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Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

New drivers with a learner’s permit should have car insurance while learning to drive, even though they are not yet fully licensed.

The good news is that teenage drivers with a permit may already be covered by a parent’s car insurance policy. If you are the parent of a freshly minted driver with a permit, adding them to your policy likely will not cost you anything. The rate increase will come later when the young driver gets their license.

Do You Need Auto Insurance With a Learner’s Permit?

Every driver on the road should have car insurance, including those driving with a learner’s permit.

Depending on the state, a teenager with a learner’s permit may not be legally required to have car insurance. But insurers typically require all drivers in your household to be listed on your insurance policy.

If someone with a learner’s permit is driving your car, it’s best to inform your insurance company. If you don’t inform your insurer and your teen gets in an accident, the insurance company could deny your claim.

When your child is ready to get their learner’s permit, call your insurance company to let them know. If, however, you do not want your teen on your policy, you should exclude the driver from coverage.

How Can You Get Insurance with a Permit?

Drivers with a permit can be added to a parent’s car insurance policy or they can buy their own.

Adding a permit holder to a parent policy

If your teen is a new driver who still lives at home, adding them to your car insurance policy is the easiest way to secure coverage.

Adding a driver with a permit to your existing policy likely won’t cost you anything until the driver gets their license. So, if your teen takes two years to learn how to drive with a permit, you can enjoy that time without an increase in your car insurance rate.

Related: Best cheap car insurance for teens

Buying your own car insurance policy

First-time drivers can buy their own car insurance policy, but this is usually more expensive than adding them to an existing parent’s policy.

Buying your own car insurance policy may be your only option if:

  • You are an adult driver with a permit
  • You are a teenage driver whose parents do not have car insurance
  • You are a young driver who does not share a permanent address with your parents
  • You are an emancipated minor
  • You’ve bought your own car

How Much Car Insurance Do Learner’s Permit Drivers Need?

Drivers who are learning with a permit will need to meet state minimum car insurance requirements, either through their parent’s policy or their own. Most states require a minimum amount of liability auto insurance, and some have additional requirements, such as personal injury protection coverage.

For instance, Florida requires drivers to have at least:

  • $10,000 in liability coverage for bodily injury damages for one person
  • $20,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident
  • $10,000 in liability coverage for property damage
  • $10,000 in personal injury protection coverage

If a new driver causes an accident, having only the state minimum amount of car insurance will likely not be enough. As a good rule of thumb, you should make sure to have enough liability insurance to cover what you could lose in a lawsuit after a car accident.

Related: How much car insurance do I need?

How Much Is Car Insurance for New Drivers with a Permit?

If you’re a parent, it likely won’t cost anything to add a new driver with a permit to your car insurance policy. But, once the driver becomes fully licensed, your car insurance premium will increase significantly.

Average rate increase to add a teen driver to a parent policy

How Can Parents Save on Car Insurance?

Parents adding a teen driver to their policy can save on car insurance by:

  • Shopping around. To find the best deal, take the time to compare auto insurance quotes from at least three or four different companies.
  • Signing up for a driver’s education program. Some insurers offer programs that help teen drivers and offer discounts for the teens who complete them.
  • Checking for discounts. Many insurers offer car insurance discounts that apply to teen drivers, such as good grade discounts and student away from home discounts.
  • Bundling your policies. You could save on premiums by buying auto insurance and homeowners insurance (or renter’s insurance) from the same insurer.
  • Driving safely. Insurance rates tend to go up after a speeding ticket or accident, so encourage safe driving habits for the whole family.

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Car Insurance for Permit Drivers FAQ

Does it make sense for a permit holder to buy their own car insurance?

No, it does not make sense for a permit holder to buy their own car insurance unless they have to.

Scenarios where a permit holder may be required to buy their own policy include if they don’t have a parent or guardian with auto insurance, they no longer live with a parent or they buy their own car.

Related: Tips for first-time car insurance buyers

When should a permit holder be added to a parent’s car insurance policy?

When your child gets their learner’s permit, you should notify your insurance company. As a driver using your car with your permission, they may be covered under your policy at no charge.

Once your child gets their driver’s license, you can add them to your car insurance policy as a listed operator. At that point, your insurance rate will increase.

