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E20-920 Cloud Services Expert exam for Cloud Architects

Exam Title : Dell EMC Certified Expert - Cloud Architect - Cloud Services (DECE-CA)
Exam ID : E20-920
Exam Duration : 90 mins
Questions in exam : 60
Passing Score : 60%
Official Training : Cloud Services Planning and Design (MR-1CP-ETCSPD)
Exam Center : Pearson VUE
Real Questions : Dell EMC Cloud Services Expert Real Questions
VCE practice questions : Dell EMC E20-920 Certification VCE Practice Test

IT Transformation and Cloud Services 10%
- Describe the nature and features of various industry IT transformation models used to create business value
- Describe features of the ITaaS transformation model and why it is being adopted (drivers, benefits)
- Describe nature of the cloud services and how they tie into the four ITaaS Focus areas (governance, finance, organization, and technology), as well as planning and design considerations for creating an environment for building and delivering cloud services

Technology Planning 30%
- Identify innovative practices, tools, and technologies (e.g., DevOps, Microservices, open source) that influence the creation of cloud native applications and cloud services; Contrast these with traditional application development
- Describe workload considerations, analysis, and right sourcing as well as assessment of current applications profiles and existing services
- Identify backend technology processes and tools that might aid in delivering cloud services as well as the significance, and benefits, of measuring and reporting for cloud services
- Identify characteristics of, and considerations for, orchestration and automation and their important role in moving from traditional IT capabilities to delivering cloud services
- Describe the nature and use of Service Catalogs and Service Templates and the tie-in to Orchestration

Governance Planning, Security, and Trust 18%
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, governance for cloud services
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, risk management for cloud services
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, compliance and auditing for cloud services
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, security and trust with cloud services

Financial Planning 10%
- Describe financial goals and considerations in support of cloud services; understand the terms CAPEX, OPEX, ROI, and Cost to serve
- Describe considerations for service funding as well as details for service costing and pricing
- Describe the nature and use of Chargeback and Showback financial information

Organizational Planning 10%
- Characterize the challenges (e.g., legacy tools, culture, service maturity level) typically faced by organizations that plan to deliver cloud services
- Describe the considerations (e.g., alignment, cross functional teams, DevOps) for organizations that are transitioning to cloud services within an ITaaS model
- Describe the organizational roles, responsibilities, and competencies required for deploying cloud based services; identifying skills and gaps; developing related training

Service Creation and Management 15%
- Describe the strategy and related considerations for overall service design, taking into consideration various deployment models
- Describe key components of service creation, including: template, offering, contract, and orchestration
- Describe key components of service operations and management including: visibility and control, management, reporting and alerting, termination of services

Emerging Trends in Cloud Services 7%
- Identify emerging trends in technology that are reshaping social behaviors, businesses, including a movement towards a more digital world
- Describe emerging transformation of cloud services delivery resulting from converged infrastructure and operations engineering, with emphasis on how IT can deliver business value through the leveraging of modern applications and software defined approaches

Cloud Services Expert exam for Cloud Architects
EMC Architects exam plan
Killexams : EMC Architects exam plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-920 Search results Killexams : EMC Architects exam plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-920 https://killexams.com/exam_list/EMC Killexams : Architects must prove CPD to stay on register under emerging ARB plans

From 2024, architects will have to carry out CPD every year, and confirm they have undertaken it when they pay their annual retention fee, according to emerging plans drawn up by the professional regulator.

A three-month consultation has begun on the board’s latest proposals, which have been in the pipeline for more than a year.

The regulator initially went out to the profession last autumn to help shape its new powers – given to it under The Building Safety Bill – to monitor the training and development of all architects throughout their careers.

Under the new regime, architects will need to record their CPD activities with the ARB, detailing the outcomes, as well as writing a ‘reflective statement’ on the development they have carried out over the previous 12 months and their future development requirements.

To avoid duplication, CPD undertaken to maintain RIBA membership would be transferable and accepted by the ARB. The board would spot-check architects’ CPD records annually.

The board has said it does not plan to introduce a minimum number of activities or hours that an architect must have completed – and architects will be encouraged to do the CPD that is ‘most relevant to their practice, in a way that works best for them’.

However, the ARB has left the door open to mandate core subjects such as, potentially, sustainability and fire safety.

