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Exam Code: EX0-105 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
EX0-105 Information Security Foundation based on ISO/IEC 27002 (ISFS)

Exam ID : EX0-105
Exam Title : Information Security Foundation based on ISO/IEC 27002 (Exin)
Questions : 40
Pass Marks : 65%
Duration : 1 hour
Exam Type : Multiple Choice

EXIN Information Security Foundation is a relevant certification for all professionals who work with confidential information. It explains the concept, value, and importance of information security as well as the threats and risks.

This foundation-level certification is suitable for all professionals who deal with information, especially confidential information. It creates a solid basis to pursue a higher level certification on the subject of Information Security. Entrepreneurs or small business owners who need a basic understanding of the subject also benefit from Information Security Foundation.

EXIN Information Security Foundation based on ISO/IEC 27001 is a certification that validates a professionals knowledge about:
• Information and security: the concept, the value, the importance and the reliability of information;
• Threats and risks: the concepts of threat and risk and the relationship with the reliability of information;
• Approach and organization: the security policy and security organization including the components of the security organization and management of (security) incidents;
• Measures: the importance of security measures including physical, technical and organizational measures and
• Legislation and regulations: the importance and impact of legislation and regulations

Information security is the protection of information from a wide range of threats in order to ensure business continuity, minimize business risk, and maximize return on investments and business opportunities.
Information security is gaining importance in the Information Technology (IT) world.
Globalization of the economy is leading to an ever-increasing exchange of information between organizations (their employees, customers and suppliers) and an explosion in the use of networked computers and computing devices.
The international standard for Information Security Management ISO/IEC 27001 is a widely respected and referenced standard and provides a framework for the organization and management of an information security program. Implementing a program based on this standard will serve an organization well in its goal of meeting many of the requirements faced in todays complex operating environment. A strong understanding of this standard is important to the personal development of every information security professional.
In EXINs Information Security modules the following definition is used: Information Security deals with the definition, implementation, maintenance, compliance and evaluation of a coherent set of controls (measures) which safeguard the availability, integrity and confidentiality of the (manual and automated) information supply.
In the module EXIN Information Security Foundation based on ISO/IEC 27001, the basic concepts of information security and their relationships are tested. One of the objectives of this module is to raise the awareness that information is valuable and vulnerable, and to learn which measures are necessary to protect information.

1. Information and Security 10%
1.1 The Concept of Information 2.5%
1.2 Value of Information 2.5%
1.3 Reliability Aspects 5%
2. Threats and Risks 30%
2.1 Threats and Risks 15%
2.2 Relationships between Threats, Risks and the Reliability of Information 15%
3. Approach and Organization 10%
3.1 Security Policy and Security Organization 2.5%
3.2 Components 2.5%
3.3 Incident Management 5%
4. Measures 40%
4.1 Importance of Measures 10%
4.2 Physical Security Measures 10%
4.3 Technical Measures 10%
4.4 Organizational Measures 10%
5. Legislation and Regulation 10%
5.1 Legislation and Regulations 10%
Total 100%

Exam specifications
1 Information and Security
1.1 The concept of Information
The candidate can …
1.1.1 Explain the difference between data and information.
1.1.2 Describe the storage medium that forms part of the basic infrastructure.
1.2 Value of Information
The candidate can …
1.2.1 Describe the value of data/information for organizations.
1.2.2 Describe how the value of data/information can influence organizations.
1.2.3 Explain how applied information security concepts protect the value of data/information.
1.3 Reliability Aspects
The candidate can …
1.3.1 Name the reliability aspects of information.
1.3.2 Describe the reliability aspects of information.
2 Threats and Risks
2.1 Threat and Risk
The candidate can …
2.1.1 Explain the concepts threat, risk and risk analysis.
2.1.2 Explain the relationship between a threat and a risk.
2.1.3 Describe various types of threats.
2.1.4 Describe various types of damage.
2.1.5 Describe various risk strategies.
2.2 Relationships between threats, risks and the reliability of information
The candidate can …
2.2.1 Recognize examples of the various types of threats.
2.2.2 Describe the effects that the various types of threats have on information and the processing of information.
3 Approach and Organization
3.1 Security Policy and Security Organization
The candidate can…
3.1.1 Outline the objectives and the content of a security policy.
3.1.2 Outline the objectives and the content of a security organization.
3.2 Components
The candidate can..
3.2.1 Explain the importance of a code of conduct.
3.2.2 Explain the importance of ownership.
3.2.3 Name the most important roles in the information security organization.
3.3 Incident Management
The candidate can..
3.3.1 Summarize how security incidents are reported and what information is required.
3.3.2 provide examples of security incidents.
3.3.3 Explain the consequences of not reporting security incidents.
3.3.4 Explain what an escalation entails (functionally and hierarchically).
3.3.5 Describe the effects of escalation within the organization.
3.3.6 Explain the incident cycle.
4 Measures
4.1 Importance of Measures
The candidate can..
4.1.1 Describe various ways in which security measures may be structured or arranged.
4.1.2 provide examples for each type of security measure.
4.1.3 Explain the relationship between risks and security measures.
4.1.4 Explain the objective of the classification of information.
4.1.5 Describe the effect of classification.
4.2 Physical Security Measures
The candidate can…
4.2.1 provide examples of physical security measures.
4.2.2 Describe the risks involved with insufficient physical security measures.
4.3 Technical Measures
The candidate can…
4.3.1 provide examples of technical security measures.
4.3.2 Describe the risks involved with insufficient technical security measures.
4.3.3 Understand the concepts cryptography, digital signature and certificate.
4.3.4 Name the three steps for online banking (PC, web site, payment).
4.3.5 Name various types of malicious software.
4.3.6 Describe the measures that can be used against malicious software.
4.4 Organizational Measures
The candidate can…
4.4.1 provide examples of organizational security measures.
4.4.2 Describe the dangers and risks involved with insufficient organizational security measures.
4.4.3 Describe access security measures such as the segregation of duties and the use of passwords.
4.4.4 Describe the principles of access management.
4.4.5 Describe the concepts identification, authentication and authorization.
4.4.6 Explain the importance to an organization of a well set-up Business Continuity Management.
4.4.7 Make clear the importance of conducting exercises.
5 Legislation and Regulations
5.1 Legislation and Regulations
The candidate can…
5.1.1 Explain why legislation and regulations are important for the reliability of information.
5.1.2 provide examples of legislation related to information security.
5.1.3 provide examples of regulations related to information security.
5.1.4 Indicate possible measures that may be taken to fulfill the requirements of legislation and regulations.

