forefront of the channel agenda”. 

“As print volumes settle into the rhythms of hybrid working, sustainability will return to being a priority”
Greig Millar, Brother UK

Brother’s Millar observes that channel partners have had a lot to deal with over the past couple of years, “but as print volumes settle into the rhythms of hybrid working, sustainability will return to being a priority”. He still believes it is the responsibility of vendors to ensure they can “support resellers with the sustainable solutions that will meet customers’ demands, whether that’s through a single programme or a range of comprehensive initiatives”.

Christina Walker, global director of channel at Blancco, believes that what motivates channel partners is how the solutions they use or offer can help to achieve their sustainability goals internally and for their customers.

“There hasnt been any demonstrable proof yet that sustainability programmes are an advantage for partners. However, it would certainly be an interesting factor to bring into an existing programme,” she says.

Walker disputes that partners have been apathetic about sustainability.I havent seen our partners being passive on the subject,” she adds. “In fact, they have been very proactive about sustainability and are currently doing reviews of their vendors to identify if they meet their customersand internal requirements.”

It’s heartening that all parts of the IT supply chain are starting to acknowledge and appreciate that sustainability is not just a word or a trend. Sustainability is a circle as big as the planet, and we all need to be inside it.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 14:12:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.computerweekly.com/microscope/feature/Is-there-a-need-for-sustainability-focused-channel-programmes
Killexams : Remoticon 2021 // Rob Weinstein Builds An HP-35 From The Patent Up

Fifty years ago, Hewlett-Packard introduced the first handheld scientific calculator, the HP-35. It was quite the engineering feat, since equivalent machines of the day were bulky desktop affairs, if not rack-mounted. [Rob Weinstein] has long been a fan of HP calculators, and used an HP-41C for many years until it wore out. Since then he gradually developed a curiosity about these old calculators and what made them tick. The more he read, the more engrossed he became. [Rob] eventually decided to embark on a three year long reverse-engineer journey that culminated a recreation of the original design on a protoboard that operates exactly like the original from 1972 (although not quite pocket-sized). In this presentation he walks us through the history of the calculator design and his efforts in understanding and eventually replicating it using modern FPGAs.

The HP patent ( US Patent 4,001,569 ) contains an extremely detailed explanation of the calculator in nearly every aspect. There are many novel concepts in the design, and [Rob] delves into two of them in his presentation. Early LED devices were a drain on batteries, and HP engineers came up with a clever solution. In a complex orchestra of multiplexed switches, they steered current through inductors and LED segments, storing energy temporarily and eliminating the need for inefficient dropping resistors. But even more complicated is the serial processor architecture of the calculator. The first microprocessors were not available when HP started this design, so the entire processor was done at the gate level. Everything operates on 56-bit registers which are constantly circulating around in circular shift registers. [Rob] has really done his homework here, carefully studying each section of the design in great depth, drawing upon old documents and books when available, and making his own material when not. For example, in the course of figuring everything out, [Rob] prepared 338 pages of timing charts in addition to those in the patent.

LED Driver Timing Chart

One section called the “Micro-Programmed Controller” is presented as just a black-box in the patent. This is the heart of the systems, and is essential to the calculator’s operation. However, all the other parts that talk to the controller were so well-described in the patent that [Rob] was able to back out the details. The controller, and all sections of the calculator, was implemented in Verilog, and tested on an instrumented workbench he built to test each module.

Once everything was working in the simulations, [Rob] set out to build a working model. TInyFPGA models were used, one for each custom chip. A few understandable departures were made from the original design. An 18650 lithium ion cell powers the board, kept topped off by a modern battery charging controller. The board is larger than the original, and yes, he’s using the Hackaday-obligatory 555 chip in the power-on circuit. In this short demonstration video, you can see the final prototype being put through its paces side by side with an original HP-35, working through examples from the owner’s manual.

This is an incredibly researched and thoroughly documented project. [Rob] has made the design open source and is sharing it on the project’s GitLab repository. [Rob]’s slides for Remoticon are not only a great overview of the project, but have some good references included. Its clear he has a real passion for these old calculators and has done a fantastic job exploring the HP-35. But even after three years, there’s more to come. He’s thinking about making a PCB version, and a discrete implementation using individual logic gates may be in the works.

We wrote about the history of the HP-35 before. And if you like hacking into these old calculators, check out our writeup of a similar dive into the Sinclair scientific calculator.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Chris Lott en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2022/04/07/remoticon-2021-rob-weinstein-builds-an-hp-35-from-the-patent-up/
Killexams : The Last Scientific Calculator?

There was a time when being an engineering student meant you had a sword. Well, really it was a slide rule hanging from your belt, but it sounds cooler to call it a sword. The slide rule sword gave way to calculators hanging from your belt loop, and for many engineers that calculator was from HP. Today’s students are more likely to have a TI or Casio calculator, but HP is still in there with the HP Prime. It is hard to call it a calculator since the latest variant has a 528 MHz ARM Cortex A7, 256 MB of RAM, and 512 MB of ROM. But if you can’t justify a $150 calculator, there are some cheap and even free options out there to get the experience. To start with, HP has a free app that runs on Windows or Mac that works just like the calculator. Of course, that’s free as in no charge, not free as in open source. But still, it will run under Wine with no more than the usual amount of coaxing.

You might wonder why you need a calculator on your computer, and perhaps you don’t. However, the HP Prime isn’t just your 1980s vintage calculator. It also has an amazing number of applications including a complete symbolic math system based on xCAS/Giac. It is also programmable using a special HP language that is sort of like Basic or Pascal. Other applications include plotting, statistics, solvers, and even a spreadsheet that can hold up to 10,000 rows and 676 columns.

Portability

It is easy to think that HP provides the free PC software so you’ll go out and buy the real calculator, and that may be part of it. However, you can also get official apps for Android and iOS. They aren’t free, but they are relatively inexpensive. On iOS the cost right now is $25 and on Android it is $20. There are also “lite” versions that are free.

