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E20-920 Cloud Services Expert test for Cloud Architects

Exam Title : Dell EMC Certified Expert - Cloud Architect - Cloud Services (DECE-CA)
Exam ID : E20-920
Exam Duration : 90 mins
Questions in test : 60
Passing Score : 60%
Official Training : Cloud Services Planning and Design (MR-1CP-ETCSPD)
Exam Center : Pearson VUE
Real Questions : Dell EMC Cloud Services Expert Real Questions
VCE practice test : Dell EMC E20-920 Certification VCE Practice Test

IT Transformation and Cloud Services 10%
- Describe the nature and features of various industry IT transformation models used to create business value
- Describe features of the ITaaS transformation model and why it is being adopted (drivers, benefits)
- Describe nature of the cloud services and how they tie into the four ITaaS Focus areas (governance, finance, organization, and technology), as well as planning and design considerations for creating an environment for building and delivering cloud services

Technology Planning 30%
- Identify innovative practices, tools, and technologies (e.g., DevOps, Microservices, open source) that influence the creation of cloud native applications and cloud services; Contrast these with traditional application development
- Describe workload considerations, analysis, and right sourcing as well as assessment of current applications profiles and existing services
- Identify backend technology processes and tools that might aid in delivering cloud services as well as the significance, and benefits, of measuring and reporting for cloud services
- Identify characteristics of, and considerations for, orchestration and automation and their important role in moving from traditional IT capabilities to delivering cloud services
- Describe the nature and use of Service Catalogs and Service Templates and the tie-in to Orchestration

Governance Planning, Security, and Trust 18%
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, governance for cloud services
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, risk management for cloud services
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, compliance and auditing for cloud services
- Describe the nature of, and key considerations pertaining to, security and trust with cloud services

Financial Planning 10%
- Describe financial goals and considerations in support of cloud services; understand the terms CAPEX, OPEX, ROI, and Cost to serve
- Describe considerations for service funding as well as details for service costing and pricing
- Describe the nature and use of Chargeback and Showback financial information

Organizational Planning 10%
- Characterize the challenges (e.g., legacy tools, culture, service maturity level) typically faced by organizations that plan to deliver cloud services
- Describe the considerations (e.g., alignment, cross functional teams, DevOps) for organizations that are transitioning to cloud services within an ITaaS model
- Describe the organizational roles, responsibilities, and competencies required for deploying cloud based services; identifying skills and gaps; developing related training

Service Creation and Management 15%
- Describe the strategy and related considerations for overall service design, taking into consideration various deployment models
- Describe key components of service creation, including: template, offering, contract, and orchestration
- Describe key components of service operations and management including: visibility and control, management, reporting and alerting, termination of services

Emerging Trends in Cloud Services 7%
- Identify emerging trends in technology that are reshaping social behaviors, businesses, including a movement towards a more digital world
- Describe emerging transformation of cloud services delivery resulting from converged infrastructure and operations engineering, with emphasis on how IT can deliver business value through the leveraging of modern applications and software defined approaches

Cloud Services Expert test for Cloud Architects
EMC Architects test
Killexams : EMC Architects test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-920 Search results Killexams : EMC Architects test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-920 https://killexams.com/exam_list/EMC Killexams : Best Enterprise Architect Certifications

Enterprise IT architect certifications appear most often at the apex of certification programs, where less than 1% of IT professionals ultimately ascend. Even so, many IT architect certifications are available, and you don’t need to invest in one certification sponsor’s vision to reach the top.

Many IT certifications in this area fall outside vendor umbrellas, which means they are vendor-neutral or vendor-agnostic. Nevertheless, the number of vendor-specific IT certifications exceeds vendor-neutral ones by a factor of more than 2 to 1. That’s why we devote the last section of this article to all such credentials, as we encountered them in search of the best enterprise architect certifications.