Related: Best car insurance for teens

How much will a policy increase by adding a teen driver?

The average cost of adding a young driver—age 16 to 21—to a married couple’s car insurance policy is $1,951 a year, according to a Forbes Advisor analysis of rates from top 11 insurance companies across the nation.

With that in mind, those hoping to find the best cheap car insurance for teens should shop around and compare premiums with at least three or four different insurance companies.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:52:00 -0500 Holly Johnson en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/car-insurance/can-you-get-insurance-with-a-permit/
Killexams : The Learning Network No result found, try new keyword!“Make a plan first.” “If the weather permits, wear velvet.” And more. By The Learning Network A NASA spacecraft successfully smashed into a small asteroid and changed its orbit: Should we ... Thu, 13 Oct 2022 19:40:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.nytimes.com/section/learning Killexams : 5 Ways Teachers Can Collaborate to Support English Learners

When it comes to providing English learners with an equitable education, some researchers point to the need for more-strategic collaboration between general classroom and content teachers and multilingual specialists.

About 10 percent of all public school students were classified as English learners in 2019. While only 2 percent of all public school teachers teach English as a Second Language as their main assignment, 64 percent of all public school teachers have at least one English learner in their class, according to the latest federal data available , which is from the 2017-18 school year.

At the Sept. 28 to 30 conference of the WIDA consortium—which offers language assessments for English learners in 36 states, several U.S. territories, and federal agencies such as the Bureau of Indian Education—tips and tricks were shared on how to best meet the needs of this growing student population, including the call for collaboration among educators.

Andrea Honigsfeld, a professor of teacher education for teachers of English to speakers of other languages, or TESOL, at Molloy University in New York, and Valentina Gonzalez, an educational consultant and author for Seidlitz Education, a consulting group for those working with multilingual learners, presented actionable practices that teachers can use when working with English learners and multilingual certified in their districts.

The hope is that if all educators in a district view multilingual learners as their students, rather than just the responsibility of certified or an add-on to their already packed workload, it prevents marginalization of these students and benefits teachers as well.

“When we collaborate with one another, we’re reducing the workload we have,” Gonzalez said.

The co-presenters shared the following five key strategies to bring about effective collaboration.

Collaborative planning

Collaboration starts at planning meetings. Schools should create opportunities for at least a weekly common planning time where grade-level teams at the elementary level, or content-area certified at the secondary level, can work together with the English language development team or specialists. They would examine the curriculum and plan out how they will scaffold and differentiate instruction for multilingual learners and others who need the extra support, Honigsfeld said.

In an ideal world, she added, administrators would set up two of these weekly planning periods so that one could be a larger group or team meeting to focus on questions such as what are the curricular goals and grade-level standards. The second meeting would dive deeper into students’ individual and group needs.

Questions in these collaborative planning meetings should also consider: what type of academic language and literacy opportunities are embedded in the lesson; how can teachers ensure all students can be successful and participate fully; and how to use scaffolding to ensure students understand the content while being appropriately challenged.

Intentional partnership building

At some point during the school week there may be teachers who are doing exemplary work when it comes to supporting multilingual learners alongside their peers and others who are still learning what strategies work best. This is where educators can intentionally build bridges by, for example, inviting colleagues to visit during certain class periods to either observe or offer feedback, Honigsfeld said.

“Many seasoned teachers might have started out their careers with the notion of ‘my classroom, my kids, I close the door and behind the door it’s my way of reaching these students,’ ” Honigsfeld said. “And with the best of intentions, we’re creating silos or pockets of excellence.”

In cases of resistance to such partnerships or to partnerships with a specialist within the classroom, finding ways to build trust among colleagues is key, Gonzalez said.

“Sometimes just talking less and listening more offers the other partner space to contribute, aiming for parity in the lesson, aiming for parity in the classroom, or in planning, and sharing the spotlight with one another,” she added.

Content and language integration

The ability to incorporate academic language lessons into a multitude of subjects is key for supporting multilingual learners and their peers.

For instance, in math class, teachers can think about typical sentence structures that the students use in a math lesson, such as the comparative forms of “less than” or “greater than.” Within the math lesson, teachers can explore these language forms and other nuances of academic language (such as using “than” rather than “then”) as part of the content area, Honigsfeld said.

