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Exam Code: Google-ACE Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Google-ACE Google Associate Cloud Engineer - 2022

Length: Two hours
Languages: English, Japanese, Spanish, Indonesian.
Exam format: Multiple choice and multiple select, taken in person at a test center. Locate a Test Center near you.
Prerequisites: None
Recommended experience: 6 months+ hands-on experience with Google Cloud

An Associate Cloud Engineer deploys applications, monitors operations, and manages enterprise solutions. This individual is able to use Google Cloud Console and the command-line interface to perform common platform-based tasks to maintain one or more deployed solutions that leverage Google-managed or self-managed services on Google Cloud.

The Associate Cloud Engineer exam assesses your ability to:

Set up a cloud solution environment
Plan and configure a cloud solution
Deploy and implement a cloud solution
Ensure successful operation of a cloud solution
Configure access and security

Setting up a cloud solution environment
Setting up cloud projects and accounts. Activities include:

Creating projects
Assigning users to predefined IAM roles within a project
Managing users in Cloud Identity (manually and automated)
Enabling APIs within projects
Provisioning one or more Stackdriver workspaces

Managing billing configuration. Activities include:

Creating one or more billing accounts
Linking projects to a billing account
Establishing billing budgets and alerts
Setting up billing exports to estimate daily/monthly charges

Installing and configuring the command line interface (CLI), specifically the Cloud SDK (e.g., setting the default project).

Planning and configuring a cloud solution
Planning and estimating GCP product use using the Pricing Calculator
Planning and configuring compute resources. Considerations include:

Selecting appropriate compute choices for a given workload (e.g., Compute Engine, Google Kubernetes Engine, App Engine, Cloud Run, Cloud Functions)
Using preemptible VMs and custom machine types as appropriate

Planning and configuring data storage options. Considerations include:

Product choice (e.g., Cloud SQL, BigQuery, Cloud Spanner, Cloud Bigtable)
Choosing storage options (e.g., Standard, Nearline, Coldline, Archive)

Planning and configuring network resources. Tasks include:

Differentiating load balancing options
Identifying resource locations in a network for availability
Configuring Cloud DNS
Deploying and implementing a cloud solution
Deploying and implementing Compute Engine resources. Tasks include:

Launching a compute instance using Cloud Console and Cloud SDK (gcloud) (e.g., assign disks, availability policy, SSH keys)
Creating an autoscaled managed instance group using an instance template
Generating/uploading a custom SSH key for instances
Configuring a VM for Stackdriver monitoring and logging
Assessing compute quotas and requesting increases
Installing the Stackdriver Agent for monitoring and logging

Deploying and implementing Google Kubernetes Engine resources. Tasks include:

Deploying a Google Kubernetes Engine cluster
Deploying a container application to Google Kubernetes Engine using pods
Configuring Google Kubernetes Engine application monitoring and logging
Deploying and implementing App Engine, Cloud Run, and Cloud Functions resources. Tasks include, where applicable:

Deploying an application, updating scaling configuration, versions, and traffic splitting
Deploying an application that receives Google Cloud events (e.g., Cloud Pub/Sub events, Cloud Storage object change notification events)

Deploying and implementing data solutions. Tasks include:

Initializing data systems with products (e.g., Cloud SQL, Cloud Datastore, BigQuery, Cloud Spanner, Cloud Pub/Sub, Cloud Bigtable, Cloud Dataproc, Cloud Dataflow, Cloud Storage)
Loading data (e.g., command line upload, API transfer, import/export, load data from Cloud Storage, streaming data to Cloud Pub/Sub)

Deploying and implementing networking resources. Tasks include:

Creating a VPC with subnets (e.g., custom-mode VPC, shared VPC)
Launching a Compute Engine instance with custom network configuration (e.g., internal-only IP address, Google private access, static external and private IP address, network tags)
Creating ingress and egress firewall rules for a VPC (e.g., IP subnets, tags, service accounts)
Creating a VPN between a Google VPC and an external network using Cloud VPN
Creating a load balancer to distribute application network traffic to an application (e.g., Global HTTP(S) load balancer, Global SSL Proxy load balancer, Global TCP Proxy load balancer, regional network load balancer, regional internal load balancer)

Deploying a solution using Cloud Marketplace. Tasks include:

Browsing Cloud Marketplace catalog and viewing solution details
Deploying a Cloud Marketplace solution
Deploying application infrastructure using Cloud Deployment Manager. Tasks include:

Developing Deployment Manager templates
Launching a Deployment Manager template

Ensuring successful operation of a cloud solution
Managing Compute Engine resources. Tasks include:

Managing a single VM instance (e.g., start, stop, edit configuration, or delete an instance)
SSH/RDP to the instance
Attaching a GPU to a new instance and installing CUDA libraries
Viewing current running VM inventory (instance IDs, details)
Working with snapshots (e.g., create a snapshot from a VM, view snapshots, delete a snapshot)
Working with images (e.g., create an image from a VM or a snapshot, view images, delete an image)
Working with instance groups (e.g., set autoscaling parameters, assign instance template, create an instance template, remove instance group)
Working with management interfaces (e.g., Cloud Console, Cloud Shell, GCloud SDK)

Managing Google Kubernetes Engine resources. Tasks include:

Viewing current running cluster inventory (nodes, pods, services)
Browsing the container image repository and viewing container image details
Working with node pools (e.g., add, edit, or remove a node pool)
Working with pods (e.g., add, edit, or remove pods)
Working with services (e.g., add, edit, or remove a service)
Working with stateful applications (e.g. persistent volumes, stateful sets)
Working with management interfaces (e.g., Cloud Console, Cloud Shell, Cloud SDK)

Managing App Engine and Cloud Run resources. Tasks include:

Adjusting application traffic splitting parameters
Setting scaling parameters for autoscaling instances
Working with management interfaces (e.g., Cloud Console, Cloud Shell, Cloud SDK)

Managing storage and database solutions. Tasks include:

Moving objects between Cloud Storage buckets
Converting Cloud Storage buckets between storage classes
Setting object life cycle management policies for Cloud Storage buckets
Executing queries to retrieve data from data instances (e.g., Cloud SQL, BigQuery, Cloud Spanner, Cloud Datastore, Cloud Bigtable)
Estimating costs of a BigQuery query
Backing up and restoring data instances (e.g., Cloud SQL, Cloud Datastore)
Reviewing job status in Cloud Dataproc, Cloud Dataflow, or BigQuery
Working with management interfaces (e.g., Cloud Console, Cloud Shell, Cloud SDK)

Managing networking resources. Tasks include:

Adding a subnet to an existing VPC
Expanding a subnet to have more IP addresses
Reserving static external or internal IP addresses
Working with management interfaces (e.g., Cloud Console, Cloud Shell, Cloud SDK)

Monitoring and logging. Tasks include:

Creating Stackdriver alerts based on resource metrics
Creating Stackdriver custom metrics
Configuring log sinks to export logs to external systems (e.g., on-premises or BigQuery)
Viewing and filtering logs in Stackdriver
Viewing specific log message details in Stackdriver
Using cloud diagnostics to research an application issue (e.g., viewing Cloud Trace data, using Cloud Debug to view an application point-in-time)
Viewing Google Cloud Platform status
Working with management interfaces (e.g., Cloud Console, Cloud Shell, Cloud SDK)

Configuring access and security
Managing identity and access management (IAM). Tasks include:

Viewing IAM role assignments
Assigning IAM roles to accounts or Google Groups
Defining custom IAM roles

Managing service accounts. Tasks include:

Managing service accounts with limited privileges
Assigning a service account to VM instances
Granting access to a service account in another project

Viewing audit logs for project and managed services.

Google Associate Cloud Engineer - 2022
Google Associate history
Killexams : Google Associate history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/Google-ACE Search results Killexams : Google Associate history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/Google-ACE https://killexams.com/exam_list/Google Killexams : Google rejected this man 39 times. He got the job in his 40th attempt No result found, try new keyword!A man who was rejected 39 times by his “dream company” Google is now celebrating after getting in at his 40th attempt. Tyler Cohen admits he toed the line between perseverance and insanity when he ... Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:11:39 -0500 en-in text/html https://www.msn.com/en-in/money/topstories/google-rejected-this-man-39-times-he-got-the-job-in-his-40th-attempt/ar-AA101yHX?fromMaestro=true Killexams : Headstrong or crazy? Man lands his 'dream job' at Google in 40th attempt

People online are being inspired by the story of a man who never gave up and eventually landed a job at Google, his dream company. Tyler Cohen applied at the tech giant not once or twice, but a whopping 39 times. A man is currently rejoicing after being accepted at his 40th attempt after being turned down 39 times by his "dream company," Google. Tyler Cohen acknowledges that by continuing to apply to Google despite numerous rejections, he erred on the side of lunacy. On LinkedIn, he posted a screenshot of his correspondence history with the internet giant, which displays communications going back to 2019.

"There's a fine line between perseverance and insanity. I'm still trying to figure out which one I have, "said the San Francisco-based Cohen, who will presumably resign from his role as Associate Manager-Strategy & Ops at DoorDash to join Google.

"39 rejections, 1 acceptance," he added, alongside the hashtags # google # acceptedoffer # application and # noogler, which is Google's term for new hires.

More than 36,000 people have reacted to Cohen's post, and there have been hundreds more comments. Google itself saw the message and responded from its Checked LinkedIn account to welcome Cohen to the team.

"What a journey it's been, Tyler! It was definitely time," wrote Google.

While the majority of LinkedIn users applauded the newly recruited "noogler," other people questioned whether Cohen's hiring after 39 attempts indicated more about Google's hiring procedures than Cohen's abilities.

(With inputs from agencies)
 

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Wed, 27 Jul 2022 02:53:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wionews.com/trending/headstrong-or-crazy-man-lands-his-dream-job-at-google-in-40th-attempt-501198
Killexams : How This Founder Developed A Device To Tackle Surface Germs Amid Ongoing Covid

What started as grief over a friend’s staph infection that rapidly led to an emergency room visit and the friend’s untimely death turned into brainstorming and a new perspective on germs, healthcare and innovation by Debra Vanderhoff. The infection that gripped Vanderhoff’s friend had taken her from an ordinary day to death within days, after coming in contact with a contaminated door handle, which led to an ear infection that eventually penetrated her brain, according to Vanderhoff. She views it as a preventable loss, and thus began exploring ways to fight germs that exist so prevalently on commonly-used touchpoints.

In 2019, Vanderhoff merged her innovative and creative skills, aiming to make a difference in the germ-contracting realm to try and mitigate losses such as the one of her friend. This meant embarking in an area of business that was relatively new to her. She and her husband Chris Hickey “tinkered around in the garage, put some parts together,” Vanderhoff said. “We’re not engineers, we’re not scientists—we’re just very resourceful people.”

The result, after much trial and error is the GermPass, a decontamination chamber with UVC light for public touchpoints, launched by Vanderhoff’s company MicroLumix. The couple put in $3 million to dive into the research and development and manufacturing, according to Vanderhoff. Fast forward to February of this year, as germ spreading and infectious disease continues to be a widespread concern, they launched the technology. Now the company is partnering with Crothall Healthcare, a healthcare support services company whose leaders plan to incorporate the device in all their facilities and eventually promote it in their 620 nationwide accounts.

Vanderhoff, though not from the medical field herself, was aware that hands, in direct contact with touchpoints, can carry many germs—with an average of 3,200 different germs transferred through contact with contaminated hands or surfaces. And some of those germs can lead to infections. Tackling touchpoints seemed like a fair shot, as “many communicable diseases are transferred by touch, by the hands,” according to Dr. Chanu Rhee, M.D., an infectious disease physician and associate hospital epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. And it’s possible that staph infections, which can be spread by the hands, can lead to invasive infections and in some severe cases could lead to death, Rhee said. It depends on the bug, but that’s a reason good hand washing can make a difference in infection prevention and control, he added.

Vanderhoff, who has a professional background in consulting and marketing and a history of forming start-up companies with her husband, now serves as the COO of MicroLumix. She points to her proficiency in connecting with businesses as well as “the drive to be able to source things” as strengths that guided them through the development process.

But sourcing and communication beyond the couple’s garage came after much trial and error that consumed the early days of the GermPass. On figuring out what kind of a material and mechanics would be buildable, the couple would buy parts, put them together, and often asked in the end, “what do we do with it?” followed by, “I don’t know. Let’s Google it.” Searching technicalities of putting pieces together helped them out, including how to install sensor-activated doors that open and close—inspired by garage doors and some garbage cans. The product had to close because it has to be sterile, Vanderhoff said. The process led her to “troubleshoot, draw stuff out, order some parts, glue things together.”

Eventually, with the help of a neighbor and Navy veteran with electronics experience, she embedded a trash can with UVC light. UVC radiation is a disinfectant known to reduce the spread of bacteria, according to the FDA, and has been proven “to destroy the outer protein coating of the SARS-Coronavirus,” though the FDA lays out potential safety risks. For Vanderhoff’s product the power came from a de-commissioned drone battery. Then, after buying a portable ATP germ testing device, the road was clear to test the germ-killing chamber’s ability.