For IT pros who’ve already invested in vendor-specific certification programs, credentials at the architect level may indeed be worth pursuing. Enterprise architects are among the highest-paid employees and consultants in the tech industry.

What do enterprise architects do?

Enterprise architects are technical experts who are able to analyze and assess organizational needs, make recommendations regarding technology changes, and design and implement those changes across the organization. 

How much does an enterprise architect earn?

The national average salary per SimplyHired is $130,150, in a range from $91,400 to a whopping $185,330. Glassdoor reports $133,433 as the average. Ultimately, the value of any IT certification depends on how long the individual has worked and in what part of the IT patch.

How do I become an enterprise architect?

Becoming an enterprise architect is not easy. While the requirements may vary by employer, most enterprise architects have a bachelor’s degree or higher in a computer-related field along with 5-10 years of professional work experience. Many enterprise architects obtain additional certifications past graduation.

Why should I get certified?

Certifications are a great way to demonstrate to prospective employers that you have the experience and technical skills necessary to do the job and supply you a competitive edge in the hiring process. Certification holders also frequently earn more than their uncertified counterparts, making certifications a valuable career-building tool. 

Which certifications are the best?  

Below, you’ll find our top five certification picks. Before you peruse our best picks, check out the results of our informal job board survey. Data indicates the number of job posts in which our featured certifications were mentioned on a given day. The data should supply you an idea of the relative popularity of each of these certifications.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order, by certification)

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

LinkUp

Total

AWS Certified Solution Architect (Amazon Web Services)

1,035

464

2,672

240

4,411

CTA (Salesforce)

303

787

3,201

353

4,644

ITIL Master (Axelos)

641

848

1,218

1,119

3,826

TOGAF 9 (The Open Group)

443

730

271

358

1,802

Zachman Certified – Enterprise Architect (Zachman)

86

107

631

252

1,076

AWS Certified Solution Architect

Making its first appearance on the leaderboard is the Certified Solutions Architect credential from Amazon Web Services (AWS). AWS, an Amazon subsidiary, is the global leader in on-demand cloud computing. AWS offers numerous products and services to support its customers, including the popular Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). AWS also offers numerous cloud applications and developer tools, including Amazon Comprehend, Amazon SageMaker Batch Transform and Amazon Lightsail.

AWS offers certifications at the foundation, associate and professional levels across five role-based categories: architect, developer, operations, cloud and specialty certifications. Foundation-level certifications validate a candidate’s understanding of the AWS Cloud and serve as a prerequisite to AWS specialty certifications. Foundation certifications are a recommended starting place for those seeking higher-level credentials.

Associate credentials typically have no prerequisites and focus on technical skills. They are required to obtain professional-level certifications, which are the highest level of technical certification available. Specialty certs, meanwhile, focus on skills in targeted areas.

AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate 2019

AWS currently offers the following credentials:

  • Foundation credentials: AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner
  • Associate credentials: AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate, AWS Certified Developer and AWS Certified SysOps Administrator
  • Professional: AWS Certified Solutions Architect Professional and AWS Certified DevOps Engineer
  • Specialty: AWS Certified Advanced Networking, AWS Certified Big Data and AWS Certified Security

The AWS Certified Solutions Architect credential is available at the associate and professional levels. The associate credential targets candidates with at least one year of experience architecting and implementing solutions based on AWS applications and technologies. AWS updated the associate-level test in February 2018 to include architecture best practices and new services.

The AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Professional certification targets senior AWS architects who can architect, design, implement and manage complex enterprise-level AWS solutions based on defined organizational requirements. Candidates should have a minimum of two years’ direct experience deploying and designing on the AWS cloud and be able to translate organizational requirements into solutions and recommend best practices. The associate credential is a mandatory prerequisite.