Concepts:
Access control Encryption
Asset Escalation
o Functional escalation
o Hierarchical escalation
Audit Exclusivity
Authentication Hacking
Authenticity Hoax
Authorization Identification
Availability Impact
Backup Incident cycle
Biometrics Indirect damage
Botnet Information
Business Continuity Management (BCM) Information analysis
Business Continuity Plan (BCP) Information architecture
Business Assets Information management
Category Information security review
Certificate Information system
Change Management Infrastructure
Classification (grading) Integrity
Clear desk policy Interference
Code of conduct ISO/IEC 27001
Code of practice for information security (ISO/IEC 27002)
ISO/IEC 27002
Completeness Key
Compliance Logical access management
Computer criminality legislation Managing business assets
Confidentiality Maintenance door
Continuity Malware
Controls Non-disclosure agreement
Copyright legislation Non-repudiation
Corrective Patch
Correctness Personal data protection legislation
Cryptography Personal firewall
Cyber crime Phishing
Damage Precision
Data Preventive
Detective Priority
Digital signature Privacy
Direct damage Production factor
Disaster Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
Disaster Recovery Plan (DRP) Public records legislation
Qualitative risk analysis Security regulations for the government
Quantitative risk analysis Segregation of duties
Reductive Social engineering
Redundancy Spam
Reliability of information Spyware
Repressive Stand-by arrangement
Risk Storage medium
Risk analysis System acceptance testing
Risk assessment (Dependency & Vulnerability analysis)
o Risk avoiding
o Risk bearing
Threat
Risk management
o Risk neutral
Timeliness
Risk strategy Trojan
Robustness Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)
Rootkit Urgency
Secret authentication information User access provisioning
Security in development Validation
Security event Verification
Security incident Virtual Private Network (VPN)
Security measure Virus
Security Organization Vulnerability
Security Policy Worm

Information Security Foundation based on ISO/IEC 27002 (ISFS)
Exin Information approach
Killexams : Exin Information approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EX0-105 Search results Killexams : Exin Information approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EX0-105 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Exin Killexams : Three ways to take an empathetic approach to an insider security incident

Security teams have been tackling external threats like ransomware and phishing for decades. It’s a simple mission: identify the threat, stop the attack by blocking, and prevent it from spreading. Urgency becomes a top priority – to ensure the team can contain the situation before bad actors get their hands on too much information or compromise the company’s systems.

Recently, data threats from other origins have become a more looming and present hazard. Companies are starting to realize that data leaks, loss and theft from internal sources pose just as much danger to an organization’s valued data and bottom line. Many security teams today don’t know that external and internal data threats require different approaches – in fact, they should tackle insider risks with an opposite mindset.

Define the internal threat

Insider risk, while not new, has become more prevalent over the past few years. For today’s highly- distributed workforce, use of collaboration tools and cloud destinations has reached an all-time high. Valued corporate data – customer information, financial insights and highly confidential trade secrets – moves between personal devices, unprotected email addresses or unsanctioned sharing services with little to no oversight. This opens up companies and employees to potentially oversharing information, whether intentionally or accidentally.

Companies of any size and specialty can fall victim to insider risk. This year alone, we saw a former Block employee download information belonging to CashApp customers; Cartier sued Tiffany for stealing trade secrets; and a former Apple car engineer pled guilty to stealing trade secrets. Although these all were cases of malicious data theft, what about the non-malicious data exposure events that could disrupt the business? Take, for example, the CFO who accidentally shared to her entire company a document entitled, “Restructuring.” An accident on the CFO’s part, think of the potential employee unrest of that event. For a public company, that could trigger a RegFD filing and impact stock trading and price.

This organization’s security team caught the CFO’s mistake quickly, but when it came time to address the CFO, was it appropriate to be heavy-handed like for an external threat? Or does a CFO making an honest error deserve some grace and in-the-moment corrective education? Security teams need to take an empathetic approach to potential breaches and data exposure; it’s the better, more productive option.

How to approach internal data exposure risks

Members of the security operations center (SOC) team are experts in preventing, detecting and responding to external cybersecurity risks that threaten their company’s assets or reputation. However, they are much less experienced in investigating and responding to potential insider risks.

More than 50% of internal events are non-malicious, like those of our CFO friend. This means, typically, an employee simply tries to do their job, but made a mistake, took a shortcut or found a workaround to a complicated process. While a company’s information is at risk whether the intent was malicious or not, assuming the worst and treating employees in a hostile manner often backfires.