After reaching a point where they figured out the components and conceptually designed how the system would work, Vanderhoff utilized her talent of sourcing to locate engineers for the lighting and design sides, and had them work on constructing the product she had visualized.

Targeting healthcare facilities has been a priority of Vanderhoff’s from early on. On Crothall Healthcare’s investment in the technology, Crothall National Director of Standardization, Innovation and Global Support Eric Anderson explained, “this affects patient experience knowing the hospitals are doing everything they can to protect their patients, visitors and staff.” The GermPass will also be used on door handle units of all patient rooms and other office doors at eight locations of Florida’s Angel Kids Pediatrics starting at the end of August, according to the Dr. Ashraf Affan, chairman of the center.

Vanderhoff hopes her technology can one day help serve other touchpoints as well, such as elevator buttons, ATM machines and shopping carts.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 00:52:00 -0500 Monica Haider en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/monicahaider/2022/08/09/how-this-founder-developed-a-device-to-tackle-surface-germs-amid-ongoing-covid/
Killexams : Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and the 23 Other Richest People in the US

Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

The rich don't always get richer in tumultuous times like these, but some fare better than others. Take Elon Musk. The Tesla CEO and soon-to-be owner of social media giant Twitter grew his net worth by a staggering $68 billion from March 2021 to March 2022, according to Forbes' 36th Annual World's Billionaires List, placing him at No. 1 on the annual list for the first time ever.

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Some of America's richest people made their fortune as innovators. Think of Musk with his electric cars and space rockets. Others were born into fortunes built by forebearers with names like Mars, Walton and Koch. Then there are people like Bill Gates, who spends most of his time and effort on giving money away through philanthropy, yet somehow, keeps getting richer.

Using data from Forbes' Real-Time Billionaire List, GOBankingRates identified the 25 richest people in America and ranked them in ascending order from least rich to richest. The list also includes their ages, net worths and the source of their fortunes.

Bret Hartman/TED

Ray Dalio

Ray Dalio is the founder and co-chief investment officer at Bridgewater Associates. With $154 billion in assets under management, Bridgewater is the largest hedge fund company in the world.

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Patrick Semansky/AP/Shutterstock

Miriam Adelson

Miriam Adelson was married to Sheldon Adelson, former chair and CEO of the Las Vegas Sands, who died in 2021. Miriam, a medical doctor specializing in addiction, now owns over half of the Sands. The company has a $48 billion market capitalization.

Larry Busacca / Getty Images

Ken Griffin

Ken Griffin turned his penchant for trading into a $39 billion hedge fund after founding Citadel Securities in 1990. The University of Chicago named its economics department after Griffin following his $150 million donation.

Mark Lennihan/AP

Jim Simons

A former math professor and department chair at Stony Brook University, Jim Simons founded hedge fund firm Renaissance Technologies in 1982. Simons is still involved in the company's operations over a decade after he formally retired.

Roger Askew/The Oxford Union/REX/Shutterstock

Stephen Schwarzman

Stephen Schwarzman is cofounder of the private equity firm Blackstone, which has $684 billion in assets. Although his cofounder, Peter Peterson, retired after the company went public in 2007, Schwarzman still serves as chair and CEO.

Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

MacKenzie Scott

  • U.S. wealth rank: 20

  • Overall wealth rank: 40

  • Net worth: $31.2 billion

  • Age: 52

  • Source of income: Amazon

Mackenzie Scott's 2019 divorce from Amazon boss Jeff Bezos made the author and former hedge fund employee one of the richest people on Earth. She immediately put her newfound wealth to good use, becoming one of the world's most prolific philanthropists in that short time alone.

RON SACHS/POOL/EPA-EFE

Jacqueline Mars

  • U.S. wealth rank: 18 (tie)

  • Overall wealth rank: 36 (tie)

  • Net worth: $32.8 billion

  • Age: 82

  • Source of income: Candy, pet food

John Mars' only living sibling is Jacqueline Mars. The company they inherited is famous for candy, but it's also a pet food giant with brands like Whiskas and Pedigree in its portfolio.

Ekaterina79 / Getty Images

John Mars

  • U.S. wealth rank: 18 (tie)

  • Overall wealth rank: 36 (tie)

  • Net worth: $32.8 billion

  • Age: 86

  • Source of income: Candy, pet food

One of the only billionaires whose name makes you hungry, John Mars is the grandson of candy magnate Frank Mars. He and his two siblings inherited about a third of the famous sweets empire each.

Ethan Miller / Getty Images

Phil Knight and Family

Phil Knight co-founded Nike and oversaw its ascent to the pinnacle of the global athletic shoes and apparel industry. He formed what would become Nike with his old track coach with an investment of $500 each in 1964.

Richard Drew/AP

Michael Dell

Michael Dell struck it rich with the direct-order computer company that bears his name, and when Dell merged with EMT in 2016, the $60 billion deal was the largest tech acquisition in history. His side hustle is MSD Capital, which owns a portfolio of restaurants and hotels.

Mary Altaffer/AP/Shutterstock

Julia Koch and Family

  • U.S. wealth rank: 14 (tied)

  • Overall wealth rank: 21 (tied)

  • Net worth: $61.4 billion

  • Age: 60

  • Source of income: Koch Industries

Along with her three children, Julia Koch inherited roughly 42 percent of Koch Industries when her husband, David Koch, died in 2019. She previously worked in the fashion industry.

Gavin Peters / Wikimedia Commons

Charles Koch

  • U.S. wealth rank: 14 (tied)

  • Overall wealth rank: 21 (tied)

  • Net worth: $61.4 billion

  • Age: 86

  • Source of income: Koch Industries

Charles Koch is known not only as a billionaire businessman, but as a heavyweight in the political donor class. Since 1967, he has served as chairman and CEO of Koch Industries, the company his father Fred Koch founded in 1940 after developing a new way to produce gasoline.

WESLEY HITT / Flickr.com

Rob Walton

The oldest son of legendary Walmart founder Sam Walton, Rob Walton took the mantle when the elder Walton died in 1992. Rob Walton and the rest of Sam Walton's heirs together own half of the stock of the company their father founded.

Joe Schildhorn/BFA.com/REX/Shutterstock

Alice Walton

The renegade of the Walmart heirs, Alice Walton is Sam Walton's only daughter. Unlike her siblings, company life was not for her. She pursued a career as an art curator and museum founder, instead.