AWS Certified Solution Architect facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Solution Architect – Associate

Certified Solution Architect – Professional

Prerequisites and required courses

Associate: One year of hands-on experience recommended, AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner

Professional: Certified Solution Architect – Associate credential plus a minimum of two years of hands-on experience

Number of exams

Associate: One test (65 questions, 130 minutes to complete)

Professional: One test (170 minutes to complete)

Certification fees

Associate: $150 (practice test $20)

Professional: $300 (practice test $40)

URL

https://aws.amazon.com/certification/

Self-study materials

AWS makes demo questions, practice exams, test guides, whitepapers and more available on the certification home page.


CTA: Certified Technical Architect

In 1999, Salesforce revolutionized the world of CRM when it introduced the concept of using the cloud to provide top-notch CRM software. Today, Salesforce has more than 150,000 customers, making it the industry leader for CRM enterprise cloud platforms. Currently, Salesforce offers solutions for various focus areas, including sales, service, marketing, commerce, engagement, community, productivity (Quip), platform and ecosystem, integration, analytics, enablement, internet of things (IoT), artificial intelligence, mobility, and industry (financial and health).

To meet industry needs for qualified and experienced professionals with the skills necessary to support its growing customer base, Salesforce developed and maintains a top-tier certification program. It offers many paths to candidates, including for administration, app building, architecture and marketing.

Salesforce Architect certifications are hierarchical, with most (but not all) lower-level credentials serving as prerequisites for more advanced credentials. At the top of the certification pyramid is the highest credential a Salesforce professional can earn – the Certified Technical Architect (CTA), which is our featured Salesforce certification.

The Salesforce Architect certification pyramid has three levels:

  • Specializations: These form the bottom tier of the pyramid. Salesforce offers eight specializations, four of which support application solutions, while the other four support system solutions. Application specializations include certifications for Data Architecture and Management Designer, Sharing and Visibility Designer, Platform Developer I, and Platform App Builder. System specializations include Development Lifecycle and Deployment Designer, Identity and Access Management Designer, Integration Architecture Designer, and Platform Developer I credentials.
  • Domain Architect: There are two Salesforce Domain Architect credentials: the Certified Application Architect and the Certified System Architect. The Certified Application Architect designation targets professionals with expert-level knowledge in Salesforce product functionality and features, while the Certified System Architect credential focuses on governance, integration and testing. Both credentials require the candidate to first earn their corresponding specialization certifications in addition to meeting other requirements.
  • Technical Architect: The Certified Technical Architect (CTA) is the highest Salesforce credential available. CTAs are experts in all Salesforce domains and possess skills necessary to design, build and implement Salesforce platform solutions. To earn the CTA, candidates must first obtain both the Certified Application Architect and Certified System Architect credentials or pass a single exam. Candidates must meet experience requirements and pass a rigorous board review, which validates their knowledge and skills in Salesforce competency areas, such as communication, development lifecycle and deployment planning, integration, solution architecture, data, security, and systems architecture.

Salesforce requires CTAs to maintain current skills. Credential holders must pass maintenance module exams with each new product release cycle (typically in summer, winter and spring). While challenging to earn, the CTA is important for IT professionals who are serious about a Salesforce technologies career.

CTA facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Technical Architect (CTA)

Prerequisites and required courses

Salesforce Certified Application Architect and Salesforce Certified System Architect credential:

  • Five years of implementation experience (must include development experience across the full software development lifecycle)
  • Three years of experience in an architect role
  • Two years of experience with the Lightning Platform (one year must be in an architect role while implementing Salesforce technologies and applications)
  • Experience as a technical architect on multiple complex deployments OR equivalent knowledge through project participation
  • Additional experience – guiding teams on platform technology; identifying and mitigating technical risks; exposure to project globalization, object-oriented design patterns, platform-specific design patterns and limits; developing code on the Force.com platform; building and addressing security complexities, mechanisms, and capabilities on the Force.com platform as part of a functional security model; knowledge of data migration, design trade-offs and ETL tools, large data volume considerations, risks and mitigation strategies, general mobile solutions and architecture, on-platform mobile solutions, and considerations as well as project and development lifecycle methodologies

Number of exams

One test (four hours to complete; candidates must formulate, justify and present recommendations based on a hypothetical scenario to a review board)

Certification fees

$6,000

Retake fee: $3,000

URL

http://certification.salesforce.com/technicalarchitect

Self-study materials

Salesforce maintains links on the certification webpage to numerous review materials, including the online documentation, tip sheets, user guides, exam guide and outline, Architect Journey e-books, Trailhead trails, and the Salesforce Certification Guide.


