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The SANS Institute was founded in 1989 to provide IT security and administration information and vendor-neutral training on those subjects. Since its inception, SANS has trained more than 165,000 individuals via in-class courses, training events, and technical conferences held throughout the world; self-paced online training (called SANS OnDemand); and interactive virtual training (called SANS vLive).

Course subjects from the SANS Institute include security essentials, hacking techniques, intrusion detection and incident response, network defense, mobile device security, auditing, digital forensics and related security topics. The “information” component of SANS includes the SANS studying Room, an extensive library of downloadable security research documents; the Internet Storm Center, which monitors and reports on malicious attacks and provides weekly bulletins and alerts; free security policy templates; the CIS Critical Security Controls for cyber defense and more.

SANS formed the Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) program to act as the certification arm for its training courses, ensuring that individuals meet knowledge and skills standards in specific areas of IT security. More than 165,000 GIAC credentials have been issued. GIAC certifications are well known and highly respected among employers and the information security industry. Even the United States National Security Agency (NSA) recognizes GIAC certifications.

GIAC offers more than 30 security certifications across introductory, intermediate, advanced and expert levels. According to SANS, GIAC certifications are unique because “they measure specific skills and knowledge areas rather than general infosec knowledge.” That means a typical GIAC certification requires rigorous preparation and hands-on experience. That’s why SANS training comes highly recommended.

Note: Another component of SANS is the SANS Technology Institute, which offers one security-related master’s degree – the Information Security Engineering (MSISE). The SANS Technology Institute also offers five graduate certificate programs focused on Cybersecurity Engineering (CORE), Cyber Defense Operations, Incident Response, Industrial Control Systems Security, and Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking.

SANS GIAC certification tracks

GIAC certifications fall within six specific domains, each with its own certification track:

  • Cyber Defense: Boasting 12 credentials (10 of which are advanced certs), the Cyber Defense certification family is the largest of the SANS GIAC certification domains. Cyber defense certifications are geared to professionals who identify and defend against cybersecurity threats.
  • Industrial Control Systems (ICS): SANS GIAC offers three ISC certifications, one at the intermediate and two at the advanced levels. ISC certifications are geared toward control system engineers and other security professionals charged with cyber security for control system infrastructures and technology along with automation security.
  • Penetration Testing: SANS GIAC-certified pen-test professionals possess the skills necessary to perform tasks that include evaluating attack techniques and methods, recommending security best practices to prevent security incidents, and formulating plans to defend against security incidents when they occur. With seven credentials, Penetration Testing is the second largest certification domain. Credentials are offered for a variety of scenarios, including web applications, mobile devices, Python coding, wireless networks, ethical hacking and more.
  • Digital Forensics and Incident Response: This domain targets InfoSec professionals, including IT administrators, security engineers and security analysts. Also included are law enforcement and legal professionals who respond to security incidents and related cyber breaches, conduct forensic investigations, and examine and gather incident artifacts and related evidence.
  • Developer: Developer certifications are aimed at developers and anyone else interested in building secure programs and applications. Three certs are offered – Java programming, web applications and .NET programming.
  • Management and Leadership:  The management and leadership domain is focused on professionals who may have (or lack) technical skills but provide managerial or project management support. They are also instrumental in developing and implementing security policies on an organizationwide basis. These credentials include certs for auditors, project managers, CISOs, data security law and InfoSec professionals.

Another certification “category” is the pinnacle GIAC certification – namely, the GIAC Security Expert (GSE). Some industry officials consider the GSE to be the premier security-related certification available today. Whereas most GIAC certifications can be achieved by passing a single multiple-choice exam, the GSE test includes both a multiple-choice component and a hands-on lab.

SANS GIAC certification levels

SANS offers four levels of certifications, including introductory, intermediate, advanced and expert. The table below is a modified version of the GIAC certification roadmap,  which lists each certification by level and certification tracks.

Introductory Level

Cyber Defense

Intermediate Level

Cyber Defense

ICS

Penetration Testing

Digital Forensics and Incident Handling

Management and Leadership

Advanced Level

Cyber Defense

ICS

Penetration Testing

Digital Forensics and Incident Response

Developer

Management and Leadership

Other than the GSE, GIAC certifications require passing one test and have no prerequisites. That said, GIAC highly recommends SANS training courses, especially for candidates who don’t have adequate hands-on experience and aren’t able to self-study.