WESLEY HITT / Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

Jim Walton

Sam Walton's youngest son is Jim Walton, who turned his seat on the company's board over to his own son, Steuart, in 2016. Instead, he serves as chairman of Arvest Bank, which--along with its $20 billion in assets--belongs to his family, as well.

David Ramos / Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg

Mark Zuckerberg built Facebook into the world's biggest social network, but he also used the company to acquire an astonishing collection of other companies. Most recently, Zuckerberg became the youngest person ever to cross $100 billion in personal wealth when Facebook-owned Instagram launched Reels as a competitor to TikTok in 2020. Facebook's name changed to Meta in 2021.

rblfmr / Shutterstock.com

Michael Bloomberg

Michael Bloomberg built his enormous fortune from the ground up, starting his Wall Street career at the entry level before building a financial empire that was based on media and technology. His second act was a political career that included a long run as the mayor of New York City.

Francois Durand / Getty Images

Steve Ballmer

Stanford dropout Steve Ballmer joined Microsoft in 1980 as employee No. 30. As CEO from 2000-2014, he shepherded the company through the dot-com bust, the rise of Google, and Apple's most transformative era of innovation.

James Duncan Davidson / Flickr.com

Sergey Brin

Sergey Brin is no longer the president of Google's parent company Alphabet, but he remains a member of the board and a controlling shareholder. Along with Larry Page, he co-founded Google in 1998 while studying at Stanford.

Kimberly White / Getty Images

Larry Ellison

Larry Ellison still owns more than one-third of Oracle, the software giant he co-founded. He also sits on the board of Tesla, a position he has held since 2018 when he bought 3 million shares of Elon Musk's company.

Kimberly White / Getty Images

Larry Page

Like Sergey Brin, Larry Page was pursuing an advanced computer science degree at Stanford when he co-founded Google in 1998. He was instrumental in developing the PageRank algorithm that made it possible to search the early Internet. Although he stepped down as CEO of Alphabet, he remains a controlling shareholder.

Daniel Zuchnik / WireImage

Warren Buffett

  • U.S. wealth rank: 4

  • Overall wealth rank: 5

  • Net worth: $110.5 billion

  • Age: 91

  • Source of income: Berkshire Hathaway, self made

Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway owns dozens of companies and brands, many of which, like Duracell and Geico, are household names. He also happens to be one of the most successful stock investors of all time.

JStone / Shutterstock.com

Bill Gates

  • U.S. wealth rank: 3

  • Overall wealth rank: 4

  • Net worth: $125.1 billion

  • Age: 66

  • Source of income: Microsoft, self made

Bill Gates spent the first part of his life amassing one of the world's greatest fortunes and now seems intent on giving it away. Although he rose to power, prominence, and wealth as the founder of Microsoft, he is now best known for his philanthropic efforts through the world's largest charity, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Jeff Bezos

  • U.S. wealth rank: 2

  • Overall wealth rank: 3

  • Net worth: $133.4 billion

  • Age: 58

  • Source of income: Amazon, self made

Bezos amassed a fortune from Amazon, the e-commerce powerhouse he started out of his garage in 1994. Bezos stepped down as CEO in 2021 but still serves as executive chairman. Other ventures include The Washington Post and Blue Origin. A drop in Amazon's stock price and donations Bezos made to charity bumped him out of the No. 1 spot on Forbes' annual billionaires list for the first time in four years.

Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock.com

Elon Musk

  • U.S. wealth rank: 1

  • Overall wealth rank: 1

  • Net worth: $222.6 billion

  • Age: 50

  • Source of income: Tesla, SpaceX, self made

Elon Musk, the cofounder and CEO of electric vehicle maker Tesla and CEO of SpaceX, might acquire a new title in the coming months: temporary CEO of Twitter. Musk's takeover attempt is expected to result in a $44 billion purchase of the social media platform. He currently owns a 9.1% stake in the company in addition to a 21% stake in Tesla. SpaceX, Musk's private space company, is worth $100 billion.

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Daria Uhlig contributed to the reporting for this article.

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and the 23 Other Richest People in the US

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 02:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/finance/elon-musk-jeff-bezos-23-143059042.html
Killexams : Activating an Archive of Black Life in Brooklyn

On a bike path in downtown Brooklyn, a half-hour walk from Pratt Institute and just off a nexus of streets that converge at the Barclays Center, a green sign with the logo of a bike says Weeksville, with an arrow pointing east. The few buildings that remain of the historic self-sustaining Black community founded in 1838—shortly after New York State’s 1827 abolition of slavery—are a twenty-minute bike ride away and the signage is new. It underscores Weeksville Heritage Center’s accurate inclusion in New York City’s esteemed Cultural Institutions Group, an honor that increases access to funding as well as cultural cachet.

For a pair of Pratt faculty members teaching architecture, Jeffrey Hogrefe, professor of humanities and media studies and cofounder of the Architecture Writing Program, and Scott Ruff, adjunct associate professor of architecture, the new designation has its pros and cons. Co-creators of the project Pratt Weeksville Archive—an oral history initiative developed in collaboration with the Weeksville Heritage Center, community partners, and Pratt students—Hogrefe and Ruff aim to contribute to the recentering of the area’s Black history and culture in the public imagination, and support its present-day residents in activating the story of this place for generations to come.

Founded by free persons and formerly enslaved persons, Weeksville once comprised seven civic institutions, actively participated in city government, and served as a destination on the Underground Railroad. This rich heritage makes it a vital resource for imagining the future, asserts Hogrefe. “We feel that once it’s realized the extent to which this self-sustaining 19th-century community really flourished, it can become a model for a 21st-century self-sustaining Central Brooklyn,” he says. “It has a lot to offer us in the radical imagination.”

Scholars from Pratt have played a part in clarifying Weeksville’s past since the former settlement was brought to light five decades ago. Housing stock from the former community was documented in the 1970s as a result of an aerial survey by Pratt Institute professor James Hurley and pilot Joseph Haynes in 1968 and the efforts of local activists. Weeksville has slowly regained historical footing in the area ever since.

An archaeological dig in Weeksville in the 1970s. From the archive of Weeksville Heritage Center

The city’s interest in Weeksville advances attempts to determine a set of geographical boundaries for the area, markers of a thriving, aspirational Black utopia that was lost to forces of anti-Black violence, including redlining and urban renewal, and erased from maps by the end of the 19th century. However, as Ruff and Hogrefe note, future ownership of the name and the place is precarious. “If you look at the histories of Black settlement in the US, it’s a constant struggle with anti-Black violence. Now, gentrification is possibly the most silent and deadly of all because it doesn’t announce itself. It’s happening all over the US.”