Instead, when responding, approach each case with empathy, assuming the employee made an honest mistake and wants to learn how to do better in the future. These instances should include a team consisting of stakeholders from security, HR, the employee’s leader and maybe even legal because of the sensitive nature of confronting colleagues. Each investigation should consist of a few important elements:

  • Ensure the team has accurate situational context: It’s easy to assume malicious intent before the team gets the full picture. Withhold judgment until someone from the team has spoken to the employee in question, and take their word when it’s presented to them. HR leaders can help work through unconscious biases to ensure the investigations team approaches each potential threat with a blank slate.
  • Communicate the security team’s perspective: Often, employees are unaware that their action isn’t allowed. Whether security training hasn’t been thorough enough or latest enough, it’s not uncommon for the desire to get the job done to overtake a cybersecurity lesson learned months or years prior. Security and legal team members can explain in a way that each employee can understand why certain platforms or accounts aren’t sanctioned paths as well as re-share and reinforce existing data handling policies.
  • Educate and move forward: It’s important to not only outline what went wrong in that instance, but also educate employees on a better path to accomplishing similar tasks in the future. Providing this insight in the moment, as close as possible to the incident occurring, makes the lesson more likely to stick long-term. Security teams will also need to take action – there’s always the possibility that an insider breach was malicious and the team needs to deal with it appropriately. In those instances, the security, HR, leadership, and legal investigations team should meet to determine the best next steps based on company protocols.

By creating a culture of trust among colleagues, organizations will protect themselves better from both malicious and accidental breaches. Addressing insider risk with empathy can help keep employees engaged and productive, while ensuring a company’s valuable data stays safe and secure.

Jadee Hanson, CIO and CISO, Code42

Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:02:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.scmagazine.com/perspective/insider-threat/three-ways-to-take-an-empathetic-approach-to-an-insider-security-incident%ef%bf%bc
Killexams : Time to Change Our Flawed Approach to Security Awareness

Our approach to security awareness is flawed. And we must change it.

As Russian tanks creaked into Ukraine, CEOs and IT managers throughout the United States and much of the free world started sending out emails warning their employees about impending spear-phishing attacks.

It made sense: Spear-phishing was what Russians had used on Ukrainians many times in the past half of a decade, such as when they shut down the country's electrical grid on one of its coldest winter nights. It was also what the Russians had used against the Democratic National Committee and targets across the US.

At one end, the email missives from CEOs were refreshing. People were serious about the threat of phishing, which wasn't the case in 2014 when I started warning about its dangers on CNN.

At the other end, it was sobering. There wasn't much else organizations had figured out to do.

Sending messages to warn people was what AOL's CEO resorted to back in 1997, when spear-phishing first emerged and got its name. Budding hackers of the time were impersonating AOL administrators and fishing for subscribers' personal information. That was almost three decades ago, many lifetimes in Internet years.

In the interim, organizations have spent billions on security technologies and countless hours in security training. For context, a decade ago, Bank of America (BoA) was spending $400 million on cybersecurity. It now spends $1 billion per year on it. Yet thousands of its customer accounts in California were hacked last year.

And BoA isn't alone. This year, Microsoft, Nvidia, Samsung, LG, and T-Mobile — which recently paid out a $350 million settlement to customers because of a breach in 2021 — were hacked. All fell victim to spear-phishing attacks. No question that the employees in these companies are experienced and well-trained in detecting such attacks.

Flawed Approach

Clearly, something is fundamentally flawed in our approach, when you consider that after all this, email-based compromises increased by 35% in 2021, and American businesses lost over $2.4 billion due to it.

A big part of the problem is the current paradigm of user training. It primarily revolves around some form of cyber-safety instruction, usually following a mock phishing email test. The tests are sent periodically, and user failures are tracked — serving as an indicator of user vulnerability and forming the backbone of cyber-risk computations used by insurers and policymakers.

There is limited scientific support for this form of training. Most point to short-term value, with its effects wearing off within hours, according to a 2013 study. This has been ignored since the very inception of awareness as a solution.

There is another problem. Security awareness isn't a solution; it's a product with an ecosystem of deep-pocketed vendors pushing for it. There is legislation and federal policy mandating it, some stemming from lobbying by training organizations, making it necessary for every organization to implement it and users to endure it.

Finally, there is no valid measurement of security awareness. Who needs it? What type? And how much is enough? There are no answers to these questions.

Instead, the focus is on whether users fail a phishing test without a diagnosis of the why — the reason behind the failures. Because of this, phishing attacks continue, and organizations have no idea why. Which is why our best defense has been to send out email warnings to users.

Defend With Fundamentals

The only way to defend against phishing is to start at the fundamentals. Begin with the key question: What makes users vulnerable to phishing?

The science of security already provides the answers. It has identified specific mind-level or cognitive factors and behavioral habits that cause user vulnerability. Cognitive factors include cyber-risk beliefs — ideas we hold in our minds about online risk, such as how safe it might be to open a PDF document versus a Word document, or how a certain mobile OS might offer better protection for opening emails. Many such beliefs, some flawed and others accurate, govern how much mental attention we pay to details online.

Many of us also acquire media habits, from opening every incoming message to rituals such as checking emails and feeds the moment we awake. Some of these are conditioned by apps; others by organizational IT policy. They lead to mindless reactions to emails that increase phishing vulnerability.

There is another, largely ignored, factor: suspicion. It is that unease when encountering something; that sense that something is off. It almost always leads to information seeking and, armed with the right types of knowledge or experience, leads to deception-detection and correction.