Alan Kershaw, chair of the ARB, said: ‘This new consultation takes our plans on to the next stage and I strongly encourage all architects to respond. Our scheme will directly impact architects’ day-to-day practice, so now is the time to have your say in how the scheme is shaped.’

Simon Allford, RIBA President, said: ‘From the building safety crisis to the climate emergency, it’s crucial that architects continue to develop their knowledge and skills to respond to the challenges we face. We therefore welcome ARB’s consultation on the draft scheme for enhancing CPD.’

Allford also backed the move to ‘bolster, rather than duplicate’ the institute's existing system by accepting CPD records submitted to RIBA.

He added: ‘I urge all RIBA members to review the ARB proposals and respond directly. Reforms to competency requirements must reflect and cater to the practical needs of the profession while instilling confidence in the wider sector and public.’

Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Richard Waite en-US text/html https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/architects-must-prove-cpd-to-stay-on-register-under-emerging-arb-plans
Killexams : Neal Shasore: the radical historian with plans to shake up architectural education

Who had really heard of Neal Shasore before he became the head of the London School of Architecture (LSA) last summer? The 33-year-old was previously an art history lecturer at the University of Oxford and has never worked in an architecture practice. He concedes the job ‘took a degree of naivety and foolhardiness to enter into’ and that he has had ‘an intense’ first year. Even so, while getting to grips with running the LSA he has still found time to work on two forthcoming books.

Remarkably, he has also sketched out plans to expand the institution through the creation of  ‘Part 0’ and ‘Part 4’ courses – opportunities to learn before and after the traditional architecture career path. Shasore says the courses will address a need for types of teaching beyond the status quo of  ‘funnelling people into 19th-century forms of professionalism’.

The course expansion looks set to renew the LSA’s reputation for disruption just as the school might have seemed to be heading mainstream. When it was launched in 2015 with an ‘earn as you learn’ model for Part 2 students, it was hailed as a radical experiment to diversify architectural education. But times have since caught up with it: several universities now offer apprenticeships, while the ARB said in June that it had ‘overwhelming support’ for scrapping Parts 1, 2 and 3 altogether.

As the LSA welcomes 51 new students this month – and Shasore embarks on his second year in post – the AJ caught up with the head of school to talk about his first year in the job, his plans for expansion and his ambivalence towards conventional qualification.

Growing up in south-west London, Shasore was close to his uncle, an architectural designer who worked at Whitbread, a FTSE100 hospitality group. His uncle, who, like his mother, was a Ugandan Gujarati expelled from the country by dictator Idi Amin in the 1970s, encouraged him to draw and nurtured his interest in design.

But Shasore says that as a teenager he ‘lost confidence in [his] ability to draw at the worst-possible moment’, adding that ‘architecture [therefore] never seemed like something that I could do’. Shasore studied art history at university: he credits a trip to 66 Portland Place as a student, as well as Chris Ofili and David Adjaye’s 2002 exhibition The Upper Room, for sparking an interest in architecture.

Shasore later worked at 66 Portland Place ‘as the second most junior member’ of the RIBA’s practice department, co-ordinating advisory groups and professional programmes. He is now writing a book on the relationship between the RIBA and its headquarters to the British Empire, which is due to be published next year.

His other book, which is published this month, is on the ‘deeply unfashionable subject’ of architectural culture in interwar Britain – the focus of his PhD. He confesses that he thinks buildings from the period are ‘shit, broadly speaking – lots of run-of-the-mill Neo-Georgian’, but he finds the period interesting because of the creation of the Architects Registration Act and the modern architecture sector.

I had a vision of where I thought architecture education might go and about the principles that could and should underpin it

Shasore had imagined he would continue to research and lecture at Oxford ‘hopefully forever’ but applied to run the LSA following founder Will Hunter’s surprise resignation last spring. ‘I had a vision of where I thought architecture education might go and about the principles that could and should underpin it,’ he says.

He has experience of running organisations as a trustee of the Society of Architectural Historians in Great Britain, the Twentieth Century Society and The Architectural Heritage Fund. Nevertheless, he has had to get used to running a school with 11 full-time staff, 40 teachers and roughly 110 students.