Once an application has been approved, candidates have four months to attempt the associated exam. (GIAC does not administer exams immediately upon conclusion of a training event; candidates must wait at least seven days to sit for the exam.) The cost of each GIAC exam is currently $1,899, which includes two practice exams. The lab test for the GSE is $2,459, and the written test is $499. (Note: Students can purchase and take an test as part of a training course, or they may purchase and take an test by itself.)

SANS GIAC certification renewal

To remain certified, credential holders must renew their GIAC certifications every four years by earning 36 continuing professional education (CPE) credits. CPE credits may be earned by completing approved training or certifications, participating in continuing education, publishing a technical paper, completing certain graduate-level courses, getting community or work experience or participating in cyber range activities. A renewal fee of $429 is also required.

GIAC certifications cover the gamut of job roles in IT security today. GIAC-certified professionals work as security analysts or specialists (two of the most common roles), information security engineers, network security admins, database administrators, developers, forensic specialists, risk managers and auditors.

Large organizations with security operations centers (SOCs) need SOC analysts, engineers and supervisors, as well as directors of cybersecurity. A bevy of companies also hire employees and consultants who perform incident response, penetration testing and the like.

With almost 314,000 security-related jobs open in the U.S. alone (and 3.5 million globally by 2021), a reasonably educated and experienced person stands a good chance of getting hired fairly quickly. Adding a security certification or two to your resume not only validates your skills, but it may get you noticed by a hiring manager or give you more leverage during salary negotiations.

SANS training courses and events vary in format and price, but candidates can expect to pay around $5,800 to $6,610 for a training course. Although the price tag is high, many candidates recommend SANS training for its quality and depth as well as its usefulness in eventually achieving GIAC certification. SANS instructors are usually industry experts and/or full-time security practitioners, and invariably get glowing reviews from course attendees.

Candidates who attempt GIAC certification exams should consider taking practice tests beforehand. A practice test mimics an real test and is, therefore, a terrific study aid. All GIAC certification attempts (except for the GSE) come with two free practice exams. A few practice tests are also included with training courses. Candidates who don’t take training can purchase practice tests for $159 each by clicking a link in their SANS/GIAC portal account.

Sun, 18 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10786-sans-giac-certification-guide-overview-and-career-paths.html
Killexams : Best Linux Certifications

More than 20 years after Linus Torvalds developed Linux, the operating system remains a force in the computing industry. While Linux is not widely used on desktops (making up just over 2.4% of the overall desktop operating system market share in January 2019, according to NetMarketShare), it is extraordinarily strong on the web server side, where it enjoys a market share of almost 54%.

IT professionals invest considerable time learning about server computing for everything from installation, configuration, maintenance and virtualization to application support and security. This also means that many IT professionals are working with and around Linux operating systems daily, often alongside Windows and various UNIX OS brands as well.

The best of the Linux certifications vie for considerable mindshare among IT professionals and present an interesting mix of distribution- or brand-agnostic credentials alongside some pretty formidable vendor-specific credentials. There are multiple well-elaborated certification ladders available to those interested in learning, using, and mastering the Linux operating system environment and all the many bells and whistles it supports.

The results of a job search we conducted on several popular job posting sites show which Linux certifications employers are looking for when hiring new employees. While results vary from day to day (and job board to job board), this table reflects those Linux-related certifications that employers were seeking in the U.S.

Job Board Survey Results (in alphabetical order, by certification)

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

Linkup

Total

GCUX (SANS GIAC) 30 30 55 12 127
Linux+ (CompTIA) 1,045 1,339 779 547 3,710
LPIC (LPI) 38 41 247 44 370
Oracle Linux OCA 27 31 33 12 103
Oracle Linux OCP 61 69 69 25 224
RHCA (Red Hat) 89 102 190 38 419
RHCE (Red Hat) 467 553 754 267 2,041
RHCSA (Red Hat) 417 504 667 241 1,829

We found that for nearly every certification category listed above, the number of national jobs postings mentioning that certification has increased, in some cases substantially, since we surveyed the same job sites a year ago. Linux system administrators and engineers can expect average earnings in the low $70s and upward, depending on the job role. PayScale lists $70,194 as the average salary for Linux system administrators ($52,000/low and $101,000/high). Glassdoor reports earnings for Linux system administrators averaging $68,884, Linux system engineers at $99,348 and senior Linux system engineers at $122,071.