It did for the former head of the FBI. Robert Muller, after entering his banking information in response to an email request, stopped before hitting Send. Something didn't seem right. In the momentary return to reason caused by suspicion, he realized he was being phished, and changed his banking passwords.

By measuring suspicion along with the cognitive and behavioral factors leading to phishing vulnerability, organizations can diagnose what makes users vulnerable. This information can be quantified and converted into a risk index, with which they can identify those most at risk, the weakest links, and protect them better.

Doing this will help us defend users based on a diagnosis of what they need, rather than a training approach that's being sold as a solution — a paradigm that we know doesn't work.

After billions spent, our best approach remains sending out email warnings about incoming attacks. Surely, we can do better. By applying the science of security, we can. And we must — because spear-phishing presents a clear and present danger to the Internet.

Thu, 29 Sep 2022 21:23:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/vulnerabilities-threats/time-to-change-our-flawed-approach-to-security-awareness
Killexams : Modernization: An approach to what works

This article is part of a VB special issue. Read the full series here: How Data Privacy Is Transforming Marketing.

With digital disruptors eating away at market share and profits hurting from prolonged, intensive cost wars between traditional competitors, businesses had been looking to reduce their cost-to-income ratios even before COVID-19. When the pandemic happened, the urgency hit a new high. On top of that came the scramble to digitize pervasively in order to survive.

But there was a problem. Legacy infrastructure, being cost-inefficient and inflexible, hindered both objectives. The need for technology modernization was never clearer. However, what wasn’t so clear was the path to this modernization.  

Should the enterprise rip up and replace the entire system or upgrade it in parts? Should the transformation go “big bang” or proceed incrementally, in phases? To what extent and to which type of cloud should they shift to? And so on.

The Infosys Modernization Radar 2022 addresses these and other questions. 

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The state of the landscape

Currently, 88% of technology assets are legacy systems, half of which are business-critical. An additional concern is that many organizations lack the skills to adapt to the requirements of the digital era. This is why enterprises are rushing to modernize: The report found that 70% to 90% of the legacy estate will be modernized within five years.

Approaches to modernization

Different modernization approaches have different impacts. For example, non-invasive (or less invasive) approaches involve superficial changes to a few technology components and impact the enterprise in select pockets. These methods may be considered when the IT architecture is still acceptable, the system is not overly complex, and the interfaces and integration logic are adequate. Hence they entail less expenditure.

But since these approaches modernize minimally, they are only a stepping stone to a more comprehensive future initiative. Some examples of less and non-invasive modernization include migrating technology frameworks to the cloud, migrating to open-source application servers, and rehosting mainframes.

Invasive strategies modernize thoroughly, making a sizable impact on multiple stakeholders, application layers and processes. Because they involve big changes, like implementing a new package or re-engineering, they take more time and cost more money than non-invasive approaches and carry a higher risk of disruption, but also promise more value.

When an organization’s IT snarl starts to stifle growth, it should look at invasive modernization by way of re-architecting legacy applications to cloud-native infrastructure, migrating traditional relational database management systems to NoSQL-type systems, or simplifying app development and delivery with low-code/no-code platforms. 

The right choice question

From the above discussion, it is apparent that not all consequences of modernization are intentional or even desirable. So that brings us back to the earlier question: What is the best modernization strategy for an enterprise?

The truth is that there’s no single answer to this question because the choice of strategy depends on the organization’s context, resources, existing technology landscape, business objectives. However, if the goal is to minimize risk and business disruption, then some approaches are clearly better than others.

In the Infosys Modernization Radar 2022 report, 51% of respondents taking the big-bang approach frequently suffered high levels of disruption, compared to 21% of those who modernized incrementally in phases. This is because big-bang calls for completely rewriting enterprise core systems, an approach that has been very often likened to changing an aircraft engine mid-flight. 

Therefore big-bang modernization makes sense only when the applications are small and easily replaceable. But most transformations entail bigger changes, tilting the balance in favor of phased and coexistence approaches, which are less disruptive and support business continuity.

Slower but much steadier

Phased modernization progresses towards microservices architecture and could take the coexistence approach. As the name suggests, this entails the parallel runs of legacy and new systems until the entire modernization — of people, processes and technology — is complete. This requires new cloud locations for managing data transfers between old and new systems.

The modernized stack points to a new location with a routing façade, an abstraction that talks to both modernized and legacy systems. To embrace this path, organizations need to analyze applications in-depth and perform security checks to ensure risks don’t surface in the new architecture. 

Strategies such as the Infosys zero-disruption method frequently take the coexistence approach since it is suited to more invasive types of modernization. Planning the parallel operation of both old and new systems until IT infrastructure and applications make their transition is extremely critical.

The coexistence approach enables a complete transformation to make the application scalable, flexible, modular and decoupled, utilizing microservices architecture. A big advantage is that the coexistence method leverages the best cloud offerings and gives the organization access to a rich partner ecosystem. 

An example of zero-disruption modernization that I have led is the transformation of the point-of-sale systems of an insurer. More than 50,000 rules (business and UI) involving more than 10 million lines of code were transformed using micro-change management. This reduced ticket inventory by 70%, improved maintenance productivity by about 10% and shortened new policy rollout time by about 30%. 

Summing up

Technology modernization is imperative for meeting consumer expectations, lowering costs, increasing scalability and agility, and competing against nimble, innovative next-generation players. In other words, it is the ticket to future survival. 