Ruff underscores the urgency. “Real estate people have started to co-opt the term Weeksville. Two years ago, I could go on Google and there was no Weeksville. Now, Weeksville is designated as a place and they’re using it as a way to market it. It’s kind of a foot race to see who can capture the term.”

In their work, Ruff and Hogrefe consider how an active archive of oral history and critical ethnography might ward off the damaging effects of such interests. “It is up to us to encourage the stories of those who know the place and others like us to make it clear that this is a historic space that needs to be protected from predatory development,” notes Ruff.

Aerial view of Weeksville Heritage Center, in the center foreground, and its surrounding neighborhoods. Photo by Julian Olivas; courtesy of Caples Jefferson Architects

To that end, students in Pratt’s undergraduate architecture program and graduate library and information science program have been instrumental in developing the Pratt Weeksville Archive oral history and critical ethnography project. Launched in the fall of 2020 and supported by a Taconic Fellowship from the Pratt Center for Community Development, the project has engaged students from the undergraduate architecture research studio Connecting to the Archive, which Hogrefe and Ruff teach, and Research Assistants, an elective course for fourth- and fifth-year architecture students to work with a faculty member on an approved research topic, along with a graduate student with a special focus in archives. The team’s ongoing efforts are organized around the encouragement of a living, digital archive of Weeksville community members’ stories: an organic entity that is forward thinking while looking to the past and engaging the present.

The project’s aim is to establish an ongoing, accessible, public resource that can be used by Pratt students, Weeksville community members, and others to galvanize community networks, build community strength, and subsequently stimulate political will and Black empowerment.

“These are aspirational goals for us that we’re setting at the onset based on studying other archives and how they work in communities,” says Hogrefe. “We’re particularly interested in critical ethnography, which is an understanding of the positionality of the ethnographer and the role of the participant in the co-creation of the archive. Scott worked in New Orleans and I’ve done work in Oakland and Berkeley before in similar settings, and we know, from looking at them historically, the benefits of storytelling, oral history, and critical ethnography.”

Aerial photo of Weeksville Heritage Center by Julian Olivas. Courtesy of Caples Jefferson Architects

Ruff and Hogrefe’s initial collaboration with Weeksville began while they were doing research for their book In Search of African American Space: Redressing Racism (Lars Müller, 2020). Their conversations with the Weeksville Heritage Center evolved into a shared interest in opening up Weeksville’s existing archive to the public and finding ways to activate it. “We saw an opportunity there to say, as architects, part of what we do is activate space as power relations. It’s part of our process. It is not just designing buildings and putting them up,” says Ruff. 

For the Pratt Weeksville Archive, Pratt students participated in that process from its foundational stages. Fifth-year architecture students Joseph Shiveley and Jared Rice, a member of Pratt’s chapter of the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students, prepared by reviewing historical maps of the area. “One of our interests from the beginning was how Weeksville went from being one of the biggest self-sustaining Black communities in the country to one that had been very much erased from maps. When we look at the 1950s, you don’t even see Weeksville on the map,” Rice says, noting that a variety of factors contributed to its erasure over time, under the pressures of urbanization. “We used maps and [looked at] spaces to try to understand how that happened, how it transitioned, so that it could inform the conversations we would have later.”

A map issued in 1869 shows Hunterfly Road, which was erased from maps by the 20th century, and building footprints along its length (right), as well as two historic Weeksville institutions, Public Colored School No. 2 and Berean Baptist Church, indicated as African Baptist Church. Weeksville encompassed the area around Hunterfly Road to the west of Ralph Avenue, roughly within the borders of today’s Atlantic Avenue, Kingston Avenue, and Eastern Parkway. Illustration uses a map image from the Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library, “Sheet 3: Map encompassing Bedford Stuyvesant, Crown Heights, and Weeksville,” New York Public Library Digital Collections.

Sadie Hope-Gund, a graduate student in library and information science, undertook another preparatory process, which Ruff describes as anthropological detective work. Her work resulted in an in-depth annotated bibliography covering the history of the neighborhood, the history of New York City Housing Authority’s presence in the area—public housing that replaced several bulldozed original Weeksville blocks—and radical oral history practices.

Hope-Gund also led conversations to help the team think through the technical aspects of the archives setup. “The archive as a concept is very interesting, but people don’t know much about the nitty gritty,” she says, remarking that part of her work was laying out options for a digital archive. “What are the genuine steps to uploading this to a website, what is it going to be hosted on, how is it going to be organized?” 

The framing of the project also presented an opportunity to engage with questions around the impact of community-based research work. “What does it mean for an architect to do ethnography in a way that contributes to the community, rather than just drawing data from the community to design a project, which is often how architectural research is done,” says Hogrefe.

Presence is a significant part of laying the groundwork for that kind of reciprocal relationship. While the pandemic may have presented its share of delays and setbacks, the Pratt team made the most of the opportunities they had, such as a street fair outside Bethel Tabernacle African Methodist Episcopal Church, a community partner on the oral history project, last summer. “The one time we were all able to meet in person at a church event, it was really good for us to physically be there and show that we cared and were doing this project about the neighborhood,” Hope-Gund reflects. “That was definitely impactful, thinking about Pratt’s position as an institution in Brooklyn and what it means to really reach out to people and be a part of different communities in Brooklyn.”

Pratt Weeksville Archive team members at a street fair at Bethel Tabernacle in 2020: (left to right) Susan Weller, wife of Jeffrey Hogrefe; Jeffrey Hogrefe; Ronald Johnson; Obden Mondésir; Scott Ruff; Jared Rice; and Sadie Hope-Gund. Photo courtesy of Pratt Weeksville Archive

At the in-person event last summer, Hope-Gund worked with Obden Mondésir, Weeksville Heritage Center’s oral history manager at the time, to collect the testimonies of Bethel Tabernacle members Faye Robinson and Kay Robbins, who have both attended for approximately 50 years alongside generations of family. In their oral history sessions, both women celebrated the people and the family-oriented, friendly, and passionate nature of the church community. These kinds of anecdotes and impressions form the collective memory that surrounds the story of Weeksville.      

Ronald Johnson, the church’s historian, says that you can’t talk about Weeksville without talking about Bethel Tabernacle. The church, established in 1847, was one of the institutions that anchored the community in its early days and remains a vibrant center of activity. Johnson was introduced to Ruff and Hogrefe when he reached out to Weeksville about their archive as he was doing historical research on Bethel Tabernacle, which has an extensive physical archive of its own. This forged a connection he describes as essential. “I believe that it’s a necessity for neighborhood institutions such as Weeksville Heritage Center, our church, even Berean Baptist Church, which is across the street from Weeksville [Heritage Center], and Pratt to band together and collaborate, because we share commonalities in our missions that would be helpful to one another. What I hope for is a further banding together of the institutions,” says Johnson.