Integrating content and language also means coming up with creative opportunities for class participation like a talking activity where students articulate the thinking that goes beyond solving a math problem.

And teachers must remember that “every student, even your highly gifted monolingual, English-speaking student will be an academic language learner,” Honigsfeld added. “It’s not an add on, it is not something that now we’re taking away time from all the other students. Instead, we’re supporting all students in their academic language development.”

Technology integration

Honigsfeld and Gonzalez advocate for teachers to use technology as a tool both for collaborating with fellow colleagues (such as sharing resources on Padlet), and for better engaging all students, and particularly English learners.

Multilingual learners, for instance, can benefit from watching prerecorded lectures they can pause and rewind and then dig deeper into with the teacher in class. This is something that can benefit their monolingual peers as well, Honigsfeld said.

Tools like Flipgrid can also allow students to record themselves, so they respond orally rather than in writing and practice that aspect of language acquisition.

Coaching and consultation

Recognizing that there are school districts that struggle to recruit and retain enough certified to support their English learners and the heavy workloads teachers already have, coaching and consultation among educators in a school is helpful, Honigsfeld said.

This can look like teachers across class periods sharing materials and strategies to support multilingual learners since they each only get about 15 or 30 minutes to work directly with these students, she added.

It goes back to the importance of all educators thinking of themselves as the teachers of multilingual learners even when that student population isn’t as sizable in their school as other groups. And district and school administrators play their own role by giving teachers the time and resources needed to make all five of these strategies work, Honigsfeld said.

Fri, 07 Oct 2022 10:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.edweek.org/teaching-learning/5-ways-teachers-can-collaborate-to-support-english-learners/2022/10
Killexams : How Much Does Foundation Cost?

Home foundations can come in different styles depending upon your locale, so if you’re in need of a new foundation, consider the needs of your home. A new foundation can be expensive depending on the scope of the project. On average, a concrete foundation costs around $8,500. On the low-end, a foundation can cost around $6,000 and on the high end, a foundation will run close to $15,000. Total costs will vary depending upon permits, labor and the type of foundation.

Compare Quotes From Top-rated Architects, Builders & Designers

Free, No-commitment Estimates

Concrete Foundation Cost Estimator

Average Concrete Foundation Cost

With six different types of home foundations possible, cost estimates vary by design. Estimates are based on a 2,000-square foot house.

  • Monolithic Concrete Slab: $13,000
  • Stem Wall Concrete Slab: $14,000 (requires more labor, excavation and material)
  • Pier and Beam/Crawl Space: $21,000 Pier and beam foundations are uncommon and piers cost about $1,000 each, beams run between $1,000 to $5,000 as well. Plus, if you’re repairing a pier and beam foundation, you’ll need to lift the home, which can run around $1,500. A typical home needs between eight to 10 piers. Crawl spaces also require sealing and waterproofing.
  • Cinder Block Foundation: $16,000
  • Basement: $40,000 and up, depending on if it’s a finished basement

Types of Foundations and Pros/Cons

Monolithic Concrete Slab

Monolithic concrete slab foundations are better known as slab-on-grade because they rest directly on the ground and typically get poured all at once. They’re usually cheaper to install and will last a long time. A con of a slab-on-grade foundation is that sewer and drainage pipes get installed before the foundation is poured, so should you have any plumbing problems, you’ll need to cut into the slab to fix it.

Stem Wall Concrete Slab

Stem wall slabs have a footer poured first and then blocks are laid to form a wall up to the finished slab elevation. It’s considered more stable but takes longer to construct.

Pier and Beam Foundation/Crawl Space Foundation

Pier and beam foundations are typically found with older homes and elevate the home, which makes it less prone to flooding. But since it’s elevated, pests and critters can gain entry to the crawl space. They can cause damage to the beams over time.

A pier and beam foundation provides less support for floors than a concrete slab and they can suffer from water damage. They are also not as energy efficient as other foundations because warm and cold air can seep into the home.

Cinder Block Foundation

Cinder block foundations aren’t as popular as poured concrete block walls. Cinder block foundations do have advantages, like being able to hold more weight on top of the foundation. It does require more money in labor costs. On the negative side, they can be more susceptible to bowing and buckling.