It appears that these apps are not emulating the actual calculator hardware, but are ports of the calculator code. So this isn’t a case of someone just writing a pretend calculator, these apps act like the real calculator because it is running the same source code. For example, there is an application, HP Connectivity Kit, that lets you talk to a real calculator over the network. The PC and phone versions will also connect just like a real device.

Programming

You can write programs on the device or if you have the HP Connectivity software (also free) you can write programs on your PC. You can even find some from the Internet. If you miss your old calculator, there is a define feature that lets you program like a key macro recording.

The programming language isn’t hard to pick up. Here’s a short snippet:


EXPORT AREAVOL()
BEGIN
LOCAL N1, N2, L1;
CHOOSE(N1, "Area or Volume?", "Area", "Volume");
IF N1 == 1 THEN
CHOOSE(N2, "Choose shape", "Rectangle", "Triangle", "Disk");
ELSE
CHOOSE(N2, "Choose solid", "Prism", "Cylinder", "Cone", "Pyramid", "Sphere");
. . .

Hacking and What’s Next?

You’d think that the real hardware would be a prime platform for hacking, but so far that’s still on the to-do list. The only really good hardware hack for the real calculator adds a Samsung battery with a higher capacity to the machine. There are also some enticing pads on the PCB that appear to support a buzzer and I2C communications, but there’s no firmware for it. There have been a few attempts to load alien firmware into the device, but there’s no full-blown development system. Getting to the JTAG port looks pretty intense. There’s also been the inevitable hacking of the communication protocol.

History is replete with products that seemed amazing for their day but turned out to be just a stopgap for something better. Cassettes gave way to CDs and then CDs gave way to digital music. Telephone answering machines gave way to voicemail. Calculators have that feel to them. How much longer will we need them? Are the virtual HP Prime applications going to overshadow the physical device?

Regardless, the Prime is state of the art and would shame a personal computer from a few years ago. You can only wonder if it will be the last great calculator, or if there are more yet to come. And a calculator still makes a nice project. Not all homemade calculators are simple.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 11:59:00 -0500 Al Williams en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2020/03/02/the-last-scientific-calculator/
Killexams : HP launches HP Anyware for secure remote working

HP Anyware will be available somewhere in the coming months. The solution’s based on technology from Teradici, which HP acquired last year. HP Anyware should eventually replace HP’s existing zCentral Remote Boost solution.

Teradici is a cornerstone of the upcoming solution. The company provides virtual desktop environments using Cloud Access Software (CAS), allowing companies to remotely host PCs in their on-premises environment and the cloud.

Teradici uses its own PC-over-IP (PCoIP) protocol. The protocol streams the contents of a display. The data travelling over a network is unlike the data exchanged by traditional remote desktop tech, which promotes security.

HP Anyware is the next release of Teradici’s CAS solution. New functionality includes support for Arm-based M1 processors and Macs. In addition, HP and Teradici optimized the tool for Windows 11.

HP told The Register that HP Anyware will replace zCentral Remote Boost, HP’s existing solution for remote work. HP Anyware will have equivalent functionality by mid-2023, after which zCentral Remote is to be discontinued. Though the solution will receive security fixes for some time, users eventually have to migrate to Anyware.

Tip: HPC software company Teradici acquired by HP Inc.

Mon, 25 Jul 2022 22:15:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.techzine.eu/news/applications/84203/hp-launches-hp-anyware-for-secure-remote-working/
Killexams : How 3D printing will transform manufacturing in 2020 and beyond

Design News caught up with Paul Benning, chief technologist for HP 3D Printing & Digital Manufacturing to get an idea of where additive manufacturing is headed in the future. Benning explained that we’re headed for mixed-materials printing, surfaces innovation, more involvement from academic community, and greater use of software and data management.

Automated assembly with mixed materials

Benning believes we will begin to see automated assembly with industries seamlessly integrating multi-part assemblies including combinations of 3D printed metal and plastic parts.  “There’s not currently a super printer that can do all things intrinsically, like printing metal and plastic parts, due to factors such as processing temperatures,” Benning told Design News. “However, as automation increases, there’s a vision from the industry for a more automated assembly setup where there is access to part production from both flavors of HP technology: Multi Jet Fusion and Metal Jet.”

While the medical industry and recently aerospace are incorporated 3D printing into production, Benning also sees car makers as a future customer for additive. “The auto sector is a great example of where automated assembly could thrive on the factory floor.”

Benning sees a wide range of applications that might combine metal and plastics. “Benefits of an automated assembly for industrial applications include printing metals into plastic parts, building parts that are wear-resistant and collect electricity, adding surface treatments, and even building conductors or motors into plastic parts,” said Benning. “The industry isn’t ready to bring this technology to market just yet, but it’s an example of where 3D printing is headed beyond 2020.”

Surfaces will become an area of innovation

Benning sees a future where data payloads for 3D printed parts will be coded into the surface texture.  “It’s a competitive advantage to be able to build interesting things onto surfaces. HP has experimented with coding digital information into a surface texture. By encoding information into the texture itself, manufacturers can have a bigger data payload than just the serial number.”

He notes that the surface coding could be read by, humans for machines. “One way to tag a part either overtly or covertly is to make sure that both people and machines are able to read it based on the shape or orientation of the bumps. We have put hundreds of copies of a serial number spread across the surface of a part so that it’s both hidden and universally apparent.”

Benning sees this concept as p[art of the future of digital manufacturing. “This is one of our inventions that serves to tie together our technologies with the future of parts tracking and data systems,” said Benning.

Universities will introduce new ways to thinking

Benning believes that academia and training programs can offer new thought processes to liberate designers from old thinking and allow them to tap into technologies of the future. “3D printing’s biggest impact to manufacturing job skills lie on the design side,” said Benning. “You have a world of designers who have been trained in and grown up with existing technologies like injection molding. Because of this, people unintentionally bias their design toward legacy processes and away from technologies like 3D printing.”