Vanessa Smith, a Bethel Tabernacle member with deep roots in the neighborhood, says her hope is that the community will get to know the legacy of Weeksville. “People live there but they really don’t know how historical Weeksville is or the history of the area,” she says.

For Raymond Codrington, Weeksville Heritage Center’s president and CEO, the Pratt Weeksville Archive is significant to bridging that divide. “I think Pratt’s work plays an extremely important role in amplifying the history of Weeksville in ways that draw attention to how race, resistance, and community building intersect with neighborhood change,” Codrington remarks.

A gathering of Weeksville community members in the 1970s. From the archive of Weeksville Heritage Center

To date, the project team from Pratt has completed six oral histories, and more are planned with the participation of Bethel Tabernacle, local community garden members, and new Pratt team members Caleb Joshua (CJ) Spring and Cierra Francillon, both fifth-year architecture students. 

To add further longevity to the work, the Pratt team has created a framework for using cell phones to engage and empower community members to interview one another, establishing an armature to help sustain the voice of the community over the long term. This is also a means of ensuring that authorship of the narrative of this space is in the hands of its residents.

“Settler colonialism is still alive today. The term postcolonial is a misnomer. I think the decolonizing movement is more assertive in looking at how the structures of colonialism can be taken apart. That’s been part of our project,” says Hogrefe. “We feel that we’ve started something that will ripple throughout the community. It will support communities that care about themselves and are able to go to the community board and participate politically, especially as we begin to work with youth who have the energy to do that.”

That youth engagement is happening in initiatives like Co-Designing Brooklyn’s Hidden Heritage, which Ruff helped develop, connecting students at Weeksville-adjacent Medgar Evers High School with undergraduate and graduate architecture students at Pratt. For young Black residents of Brooklyn, Ruff says, he wants them to understand history so they can imagine a future. “This is your place that was purchased for you. That was a sanctuary for you. And you are the legacy and the future of Weeksville and this idealized place,” he says. “How do we continue that or honor that? If we can recover it and begin the process of continuing to build the place, then there will be more political strength for the people of Weeksville as they come together under an idea of place and of history, and of legacy. That’s really the empowering aspect of it.”

Weeksville today: The Weeksville Heritage Center is a hub for events, exhibitions, and public programming as well as archival projects and other initiatives that celebrate the past, present, and future of the community. Photo from the 2021 Harvest Festival by Dominique Sindayiganza

For anyone visiting the Weeksville Heritage Center—designed by Caples Jefferson Architects, where Pratt alumnus Everardo Jefferson, BID ’68, is a principal—there is a tactile quality to the building’s facade. A sense of layered texture generated through a juxtaposition of materials—wood, cool blue and gray stones, glass that reflects the sky, and elegant brass gates. Its low height does not impose a sense of grandiosity and its interior spaces are warm and reference African forms. Outside a grass lawn and interpretative landscape, designed by Elizabeth Kennedy, connect the new contemporary structure to the rediscovered 19th-century homes known as the Historic Hunterfly Road Houses, named for the Lenape trail they were built along. In quiet moments, a powerful meditative sense of sacred Black and Indigenous space is undeniable.

The land and the built environment speak to a Black continuum that runs from the utopian goals of Weeksville’s founder and residents in the 19th century through to the aims of the Heritage Center to bring the story of Weeksville into the consciousness of Brooklyn today and into the future. Where Pratt entered that story in the 1970s and has continued to weave through in the work of alumni and faculty engaging with the space, through the Pratt Weeksville Archive, there is now a chance to contribute to the instrumentality of Weeksville’s transhistorical presence through diverse, intergenerational collaborative practices.

For Ruff, the Heritage Center—like the archive surrounding the oral history project—embodies an ancestral presence, simultaneously futuristic, contemporary, and ancient. “It has aspects of all of those things within it,” he says, “and so it becomes a very powerful space for us to center on and for us to galvanize the community to say new things can happen here—in the name of Weeksville.”

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 02:50:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.pratt.edu/prattfolio/stories/activating-an-archive-of-black-life-in-brooklyn/
Killexams : Wineburg and Ziv: Gen Z’s (mis)information platforms

On TikTok you’re liable to find restaurant recommendations, lip-syncing snippets and false claims stating that COVID-19 vaccines contain aborted fetal tissue and that crisis actors faked the Uvalde school shooting. TikTok, along with Instagram, is where Gen Z searches for information and entertainment. They often come up with a blurry mix between fact and fiction.

The internet is how Gen Z becomes informed — and too often misinformed — about the world. Nearly 40% of this generation, young people born between the late 1990s and early 2000s, prefers using TikTok and Instagram as their search engines, according to recently released internal data from Google.

These platforms showcase short videos, which is great for a new dance move or a fun meme. But they can be just as effective in spreading videos conveying misinformation and conspiracy theories. Just because Gen Z grew up with social media doesn’t mean they know how to evaluate the information they find there.

Our educational system has been slow to respond, often providing students with dated strategies for determining online credibility such as dwelling on a website’s “About” page or checking to see when the information was published or posted. Analog strategies like these are the equivalent of teaching 16-year-olds to drive a Tesla by giving them a manual for a horse-drawn carriage. Education must meet students where they’re at. Like it or not, that address is now on social media.

After we administered a 2016 survey with colleagues at the Stanford History Education Group, we summarized students’ ability to separate digital fact from fiction in one word: “bleak.” In the intervening years, fake news and misinformation have dominated the national conversation. But awareness alone doesn’t solve the problem.

In a 2021 follow-up, our research group surveyed over 3,000 Gen Zers, asking them to evaluate a grainy video that claimed to provide evidence of U.S. voter fraud. The video was actually shot in Russia. Students could find this out by searching online for the words “Democrat 2016 voter fraud video,” which quickly brings up links to Snopes and the BBC debunking the claim. Yet the majority of those surveyed were duped, concluding that the video constituted “strong evidence” of American election tampering.

We can’t rely on social media platforms to solve the problem of misinformation — they can’t even be trusted to police themselves. Analysis by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue found that 58% of TikTok videos relating to COVID-19 vaccines lacked warning banners, despite the company’s commitment to flag vaccine-related content. Poor information always seems to find a way to slither through platform safeguards.

Media literacy that will empower younger generations needs to be more than an appendage to today’s school curricula. The California State Department of Education’s Civic Engagement Roadmap, for example, nods to “media literacy” as one of 10 “promising practices,” alongside “performance assessments” and “service learning,” to prepare Gen Z to become “agents of positive change.”