ITIL Master Certificate – IT Service Management

One of our favorite credential sets (and for employers as well, judging by job board numbers) is the ITIL for IT Service Management credentials from Axelos. Axelos is a global provider of standards designed to drive best practices and quality throughout organizations. ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library) joined the Axelos family in 2013.

Axelos manages ITIL credentialing requirements and updates, provides accreditation to Examination Institutes (EIs), and licenses organizations seeking to use ITIL. In addition to ITIL certifications, Axelos offers credentials for Prince2 2017 (which includes Foundation, Practitioner and Agile qualifications), Prince2 Agile, Resilia, MSP, MoP, M_o_R, P30, MoV, P3M3 and AgileSHIFT.

ITIL is a set of well-defined and well-respected best practices that specifically target the area of IT service management. There are more than 2 million ITIL-certified practitioners worldwide. ITIL is perhaps the most widely known and globally adopted set of best practices and management tools for IT service management and support.

ITIL Foundation (2011): Complete course and 2 practice exams

Axelos maintains a robust ITIL certification portfolio consisting of five ITIL credentials:

  • ITIL Foundation: An entry-level credential that validates general ITIL knowledge, including terminology, concepts, elements, services lifecycle and ITIL processes
  • ITIL Practitioner: A steppingstone credential for the Intermediate credential that tests a candidate’s ability to use ITIL principles within their business organization
  • ITIL Intermediate: An industry-recognized qualification with a modular structure, each module focusing on a different aspect of IT service management
  • ITIL Expert: An expert-level credential for candidates who possess broad ITIL knowledge that covers the entire ITIL scheme
  • ITIL Master: The highest ITIL credential from Axelos, targeting professionals who recommend and implement ITIL best practices

Axelos introduced ITIL 4 in early 2019. ITIL 3 practitioners should check the Axelos website frequently for updates about the transition to ITIL 4 and availability of the ITIL 4 transition modules.

The ITIL Master is the pinnacle ITIL certification, requiring experience, dedication, and a thorough understanding of ITIL principles, practices, and techniques. To gain the ITIL Master designation, candidates must have at least five years of managerial, advisory or other leadership experience in the field of IT service management. They must also possess the ITIL Expert certification. Once the skill and certification requirements are met, the real certification work begins.

Upon completing the prerequisites, candidates must register with PeopleCert, the sole approved Axelos Examination Institute, and submit an application. Next, candidates prepare and submit a proposal for a business improvement to implement within their organization. The proposal submission is followed by a “work package,” which documents a real-world project that encompasses multiple ITIL areas.

The work package (1) validates how the candidate applied ITIL principles, practices, and techniques to the project; and (2) documents the effectiveness of the solution and the ultimate benefit the business received as a result of the ITIL solution. Finally, candidates must pass an interview with an assessment panel where they defend their solution.

Axelos will soon be sponsoring 50 lucky people in their quest to obtain the ITIL 4 Master certification. You can register your interest in the program here.

ITIL Master facts and figures

Certification name

ITIL Master Certificate – IT Service Management

Prerequisites and required courses

ITIL Expert Certificate: Five years of IT service experience in managerial, leadership or advisory roles

Number of exams

No test required, but candidates must complete the following steps:

  • Register with PeopleCert.
  • Submit application.
  • Submit proposal.
  • Submit work package.
  • Attend interview.