GCUX: GIAC Certified Unix Security Administrator

The Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) program is part of SANS, a highly regarded source of instruction and research in the information security field. SANS also provides breaking news, operates a security alert service and serves on all kinds of government, research and academic information security task forces, working groups and industry organizations.

The SANS GIAC program encompasses 37 information security certifications across several categories, such as cyber defense, penetration testing, incident response and forensics, management, audit, legal, developer and industrial control systems. The GIAC Certified UNIX Security Administrator (GCUX) falls under its Cyber Defense category, and aims at professionals who install, configure, monitor, secure and audit both Unix and Linux systems.

GIAC certifications must be renewed every four years by earning 36 continuing professional experience (CPE) credits. Also, credential holders must pay a certification maintenance fee of $429 every four years.

GCUX Facts & Figures

Certification Name

GIAC Certified Unix Security Administrator (GCUX)

Prerequisites & Required Courses

None; SEC506: Securing Linux/Unix training recommended (classroom, on demand, self-study or private; $6,610)

Number of Exams

One test (75 questions, two hours, minimum passing score 68%)

Cost per Exam

$1,899 without training (called a GIAC certification attempt; includes two free practice exams) $769 as part of a training course $769 retake fee $429 certification renewal

Exams administered by Pearson VUE.

URL

https://www.giac.org/certification/certified-unix-security-administrator-gcux

Self-Study Materials

Practice tests available on the GIAC test preparation page (two tests included in test fee; additional practice tests are $159 each). No GCUX-specific study guides found; GIAC recommends searching for self-study materials based on the GCUX objectives’ knowledge areas and getting practical experience.

Linux+ (CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI)

CompTIA exercises extraordinary certification clout at the entry level in many IT niches. This nonprofit has shown itself as willing to team up with more focused IT organizations, associations and consortia to combine their own market reach and visibility with niche smarts and subject matter expertise on loan from various partners.

One great example is the organization’s partnership with the Linux Professional Institute (LPI), which resulted in the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI credential. This unique certification replaced the original CompTIA Linux+ certification in 2010 and uses the same two exams required for LPIC-1 certification.

As a result of this partnership, IT professionals who are serious about Linux can earn both the Linux+ credential and the LPIC-1 at the same time. Candidates must first earn the Linux+ credential and then submit a request to CompTIA asking that their results be sent to LPI to obtain the LPIC-1 certification. CompTIA test records are confidential, so candidates must request that their records be forwarded to LPI when taking the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI exams.

Earning the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI requires candidates to pass two exams. The first covers system architecture, installation and package management, GNU and Unix commands, devices, file systems and standard file system hierarchies. The second test digs into command shells, scripting and data management, user interfaces and desktops, administrative tasks and activities, basic system services, networking fundamentals and security topics. The CompTIA Linux+ Beta test (XK1-004) closed as of October 22, 2018, though candidates who took the test prior to the end date can still access those scores and apply a passing grade to their Linux+ certification. The replacement Linux+ 104 test based on this beta test will become publicly available in April of 2019.

Note that the Linux+ credential is valid for life.

CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI Facts & Figures

Certification Name

CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI

Prerequisites & Required Courses

None required

Recommended: CompTIA A+, CompTIA Network+ and 12 months of Linux administration experience

Number of Exams

Two exams: LX0-103 and LX0-104 (60 multiple-choice questions each, 90 minutes, 500 required out of 200 to 800 scale to pass). Note that the LX0-104 Beta test is no longer offered as of October 22, 2018; the replacement 104 test becomes publicly available in April of 2019.

Cost per Exam

$200 per exam; prices vary by geography

URL

https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/linux

Self-Study Materials

CompTIA maintains a list of training materials and additional study options, including links to study guides, test crams, practice tests, online and classroom training, CertMaster, and more. Additional third-party reference and review materials can be found on Amazon.

LPI (Linux Professional Institute) Certifications

The Linux Professional Institute (LPI) started up in October of 1999, almost one decade after Linus Torvalds began his pioneering efforts on the Linux kernel. Since then, LPI has become one of the leading certification providers on Linux subjects and technologies. Given the organization’s distribution-agnostic approach to Linux, it offers excellent coverage of a platform that’s available in many forms and flavors in today’s marketplace.