Basement Foundation

A basement foundation secures a house a floor below the ground. It can be unfinished or finished to add living space. Basement foundations tend to suffer from moisture problems and sometimes mold. A sump pump can help address moisture issues.

Foundation Cost Per Square Foot

Cement Foundation Cost

  • Cinder Block: $9 to $12
  • Crawl Space: $13
  • Pier and Beam: $9 (Piers and beams will add to the cost)

Slab Foundation Cost

  • Monolithic Concrete Slab: $5
  • Stem Wall Concrete Slab: $6

Basement Foundation Cost

Adding a basement foundation comes with a significant cost and it can escalate should you choose to finish the basement. But a finished basement can increase living space and increase your home’s value so you’ll have to weigh the cost vs. reward.

Per Square Foot

An unfinished basement typically costs between $10 to $25 per square foot while that cost increases to $30 to $100 per square foot for a finished basement. A walkout basement will cost closer to $100 per square foot.

Foundation Installation Cost

Concrete costs between $4.25 and $6.25 per square foot and the average size of a house is about 2,000 square feet. That can mean between $8,500 and $12,500 for concrete alone. Labor typically costs around $2.60 per square foot, which is about $5,200 for a 2,000-square foot house.

A pier and beam foundation can cost more because of the cost of the beams (around $1,000 to $5,000) and piers (you’ll need around eight to 10). Additional costs include:

  • Excavation: $500 to $9,000
  • Soil quality testing: $500 to $2,000
  • Tree removal: $500 to $2,000
  • Building permits: $500 to $2,000
  • Form and finishing: $1,000 to $5,000
  • Reinforcement: $150 to $750
  • Sealing: $600 to $6,000
  • Inspections: $80 to $300

Compare Quotes From Top-rated Architects, Builders & Designers

Free, No-commitment Estimates

Additional Cost Considerations

Many factors go into the estimate for your foundation, but it’s essential to be aware of any additional costs you may encounter before you proceed.

Foundation Inspections

Foundation inspections occur before you pour concrete and after the work is done to help to verify that the new foundation meets all code requirements and will support the weight of your home. They cost about $145 an hour, with most homeowners spending $150 to $1,300 in total. 

Foundation Insulation

To allow for proper airflow, prevent moisture or keep critters out, many homeowners will opt to add foundation insulation like skirting and vents around the crawl space or pier and beam foundation. Some will even add spray foam, foam board, or batts between or across the bottom of the joists to add more insulation under the floor. On average, foundation installation costs about $2,000.

Radiant Heat

Radiant heat is when all pipes need to be laid under the foundation, and the concrete is poured over them. Therefore, radiant heat needs to be completed when the foundation is installed. On average, radiant heat adds $3 per square foot, with most homeowners paying $4,800 to $10,000.

Foundation Replacement Cost

If you start to notice cracks along your foundation or suspect some sagging, you’ll likely want an engineer to come out for a structural report. The report typically costs around $500 and will pinpoint your foundation issues.

Foundation replacements can add up quickly, so expect to pay around $20,000 to $100,000 depending upon the scope of the project. If your home needs to be raised for foundation replacement, you will likely pay between $24,500 to $115,000 to raise and replace the foundation. Raising the house will run between $3,000 and $9,000 alone, then excavation can cost between $1,500 to $6,000.

DIY vs. Hire A Pro

Constructing a foundation is not a DIY project, though expert DIYers can likely lay down a concrete slab with some help from friends. Since the foundation is the structure that supports your house, the measurements need to be precise and cement placed in the proper position if you live in a climate where you have to pay attention to the frost line.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 06:10:00 -0500 Nick Gerhardt en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/home-improvement/foundation/foundation-cost/
Killexams : Heritage Foundation Homepage

A growing number of Americans think the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic is behind us. Yet in the District of Columbia, local officials are still clinging to government mandates that disproportionately harm low-income minority students. 

The Daily Signal’s Doug Blair pressed Mayor Muriel Bowser on the issue at an Aug. 15 press conference, asking the mayor why the District of Columbia planned to bar unvaccinated students, many of whom are black, from attending school in person. 