Certification fees

$4,440 if all ITIL credits obtained through PeopleCert

$5,225 if some ITIL credits were obtained from other institutes

URL

https://www.axelos.com/certifications/itil-certifications/itil-master

Self-study materials

Axelos provides documentation to guide candidates in the preparation of proposal and work package submissions. Available documents include ITIL Master FAQs, ITIL Master Proposal Requirements and Scope, and ITIL Master Work Package Requirements and Scope.

TOGAF 9

A leader in enterprise architecture, The Open Group’s standards and certifications are globally recognized. The TOGAF (The Open Group Architecture Framework) standard for enterprise architecture is popular among leading enterprise-level organizations. Currently, TOGAF is the development and architecture framework of choice for more than 80% of global enterprises.

TOGAF’s popularity reflects that the framework standard is specifically geared to all aspects of enterprise-level IT architectures, with an emphasis on building efficiency within an organization. The scope of the standard’s approach covers everything from design and planning stages to implementation, maintenance, and governance.

The Open Group offers several enterprise architect credentials, including TOGAF, Open CA, ArchiMate, IT4IT and the foundational Certified Technical Specialist (Open CTS).

The Open Group reports that there are more than 75,000 TOGAF-certified enterprise architects. At present, there are two TOGAF credentials: the TOGAF 9 Foundation (Level 1) and TOGAF 9 Certified (Level 2). (The TOGAF framework is currently based on version 9.2, although the credential name still reflects version 9.)

The TOGAF 9 Foundation, or Level 1, credential targets architects who demonstrate an understanding of TOGAF principles and standards. A single test is required to earn the Level 1 designation. The Level 1 test focuses on TOGAF-related concepts such as TOGAF reference models, terminology, core concepts, standards, ADM, architectural governance and enterprise architecture. The Level 1 credential serves as a steppingstone to the more advanced TOGAF Level 2 certification.

The TOGAF 9 Certified, or Level 2, credential incorporates all requirements for Level 1. Level 2 TOGAF architects possess in-depth knowledge of TOGAF standards and principles and can apply them to organizational goals and enterprise-level infrastructure. To earn this designation, candidates must first earn the Level 1 credential and pass the Level 2 exam. The Level 2 test covers TOGAF concepts such as ADM phases, governance, content framework, building blocks, stakeholder management, metamodels, TOGAF techniques, reference models and ADM iterations.

Candidates wanting a fast track to Level 2 certification may take a combination exam, which covers requirements for both Level 1 and 2. Training is not mandatory for either credential but is highly recommended. Training classes run 2-5 days, depending on the provider and whether you’re taking the combined or single-level course. The Open Group maintains a list of approved training providers and a schedule of current training opportunities on the certification webpage.

TOGAF 9 facts and figures 

Certification name

TOGAF 9 Foundation (Level 1)
TOGAF 9 Certified (Level 2)

Prerequisites and required courses

TOGAF 9 Foundation (Level 1): None
TOGAF 9 Certified (Level 2): TOGAF 9 Foundation (Level 1) credential

Number of exams

Level 1: One test (40 questions, 60 minutes, 55% required to pass)

Level 2: One test (eight questions, 90 minutes)

Level 1 and 2 combined test (48 questions, 2.5 hours)

Certification fees

$320 each for Level 1 and Level 2 exams

$495 for combined Level 1 and Level 2 exam

Exams are administered by Pearson VUE. Some training providers include the test with the training course.

URL

http://www.opengroup.org/togaf9/cert/docs/indiv.html

Self-study materials

A number of resources are available from The Open Group, including whitepapers, webinars, publications, TOGAF standards, the TOGAF Foundation Study Guide ($29.95 for PDF; includes practice exam), practice test (99 cents for PDF) and the TOGAF 9 Certified Study Guide (a combined study guide is available for $59.95). The Open Group also maintains a list of accredited training course providers and a calendar of training events.