The implementation of guidelines like these, however, is left to the discretion of individual teachers who, already overworked, often pass the responsibility on to others or dispense with it in a lesson or two. Teaching students to discern reliable information from inaccuracies or outright lies is too important to be left to individual discretion. In an information age, digital literacy should be the foundation to practically everything schools teach.

We can’t stop Gen Z from relying on social media for information. Nor can we kid ourselves that a presentation by a teacher or the school librarian matches the scale of the misinformation challenge. If we want to reach today’s youth, we must use the tools they can relate to — including TikTok videos — to teach the content we deem important. While doing so, we can sharpen students’ ability to identify misinformation.

Math classes, for example, could be retooled to help students understand how algorithms curate the content they see on social media platforms. Teachers can make clear how TikTok and Instagram’s algorithms sacrifice credibility in order to keep users’ eyeballs glued to the screen.

Economics courses can help students understand the platforms’ business models in our “attention economy,” and how profit motives align with the promotion of viral misinformation.

English courses could illustrate how small variations in search terms generate different results. Search “vaccines” on TikTok and you’ll be directed to information from the World Health Organization. Try “vaccines heavy metals” and you’ll find a slew of videos spouting spurious claims.

The transformation of the curriculum must include all areas of study. It’s already happening in Illinois, where some innovative teachers are integrating digital literacy into core school subjects.

Today’s young people spend seven to eight hours a day online, somewhere around 3,000 hours a year. The challenge of identifying online misinformation will not be solved with any single strategy. It will take a curriculum overhaul to truly help Gen Z distinguish fact from fiction on the platforms where they spend their time.

Sam Wineburg is a professor of education at Stanford University and founder of the Stanford History Education Group, where Nadav Ziv is a research associate. From the Los Angeles Times.

You can send letters to the editor to letters@pressdemocrat.com.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 19:02:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/opinion/wineburg-and-ziv-gen-zs-misinformation-platforms/
Killexams : Commentary: What happens when TikTok is your main source of news and information

On TikTok you’re liable to find restaurant recommendations, lip-syncing snippets and false claims stating that COVID-19 vaccines contain aborted fetal tissue and that crisis actors faked the Uvalde school shooting. TikTok, along with Instagram, is where Gen Z searches for information and entertainment. They often come up with a blurry mix between fact and fiction.

The internet is how Gen Z becomes informed — and too often misinformed — about the world. Nearly 40% of this generation, young people born between the late 1990s and early 2000s, prefers using TikTok and Instagram as their search engines, according to recently released internal data from Google.

These platforms showcase short videos, which is great for a new dance move or a fun meme. But they can be just as effective in spreading videos conveying misinformation and conspiracy theories. Just because Gen Z grew up with social media doesn’t mean they know how to evaluate the information they find there.

Our educational system has been slow to respond, often providing students with dated strategies for determining online credibility such as dwelling on a website’s “About” page or checking to see when the information was published or posted. Analog strategies like these are the equivalent of teaching 16-year-olds to drive a Tesla by giving them a manual for a horse-drawn carriage. Education must meet students where they’re at. Like it or not, that address is now on social media.

After we administered a 2016 survey with colleagues at the Stanford History Education Group, we summarized students’ ability to separate digital fact from fiction in one word: “bleak.” In the intervening years, fake news and misinformation have dominated the national conversation. But awareness alone doesn’t solve the problem.

In a 2021 follow-up, our research group surveyed over 3,000 Gen Zers, asking them to evaluate a grainy video that claimed to provide evidence of U.S. voter fraud. The video was actually shot in Russia. Students could find this out by searching online for the words “Democrat 2016 voter fraud video,” which quickly brings up links to Snopes and the BBC debunking the claim. Yet the majority of those surveyed were duped, concluding that the video constituted “strong evidence” of American election tampering.

We can’t rely on social media platforms to solve the problem of misinformation — they can’t even be trusted to police themselves. Analysis by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue found that 58% of TikTok videos relating to COVID-19 vaccines lacked warning banners, despite the company’s commitment to flag vaccine-related content.

Media literacy that will empower younger generations needs to be more than an appendage to today’s school curricula. The California State Department of Education’s Civic Engagement Roadmap, for example, nods to “media literacy” as one of 10 “promising practices,” alongside “performance assessments” and “service learning,” to prepare Gen Z to become “agents of positive change.”

The implementation of guidelines like these, however, is left to the discretion of individual teachers who, already overworked, often pass the responsibility on to others or dispense with it in a lesson or two. Teaching students to discern reliable information from inaccuracies or outright lies is too important to be left to individual discretion. In an information age, digital literacy should be the foundation to practically everything schools teach.

We can’t stop Gen Z from relying on social media for information. Nor can we kid ourselves that a presentation by a teacher or the school librarian matches the scale of the misinformation challenge. If we want to reach today’s youth, we must use the tools they can relate to — including TikTok videos — to teach the content we deem important. While doing so, we can sharpen students’ ability to identify misinformation.

Math classes, for example, could be retooled to help students understand how algorithms curate the content they see on social media platforms. Teachers can make clear how TikTok and Instagram’s algorithms sacrifice credibility in order to keep users’ eyeballs glued to the screen.

The transformation of the curriculum must include all areas of study. It’s already happening in Illinois, where some innovative teachers are integrating digital literacy into core school subjects.

Today’s young people spend seven to eight hours a day online, somewhere around 3,000 hours a year. The challenge of identifying online misinformation will not be solved with any single strategy. It will take a curriculum overhaul to truly help Gen Z distinguish fact from fiction on the platforms where they spend their time.

Sam Wineburg is a professor of education at Stanford University and founder of the Stanford History Education Group, where Nadav Ziv is a research associate.

Sun, 07 Aug 2022 20:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.yakimaherald.com/opinion/commentary-what-happens-when-tiktok-is-your-main-source-of-news-and-information/article_c8892123-7222-5a17-a45c-65ea9bd4ba64.html
Killexams : Gen Z needs help telling fact from fiction

On TikTok you’re liable to find restaurant recommendations, lip-syncing snippets and false claims stating that COVID-19 vaccines contain aborted fetal tissue and that crisis actors faked the Uvalde school shooting. TikTok, along with Instagram, is where Gen Z searches for information and entertainment. They often come up with a blurry mix between fact and fiction.

The internet is how Gen Z becomes informed — and too often misinformed — about the world. Nearly 40% of this generation, young people born between the late 1990s and early 2000s, prefers using TikTok and Instagram as their search engines, according to recently released internal data from Google.