‘The biggest challenge is continuing to proselytise for our mission and attract ever more students to come and study with us,’ he says. This year’s cohort is smaller than last year’s intake of 67.  The problem, as Shasore sees it, is that ‘the potential for growing market share is relatively limited’. Every year 2,400 students enrol in a Part 2 course at one of 42 architecture schools – meaning there is an average cohort of 57. Even that number could fall, notes Shasore, if post-Part 1 students choose to stay in work and delay further study during the cost of living crisis.

Securing funding is also ‘a major part of what I and the board have to do’, he adds. In 2020/21 the school spent £874,000 but raised just £821,000 through fees. It did, however, manage to drum up a further £118,000 through fundraising, according to the Charities Commission.

Shasore is also co-teacher on one of the school’s core modules and says ‘it’s important to be exposed to [students] and the things they enjoy and the things that piss them off’. In and out of the classroom he advocates decoloniality, saying he wants the LSA to be a ‘pluriversity’ which challenges ‘universality’ and ‘takes aim at the epistemic underpinnings of western hegemony’. He notes the election of Muyiwa Oki as RIBA president on a platform of representing architectural workers as of interest in this respect.

‘All our students are architectural workers, so we would like to open up conversations on this,’ he says, adding: ‘Young black men are not supposed to do certain things, certainly not run things, so I do feel an affinity with Muyiwa and hope he is properly supported.’

While Shasore has a detailed knowledge of architectural tradition, he is desparate to break from it, at least in educational terms. His most radical concept is for a two-year built environment diploma (see below) – a ‘sub-degree’ – which he says would ‘not be narrowly focused on architecture as a descendant from the 19th century but instead on our dying planet, imminent ecological collapse and climate change’.

The course could be taken instead of Part 1 if the ARB – as mooted – makes qualification based on ‘learning outcomes’ rather than strict completion of Parts 1-3. ‘This qualification,’ says Shasore, ‘could be an incredible springboard to architecture at [Part 2] and getting on the register – or to becoming a plumber, or an engineer, or a planner, or a fucking good client.

If we have got 20 million homes to retrofit, we need to devise courses that respond to that need

‘If we have got 20 million homes to retrofit, we need to devise courses that respond to that need, rather than trying to shove in – I’m being provocative – but to shove in people who have been trained to think in a certain way to try and solve that problem.’

Shasore says that, while he respects the validation criteria for architects’ training, he is ‘agnostic’ about the importance of having an architects’ register and of getting more people onto it. The LSA, he asserts, is about architecture, not architects – just as the RIBA, in some people’s eyes, is vice-versa.

‘We’ve got a very, very big existential and ontological crisis that we are facing, and I’m much more interested in helping to meet that through the fastest and most effective route possible. It is debatable whether a 10-year programme of learning and industry placement to join a statutory register is the only way of effecting change quickly.’ Other elements of the proposed Part 0 would engage teenagers in the built environment while Part 4 would focus on upskilling existing professionals. The proposals are part of the LSA’s working strategy until the 2024-25 academic year but are likely to evolve, says Shasore.

‘We need to see where the dust settles from this emerging landscape. But we want to be poised at the vanguard of new possibilities. There are things we will drag forward and back when we know what the ARB’s final line will be.’

Nevertheless, Shasore says he sees architecture education becoming more flexible, modular and digital. He pledges not to start a Part 1 course, saying: ‘It doesn’t feel right to launch a programme within the system that even the ARB says is inimical to greater diversity, access, and affordability.’

Looking forward, he wants to relocate the school again – despite it being in its fourth campus in seven years. ‘I love our current home,’ he says of 6 Orsman Road, a recently completed Waugh Thistleton building in Hoxton, which the LSA co-inhabits with a range of businesses. ‘But it’s a commercial office block.’

Shasore is eager to stay in Hackney and says his dream is to get an old building which could be subject to a community retrofit ‘as a group learning experience’. Though he adds: ‘That may end up being impractical for all sorts of reasons.’

Wherever the LSA ends up, it might be the direction of its educational offering which raises the most eyebrows – and pushes the boundaries of what architecture education looks like beyond Parts 1-3. ‘We will occupy unchartered territory,’ Shasore declares, before chiding himself for the colonial jargon. ‘It will be the radical ground, anyway.’

Part 0 and Part 4

The LSA is investigating launching courses outside of the usual Parts 1-3. Part 0 will be ‘a series of sub-degree interventions’ providing qualifications from Level 2 (equivalent to GCSE) through to Level 5 (equivalent to a diploma). From January, the LSA will pilot a built environment course for 13 to 16-year-olds, but it also has plans for an architectural qualification worth half an A Level.