Zachman Certified – Enterprise Architect

Founded in 1990, Zachman International promotes education and research for enterprise architecture and the Zachman Framework. Rather than being a traditional process or methodology, the Zachman Framework is more accurately referred to as an “ontology.” Ontologies differ from a traditional methodology or process in that, rather than focusing on the process or implementation, they focus on the properties, types and interrelationships of entities that exist within a particular domain. The Zachman Framework ontology focuses on the structure, or definition, of the object and the enterprise. Developed by John Zachman, this framework sets a standard for enterprise architecture ontology.

Zachman International currently offers four enterprise architect credentials:

  • Enterprise Architect Associate Certification (Level 1): Candidates must attend a four-day modeling workshop and pass a single exam. The workshop covers key concepts relating to enterprise architecture and the Zachman Framework, case studies, engineering vs. primitive models and manufacturing vs. composite models, and hands-on experience building Framework models. The workshop fee ($3,499) includes the test and certification fees for Level 1 and Level 2.
  • Enterprise Architect Practitioner Certification (Level 2): Architects must submit case studies of primitive and composite models that address specified management issues. Case studies must pass a referee review.
  • Enterprise Architect Professional Certification (Level 3): Candidates must complete a case study demonstrating primitive (architectural) and composite (implementation) models and complete a referee review. Level 3 credential holders may advertise themselves as “Zachman consultants.”
  • Enterprise Architect Educator Certification (Level 4): Designed for educators, this credential prepares candidates to develop and teach the Zachman Framework. To earn this credential, candidates should go through all educational materials related to the Zachman Framework, develop their own curricula and course materials, and present those materials for review and approval. While this is not required, Zachman recommends that Level 4 candidates obtain the Level 3 Professional designation.

Zachman credentials are valid for three years. To maintain these credentials, candidates must earn continuing education credits (referred to as EADUs). The total number of EADUs required varies by certification level.

Zachman Certified – Enterprise Architect facts and figures

Certification name

Enterprise Architect Associate Certification (Level 1)
Enterprise Architect Practitioner Certification (Level 2)
Enterprise Architect Professional Certification (Level 3)
Enterprise Architect Educator Certification (Level 4)

Prerequisites and required courses

Level 1 Associate: Four-day Modeling Workshop ($3,499)
Level 2 Practitioner: None
Level 3 Professional: None
Level 4 Educator: Review all materials related to The Zachman Framework; Level 3 Professional recommended

Number of exams

Level 1 Associate: One exam
Level 2 Practitioner: No exam; case studies and referee review required
Level 3 Professional: No exam; case studies and referee review required
Level 4 Educator: None; must develop and submit curriculum and course materials for review and validation

Certification fees

Level 1 Associate: test fee included as part of required course
Level 2 Practitioner: None, included as part of Level 1 required course
Level 3 Professional: Not available
Level 4 Educator: Not available

URL

https://www.zachman.com/certification/what-we-certify/enterprise-architect#enterprise-architect-associate-level-1

Self-study materials

Live classroom and distance learning opportunities are available. Zachman also offers webcasts, a glossary, the Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architecture and reference articles.


Beyond the top 5: More enterprise architect certifications

The Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA) is a great credential, especially for professionals working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

The Project Management Professional (PMP) certification from PMI continues to appear in many enterprise architect job descriptions. Although the PMP is not an enterprise architect certification per se, many employers look for this particular combination of skills.

Outside of our top five vendor-neutral enterprise architect certifications (which focus on more general, heterogeneous views of IT systems and solutions), there are plenty of architect-level certifications from a broad range of vendors and sponsors, most of which are vendor-specific.

The table below identifies those vendors and sponsors, names their architect-level credentials, and provides links to more information on those offerings. Choosing one or more of these certifications for research and possible pursuit will depend on where you work or where you’d like to work.