Benning believes one solution for breaking old thinking is to train upcoming engineers in new ways of thinking. “To combat this, educators of current and soon-to-be designers must adjust the thought process that goes into designing for production given the new technologies in the space,” said Benning. “We recognize this will take some time, particularly for universities that are standing up degree programs.” He also believes new software design tools will guide designers to make better use of 3D printing in manufacturing.

Software and data management is critical to the 3D printing future

Benning believes advancements in software and data management will drive improved system management and part quality. This will then lead to better customer outcomes. “Companies within the industry are creating API hooks to build a fluid ecosystem for customers and partners,” said Benning.

HP is beginning to use data to enable ideal designs and optimized workflows for Multi Jet Fusion factories. “This data comes from design files, or mobile devices, or things like HP’s FitStation scanning technology and is applied to make production more efficient, and to better deliver individualized products purpose-built for their end customers.” The goal of that individualized production can support custom products build with mass production manufacturing techniques, leading to a batch-of-one or mass customization.

Rob Spiegel has covered automation and control for 19 years, 17 of them for Design News. Other subjects he has covered include supply chain technology, alternative energy, and cyber security. For 10 years, he was owner and publisher of the food magazine Chile Pepper.

January 28-30: North America's largest chip, board, and systems event, DesignCon, returns to Silicon Valley for its 25th year! The premier educational conference and technology exhibition, this three-day event brings together the brightest minds across the high-speed communications and semiconductor industries, who are looking to engineer the technology of tomorrow. DesignCon is your rocket to the future. Ready to come aboard? Register to attend!

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.designnews.com/automation-motion-control/how-3d-printing-will-transform-manufacturing-2020-and-beyond
Killexams : HP Announces Extension of the Expiration Date for Exchange Offer for Plantronics Notes

HP Inc.

PALO ALTO, Calif., Aug. 01, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- HP Inc. (NYSE: HPQ) (“HP” or the “Company”) announced today that it has extended the expiration date of the previously announced offer to exchange (the “Exchange Offer”) any and all outstanding notes (the “Poly Notes”) of Plantronics, Inc. (NYSE: POLY) (“Poly”) for up to $500,000,000 aggregate principal amount of new notes to be issued by the Company (the “HP Notes”). HP hereby extends such expiration date from 11:59 p.m., New York City time, on August 1, 2022, to 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on August 15, 2022 (as the same may be further extended, the “Expiration Date”).

At 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on July 18, 2022 (the “Early Participation Date”), the previously announced solicitation of consents to adopt certain proposed amendments (the “Amendments”) to the indenture governing the Poly Notes (the “Poly Indenture”) expired. The requisite consents were received to adopt the Amendments with respect to all outstanding Poly Notes at the Early Participation Date, and Poly executed the supplemental indenture to the Poly Indenture with respect to the Amendments on July 25, 2022. The Amendments will become operative only upon the settlement of the Exchange Offer.

The Exchange Offer is being made pursuant to the terms and subject to the conditions set forth in the offering memorandum and consent solicitation statement dated June 27, 2022 (as amended from time to time prior to the date hereof, the “Offering Memorandum and Consent Solicitation Statement”), and is conditioned upon the closing of the Company’s acquisition of Poly (the “Acquisition”), which condition may not be waived by HP, and certain other conditions that may be waived by HP.

The settlement date for the Exchange Offer will be promptly after the Expiration Date and is expected to occur no earlier than the closing date of the Acquisition, which is expected to be completed by the end of the calendar year 2022, subject to customary closing conditions, including regulatory approvals.

Except as described in this press release, all other terms of the Exchange Offer remain unchanged.

As of 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on August 1, 2022, holders validly tendered $490,556,000 in aggregate principal amount of Poly Notes pursuant to the Exchange Offer. Tenders of Poly Notes made pursuant to the Exchange Offer may be validly withdrawn at or prior to the Expiration Date.

Documents relating to the Exchange Offer will only be distributed to eligible holders of Poly Notes who complete and return an eligibility certificate confirming that they are either a “qualified institutional buyer” under Rule 144A or not a “U.S. person” and outside the United States under Regulation S for purposes of applicable securities laws, and a non U.S. qualified offeree (as defined in the Offering Memorandum and Consent Solicitation Statement). The complete terms and conditions of the Exchange Offer are described in the Offering Memorandum and Consent Solicitation Statement, copies of which may be obtained by contacting D.F. King & Co., Inc., the exchange agent and information agent in connection with the Exchange Offer, at (888) 605-1956 (toll-free) or (212) 269-5550 (banks and brokers), or by email at hp@dfking.com. The eligibility certificate is available electronically at: www.dfking.com/hp and is also available by contacting D.F. King & Co., Inc.

This press release does not constitute an offer to sell or purchase, or a solicitation of an offer to sell or purchase, or the solicitation of tenders or consents with respect to, any security. No offer, solicitation, purchase or sale will be made in any jurisdiction in which such an offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful. The Exchange Offer is being made solely pursuant to the Offering Memorandum and Consent Solicitation Statement and only to such persons and in such jurisdictions as are permitted under applicable law.

The HP Notes offered in the Exchange Offer have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or any state securities laws. Therefore, the HP Notes may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an applicable exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and any applicable state securities laws.

About HP Inc.

HP Inc. (NYSE: HPQ) is a technology company that believes one thoughtful idea has the power to change the world. Its product and service portfolio of personal systems, printers, and 3D printing solutions helps bring these ideas to life. Visit http://www.hp.com.

Forward-looking statements

This document contains forward-looking statements based on current expectations and assumptions that involve risks and uncertainties. If the risks or uncertainties ever materialize or the assumptions prove incorrect, the results of HP and its consolidated subsidiaries may differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements and assumptions.