The LSA’s biggest plan for Part 0, however, is a two-year course equivalent to a diploma, focusing on green skills, especially retrofitting. Part 4, meanwhile, will be six to eight-week courses for architects and others in industry.

The first pilot is a health and safety course responding to the exact regulatory overhaul, and in time courses could offer training for principal designers – now a specialist regulatory role. However, they will also cover business development and heritage work and will work with charities and other social causes.

Wed, 28 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Will Ing en-US text/html https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/neal-shasore-radical-historian-with-plans-to-shake-up-architectural-education
Killexams : Architects and heritage experts work on new plan to develop home of Robert Burns

A new plan to develop Robert Burns’s first home is being pieced together by some of Scotland’s leading architects and heritage experts.

Ellisland Farm and Museum, near Dumfries, was the only home built by the Scottish poet and is where he lived with his wife Jean Armour.

The site is known for being the place where Burns wrote some of his most celebrated works, including Auld Lang Syne and Tam O’ Shanter.

Robert Burns lived at the site with his wife Jean Armour (Alamy/PA)

A team of architects and heritage experts, including some who worked on the development of Edinburgh’s Old Town, won the contract to revive the site, which has been run as a heritage attraction since 1928.

The new plan aims to look at ways to restore the 1788 buildings, Improve the area’s biodiversity and to develop better ways for people to access the site’s nature, including by bicycle, foot and public transport.

The £30,000 development was commissioned by the Robert Burns Ellisland Trust charity, which has run the site since 2020.

The trust said the plan would also look at boosting visitors to the site, create new learning opportunities for people who visited and Improve income levels, as it received no regular public subsidy.

The works would be funded by The Architectural Heritage Fund/Historic Environment Scotland, South of Scotland Enterprise and The Holywood Trust.

Original manuscript of Auld Lang Syne (David Cheskin/PA)

Delfinity Limited won the contract to develop the site after a competitive tendering exercise.

The team includes Oliver Chapman Architects and HarrisonStevens Landscape Architects, who have worked on developing Edinburgh’s Old Town, and heritage expert Lyndsay Clark, whose experience includes projects with the V&A in Dundee and National Museums Scotland.

Joan McAlpine, of the trust, said: “We are so excited to work with such a talented team of experts.

“The home of Auld Lang Syne should be recognised around the world as a place to celebrate Burns, nature and Scottish culture.

“We want more people, especially young people, to be inspired by Ellisland the way Burns was inspired – and also to generate economic benefit and jobs for this part of south Scotland.

“We will of course reach out to the wider community to develop that vision.”

Hazel Allen, director of Delfinity and lead on the project, said: “The Delfinity team are thrilled to be working with the trust to develop a compelling masterplan for this unique site, so pivotal in the life of Burns.

“Delfinity have a strong track record in the creation of robust, sustainable business models in the third and private sectors and are excited by the breadth of opportunity that the Ellisland could offer.”

The trust said engagement with local community, cultural and youth organisations would be an essential part of working up the plan over the next six months before it was officially presented in March next year.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 11:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/architects-heritage-experts-plan-develop-230100658.html
Killexams : Less emphasis on written exams in plans for Welsh GCSEs being put out to consultation

Plans for major changes to GCSEs in Wales have gone out to consultation. If agreed there would be less emphasis on traditional exams and more emphasis on digital and technology skills.

Exam regulator Qualifications Wales said it has created a plan to "offer something for everyone. Whatever their interests". Under the plans, first raised last year, there would also be fewer GCSE exams for maths and languages and and no separate English and Welsh literature and language papers.

Plans to streamline science exams into one paper met criticism that it was dumbing down, when the proposals were first made last year.

Read more: Wales will grade next summer's GCSEs and A-levels more generously than England

Emyr George, director of qualifications and policy reform at Qualifications Wales

Proposed new GCSE qualifications

  • Combining three sciences to one for biology, chemistry and physics
  • Merging Welsh literature and language
  • Merging English literature and language
  • Combining the current two maths numeracy and mathematics into one

There would be more "more effective use of digital assessment" and schools would be given more flexibility to assess pupils' attainment for results. The aim is to deliver schools more freedom to choose which areas to cover and how to assess their pupils at GCSE, the regulator said.