Sponsor

Enterprise architect certification

More information

BCS

BCS Practitioner Certificate in Enterprise and Solutions Architecture

BCS homepage

Cisco

Cisco Certified Architect (CCAr)

CCAr homepage

Enterprise Architecture Center of Excellence (EACOE)

EACOE Enterprise Architect
EACOE Senior Enterprise Architect
EACOE Distinguished Enterprise Architect EACOE Enterprise Architect Fellow

EACOE Architect homepage

EMC

EMC Cloud Architect Expert (EMCCAe)

GoCertify

FEAC Institute

Certified Enterprise Architect (CEA) Black Belt

Associate Certified Enterprise Architect (ACEA) Green Belt

FEAC CEA homepage

Hitachi Vantara

Hitachi Architect (three tracks: Infrastructure, Data Protection, and Pentaho Solutions)

Hitachi Architect Specialist (two tracks: Infrastructure and Converged)

Training & Certification homepage

IASA

Certified IT Architect – Foundation (CITA-F)

Certified IT Architect – Associate (CITA-A)

Certified IT Architect – Specialist (CITA-S)

Certified IT Architect – Professional (CITA-P)

CITA homepage

National Instruments

Certified LabVIEW Architect (CLA)

CLA homepage

Nokia

Nokia Service Routing Architect (SRA)

SRA homepage

Oracle

Oracle Certified Master, Java EE Enterprise Architect Certified Master

Java EE homepage

Red Hat

Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA)

RHCA homepage

 

SOA (Arcitura)

Certified SOA Architect

SOA Architect homepage

 
 

These architect credentials typically represent pinnacle certifications within the programs to which they belong, functioning as high-value capstones to those programs in many cases. The group of individuals who attain such credentials is often quite small but comes with tight sponsor relationships, high levels of sponsor support and information delivery, and stratospheric salaries and professional kudos.

Often, such certifications provide deliberately difficult and challenging targets for a small, highly select group of IT professionals. Earning one or more of these certifications is generally the culmination of a decade or more of professional growth, high levels of effort, and considerable expense. No wonder, then, that architect certifications are highly regarded by IT pros and highly valued by their employers.

Choosing the right IT architect credential

Enterprise architect credentials will often be dictated by choices that your employer (or industry sector, in the case of government or DoD-related work environments) have already made independent of your own efforts. Likewise, most of the vendor-specific architecture credentials make sense based on what’s deployed in your work environment or in a job you’d like to occupy.

Though there are lots of potential choices IT pros could make, the actual number they can or should make will be influenced by their circumstances.

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10758-best-enterprise-architect-certifications.html
Killexams : EMC LAB Owner

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EMC Lab Owner

Research & development

Electrical engineering

Location

Veldhoven, Netherlands

Team

Research & development

Experience

3-7 years

Degree

Bachelor

Job Category

Electrical engineering

Travel

No

Published: today Job ID: J-00250947-056

Introduction to the job

Are you challenged by the engineering of electronic solutions for high-tech products? And do you have excellent communication skills, combined with a high level of discipline? You'd better contact us today!

Role and responsibilities

o Manage the operational activities of the EMC lab
o Coordinate/schedule test activities in accordance with EMC resources and project schedules.
o Act as EMC test lab owner
o Get prepared for and attend the periodic 5S+1 audits.
o Determine EMC tools to be purchased and support tool registration.

• Perform ASML EMC test lab certification and maintenance activities:

o Provide Setup and maintain relevant means and documents to certify attain EMC test lab according to NEN-EN-ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation.
o Facilitate assessment & qualification of EMC test activities by an external Competent Body according to international standards.
o Provide and maintain uncertainty budgets, work instructions and verification procedures.
o Arrange EMC test equipment periodic calibration, maintenance, repair activities and EMC test lab maintenance activities.