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 13:17:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.heritage.org/
Killexams : The horror! Learner arrives at her matric dance in a coffin, leaving Mzansi shaken

This website is using a security service to protect itself from online attacks. The action you just performed triggered the security solution. There are several actions that could trigger this block including submitting a certain word or phrase, a SQL command or malformed data.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 21:26:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/style-beauty/fashion/the-horror-learner-arrives-at-her-matric-dance-in-a-coffin-leaving-mzansi-shaken-748d0563-fd9b-4d37-8e8e-d2a5a5373430
Killexams : Are today’s learner drivers ready to swap to electric cars?

Obviously, the other major part of this equation is the learners themselves, so what do they think? Seventeen year old Ella Woolley recently passed her test and was full of praise for the EV experience. “I absolutely loved it. The opportunity to learn in an EV was great, and the only thing to get used to was the lack of noise. But what I also noticed was that learning in a larger car [the Peugeot e-2008] gave me added confidence, and I feel like I could drive anything now. For anyone thinking of learning in an automatic, I’d definitely recommend it.”

Incidentally, it’s difficult to establish the number of driving tests taken in an EV because the Driver & Vehicle Standards Agency bundles them in with automatic cars, but their figures do show that those are rising while the number of manual tests are falling. 

One last thing we’ve not yet touched on is cost. For learners it’s comparable to a conventional automatic car, so only slightly more expensive than a manual. For instructors, The AA says that a franchise costs from £219 per week, and although higher than for a petrol model (the equivalent Peugeot 208 is £169 per week) taking into account the fuel and recharging costs sees the electric car come out fractionally cheaper overall. 

As for the experience as a whole, the ringing endorsements from instructor and learner alike are clearly good news for the industry as we make the transition to an electrified future.  We’ve certainly come a long way from the noisy old Austin Metro that this writer passed his test in, but for those getting behind the wheel for the first time there certainly seems nothing to fear from going electric.    


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A-Z Car Finder

Sat, 08 Oct 2022 23:31:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.telegraph.co.uk/cars/features/todays-learner-drivers-ready-swap-electric-cars/ Killexams : How MNPS Is Investing in Its English Learners, and How It Could Do Better

Maria Paula Zapata

According to Metro Nashville Public Schools’ open data portal, of Nashville’s roughly 82,600 students, 22,069 — about 27 percent — are active English learners or have transitioned out of the district’s English Learners program within the past four years. These students bring 129 languages to the district and represent 145 countries. The top five most-spoken non-English languages are Spanish, Arabic, Kurdish, Somali and Burmese. 

But multilingual students represent much more than numbers and data points. They and their families have a lot to offer to the district. Former English learners include MNPS student board member Abenezer Haile and former student board member Angelie Quimbo. Quimbo was also a co-valedictorian at Hillwood High School — one of the 18 2021-22 valedictorians and salutatorians who, at some point in their education, received services through MNPS’ Office of English Learners. MNPS’ executive director of English Learners Molly Hegwood tells the Scene that many students who exit the EL program outperform their peers whose primary language is English.

Audrey Sika Mvibudulu-Feruzi was an EL student who later became an EL teacher, though she’s since moved out of the district. “Initially, when I went to college, I just wanted to be a general teacher,” Mvibudulu-Feruzi tells the Scene via Zoom. “After two years and a half in, I just told myself, ‘No, let me work with the EL population, that’s where my heart is at, that’s where I came from.’ ” Drawing from needs she had as a student, Mvibudulu-Feruzi created an afterschool program that helped EL students take charge of their education. 

There are many roles within the district that support EL students, from immigrant youth transition certified to EL teachers, parent outreach translators, student ambassadors and more. There’s also the more targeted Students With Interrupted Formal Education program for those who have large gaps in their education — typically refugees or asylees. The state requires a ratio of one EL teacher for every 35 students. MNPS has only 67 in-person interpreters to serve the thousands of students who are active or latest English learners — along with their families — but the district also utilizes an over-the-phone interpretation service, which it was able to expand using federal COVID-19 relief money. Those dollars also provided more opportunities for teachers to get EL certifications, but whether those resources will continue at this level when those dollars run out remains to be seen.