For the new English language and literature, and Cymraeg language and literature GCSEs, the plan is for 60% to be assessed by exams compared to 80% at the moment. A quarter of the sciences GCSE will be practical work, but the new maths GCSE will still be 100% exam-based.

The changes are being suggested to bring new GCSE qualifications are in line with requirements of the Curriculum for Wales, which began rolling out this term, said regulator Qualifications Wales.

Planning the proposed changes the regulator said it had taken views from more than 1,400 pupils across Wales to ask what the want from qualifications. The regulator is now seeking views in a public consultation on the content of GCSE qualifications and how learners will be assessed for results.

The regulator Qualifications Wales said the new made in Wales GCSEs and related qualifications would deliver pupils more opportunities to show their skills, knowledge with "flexible content and assessments to help schools design their own curricula and meet needs of their learners". There would be "a balanced mix of assessment methods, with less emphasis on exams and more opportunities for learners to be assessed during their course of study."

Views are also being sought on the content and assessment for brand new GCSEs in film and digital media, social studies, engineering and dance.

Sarah Parry, headteacher of Llanishen High in Cardiff, said she supports the proposed changes: "Our year seven students are all now being taught both core and foundation subjects that integrate with the aims of the new Curriculum for Wales. The qualifications that those learners achieve at the end of their formal education have to match the expectations of the curriculum."

Emyr George, director of qualifications and policy reform at Qualifications Wales, said: " We want young people and schools to be able to choose from a range of bilingual qualifications which offer something for everyone. Whatever their interests and wherever they want to go next, there will be a qualification that appeals.

"We have worked closely with wider range of sector experts, including teachers and academics to re-imagine what future GCSEs should look like in terms of their design, content and assessment. Now we want to hear from as many people as possible about what they think of the proposals."

Education Minister Jeremy Miles said: "Qualifications taken by learners at 14-16 need to be reformed to ensure they are fit for purpose to meet the future needs of our learners, supporting their progression and employment and so that they align with the ambition and ethos of Curriculum for Wales."

Qualifications Wales is now seeking views on the content and assessment for of 26 GCSE. The consultation can be responded to here.

Read next:

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 04:28:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/education/less-emphasis-written-exams-plans-25170977
Killexams : Dell Plans To Buy EMC For $67 Billion: Coverage Of The Biggest Tech Deal Ever

Dell's announcement to buy storage giant EMC $67 billion solidifies the largest deal in the history of the IT business, creating in its wake a channel behemoth set to dominate the enterprise IT market.

Dell-EMC

Dell's announcement to buy storage giant EMC for $67 billion solidifies the largest deal in the history of the IT business, creating a channel behemoth set to dominate the enterprise IT market. The landmark deal transforms the onetime PC maker, created in Dell founder and CEO Michael Dell's dorm room, into a $90 billion computing force. The deal will enable Dell, the No. 2 server maker, to leverage EMC's dominance in the storage market, setting up the Round Rock, Texas-based company to take on rivals Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Cisco and Oracle as well as upstarts such as Nutanix.

The deal, in which Dell will offer EMC shareholders $33.15 per share, includes EMC subsidiary VMware as a tracking stock that amounts to about $9 per share. Partners are calling the EMC acquisition by Dell a "dream deal," with the belief that it will energize sales for partners, up data center IQs and boost bottom lines.

CRN is covering the deal from all sides. Check here for the latest news surrounding this blockbuster, as well as analysis and exclusive takes from Dell and EMC's biggest competitors.

News & Analysis

Dell-EMC

The Competition

Sun, 25 Jul 2021 12:19:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/dell-buys-emc-for-67-billion.htm
Killexams : Plans to develop home of Robert Burns being drawn up by architects and heritage experts

Ellisland Farm and Museum, near Dumfries, was the only home built by the Scottish poet and is where he lived with his wife Jean Armour.

The site is known for being the place where Burns wrote some of his most celebrated works, including Auld Lang Syne and Tam O’ Shanter.

A team of architects and heritage experts, including some who worked on the development of Edinburgh’s Old Town, won the contract to revive the site, which has been run as a heritage attraction since 1928.

The new plan aims to look at ways to restore the 1788 buildings, Improve the area’s biodiversity and to develop better ways for people to access the site’s nature, including by bicycle, foot and public transport.