These platforms showcase short videos, which is great for a new dance move or a fun meme. But they can be just as effective in spreading videos conveying misinformation and conspiracy theories. Just because Gen Z grew up with social media doesn’t mean they know how to evaluate the information they find there.

Our educational system has been slow to respond, often providing students with dated strategies for determining online credibility such as dwelling on a website’s “About” page or checking to see when the information was published or posted. Analog strategies like these are the equivalent of teaching 16-year-olds to drive a Tesla by giving them a manual for a horse-drawn carriage. Education must meet students where they’re at. Like it or not, that address is now on social media.

We can’t rely on social media platforms to solve the problem of misinformation — they can’t even be trusted to police themselves.

Analysis by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue found that 58% of TikTok videos relating to COVID-19 vaccines lacked warning banners, despite the company’s commitment to flag vaccine-related content. Poor information always seems to find a way to slither through platform safeguards.

Media literacy that will empower younger generations needs to be more than an appendage to today’s school curricula. Teaching students to discern reliable information from inaccuracies, or outright lies, is too important to be left to individual discretion. In an information age, digital literacy should be the foundation to practically everything schools teach.

We can’t stop Gen Z from relying on social media for information. Nor can we kid ourselves that a presentation by a teacher or the school librarian matches the scale of the misinformation challenge. If we want to reach today’s youth, we must use the tools they can relate to — including TikTok videos — to teach the content we deem important. While doing so, we can sharpen students’ ability to identify misinformation.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 20:25:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.sfgate.com/opinion/article/Gen-Z-needs-help-telling-fact-from-fiction-17354307.php
Killexams : Sam Wineburg: What happens when you get your news from TikTok No result found, try new keyword!On TikTok you’re liable to find restaurant recommendations, lip-syncing snippets and false claims stating that COVID-19 vaccines contain aborted fetal tissue and that crisis actors faked the Uvalde ... Sun, 07 Aug 2022 16:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/sam-wineburg-what-happens-when-you-get-your-news-from-tiktok/ar-AA10q8Yd Killexams : Sam Wineburg and Nadav Ziv column: What happens when TikTok is your main source of news

On TikTok you’re liable to find restaurant recommendations, lip-syncing snippets and false claims stating that COVID-19 vaccines contain aborted fetal tissue and that crisis actors faked the Uvalde school shooting. TikTok, along with Instagram, is where members of Gen Z search for information and entertainment. They often come up with a blurry mix between fact and fiction.

The internet is how Gen Z becomes informed — and, too often, misinformed — about the world. Nearly 40% of this generation, young people born between the late 1990s and early 2000s, prefers using TikTok and Instagram as their search engines, according to recently released internal data from Google.

These platforms showcase short videos, which is great for a new dance move or a fun meme. But they can be just as effective in spreading videos conveying misinformation and conspiracy theories. Just because members of Gen Z grew up with social media doesn’t mean they know how to evaluate the information they find there.

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Our educational system has been slow to respond, often providing students with dated strategies for determining online credibility such as dwelling on a website’s “About” page or checking to see when the information was published or posted. Analog strategies like these are the equivalent of teaching 16-year-olds to drive a Tesla by giving them a manual for a horse-drawn carriage.

Education must meet students where they’re at. Like it or not, that address now is on social media.

After we administered a 2016 survey with colleagues at the Stanford History Education Group, we summarized students’ ability to separate digital fact from fiction in one word: “bleak.” In the intervening years, fake news and misinformation have dominated the national conversation. But awareness alone doesn’t solve the problem.

In a 2021 follow-up, our research group surveyed more than 3,000 Gen Zers, asking them to evaluate a grainy video that claimed to provide evidence of U.S. voter fraud. The video actually was shot in Russia.

Students could find this out by searching online for the words “Democrat 2016 voter fraud video,” which quickly brings up links to Snopes and the BBC debunking the claim. Yet the majority of those surveyed were duped, concluding the video constituted “strong evidence” of American election tampering.

We can’t rely on social media platforms to solve the problem of misinformation — they can’t even be trusted to police themselves. Analysis by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue found that 58% of TikTok videos relating to COVID-19 vaccines lacked warning banners, despite the company’s commitment to flag vaccine-related content. Poor information always seems to find a way to slither through platform safeguards.

Media literacy that will empower younger generations needs to be more than an appendage to today’s school curricula. The California State Department of Education’s Civic Engagement Roadmap, for example, nods to “media literacy” as one of 10 “promising practices,” alongside “performance assessments” and “service learning,” to prepare Gen Z to become “agents of positive change.”

The implementation of guidelines like these, however, is left to the discretion of individual teachers who, already overworked, often pass the responsibility on to others, or dispense with it in a lesson or two. Teaching students to discern reliable information from inaccuracies or outright lies is too important to be left to individual discretion. In an information age, digital literacy should be the foundation to practically everything schools teach.

We can’t stop Gen Z from relying on social media for information. Nor can we kid ourselves that a presentation by a teacher or the school librarian matches the scale of the misinformation challenge. If we want to reach today’s youth, we must use the tools they can relate to — including TikTok videos — to teach the content we deem important. While doing so, we can sharpen students’ ability to identify misinformation.

Math classes, for example, could be retooled to help students understand how algorithms curate the content they see on social media platforms. Teachers can make clear how TikTok and Instagram’s algorithms sacrifice credibility in order to keep users’ eyeballs glued to the screen.

Economics courses can help students understand the platforms’ business models in our “attention economy,” and how profit motives align with the promotion of viral misinformation.

English courses could illustrate how small variations in search terms generate different results. Search “vaccines” on TikTok and you’ll be directed to information from the World Health Organization. Try “vaccines heavy metals” and you’ll find a slew of videos spouting spurious claims.

The transformation of the curriculum must include all areas of study. It already is happening in Illinois, where some innovative teachers are integrating digital literacy into core school subjects.

Today’s young people spend seven to eight hours a day online, somewhere around 3,000 hours a year. The challenge of identifying online misinformation will not be solved with any single strategy. It will take a curriculum overhaul to truly help Gen Z distinguish fact from fiction on the platforms where they spend their time.

Sam Wineburg is a professor of education at Stanford University and founder of the Stanford History Education Group.

Nadav Ziv is a research associate at the Stanford History Education Group.

© 2022, Los Angeles Times

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency

Sun, 07 Aug 2022 06:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://richmond.com/opinion/columnists/sam-wineburg-and-nadav-ziv-column-what-happens-when-tiktok-is-your-main-source-of/article_6b8ea923-20de-5fd5-9ef4-5334c67e9d42.html
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