As is the case throughout MNPS, EL students could certainly benefit from more staff support. Though the district was not able to provide exact vacancy numbers in time for the publication of this article, Hegwood tells the Scene: “I wouldn’t say our staffing is any better or worse than any of the other areas. It’s very similar in the sense of trends across the district.” Efat Welson is an MNPS interpreter and a translator for the special education department. She tells the Scene she’d still like to see the district hire more interpreters — a request she made directly to the board of education in April.

EL teachers who work with students are not interpreters, and they don’t necessarily speak the languages of the students they serve. “Teacher fluency in the students’ native language is not required for strong English language instruction, but it certainly is a plus,” says former school board member Gini Pupo-Walker, who directs equitable-education advocacy group Education Trust in Tennessee. “That said, hiring bilingual staff at all levels is important and should be a priority for districts.” 

Serving multilingual families means more than providing interpreters and classroom assistance. It takes a spectrum of wraparound services to truly support students — EL and otherwise — but those services aren’t always executed perfectly. While the district has interpretation services, for example, it can be difficult for some families to know how to access them.

“I think there’s a lot of information that’s available — I don’t think there’s enough information that’s accessible,” says Maria Paula Zapata, director of programs at community nonprofit Conexión Américas. “And that point of, ‘How does it become accessible?’ I think is a greater question that we would need to involve families to really get at, like what does that mean?”

Conexión Américas has a Parents as Partners program that allows Spanish-speaking parents to connect with one another and learn about the school district. Zapata describes the program as a “really beautiful peer-to-peer model, where it’s not just a staff member saying, ‘Here’s what you need to do.’ But it’s genuine parents saying, ‘Hey, I’ve gone through this program as well. I’ve had children in the school system … and here’s some things that we think can be helpful.’ ”

While programs like these are often helpful, they don’t exist in all languages spoken in the district. 

MNPS leverages outside support through its Community Achieves initiative, which connects students and their families with services that can tend to a range of needs. There’s also a collaborative effort from local organizations, led by Nashville’s teachers’ union, the Metropolitan Nashville Education Association, to implement their own community schools model.

Zapata notes that details matter. Bilingual signage and friendly staff can be the difference between a positive experience with the district or a negative one. “The warmth of your front office? It is a really big indicator of whether families feel included in your school,” she says. 

Like many students, English learners could benefit from more support. This can mean donating resources, donating money to organizations that support them, tutoring kids and responding to schools’ specific needs. Also, as Mvibudulu-Feruzi points out, “Just take the time to learn where children are coming from. … I know that when I was younger, when I had an educator … who was interested in my culture or interested in where I came from, or even interested in me having a different accent than the Southern accent … that brightened my day. That made me feel safer at school. [It’s also important to make sure you’re not] looping everyone into one culture because we don’t all have one culture, and even within a culture, there are subcultures.”

“We need to start seeing EL students not for the additional supports that they may need, but how much potential they have to shape and contribute to our community — if we provide them all the things they need to be successful,” says Zapata. “If you want [a] multicultural, multilingual, diverse workforce … you need to invest in them now. Otherwise, we’re losing out on everything that we say we want for the future. And I think that that’s the most important [thing]. We’re not talking about poor little kids who don’t speak English now, we’re talking about the future of a multicultural workforce.”

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 05:52:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.nashvillescene.com/news/citylimits/how-mnps-is-investing-in-its-english-learners-and-how-it-could-do-better/article_63b4a83a-4684-11ed-a2e0-83a106c4a33c.html
Killexams : Launching today - Astride, the secure, easy-to-use, digital skills gap-assessment tool created by EXIN

Astride Insights Reports helps organizations identify digital skills gaps, maximize return on learning, and boost overall performance

UTRECHT, Netherlands, Oct. 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- EXIN, a leading independent examination institute is embarking on a new chapter. Astride revolutionizes how individuals can learn how they benchmark in their current job role. They will gain free insights to better equip them so they can prepare for what's next in their career. This tool is a great asset for organizations, as they will gain knowledge about team skills and competencies and learn what certifications can help bridge skills gaps.

EXIN showcases Astride to the Stichting Competens, whose investment has been a great support to get Astride to where it is today. Both firms are excited to see how Astride can benefit professionals in their digital skills journey.