All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, any statements regarding the consummation of the Acquisition; the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the actions by governments, businesses and individuals in response to the situation; margins, expenses, effective tax rates, net earnings, cash flows, benefit plan funding, deferred taxes, share repurchases, foreign currency exchange rates or other financial items; any projections of the amount, timing or impact of cost savings or restructuring and other charges, planned structural cost reductions and productivity initiatives; any statements of the plans, strategies and objectives of management for future operations, including, but not limited to, our business model and transformation, our sustainability goals, our go-to-market strategy, the execution of restructuring plans and any resulting cost savings, net revenue or profitability improvements or other financial impacts; any statements concerning the expected development, demand, performance, market share or competitive performance relating to products or services; any statements concerning potential supply constraints, component shortages, manufacturing disruptions or logistics challenges; any statements regarding current or future macroeconomic trends or events and the impact of those trends and events on HP and its financial performance; any statements regarding pending investigations, claims, disputes or other litigation matters; any statements of expectation or belief, including with respect to the timing and expected benefits of acquisitions and other business combination and investment transactions; and any statements of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing. Forward-looking statements can also generally be identified by words such as “future,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “predicts,” “projects,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “can,” “may,” and similar terms.

Risks, uncertainties and assumptions include factors relating to the consummation of the Acquisition and HP’s ability to meet expectations regarding the accounting and tax treatments of the Acquisition; the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the actions by governments, businesses and individuals in response to the situation, the effects of which may give rise to or amplify the risks associated with many of these factors listed here; the need to manage (and reliance on) third-party suppliers, including with respect to component shortages, and the need to manage HP’s global, multi-tier distribution network, limit potential misuse of pricing programs by HP’s channel partners, adapt to new or changing marketplaces and effectively deliver HP’s services; HP’s ability to execute on its strategic plan, including the previously announced initiatives, business model changes and transformation; execution of planned structural cost reductions and productivity initiatives; HP’s ability to complete any contemplated share repurchases, other capital return programs or other strategic transactions; the competitive pressures faced by HP’s businesses; risks associated with executing HP’s strategy and business model changes and transformation; successfully innovating, developing and executing HP’s go-to-market strategy, including online, omnichannel and contractual sales, in an evolving distribution, reseller and customer landscape; the development and transition of new products and services and the enhancement of existing products and services to meet evolving customer needs and respond to emerging technological trends; successfully competing and maintaining the value proposition of HP’s products, including supplies; challenges to HP’s ability to accurately forecast inventories, demand and pricing, which may be due to HP’s multi-tiered channel, sales of HP’s products to unauthorized resellers or unauthorized resale of HP’s products or our uneven sales cycle; integration and other risks associated with business combination and investment transactions; the results of the restructuring plans, including estimates and assumptions related to the cost (including any possible disruption of HP’s business) and the anticipated benefits of the restructuring plans; the protection of HP’s intellectual property assets, including intellectual property licensed from third parties; the hiring and retention of key employees; the impact of macroeconomic and geopolitical trends, changes and events, including the Russian invasion of Ukraine and its regional and global ramifications and the effects of inflation; risks associated with HP’s international operations; the execution and performance of contracts by HP and its suppliers, customers, clients and partners, including logistical challenges with respect to such execution and performance; changes in estimates and assumptions HP makes in connection with the preparation of its financial statements; disruptions in operations from system security risks, data protection breaches, cyberattacks, extreme weather conditions or other effects of climate change, medical epidemics or pandemics such as the COVID-19 pandemic, and other natural or manmade disasters or catastrophic events; the impact of changes to federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations, including environmental regulations and tax laws; potential impacts, liabilities and costs from pending or potential investigations, claims and disputes; and other risks that are described (i) in “Risk Factors” in the Offering Memorandum and Consent Solicitation Statement and (ii) in our filings with the SEC, including but not limited to the risks described under the caption “Risk Factors” contained in Item 1A of Part I of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2021, as well as in Item 1A of Part II of our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended January 31, 2022 and the fiscal quarter ended April 30, 2022. HP does not assume any obligation or intend to update these forward-looking statements.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 10:56:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/hp-announces-extension-expiration-date-225600161.html
Killexams : These JDM Cars Used To Be Cheap, But Only The Wealthy Can Afford Them Now No result found, try new keyword!JDM cars have a cult-like following behind them, and for that reason, they are highly sought-after in the used car market. In the light of the current financial state of the world, used car prices are ... Sun, 07 Aug 2022 12:30:12 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news/these-jdm-cars-used-to-be-cheap-but-only-the-wealthy-can-afford-them-now/ar-AA10pJIy Killexams : IBM Research Rolls Out A Comprehensive AI And Platform-Based Edge Research Strategy Anchored By Enterprise Use Cases And Partnerships

I recently met with Dr. Nick Fuller, Vice President, Distributed Cloud, at IBM Research for a discussion about IBM’s long-range plans and strategy for artificial intelligence and machine learning at the edge.

Dr. Fuller is responsible for providing AI and platform–based innovation for enterprise digital transformation spanning edge computing and distributed cloud management. He is an IBM Master Inventor with over 75 patents and co-author of 75 technical publications. Dr. Fuller obtained his Bachelor of Science in Physics and Math from Morehouse College and his PhD in Applied Physics from Columbia University.

Edge In, not Cloud Out

In general, Dr. Fuller told me that IBM is focused on developing an "edge in" position versus a "cloud out" position with data, AI, and Kubernetes-based platform technologies to scale hub and spoke deployments of edge applications.

A hub plays the role of a central control plane used for orchestrating the deployment and management of edge applications in a number of connected spoke locations such as a factory floor or a retail branch, where data is generated or locally aggregated for processing.

“Cloud out” refers to the paradigm where cloud service providers are extending their cloud architecture out to edge locations. In contrast, “edge in” refers to a provider-agnostic architecture that is cloud-independent and treats the data-plane as a first-class citizen.

IBM's overall architectural principle is scalability, repeatability, and full stack solution management that allows everything to be managed using a single unified control plane.

IBM’s Red Hat platform and infrastructure strategy anchors the application stack with a unified, scalable, and managed OpenShift-based control plane equipped with a high-performance storage appliance and self-healing system capabilities (inclusive of semi-autonomous operations).

IBM’s strategy also includes several in-progress platform-level technologies for scalable data, AI/ML runtimes, accelerator libraries for Day-2 AI operations, and scalability for the enterprise.