There are many modernization approaches, and not all of them are equal. For example, the big-bang approach, while quick and sometimes even more affordable, carries a very significant risk of disruption. Since a single hour of critical system downtime could cost as much as $300,000, maintaining business continuity during transformation is a very big priority for enterprises.

The phased coexistence approach mitigates disruption to ensure a seamless and successful transformation. 

Gautam Khanna is the vice president and global head of the modernization practice at Infosys.

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Wed, 05 Oct 2022 09:32:00 -0500 Gautam Khanna, Infosys en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/data-infrastructure/modernization-an-approach-to-what-works/
Killexams : Adopting An Open Approach To Modernize IT

Rajat Bhargava is an entrepreneur, investor, author and currently CEO and cofounder of JumpCloud.

From the 1980s until the mid-2000s, the monoculture around Microsoft ruled. Users logged into Windows-managed computers and used Office and Windows File Server; businesses relied on Microsoft Active Directory (AD) to manage user identity and access.

Then, IT evolved. On-premises environments and closed systems gave way to the flexibility of the cloud. Organizations adopted Mac- and Linux-based systems. Software as a service (SaaS) environments exploded. Data centers started to be replaced by infrastructure as a service (IaaS) providers. Now, Gartner predicts that over 95% of new digital workloads will be deployed on cloud-native platforms by 2025, a dramatic increase from 30% in 2021.

With cloud servers preferred for data processing and storage, web applications now dominate the market. In part because wired connections gave way to wireless networks and people became more mobile through smartphones, and Google Workspace (aka G Suite, Google Apps) and M365 (aka Office 365) became as popular as machine-based Office applications in the enterprise space.

In this environment, organizations can’t be bound to anachronistic approaches as businesses shift to the cloud and globally distributed workforces. Now’s the time for companies—especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)—to approach IT with an open mind and an open approach.

“Open” in this context doesn’t mean porous or loose; it represents scalability, flexibility and agility in terms of changes in technology and developments in the stack. An open approach improves end user experience, worker productivity and satisfaction. An open approach to IT can be a critical tool in helping organizations establish zero-trust security without sacrificing the agility and flexibility made possible by the cloud.

In this article, I’ll offer some tips to getting started with this approach.

Open Identity

Modernizing IT stacks means making sure that work—remote and hybrid—functions well. Employees care about doing their job; they want easy access to the resources they need. IT teams want a similarly streamlined experience and assurance that company data remains secure without impacting productivity. My company’s survey of 506 SME IT admins found that nearly 75% prefer a single solution to manage employee identities, access and devices than having to manage a number of different solutions. An open directory platform approach incorporates a cloud-hosted “virtual” domain that meets this need, offering the flexibility and security necessary to support modern workplaces.

This means creating an IT environment that consumes identities wherever they live. Not just employee identities but also device identities, allowing your system to be open to receive information from authorized sources anywhere. On the outgoing side, it means creating a single source of user identity that can be propagated out to other devices, other users or to an authorized network.

Identity as a service and cloud directories are vital tools that enable an open approach. Look for those that offer fluidity and the flexibility to change resources any time (for example, from M365 to Google Workspace or vice versa).

Flexible Security Layers

Instead of traditional perimeters, an open approach favors a creation of virtual offices and security perimeters around each employee—and whatever devices they use. Being open doesn’t equate to a cavalier security approach; it’s a way to offer authorized access to resources anywhere that is convenient and tracked for compliance and overall visibility.

Security layers can evolve with each organization’s need and should include:

Identity layer: A cloud directory houses authentication credentials and establishes centralized access control across user identity, admin access, service accounts and machines. Centering identity within a cloud directory allows SME teams to draw a security perimeter around each employee, enabling updates without disruption and providing access to on-prem and cloud-based resources.

Device layer: Most IT environments operate within an ever-evolving state of company-issued, personal and mobile devices running some combination of Mac, Windows or Linux systems. In this complicated device ecosystem, organizations should extend user identity to establish device trust, meaning that a device is known and its user is verified. A mobile device management solution (MDM) is one option that can install a remote agent to handle basics—including multifactor authentication (MFA) and permissions—zero-touch onboarding and remote lock, restart or wipe. Determine the control level you need in your device environment, factoring in options like how you honor employee device choice and how you manage your bring your own device (BYOD) policy.

IT resource layer: In office environments, employees generally use a form of single sign-on (SSO) to log into their desktop at designated workstations and then get instant access to applications and shared files and servers. In remote, hybrid and other modern IT environments, SSO should include everything from SaaS apps to systems, files, infrastructure and shared networks. Some organizations use SSO solely for web-based applications, while some centralize identity and extend it to virtually any IT resource through authentication protocols like LDAP, SAML, OpenID Connect, SSH, RADIUS and REST.

Open Insights

Given security, ongoing monitoring and compliance needs, visibility is critical to an open IT approach. Considering the breadth of access transactions, businesses should look for a holistic solution with broad coverage.

Basic event logging data is table stakes, and IT solutions should include a method for capturing discrete and unique log formats. That includes logs from SSO and from cloud RADIUS for network connection, LDAP and device connections—any log format for resources deployed in your stack.

Because integration requirements make log analysis and management solutions expensive, challenging to implement and difficult for admins managing custom feeds for authentication protocols, consider options that offer a wide range of analysis by enriching raw data. This can be done with a number of other data points, sessionizing the data through post-processing. Such information provides admins with broad insight across their entire IT environment, not just into a particular service or user.