The LPI Certification (LPIC) program is available in three distinct levels:

  • LPIC-1Linux Administrator: A  junior-level Linux certification with no prerequisites. Candidates must pass two exams that cover basic Linux skills, including installing and configuring Linux on a workstation, working at the command line, performing basic maintenance tasks, and making LAN or internet connections. While you can obtain the LPIC-1 credential directly from LPI, candidates should consider obtaining the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI credential first, which qualifies you for both the Linux+ and LPIC-1 credentials.
  • LPIC-2Linux Engineer: An advanced-level Linux certification that requires an active LPIC-1 certification. Candidates must pass two exams that cover significant Linux skills and topics. The first test covers the kernel, system startup, file system and devices, advanced storage administration, network configuration, system maintenance and capacity planning. The second test covers web services, file sharing, network client management, email services, system security and troubleshooting, and domain name servers.
  • LPIC-3Linux Enterprise Professional Certification: A senior-level Linux certification that requires an active LPIC-2 and passing any single test in the 300 series. Valid test IDs currently include 300: Mixed Environment303: Security, and 304: Virtualization and High Availability. The Mixed Environment test covers Samba (domain integration, user and group management, name services, share configuration and so forth), plus OpenLDAP, and working with Linux and Windows clients. The Security test covers network, operations and application security, as well as cryptography and access controls. High availability cluster storage and management, along with virtualization, are covered in the Virtualization and High Availability exam.

In addition to the LPIC-1, 2 and 3 credentials, LPI also offers an entry-level credential, the Linux Essentials Professional Development Certificate (PDC). Linux Essentials focuses on foundational skills, such as creating and running simple scripts, restoring compressed backups and archives, working with the command line, Linux operating system basics, FOSS, and users/groups and file permissions for public and private directories. Linux Essentials is a great way to get started while gaining the skills and knowledge needed for the more challenging LPIC credentials.

LPI’s latest certification is the LPIC-OT DevOps Tools Engineer, which recognizes the effective use of tools for collaboration during system and software development. There are no prerequisites, and the single test lasts for 90 minutes and has 60 questions.

LPIC credentials are worthwhile for IT pros whose chosen Linux distributions do not warrant their own certification programs, and for those seeking broad, vendor- and distribution-neutral coverage of Linux topics, tools and technologies. They are popular among IT pros and in demand among IT employers.

LPIC-1, LPIC-2 and LPIC-3 Facts & Figures

Certification Name

LPIC-1: Linux Administrator

LPIC-2: Linux Engineer

LPIC-3: Linux Enterprise Professional

Prerequisites & Required Courses

LPIC-1: None, Linux Essentials recommended

LPIC-2: Active LPIC-1 certification

LPIC-3: Active LPIC-2 certification plus completion of one of the 300 series specialty exams

Training is recommended but not required

Number of Exams

LPIC-1: Exam 101-500 and Exam 102-500

LPIC-2: Exam 201-450 and Exam 202-450

LPIC-3: One of the 300 series exams: Mixed Environment (Exam 300-100)

Security (Exam 303-200)

Virtualization and High Availability (Exam 304-200)

Cost per Exam

$200 per exam. Exams administered by Pearson VUE. Linux ID required to register.

URL

http://www.lpi.org/our-certifications/summary-of-certifications

Self-Study Materials

Study guides, courseware knowledge packs, eLearning courses, test crams, practice tests, online and classroom training, Linux Academy subscriptions and more are available at LPI test Preparation, LPI Marketplace and Amazon.

Oracle Linux OCA & OCP

When Oracle bought Sun Microsystems in 2010, it acquired a rich and deep UNIX tradition. Oracle started phasing out Solaris almost immediately after finalizing the Sun acquisition.

Today, Oracle offers associate- and professional-level certifications based on Linux rather than harking back to any kind of UNIX roots. These certifications retain enough of their Sun roots, however, so that courses are not mandatory prerequisites to taking the exams for the two Oracle Linux certifications currently available.

As with other vendor-specific Linux certifications, Oracle’s are most appealing to those who work with or around that distribution, or who wish to work for employers who use those distributions.