It is an important to mention that IBM is designing its edge platforms with labor cost and technical workforce in mind. Data scientists with PhDs are in high demand, making them difficult to find and expensive to hire once you find them. IBM is designing its edge system capabilities and processes so that domain experts rather than PhDs can deploy new AI models and manage Day-2 operations.

Why edge is important

Advances in computing and storage have made it possible for AI to process mountains of accumulated data to provide solutions. By bringing AI closer to the source of data, edge computing is faster and more efficient than cloud. While Cloud data accounts for 60% of the world’s data today, vast amounts of new data is being created at the edge, including industrial applications, traffic cameras, and order management systems, all of which can be processed at the edge in a fast and timely manner.

Public cloud and edge computing differ in capacity, technology, and management. An advantage of edge is that data is processed and analyzed at / near its collection point at the edge. In the case of cloud, data must be transferred from a local device and into the cloud for analytics and then transferred back to the edge again. Moving data through the network consumes capacity and adds latency to the process. It’s easy to see why executing a transaction at the edge reduces latency and eliminates unnecessary load on the network.

Increased privacy is another benefit of processing data at the edge. Analyzing data where it originates limits the risk of a security breach. Most of the communications between the edge and the cloud is then confined to such things as reporting, data summaries, and AI models, without ever exposing the raw data.

IBM at the Edge

In our discussion, Dr. Fuller provided a few examples to illustrate how IBM plans to provide new and seamless edge solutions for existing enterprise problems.

Example #1 – McDonald’s drive-thru

Dr. Fuller’s first example centered around Quick Service Restaurant’s (QSR) problem of drive-thru order taking. Last year, IBM acquired an automated order-taking system from McDonald's. As part of the acquisition, IBM and McDonald's established a partnership to perfect voice ordering methods using AI. Drive-thru orders are a significant percentage of total QSR orders for McDonald's and other QSR chains.

McDonald's and other QSR restaurants would like every order to be processed as quickly and accurately as possible. For that reason, McDonald's conducted trials at ten Chicago restaurants using an edge-based AI ordering system with NLP (Natural Language Processing) to convert spoken orders into a digital format. It was found that AI had the potential to reduce ordering errors and processing time significantly. Since McDonald's sells almost 7 million hamburgers daily, shaving a minute or two off each order represents a significant opportunity to address labor shortages and increase customer satisfaction.

Example #2 – Boston Dynamics and Spot the agile mobile robot

According to an earlier IBM survey, many manufacturers have already implemented AI-driven robotics with autonomous decision-making capability. The study also indicated that over 80 percent of companies believe AI can help Boost future business operations. However, some companies expressed concern about the limited mobility of edge devices and sensors.

To develop a mobile edge solution, IBM teamed up with Boston Dynamics. The partnership created an agile mobile robot using IBM Research and IBM Sustainability Software AI technology. The device can analyze visual sensor readings in hazardous and challenging industrial environments such as manufacturing plants, warehouses, electrical grids, waste treatment plants and other hazardous environments. The value proposition that Boston Dynamics brought to the partnership was Spot the agile mobile robot, a walking, sensing, and actuation platform. Like all edge applications, the robot’s wireless mobility uses self-contained AI/ML that doesn’t require access to cloud data. It uses cameras to read analog devices, visually monitor fire extinguishers, and conduct a visual inspection of human workers to determine if required safety equipment is being worn.

IBM was able to show up to a 10X speedup by automating some manual tasks, such as converting the detection of a problem into an immediate work order in IBM Maximo to correct it. A fast automated response was not only more efficient, but it also improved the safety posture and risk management for these facilities. Similarly, some factories need to thermally monitor equipment to identify any unexpected hot spots that may show up over time, indicative of a potential failure.

IBM is working with National Grid, an energy company, to develop a mobile solution using Spot, the agile mobile robot, for image analysis of transformers and thermal connectors. As shown in the above graphic, Spot also monitored connectors on both flat surfaces and 3D surfaces. IBM was able to show that Spot could detect excessive heat build-up in small connectors, potentially avoiding unsafe conditions or costly outages. This AI/ML edge application can produce faster response times when an issue is detected, which is why IBM believes significant gains are possible by automating the entire process.

IBM market opportunities

Drive-thru orders and mobile robots are just a few examples of the millions of potential AI applications that exist at the edge and are driven by several billion connected devices.

Edge computing is an essential part of enterprise digital transformation. Enterprises seek ways to demonstrate the feasibility of solving business problems using AI/ML and analytics at the edge. However, once a proof of concept has been successfully demonstrated, it is a common problem for a company to struggle with scalability, data governance, and full-stack solution management.

Challenges with scaling

“Determining entry points for AI at the edge is not the difficult part,” Dr. Fuller said. “Scale is the real issue.”

Scaling edge models is complicated because there are so many edge locations with large amounts of diverse content and a high device density. Because large amounts of data are required for training, data gravity is a potential problem. Further, in many scenarios, vast amounts of data are generated quickly, leading to potential data storage and orchestration challenges. AI Models are also rarely "finished." Monitoring and retraining of models are necessary to keep up with changes the environment.

Through IBM Research, IBM is addressing the many challenges of building an all-encompassing edge architecture and horizontally scalable data and AI technologies. IBM has a wealth of edge capabilities and an architecture to create the appropriate platform for each application.

IBM AI entry points at the edge

IBM sees Edge Computing as a $200 billion market by 2025. Dr. Fuller and his organization have identified four key market entry points for developing and expanding IBM’s edge compute strategy. In order of size, IBM believes its priority edge markets to be intelligent factories (Industry 4.0), telcos, retail automation, and connected vehicles.

IBM and its Red Hat portfolio already have an established presence in each market segment, particularly in intelligent operations and telco. Red Hat is also active in the connected vehicles space.

Industry 4.0

There have been three prior industrial revolutions, beginning in the 1700s up to our current in-progress fourth revolution, Industry 4.0, that promotes a digital transformation.