For more information, visit https://www.exin.com/astride-by-exin/

How does it work?

  • First, Astride asks a series of questions in key areas based on the recognized European Competency Framework (e-CF).
  • The proprietary software gathers the information and processes it.
  • Then, a custom-tailored Astride Insights Report is produced.

The tool evaluates competencies and compares them with equivalent job roles. By focusing on 42 primary competencies, and 30 job roles, the tool is a tremendous asset for companies to identify organization-wide skills performance.

Michiel Buysing Damsté, CEO at EXIN, is excited to unveil Astride, commenting:

"Technological disruption comes fast! Companies struggle to find professionals with the right, relevant skills in a competitive labor market. To maximize Return on Learning (RoL) we need to make sure that we invest our time on what matters most for professionals' current roles and future career development. Astride by EXIN, boosts digital skill development journeys by identifying skills gaps on an individual and organizational level. Astride provides guidance for next steps relevant for CxOs, L&D leaders and professionals."

Petra Hendrikson, Chair of the Board of Directors at Stichting Competens, IT Skillsfund adds:

"The Stichting Competens invested in Astride, and we look back on a great collaboration with EXIN. We strongly believe that Astride will make a big impact for people who seek relevant feedback on their skill levels and growth potential."

Visit https://www.exin.com/astride-by-exin/ to get started.

About EXIN
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Killexams : Engineering school empowers learners with critical skills suitable for the mining sector

The learners of Ekangala Engineering School of Specialisation are obtaining a range of critical skills suitable for the mining sector, thanks to a new curriculum. 

The new school of specialisation is the 21st to be launched by Gauteng Education MEC Panyaza Lesufi, and its curriculum focuses on skills needed in the mining sector.

It is located at Ekangala in Bronkhorstspruit, which is home to several mines, including Petra Diamonds in nearby Cullinan.

School principal Zanele Tjiana says the idea to change the name and curriculum of the former Ekangala Comprehensive High School to Ekangala Engineering School of Specialisation came from the Premier’s Office.

“I supported the idea and highlighted the fact that many people in our community are unemployed because many factories have shut down. The school now focuses on mining because Ekangala is surrounded by mines,” she says. 

The school now offers technical subjects and a dynamic curriculum that teaches welding, fitting and turning, automotive mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, excavation and mining skills.

According to MEC Lesufi, latest statistics show that 85% of matric learners go to university after matric and become academics. Schools of specialisation will help create more artisans and technically skilled people.

“Learners in such schools will be able to either work immediately at industry-leading companies, or they will embark on entrepreneurship and start their own businesses,” he says.

The school has partnered with Petra Diamonds to arrange field trips for the learners to the mines so that they can explore career opportunities in the industry.

Petra is also sponsoring bursaries for learners from Grade 10 right through to tertiary level. Currently, three youngsters have bursaries to study at the University of Pretoria.

Two of them achieved 100% in mathematics and physical science. A Grade 10 learner is also benefitting from the partnership.

School fees are R800 per year and in exchange, learners receive a quality education.  According to the Department of Basic Education, if parents who, for whatever reason, cannot afford school fees and needs assistance to apply for exemption or lodge an appeal, they may request the school fees committee chairperson or any members of the School Fees Committee to assist him or her in making the application.

The School Fees Committee must respond in writing to the parents on the outcome of their application within 14 days of applying. The school achieved an 80% matric pass rate in 2021 and hopes to increase this to 90% this year.

There are currently 1 061 learners from Grade 8 to Grade 12. One learner, Sihle Sibanyoni (17), who is in Grade 11, enjoys electronics, technical mathematics and technical sciences subjects.

“I want to become an electrical engineer and ‘the next big thing’ in the mining industry,” she says.

To be admitted to the school, applicants who have passed Grade 7 must pass an aptitude test with an average of 60% in mathematics, English and natural science.

-This article was originally published in the GCIS Vuk'uzenzele.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 19:01:00 -0500 en-ZA text/html https://www.sowetanlive.co.za/sebenza-live/2022-10-14-engineering-school-empowers-learners-with-critical-skills-suitable-for-the-mining-sector/
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