For many organizations, extending closed legacy systems was a necessity. In the age of hybrid and remote work, it’s proving more of a liability than an asset. An open approach allows companies to embrace a diverse, modern IT environment that can keep pace with what users need, keeping them and company data secure at every access point.


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Thu, 06 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Rajat Bhargava en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2022/10/07/adopting-an-open-approach-to-modernize-it/
Killexams : How not to tell customers their data is at risk: the perils of the Optus approach

Optus fears data on up to 9.8 million of its customers has been accessed in a sophisticated cyberattack – including, for some customers, passport and drivers licence details, as well as phone numbers, dates of birth and email addresses.

It made the announcement through the media, in the middle of Thursday’s national day of mourning public holiday, and during the four-day long weekend in Melbourne in the lead-up to the AFL grand final.

At first, it didn’t text or email its customers. Instead, it issued a press release in the belief this was

the quickest and most effective way to alert as many current and former customers as possible, so they could be vigilant and monitor for any suspicious activity.

Trust in the media is at an all-time low. Communications authority Edelman reports that globally, only 50% of people trust the media, down from 62% a decade ago. Far more people (61%) trust businesses.

Tweets rather than texts

It has been conventional wisdom that brands should take an integrated approach to marketing communications. Many channels are better than one, increasingly so as audiences for traditional channels continue to fragment.

An integrated marketing approach need not mean communicating through every available channel, but it should mean strategically selecting channels that are trusted and consumed by the brand’s customers.


Read more: This law makes it illegal for companies to collect third-party data to profile you. But they do anyway


One of the best channels Optus has is its own phone network, and it is experienced in using it to contact its customers.

Customers are likely to expect this where Optus has something important to say, and they are likely to trust a direct message from Optus more than one filtered through the media.

They are even likely to spread it via word of mouth through friends who also use Optus, giving the company a continuing role in shaping the message.

Instead, Optus backed up its press release with tweets.

Optus has around 5.8 million active users, around 21% of the Australian population. They are a cross-section of the population, having little in common other than the fact they use Optus for communications.

Some of Optus’ customers, especially those in Gen Z, might not use traditional news media. They wouldn’t have received the message through that channel.

Former customers dating back to 2017 are also likely to be affected by the breach, taking the total affected to around 9.8 million, about one third of the population.

Twitter is used by about only about 18% of the population, and the overlap with Optus customers might not be large.

What can brands learn from Optus?

As marketing and branding experts, we’ve distilled three lessons, each well known before the data breach.

  1. When you have news affecting your customers, tell them before anyone else, in a personalised, one-to-one approach.

  2. Use channels that are trusted and consumed by your customers.

  3. Encourage word of mouth through your relationships with your brand community and loyal customers.

Thu, 22 Sep 2022 19:27:00 -0500 en text/html https://theconversation.com/how-not-to-tell-customers-their-data-is-at-risk-the-perils-of-the-optus-approach-191258
Killexams : A new approach to closing the cyber workforce talent gap

National security leaders routinely warn that the United States faces growing cyber threats. Managing risks will require expertise in the public and private sector to Boost security. But there are currently more than 700,000 open cybersecurity positions across the country. That includes nearly 39,000 open government jobs. 

Federal and state government agencies often struggle to hire and retain employees with needed skills to fill cybersecurity positions. The Commerce Department’s chief information officer recently told FedScoop that his agency had resorted to poaching talent from other agencies. “We’re stealing people from each other, that’s what it’s come down to,” commented Commerce CIO André Mendes.

For state and local government agencies, the competition for cyber talent is even more challenging. The National Association of State Chief Information Officers described the “talent crisis” as a top issue facing state technology leaders in 2022. With state and local governments facing growing cyber threats, many state and local government agencies struggle to recruit, fill, and retain key positions responsible for cybersecurity. 

Recognizing the problem, the Department of Homeland Security recently announced a new state and local cybersecurity grant program that will award $1 billion in funds over the next four years. That’s on top of the billions in unspent homeland security grants awarded to states and local governments that could be spent to Boost cyber risk management. 

But states and localities, like the federal government, will continue to struggle to manage cyber risks if they don’t have the workers needed to fill key positions. Addressing the nation’s cyber workforce challenge will require new approaches at the federal and state level to Boost training and help prepare future workers for careers in cybersecurity.

One promising approach is Rep. Lisa McClain (R-Mich.) and Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-N.Y.)’s new National Community College Cybersecurity Challenge Act, introduced on Thursday. The bill aims to address the cyber workforce talent gap by leveraging the nation’s community colleges and public-private partnerships to Boost training. 

The bipartisan bill would authorize funding for the Department of Education to provide challenge grants to states that submit a plan to expand cybersecurity instruction at community colleges. It would also increase the number of students earning degrees in cybersecurity, with a focus on helping disadvantaged students. States would be required to provide 50 percent in matching funds (though the Education secretary would be empowered to waive this requirement). States would also be required to help community college students gain access to “real-world cybersecurity work-based experiences” and job opportunities through public-private partnerships. 

The legislation would also create a “national cybersecurity workforce innovation fund” to award matching grants to community colleges and public or private entities that focus on cybersecurity training. Awarded funds would be required to be used to Boost training by placing cybersecurity professionals into teaching positions and work-based training programs for students to gain real-world cybersecurity experience. 

The bill would authorize $250 million in annual grants to states through 2027 and a total of $150 million for the workforce innovation fund. The bill wisely offsets these authorized spending increases by rescinding the same amount from unspent coronavirus relief funding bills passed in 2020. 