Manufacturing is the fastest growing and the largest of IBM’s four entry markets. In this segment, AI at the edge can Boost quality control, production optimization, asset management, and supply chain logistics. IBM believes there are opportunities to achieve a 4x speed up in implementing edge-based AI solutions for manufacturing operations.

For its Industry 4.0 use case development, IBM, through product, development, research and consulting teams, is working with a major automotive OEM. The partnership has established the following joint objectives:

  • Increase automation and scalability across dozens of plants using 100s of AI / ML models. This client has already seen value in applying AI/ML models for manufacturing applications. IBM Research is helping with re-training models and implementing new ones in an edge environment to help scale even more efficiently. Edge offers faster inference and low latency, allowing AI to be deployed in a wider variety of manufacturing operations requiring instant solutions.
  • Dramatically reduce the time required to onboard new models. This will allow training and inference to be done faster and allow large models to be deployed much more quickly. The quicker an AI model can be deployed in production; the quicker the time-to-value and the return-on-investment (ROI).
  • Accelerate deployment of new inspections by reducing the labeling effort and iterations needed to produce a production-ready model via data summarization. Selecting small data sets for annotation means manually examining thousands of images, this is a time-consuming process that will result in - labeling of redundant data. Using ML-based automation for data summarization will accelerate the process and produce better model performance.
  • Enable Day-2 AI operations to help with data lifecycle automation and governance, model creation, reduce production errors, and provide detection of out-of-distribution data to help determine if a model’s inference is accurate. IBM believes this will allow models to be created faster without data scientists.

Maximo Application Suite

IBM’s Maximo Application Suite plays an important part in implementing large manufacturers' current and future IBM edge solutions. Maximo is an integrated public or private cloud platform that uses AI, IoT, and analytics to optimize performance, extend asset lifecycles and reduce operational downtime and costs. IBM is working with several large manufacturing clients currently using Maximo to develop edge use cases, and even uses it within its own Manufacturing.

IBM has research underway to develop a more efficient method of handling life cycle management of large models that require immense amounts of data. Day 2 AI operations tasks can sometimes be more complex than initial model training, deployment, and scaling. Retraining at the edge is difficult because resources are typically limited.

Once a model is trained and deployed, it is important to monitor it for drift caused by changes in data distributions or anything that might cause a model to deviate from original requirements. Inaccuracies can adversely affect model ROI.

Day-2 AI Operations (retraining and scaling)

Day-2 AI operations consist of continual updates to AI models and applications to keep up with changes in data distributions, changes in the environment, a drop in model performance, availability of new data, and/or new regulations.

IBM recognizes the advantages of performing Day-2 AI Operations, which includes scaling and retraining at the edge. It appears that IBM is the only company with an architecture equipped to effectively handle Day-2 AI operations. That is a significant competitive advantage for IBM.

A company using an architecture that requires data to be moved from the edge back into the cloud for Day-2 related work will be unable to support many factory AI/ML applications because of the sheer number of AI/ML models to support (100s to 1000s).

“There is a huge proliferation of data at the edge that exists in multiple spokes,” Dr. Fuller said. "However, all that data isn’t needed to retrain a model. It is possible to cluster data into groups and then use sampling techniques to retrain the model. There is much value in federated learning from our point of view.”

Federated learning is a promising training solution being researched by IBM and others. It preserves privacy by using a collaboration of edge devices to train models without sharing the data with other entities. It is a good framework to use when resources are limited.

Dealing with limited resources at the edge is a challenge. IBM’s edge architecture accommodates the need to ensure resource budgets for AI applications are met, especially when deploying multiple applications and multiple models across edge locations. For that reason, IBM developed a method to deploy data and AI applications to scale Day-2 AI operations utilizing hub and spokes.

The graphic above shows the current status quo methods of performing Day-2 operations using centralized applications and a centralized data plane compared to the more efficient managed hub and spoke method with distributed applications and a distributed data plane. The hub allows it all to be managed from a single pane of glass.

Data Fabric Extensions to Hub and Spokes

IBM uses hub and spoke as a model to extend its data fabric. The model should not be thought of in the context of a traditional hub and spoke. IBM’s hub provides centralized capabilities to manage clusters and create multiples hubs that can be aggregated to a higher level. This architecture has four important data management capabilities.

  1. First, models running in unattended environments must be monitored. From an operational standpoint, detecting when a model’s effectiveness has significantly degraded and if corrective action is needed is critical.
  2. Secondly, in a hub and spoke model, data is being generated and collected in many locations creating a need for data life cycle management. Working with large enterprise clients, IBM is building unique capabilities to manage the data plane across the hub and spoke estate - optimized to meet data lifecycle, regulatory & compliance as well as local resource requirements. Automation determines which input data should be selected and labeled for retraining purposes and used to further Boost the model. Identification is also made for atypical data that is judged worthy of human attention.
  3. The third issue relates to AI pipeline compression and adaptation. As mentioned earlier, edge resources are limited and highly heterogeneous. While a cloud-based model might have a few hundred million parameters or more, edge models can’t afford such resource extravagance because of resource limitations. To reduce the edge compute footprint, model compression can reduce the number of parameters. As an example, it could be reduced from several hundred million to a few million.
  4. Lastly, suppose a scenario exists where data is produced at multiple spokes but cannot leave those spokes for compliance reasons. In that case, IBM Federated Learning allows learning across heterogeneous data in multiple spokes. Users can discover, curate, categorize and share data assets, data sets, analytical models, and their relationships with other organization members.

In addition to AI deployments, the hub and spoke architecture and the previously mentioned capabilities can be employed more generally to tackle challenges faced by many enterprises in consistently managing an abundance of devices within and across their enterprise locations. Management of the software delivery lifecycle or addressing security vulnerabilities across a vast estate are a case in point.

Multicloud and Edge platform

In the context of its strategy, IBM sees edge and distributed cloud as an extension of its hybrid cloud platform built around Red Hat OpenShift. One of the newer and more useful options created by the Red Hat development team is the Single Node OpenShift (SNO), a compact version of OpenShift that fits on a single server. It is suitable for addressing locations that are still servers but come in a single node, not clustered, deployment type.