OCA and OCP Facts & Figures

Certification Name

Oracle Certified Associate (OCA), Oracle Linux 5 and 6 System Administrator

Oracle Certified Professional (OCP), Oracle Linux 6 System Administrator

Prerequisites & Required Courses

OCA: No prerequisites. Recommended training: Oracle Linux S­­ystem Administration OCP: OCA Linux 5 and 6 System Administrator or Linux Administrator Certified Associate (now retired). Recommended training: Oracle Linux System Administration

Number of Exams

OCA: One exam, 1Z0-100 Oracle Linux 5 and 6 System Administration (150 minutes, 80 questions, 61% to pass) OCP: One exam, 1Z0-105 Oracle Linux 6 Advanced System Administrator (150 minutes, 97 questions, 61% to pass)

Cost per Exam

OCA: $245

OCP: $245

URL

https://education.oracle.com/oracle-linux/oracle-linux-administration/product_295?certPage=true

Self-Study Materials

Oracle offers online and in-class training for its credentials, with hit-or-miss coverage for them on the aftermarket. Start with Amazon searches — check test IDs 1Z0-100 and 1Z0-105 to get a sense for what’s available.

Note: Though there is now an OCA and OCP test available for Oracle Linux 7 System Administrator, Oracle has yet to announce this new certification or release the details of new Linux 7-based certification tests for OCA and OCP candidates.

Oracle Linux 6 Certified Implementation Specialist Certification

The Oracle Linux 6 Certified Implementation Specialist Certification is a certification available for those who sell, design, configure and implement Oracle Linux 6 solutions. Though any candidate can complete this certification, it is most typically achieved by Oracle partner implementation personnel with strong foundational experience in Linux and previous field experience implementing Linux 6.

Red Hat RHCSA, RHCE & RHCA

If there’s one major star in the vendor-specific Linux certification firmament, it’s got to be Red Hat. The company has major market presence and serious duration as a commercial provider of Linux platforms and technologies.

Red Hat offers a typical administrator, engineer, architect certification ladder. Unlike many other such programs, however, it offers highly regarded and valued credentials at each rung, along with demanding and hands-on oriented exams and an excellent training curriculum to match. All exams for the following Red Hat certifications are performance based and last two hours or longer.

The giveaway for Red Hat certifications is that all come with acronyms that start with RH, as follows:

  • Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA): This foundation certification vets essential skills in handling files, working at the command line and using system documentation, along with managing systems (boot up, identifying processes, start/stop virtual machines, controlling services), configuring storage partitions and logical volumes, and more.
  • Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE): This cornerstone certification is designed to test and validate the skills and knowledge necessary to work as a senior-level Linux system administrator. subjects covered include advanced IP routing and services, managing runtime kernel behavior, working with iSCSI, automating maintenance tasks with shell scripts and working with networking services for Web, FTP, NFS, SMB, SMTP, SSH and more. An RHSCA is a prerequisite for the RHCE.
  • Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA): Red Hat’s pinnacle certification offers two paths to certification, depending on which prerequisite advanced Red Hat certification credentials you have already completed: Red Hat Certified Enterprise Microservices Developers (RHCEMDs) and Red Hat Certified JBoss Developers (RHCJDs) can earn an RHCA in Enterprise Applications, and Red Hat Certified Engineers (RHCEs) can earn an RHCA in Infrastructure. In general, the five additional exams that must be passed to achieve the RCHA in either Infrastructure or in Enterprise Applications are specific to each area of specialization, though a few of the tests can be used to satisfy the five test requirement in both RHCA tracks. A number of previously available certification exams have been discontinued for new RHCA candidates and renewals, though those exams can still be applied to the RHCA certification if you’ve already passed them. Find out more about discontinued exams that can be counted towards the RHCA credential on the RHCA page under the Candidate Guidance tab.

Because Red Hat Linux is widely used in the business world, the RHCA certification is an excellent choice for those interested in a more platform-focused path into the Linux world. Of course, for those who already work with or around Red Hat, it is a natural certification choice as well.

RHCSA, RHCE and RHCA Facts & Figures

Certification Name:

Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA)

Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE)

Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA)

Prerequisites & Required Courses

RHCSA: No prerequisites Recommended training:

Windows system administrators: Red Hat System Administration I (RH124) (5 days, $3,400) and II (RH134) (4 days, $3,400)Linux/Unix Administrators, RHCSA Rapid Track Course (RH199) (4 days, $3,700)

RHCE: RHCSA credential Recommended training:

Same as for RHCSA, plus

Red Hat System Administration III (RH254) ($3,400)

RHCA:

RHCE-certified (Infrastructure track) – Candidates currently holding an RHCE certification must pass five additional exams from the Infrastructure track below.