With growing questions about the return on investment of federal subsidies for higher education, refocusing federal funds to Boost cybersecurity training at community colleges through public-private partnerships is a commonsense strategy to address the nation’s cybersecurity workforce training gap while offering students new pathways for promising careers.

The cybersecurity workforce talent gap also spur the education sector to address the cybersecurity workforce talent gap. Student demand for this training should be on the rise, since cybersecurity degrees offer a promising return on investment. According to the Department of Homeland Security, the average starting salary for a two-year degree in cybersecurity is $70,000,  increasing to $116,000 for students earning four-year degrees.

Schools at all levels of the education system, including K-12, should be working to provide students with options to train for cybersecurity careers. With states having more than $100 billion in unspent relief funds for education, there is a particularly good opportunity to use funds to help disadvantaged students receive training for these high-paying jobs. 

Facing growing threats, the nation faces an urgent need to prepare a workforce for open positions to defend the public and private sectors from cyber attacks. Federal and state policymakers, and the entire education sector, should consider new approaches to solving this workforce training gap. The bipartisan National Community College Cybersecurity Challenge Act is a good place to start. 

Dan Lips is Head of Policy at Lincoln Network.

Mon, 26 Sep 2022 07:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://thehill.com/opinion/congress-blog/3662151-a-new-approach-to-closing-the-cyber-workforce-talent-gap/
Killexams : Johnson & Johnson CEO touts 'smart' data approach to medicine breakthroughs at new research center
Johnson & Johnson CEO touts 'smart' data approach to new medicines at new research center

watch now

Johnson & Johnson is honing in on finding new solutions to advance health care treatments, CEO Joaquin Duato told CNBC's Jim Cramer on Tuesday.

The "Mad Money" host sat down with the chief executive on Tuesday at the opening of the company's new research and development center in San Francisco.

Duato, who became CEO in January, said this is an exciting moment for the company because it's on the path of facilitating the future of medicine.

When Cramer asked what makes him confident that Johnson & Johnson can deliver on this claim, Duato cited two initiatives: 1/ the way it develops and discovers new medicines and, 2/ how the company is incorporating technology into its medical devices.

"When it comes to developing new medicines, our ability to process hundreds of millions of data points makes us much smarter and faster when it comes to identifying the right targets for our medicines," Duato explained.

Duato said the company is working to be more competitive in medtech and pharmaceuticals, segments that fall under the same business umbrella, by taking the "smart" approach in building medical devices through sensors, visualizations and the ability to upload data to advance medical outcomes.

Johnson & Johnson is the largest pharmaceutical company in the world. Its pharma business sales jumped 12.4% to $13.3 billion in the second quarter, while medtech and consumer health sales grew 3.4% to $6.8 billion and 2.9% to $3.8 billion, respectively.

Disclaimer: Cramer's Charitable Trust owns shares of Johnson & Johnson.

Click here to download Jim Cramer's Guide to Investing at no cost to help you build long-term wealth and invest smarter.

Tue, 20 Sep 2022 13:24:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/09/20/jnj-ceo-touts-smart-data-approach-to-new-medicines-at-new-center.html
Killexams : Launching today - Astride, the secure, easy-to-use, digital skills gap-assessment tool created by EXIN

Astride Insights Reports helps organizations identify digital skills gaps, maximize return on learning, and boost overall performance

UTRECHT, Netherlands, Oct. 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- EXIN, a leading independent examination institute is embarking on a new chapter. Astride revolutionizes how individuals can learn how they benchmark in their current job role. They will gain free insights to better equip them so they can prepare for what's next in their career. This tool is a great asset for organizations, as they will gain knowledge about team skills and competencies and learn what certifications can help bridge skills gaps.

EXIN showcases Astride to the Stichting Competens, whose investment has been a great support to get Astride to where it is today. Both firms are excited to see how Astride can benefit professionals in their digital skills journey.

For more information, visit https://www.exin.com/astride-by-exin/

How does it work?

  • First, Astride asks a series of questions in key areas based on the recognized European Competency Framework (e-CF).
  • The proprietary software gathers the information and processes it.
  • Then, a custom-tailored Astride Insights Report is produced.

The tool evaluates competencies and compares them with equivalent job roles. By focusing on 42 primary competencies, and 30 job roles, the tool is a tremendous asset for companies to identify organization-wide skills performance.

Michiel Buysing Damsté, CEO at EXIN, is excited to unveil Astride, commenting:

"Technological disruption comes fast! Companies struggle to find professionals with the right, relevant skills in a competitive labor market. To maximize Return on Learning (RoL) we need to make sure that we invest our time on what matters most for professionals' current roles and future career development. Astride by EXIN, boosts digital skill development journeys by identifying skills gaps on an individual and organizational level. Astride provides guidance for next steps relevant for CxOs, L&D leaders and professionals."

Petra Hendrikson, Chair of the Board of Directors at Stichting Competens, IT Skillsfund adds:

"The Stichting Competens invested in Astride, and we look back on a great collaboration with EXIN. We strongly believe that Astride will make a big impact for people who seek relevant feedback on their skill levels and growth potential."

Visit https://www.exin.com/astride-by-exin/ to get started.

About EXIN
We are EXIN, an independent examination institute focusing on competencies required in the digital world. We offer an end-to-end solution for certifying professionals. In 2022, we now engage in the skills-gap assessment space with our latest tool, Astride by EXIN. We are proud to be part of the Software Improvement Group (SIG). SIG focuses on assessing and certifying IT Processes and Technology, we have our focus on People. EXIN - certified for what's next.