For smaller footprints such as industrial PCs or computer vision boards (for example NVidia Jetson Xavier), Red Hat is working on a project which builds an even smaller version of OpenShift, called MicroShift, that provides full application deployment and Kubernetes management capabilities. It is packaged so that it can be used for edge device type deployments.

Overall, IBM and Red Hat have developed a full complement of options to address a large spectrum of deployments across different edge locations and footprints, ranging from containers to management of full-blown Kubernetes applications from MicroShift to OpenShift and IBM Edge Application Manager.

Much is still in the research stage. IBM's objective is to achieve greater consistency in terms of how locations and application lifecycle is managed.

First, Red Hat plans to introduce hierarchical layers of management with Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management (RHACM), to scale by two to three orders of magnitude the number of edge locations managed by this product. Additionally, securing edge locations is a major focus. Red Hat is continuously expanding platform security features, for example by recently including Integrity Measurement Architecture in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, or by adding Integrity Shield to protect policies in Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management (RHACM).

Red Hat is partnering with IBM Research to advance technologies that will permit it to protect platform integrity and the integrity of client workloads through the entire software supply chains. In addition, IBM Research is working with Red Hat on analytic capabilities to identify and remediate vulnerabilities and other security risks in code and configurations.

Telco network intelligence and slice management with AL/ML

Communication service providers (CSPs) such as telcos are key enablers of 5G at the edge. 5G benefits for these providers include:

  • Reduced operating costs
  • Improved efficiency
  • Increased distribution and density
  • Lower latency

The end-to-end 5G network comprises the Radio Access Network (RAN), transport, and core domains. Network slicing in 5G is an architecture that enables multiple virtual and independent end-to-end logical networks with different characteristics such as low latency or high bandwidth, to be supported on the same physical network. This is implemented using cloud-native technology enablers such as software defined networking (SDN), virtualization, and multi-access edge computing. Slicing offers necessary flexibility by allowing the creation of specific applications, unique services, and defined user groups or networks.

An important aspect of enabling AI at the edge requires IBM to provide CSPs with the capability to deploy and manage applications across various enterprise locations, possibly spanning multiple end-to-end network slices, using a single pane of glass.

5G network slicing and slice management

Network slices are an essential part of IBM's edge infrastructure that must be automated, orchestrated and optimized according to 5G standards. IBM’s strategy is to leverage AI/ML to efficiently manage, scale, and optimize the slice quality of service, measured in terms of bandwidth, latency, or other metrics.

5G and AI/ML at the edge also represent a significant opportunity for CSPs to move beyond traditional cellular services and capture new sources of revenue with new services.

Communications service providers need management and control of 5G network slicing enabled with AI-powered automation.

Dr. Fuller sees a variety of opportunities in this area. "When it comes to applying AI and ML on the network, you can detect things like intrusion detection and malicious actors," he said. "You can also determine the best way to route traffic to an end user. Automating 5G functions that run on the network using IBM network automation software also serves as an entry point.”

In IBM’s current telecom trial, IBM Research is spearheading the development of a range of capabilities targeted for the IBM Cloud Pak for Network Automation product using AI and automation to orchestrate, operate and optimize multivendor network functions and services that include:

  • End-to-end 5G network slice management with planning & design, automation & orchestration, and operations & assurance
  • Network Data and AI Function (NWDAF) that collects data for slice monitoring from 5G Core network functions, performs network analytics, and provides insights to authorized data consumers.
  • Improved operational efficiency and reduced cost

Future leverage of these capabilities by existing IBM Clients that use the Cloud Pak for Network Automation (e.g., DISH) can offer further differentiation for CSPs.

5G radio access

Open radio access networks (O-RANs) are expected to significantly impact telco 5G wireless edge applications by allowing a greater variety of units to access the system. The O-RAN concept separates the DU (Distributed Units) and CU (Centralized Unit) from a Baseband Unit in 4G and connects them with open interfaces.

O-RAN system is more flexible. It uses AI to establish connections made via open interfaces that optimize the category of a device by analyzing information about its prior use. Like other edge models, the O-RAN architecture provides an opportunity for continuous monitoring, verification, analysis, and optimization of AI models.

The IBM-telco collaboration is expected to advance O-RAN interfaces and workflows. Areas currently under development are:

  • Multi-modal (RF level + network-level) analytics (AI/ML) for wireless communication with high-speed ingest of 5G data
  • Capability to learn patterns of metric and log data across CUs and DUs in RF analytics
  • Utilization of the antenna control plane to optimize throughput
  • Primitives for forecasting, anomaly detection and root cause analysis using ML
  • Opportunity of value-added functions for O-RAN

IBM Cloud and Infrastructure

The cornerstone for the delivery of IBM's edge solutions as a service is IBM Cloud Satellite. It presents a consistent cloud-ready, cloud-native operational view with OpenShift and IBM Cloud PaaS services at the edge. In addition, IBM integrated hardware and software Edge systems will provide RHACM - based management of the platform when clients or third parties have existing managed as a service models. It is essential to note that in either case this is done within a single control plane for hubs and spokes that helps optimize execution and management from any cloud to the edge in the hub and spoke model.

IBM's focus on “edge in” means it can provide the infrastructure through things like the example shown above for software defined storage for federated namespace data lake that surrounds other hyperscaler clouds. Additionally, IBM is exploring integrated full stack edge storage appliances based on hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI), such as the Spectrum Fusion HCI, for enterprise edge deployments.

As mentioned earlier, data gravity is one of the main driving factors of edge deployments. IBM has designed its infrastructure to meet those data gravity requirements, not just for the existing hub and spoke topology but also for a future spoke-to-spoke topology where peer-to-peer data sharing becomes imperative (as illustrated with the wealth of examples provided in this article).

Wrap up

Edge is a distributed computing model. One of its main advantages is that computing, and data storage and processing is close to where data is created. Without the need to move data to the cloud for processing, real-time application of analytics and AI capabilities provides immediate solutions and drives business value.