RHCJD/RHCEMD-certified (Enterprise Applications track) – Candidates currently holding an RHCJD or an RHCEMD certification must pass five additional exams from the Enterprise Applications track below.

Number of Exams

RHCSA: One exam, EX200 Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) test (2.5 hours) RHCE: One exam, EX300 Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) test (3.5 hours) RHCA: Five exams total depending on whether you have already completed an RHCE certification (for the RHCA Infrastructure track), or an RHCEMD/RHCJD (for the RHCA Enterprise Applications track): An RHCE must pass five exams from the following list to achieve the RHCA in Infrastructure:

EX125 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ceph Storage Administration exam

EX210 – Red Hat Certified System Administrator in Red Hat OpenStack exam

EX220 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Hybrid Cloud Management exam

EX236 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Gluster Storage Administration exam

EX248 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Enterprise Application Server Administration exam

EX270 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Container Management (Retired)

EX276 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containerized Application Development (Retired)

EX280 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Administration exam

EX310 – Red Hat Certified Engineer in Red Hat OpenStack

EX318 – Red Hat Certified Virtualization Administrator exam

EX333 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Network Services test (Retired)

EX342 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Diagnostics and Troubleshooting

EX401 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management test (Retired)

EX403 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management exam

EX405 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Configuration Management

EX407 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ansible Automation exam

EX413 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Server Security and Hardening exam

EX415 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Linux exam

EX423 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Directory Services and Authentication test (Retired)

EX429 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in SELinux Policy Administration test (Retired)

EX436 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in High Availability Clustering exam

EX440 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Messaging Administration exam

EX442 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Performance Tuning exam

RHCSA: One exam, EX200 Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) test (2.5 hours) RHCE: One exam, EX300 Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) test (3.5 hours) RHCA: Five exams total depending on whether you have already completed an RHCE certification (for the RHCA Infrastructure track), or an RHCEMD/RHCJD (for the RHCA Enterprise Applications track): An RHCE must pass five exams from the following list to achieve the RHCA in Infrastructure:

EX125 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ceph Storage Administration exam

EX210 – Red Hat Certified System Administrator in Red Hat OpenStack exam

EX220 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Hybrid Cloud Management exam

EX236 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Gluster Storage Administration exam

EX248 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Enterprise Application Server Administration exam

EX270 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Container Management (Retired)

EX276 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containerized Application Development (Retired)

EX280 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Administration exam

EX310 – Red Hat Certified Engineer in Red Hat OpenStack

EX318 – Red Hat Certified Virtualization Administrator exam

EX333 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Network Services test (Retired)

EX342 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Diagnostics and Troubleshooting

EX401 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management test (Retired)

EX403 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management exam

EX405 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Configuration Management

EX407 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ansible Automation exam

EX413 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Server Security and Hardening exam

EX415 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Linux exam

EX423 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Directory Services and Authentication test (Retired)

EX429 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in SELinux Policy Administration test (Retired)

EX436 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in High Availability Clustering exam

EX440 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Messaging Administration exam

EX442 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Performance Tuning exam

EX450 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Data Virtualization exam

RHCEMDs and RHCJD must pass five exams from the following list to achieve the RHCA certification in Enterprise Applications:

EX288 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Application Development exam

EX248 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Enterprise Application Server Administration exam

EX276 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containerized Application Development test (Retired)

EX280 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Administration exam

EX405 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Configuration Management

EX407 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ansible Automation exam

EX421 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Camel Development exam

EX427 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Business Process Design exam

EX440 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Messaging Administration exam

EX450 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Data Virtualization exam

EX453 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Fast-Cache Application Development exam

EX465 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Business Rules exam

Cost per Exam

$400 each ($2,000 total RHCA test costs)

URL

www.redhat.com/training/certifications/#certifications

Self-Study Materials

Red Hat skills assessments and other materials can be located on the training page. Red Hat Training includes multiple training options (online, classroom, self-paced, virtual, video and more). Red Hat Learning Subscription includes all online courses in one package; prices vary by geography, candidates can expect to pay $5,500 for a Basic Subscription and $7,000 for a Standard Subscription. Study guides are on Amazon.

Beyond the Top 5: More Linux certifications

Outside the top five Linux credentials and programs covered in this article, other Linux certifications may be worthy of your time and attention.