We look forward to helping you in your global certification and accreditation efforts. www.exin.com

Photo - https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1912816/EXIN_Showcases_Astride.jpg

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Mon, 03 Oct 2022 20:24:00 -0500 de text/html https://www.finanznachrichten.de/nachrichten-2022-10/57213091-launching-today-astride-the-secure-easy-to-use-digital-skills-gap-assessment-tool-created-by-exin-008.htm
Killexams : CoRise’s approach to up-skilling involves fewer courses and more access

Despite the boom of education technology investment and innovation over the past few years, founder Julia Stiglitz, who broke into the edtech world as an early Coursera employee, thinks there’s a lot of room to grow. Her new startup, CoRise, sells expert-led programming to people who want to up-skill their careers. It’s a fresh play in a crowded sector, with heavyweights including Udemy, Udacity, Guild Education and, well, her former employer.

“We haven’t solved the problems yet, and in fact, they’re growing,” Stiglitz said in an interview with TechCrunch. The edtech veteran is right: The next-generation of edtech is still looking for ways to balance motivation and behavior change, offered at an accessible price point in a scalable format. There’s an inherent trade-off between engagement and scale — an elephant that even the unicorns have not entirely been able to avoid.

Enter CoRise, which wants to do it all. The startup, built by Stiglitz, Sourabh Bajaj and Jacob Samuelson, pairs students who want to learn and Boost on highly technical skills, such as DevOps or data science, with experts. CoRise defines experts as leaders at tech companies; advertised instructors include a data engineering manager at Drizly, former CTO at Wikimedia and director of machine learning at ShareChat, for example. Some classes, like this SQL crash course, are even taught by CoRise employees.

As far as early users go, it’s not going for the solopreneur who wants to break into tech. Instead, CoRise is selling to enterprises in need of more tailored solutions for their talent. In talking to learning and development leaders, the founder learned that organizations are either rolling out asynchronous education platforms to the entire staff, or bringing in consultants to do customer training; “there sort of wasn’t anything in between,” she said, so she built it.

Stiglitz doesn’t want CoRise to scale to a place where it hosts 20,000 courses taught by thousands of instructors. Instead, the startup wants to offer one applied machine learning course that teaches 1,000 or 5,000 students at a time.

By focusing on bigger cohorts, CoRise is taking a different approach than some of its competitors. Udemy founder Gagan Biyani, for example, is working on Maven, which offers expert-led programming that divides people into small groups to nurture collaboration and the exchange of ideas. Stiglitz, meanwhile, thinks that smaller cohorts drive up the expense of the program. Standardized courses with bigger classes is the only way to get programming to “be really accessible”, in her view.

Single course access costs an average of $400, and students can buy an all-access pass to every cohort for around $1,000, she adds. For comparison, a single course on Maven — perhaps this one on founder finance — can cost $2,000.

“We’re trying to figure out how you get outcomes or results for learners at this scale, and still make it really accessible, still have instructors make solid revenue on it,” she said. “We need to figure out how to have lots of people in a cohort and still have a great experience.”

The challenge of big classes and standardized courses, of course, is the lack of personalization. CoRise created a “nudging infrastructure” that looks at how an individual student is interacting with a course, associated lectures and due assignments. It also looks at things like if the student has gone to office hours, or if they have submitted their work in time.

The back-end information helps CoRise then send out an automated “nudge” or push notification to someone who needs a reminder to seek additional support. The course manager also follows up with a human response so students don’t feel like it’s all robots and automatic messages, the founder explained.

Over time, CoRise can get smarter on how to support students who are struggling before they even show up to office hours, a big vision shared among the personalized learning movement.

“A lot of what we’re trying to figure out is like what needs to be human to retain that motivational element? And then what can we scale up on the backend in order to drive scale and keep costs down to make a reasonable price,” she said. Stiglitz says that the average completion rate of the course is 78%. The startup’s nudge framework is certainly compelling, but is only one step toward a more customized and engaging experience for learners. And while low costs certainly matter — a lot — there can be a race to the bottom if other competitors also seek to drive price down to win over customers.

While the startup didn’t disclose the number of learners who have gone through its platform, it did say that they come from more than 500 companies, including Spotify, Walmart and Lyft. It has a 68 NPS score.

The startup has raised millions to better figure out the above. To date, CoRise tells TechCrunch that it has raised $8.5 million from Greylock, GSV and Cowboy Ventures since launch, with $5.5 million in its first check and the following $3 million given in latest traction. Other investors include Greg Brockman, co-founder of OpenAI, and Mustafa Suleyman, co-founder DeepMind.

My last question for Stiglitz was an annoying one: How does her focus on fewer classes and instructors sit with her investors? Wouldn’t they want her to always be launching new classes?

“The pressure is going to be scale, scale, scale, but it’s going to be scale, scale, scale, within the class,” she said. “We’re targeting large companies who want to roll out SQL training to 1,000 people, but they’re not going to want to roll out eight different versions of that class. That’s how we get scale.”

Image Credits: CoRise

Wed, 28 Sep 2022 04:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://techcrunch.com/2022/09/28/corises-approach-to-up-skilling-involves-fewer-courses-and-more-access/
Killexams : CAR T-cell therapy is becoming a more accepted therapeutic approach. What is it?

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Thu, 29 Sep 2022 11:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.metrowestdailynews.com/story/lifestyle/health-fitness/2022/09/28/car-t-cell-therapy-new-approach-fighting-cancer-other-diseases/10445340002/
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