The £30,000 development was commissioned by the Robert Burns Ellisland Trust charity, which has run the site since 2020.

The trust said the plan would also look at boosting visitors to the site, create new learning opportunities for people who visited and Improve income levels, as it received no regular public subsidy.

The works would be funded by The Architectural Heritage Fund/Historic Environment Scotland, South of Scotland Enterprise and The Holywood Trust.

Delfinity Limited won the contract to develop the site after a competitive tendering exercise.

The team includes Oliver Chapman Architects and HarrisonStevens Landscape Architects, who have worked on developing Edinburgh’s Old Town, and heritage expert Lyndsay Clark, whose experience includes projects with the V&A in Dundee and National Museums Scotland.

Joan McAlpine, of the trust, said: “We are so excited to work with such a talented team of experts.

“The home of Auld Lang Syne should be recognised around the world as a place to celebrate Burns, nature and Scottish culture.

“We want more people, especially young people, to be inspired by Ellisland the way Burns was inspired – and also to generate economic benefit and jobs for this part of south Scotland.

“We will, of course, reach out to the wider community to develop that vision.”

Sat, 08 Oct 2022 04:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.scotsman.com/heritage-and-retro/heritage/plans-to-develop-home-of-robert-burns-being-drawn-up-by-architects-and-heritage-experts-3870052
Killexams : The Eagles’ Architect Always Has a Plan B, but Plan A Is Working No result found, try new keyword!A few have been nearly disastrous. When Roseman does make a mistake, however, there’s always a contingency plan: His exit strategy from a bad trade is usually more trades. Roseman’s riskiest ... Tue, 04 Oct 2022 16:01:00 -0500 text/html https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/05/sports/football/philadelphia-eagles.html Killexams : Architects and heritage experts work on new plan to develop home of Robert Burns

A new plan to develop Robert Burns’s first home is being pieced together by some of Scotland’s leading architects and heritage experts.

Ellisland Farm and Museum, near Dumfries, was the only home built by the Scottish poet and is where he lived with his wife Jean Armour.

The site is known for being the place where Burns wrote some of his most celebrated works, including Auld Lang Syne and Tam O’ Shanter.

Robert Burns lived at the site with his wife Jean Armour (Alamy/PA)

A team of architects and heritage experts, including some who worked on the development of Edinburgh’s Old Town, won the contract to revive the site, which has been run as a heritage attraction since 1928.

The new plan aims to look at ways to restore the 1788 buildings, Improve the area’s biodiversity and to develop better ways for people to access the site’s nature, including by bicycle, foot and public transport.

The £30,000 development was commissioned by the Robert Burns Ellisland Trust charity, which has run the site since 2020.

The trust said the plan would also look at boosting visitors to the site, create new learning opportunities for people who visited and Improve income levels, as it received no regular public subsidy.

The works would be funded by The Architectural Heritage Fund/Historic Environment Scotland, South of Scotland Enterprise and The Holywood Trust.

Original manuscript of Auld Lang Syne (David Cheskin/PA)

Delfinity Limited won the contract to develop the site after a competitive tendering exercise.

The team includes Oliver Chapman Architects and HarrisonStevens Landscape Architects, who have worked on developing Edinburgh’s Old Town, and heritage expert Lyndsay Clark, whose experience includes projects with the V&A in Dundee and National Museums Scotland.

Joan McAlpine, of the trust, said: “We are so excited to work with such a talented team of experts.

“The home of Auld Lang Syne should be recognised around the world as a place to celebrate Burns, nature and Scottish culture.

“We want more people, especially young people, to be inspired by Ellisland the way Burns was inspired – and also to generate economic benefit and jobs for this part of south Scotland.

“We will of course reach out to the wider community to develop that vision.”

Hazel Allen, director of Delfinity and lead on the project, said: “The Delfinity team are thrilled to be working with the trust to develop a compelling masterplan for this unique site, so pivotal in the life of Burns.

“Delfinity have a strong track record in the creation of robust, sustainable business models in the third and private sectors and are excited by the breadth of opportunity that the Ellisland could offer.”

The trust said engagement with local community, cultural and youth organisations would be an essential part of working up the plan over the next six months before it was officially presented in March next year.

Fri, 07 Oct 2022 10:11:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/architects-heritage-experts-plan-develop-230100554.html
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