The Linux Foundation, a membership-based organization, promotes the development of the Linux kernel through collaboration, conferences and education. The organization’s small but respected certification program includes the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE).

IBM continues to offer a handful of Linux-related certifications. One certification of interest is the Certified Database Administrator, which continues to be in demand for those running DB2 on Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

Many industry experts, including Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols, a long-time user and expert on Linux and Unix operating systems, say that certifications can be an important ingredient in a job candidate’s qualifications. But interviewers should also pay close attention to how many Linux systems candidates have set up, managed or used to get a sense of the scale and scope of their experience.

In other words, when you see a web hosting service advertising for Linux jobs, they’re not looking for people who’ve installed and used Linux at home or in a small business setting; they’re looking for professionals who’ve set up and managed Linux in a highly distributed and virtualized data center environment, with lots of complex networking and services coming into the mix.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10750-best-linux-certifications.html
Killexams : Struggling to find cyber pros? Look to your network admins

Gabriel Esek’s route to cyber began where a lot of tech careers do — at an IT help desk.

From there, he worked his way up the tech ladder, through network administration and engineering, learning as he went about the components of enterprise systems and their vulnerabilities.

“I just never had the confidence that I had what it takes to break into cybersecurity,” said Esek, who is now a level three cybersecurity engineer in the security services department at cybersecurity firm Arctic Wolf.

The skills and confidence Esek cultivated as a network specialist gave him a leg up when he pivoted to cybersecurity early last year. A trifecta of certifications — CompTIA’s A+, Network+ and Security+ — were the icing on the cake.

Cybersecurity is a broad field with many niches that are at once embedded in and distinct from the larger IT world. Understanding networks components — the hardware that comprises IT systems — is fundamental to cyber. With certifications training, it can be relatively easy to cross the natural bridge between network admin and security.

“If you're good at networking, you understand routing and filtering, and you probably understand firewalls and VPNs,” said Ed Skoudis, president of the SANS Technology Institute, SANS Fellow, and founder of cyber consulting service Counter Hack. “These are all amazing and useful building blocks of cybersecurity infrastructures.”

Network professionals typically learn the OSI seven-layer stack model for system connectivity, said Skoudis, who also got his start in network admin. 

“Understanding how that stack works helps with understanding how things are happening from a security perspective,” Skoudis said.

The cyber talent challenge

Recruiting and retaining talent is a challenge throughout tech. Nearly 3 in 5 of the more than 1,400 IT professionals surveyed in June for Spiceworks Ziff Davis’ 2023 tech budget trends report, said their companies are having trouble finding IT talent.

The stakes are particularly high in cyber. The average cost of a data breach reached an all-time global high of $4.35 million this year, according to IBM’s analysis. 

Most companies see cybercrime as a top threat, and more than half of security and IT executives expect an increase in ransomware attacks over the next year, according to a accurate PwC study.

“Now that businesses are more digital than ever, being compromised with cyber breach is huge. It can literally bring down your business,” said Curtis Johnstone, distinguished engineer at Quest Software and a Microsoft MVP.

Tapping into network admin to source potential cyber talent in-house would be good news for many organizations, particularly for midsize enterprises, which rank cybersecurity as a top priority and may have a harder time recruiting than larger companies.

Demand = dollars

Esek’s journey from IT desk and network admin to cyber isn’t unique. 

Petr Sidopulos, cybersecurity operations architect for the Teacher Retirement System of Texas, got his start as a webmaster for the Texas Army National Guard. 

Sidopulos worked his way through IT support and server administration to cyber, earning the GIAC Security Essential Certification and numerous other cyber credentials.

“I did not need any certifications to get into cyber in 2012,” said Sidopulos. “But my on-the-job results and the certifications gave me the knowledge and experience to progress into my [current] role.”

Esek and Sidopulos said inherent interest drew them to cyber, and both leveraged network experience, coupled with certifications, to advance in a field plagued by workforce shortages.

For professionals with the right credentials, it’s also one of the better paying fields in IT. Certified Information Security Managers is the second highest paying IT certification, according to Skillsoft’s survey of more than 2,500 tech professionals, and Certified Information Systems Security Professional ranked fourth. Each credential commanded average annual salaries above $150,000.

While it may require a salary bump, there are advantages to drafting talent from within, according to James Stanger, CompTIA chief technology evangelist.