IBM’s goal is not to move the entirety of its cloud infrastructure to the edge. That has little value and would simply function as a hub to spoke model operating on actions and configurations dictated by the hub.

IBM’s architecture will provide the edge with autonomy to determine where data should reside and from where the control plane should be exercised.

Equally important, IBM foresees this architecture evolving into a decentralized model capable of edge-to-edge interactions. IBM has no firm designs for this as yet. However, the plan is to make the edge infrastructure and platform a first-class citizen instead of relying on the cloud to drive what happens at the edge.

Developing a complete and comprehensive AI/ML edge architecture - and in fact, an entire ecosystem - is a massive undertaking. IBM faces many known and unknown challenges that must be solved before it can achieve success.

However, IBM is one of the few companies with the necessary partners and the technical and financial resources to undertake and successfully implement a project of this magnitude and complexity.

It is reassuring that IBM has a plan and that its plan is sound.

Paul Smith-Goodson is Vice President and Principal Analyst for quantum computing, artificial intelligence and space at Moor Insights and Strategy. You can follow him on Twitter for more current information on quantum, AI, and space.

Note: Moor Insights & Strategy writers and editors may have contributed to this article.

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Killexams : ‘The role of the safety practitioner is evolving towards managing how the work is set up,’ SHP meets Marcin Nazaruk

Ahead of EHS Congress, taking place in Berlin in September, SHP catches up with speaker Marcin Nazaruk, Human Performance and Culture Leader at Baker Hughes, on how to learn from ‘normal work’ to get safety and business results and how to implement the findings.

What is your background in safety and how does your experience help you in your current role?

Marcin NazarukMarcin Nazaruk (MN): “My background combines multiple fields including industrial psychology, safety management, business, behavioural science, systems thinking, and many others.

“My work involves working at all levels of the hierarchy. Some days I’m on the shop floor learning from the operators how the work is really done compared to how it was imagined to be done. Other times, I work with supervisors, executives, engineers, central corporate teams, as well as customers and contractors.

“I take the most useful elements from different models and make them work to tangibly reduce the risk. For example, we were recognised by the Center for Offshore Safety with a Leadership Award for showing 37% in accident reduction through the practical application of learning from ‘normal work’.

“I’ve spent years translating modern safety science into practical, hands-on tools and developed many industry guides and practitioner toolkits available through various industry bodies, as well as training and content for the executive leaders. Click here for the full list of the tools.”

How is the role of the safety practitioner changing, and why is it important to modernise outdated practices?

(MN): “The role of the safety practitioner is evolving towards managing how the work is set up which requires collaboration across departments and levels of hierarchy.

“This is because the level of risk depends not only on how well hazards are controlled but also on how easy the organisation makes it to do the right thing. For example, an incorrect procedure may force people to come up with their own way of doing things but the problem with the procedure is due to corporate document management processes. The insufficient amount of time available for the job not only may force people to skip some steps but it also implies planning and resourcing issues higher up in the organisation which in turn are influenced by terms of contracts, organisational strategy, or cost management.

“Breaking down the silos and helping people in various departments realise their indirect impact on risk in operations is the next wave of efforts toward achieving high reliability.

“The consequence of not accounting for these factors in safety management is repeat accidents.

“If you’d like to learn how to proactively identify issues with the work set up and find organisational factors that will create your next accident, get in touch.”

At EHS Congress in September, you will be sharing with delegates how to learn from ‘normal work’ to get safety and business results. How would you describe ‘normal work’ and why is learning from it important?

(MN): “’Normal work’ is about how people adapt to changing conditions and challenges as part of their job.

“For example, using a crane to lift a load. Every time an operator does it, there may be something different about the situation, such as:

  • Less time available than planned.
  • Additional people in the area.
  • One person being off work.
  • Correct tools not available, e.g., lifting slings.

“Overcoming these challenges is part of what needs to be done. It’s ‘normal work’.

“It’s easy to see how these factors can increase the risk, and yet, none of them would be classified as a hazard because none of them is a source of harm.

“Popular approaches to safety management focus on controlling identified hazards but miss a whole world of organizational factors.

“Learning from normal work (also known as pre-accident investigations, or learning from success), is about proactively looking into the things that make the work difficult and increase the chances of human error, non-conformance, or unsafe acts in order to tangibly reduce the risk.

Click here to see some real-life examples.”

What are your top three tips for practically implementing learning from ‘normal work,’ to get better results?

(MN): “The factors that will create your next accident exist today. We can find and address them before they lead to an event. However, it requires changing how we think about failure and the type of questions that we ask.

“My top three tips would be:

  1. Build a shared mindset among the key stakeholders on the Human Performance Principles and the modern view of incident causation.
  2. Develop skills to learn about the local constraints and organisational factors.
  3. Integrate the learning from ‘normal work’ concepts and tools with your existing safety processes to ensure the sustainability of the effort.

“To help organisations to apply these points in practice, I was the lead author of the new guide on this subject that will be published by the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (IOGP) later in 2022.

“We’ve also created resources that allow companies to start now. Click here for more details.”

Hear more from Marcin Nazaruk at the 2022 EHS Congress, taking place in Berlin from 13-14 September. His session will take place on day one of the conference.

Click to register for your place and to see the full EHS Congress agenda.

Click here for more from EHS Congress on SHP.

When SHP met Louis Theroux…

The Safety & Health Podcast brings you the full recording of Louis Theroux’s keynote session at Safety & Health Expo.

Louis sat down with SHP Editor Ian Hart, in front of a packed Keynote Theatre audience, to discuss all things, from communicating effectively and working in hostile to health and health and wellbeing.

‘The role of the safety practitioner is evolving towards managing how the work is set up,’ SHP meets Marcin Nazaruk SHP catches up with Marcin Nazaruk to how to learn from ‘normal work’ to get safety and business results and how to implement the findings.

Ian Hart

SHP - Health and Safety News, Legislation, PPE, CPD and Resources

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