Education and experience

• Bachelor or Master degree in Electrical Engineering or equivalent.
• Experience in managing an (accredited) EMC laboratory
• Experience with ISO17025
• Has worked no less than 3 years ago as EMC engineer
• 10+ years of EMC engineer experience
• Expert in EMC testing
• Knowledge of EMC standards, testing and measurement techniques
• Writing of technical documentation
• Familiar with electrical safety basics
• Working in multidisciplinary and preferable international environment
• Basic knowledge of software

Skills

Working at the cutting edge of tech, you'll always have new challenges and new problems to solve - and working together is the only way to do that. You won't work in a silo. Instead, you'll be part of a creative, dynamic work environment where you'll collaborate with supportive colleagues. There is always space for creative and unique points of view. You'll have the flexibility and trust to choose how best to tackle tasks and solve problems.
To thrive in this job, you'll need the following skills:

• Initiative and pro-active;
• Highly motivated team player with good social and communication skills;
• Structured with eye for details;
• Accurate and problem-solving;
• Pragmatic attitude;
• Drive and ownership;
• Excellent knowledge of the English language, both spoken and written;

ASML is an Equal Opportunity Employer that values and respects the importance of a diverse and inclusive workforce. It is the policy of the company to recruit, hire, train and promote persons in all job titles without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, veteran status, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity. We recognize that diversity and inclusion is a driving force in the success of our company.

The sector Development & Engineering (D&E) of ASML is responsible for the specification, design, and realization of products in the ASML portfolio. Within the sector D&E the Cluster Electronic Development (EDEV) is responsible for the definition, realization, qualification, and integration of electronic functions and modules within these products. The EMC Test Engineer/ EMC Lab Coordinator reports to the Group Manager System Electrical Architecture and multiple program related projects.
*This position requires access to U.S. controlled technology, as defined in the United States Export Administration Regulations. Qualified candidates must be legally authorized to access such U.S. controlled technology prior to beginning work. Business demands may require ASML to proceed with applicants who are immediately eligible to access U.S. controlled technology.
Please share your resume and cover letter when applying for this position.

Need to know more about applying for a job at ASML? Read our frequently asked questions .

About the location

  • Veldhoven, the Netherlands
  • The Netherlands

About ASML

  • ASML at a glance
  • Working at ASML

Meld Misbruik

Fri, 01 Jul 2022 09:29:00 -0500 NL text/html https://tweakers.net/carriere/it-banen/469886/emc-lab-owner-veldhoven-asml
Killexams : Delving into EMI, EMC, and Noise

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Mitigate EMI in Your 400-Hz Systems

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How to Shield and Filter RF Designs from EMI

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Killexams : EMC LAB Coordinator

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EMC Lab Coordinator

Location

Veldhoven, Netherlands

Team

Research & development

Experience

3-7 years

Degree

Bachelor

Job Category

Electrical engineering

Travel

No

Published: 1 day ago Job ID: J-00250947-056

Introduction to the job

Are you challenged by the engineering of electronic solutions for high-tech products? And do you have excellent communication skills, combined with a high level of discipline? You'd better contact us today!

Role and responsibilities

The Development & Engineering EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) competence team are experts on design for EMC, functional (inter- and intra-system) and regulatory (EMC) compliance. Skilled advisors aiding in D&E/ factory troubleshooting activities, customer service & support requests and facility management features.
As an EMC Lab Coordinator you are a knowledge base for all the ASML electrical designers and integrators to get subsystems qualified as per EMC standards. You coordinate EMC test lab related activities, provide improvements and support, and perform EMC tests and measurements.

The EMC Test Engineer/Lab Coordinator is responsible for the following:
• Perform ASML EMC test lab coordination/management activities:

o Manage the operational activities of the EMC lab
o Coordinate/schedule test activities in accordance with EMC resources and project schedules.
o Act as EMC test lab owner
o Get prepared for and attend the periodic 5S+1 audits.
o Determine EMC tools to be purchased and support tool registration.

• Perform ASML EMC test lab certification and maintenance activities:

o Provide Setup and maintain relevant means and documents to certify attain EMC test lab according to NEN-EN-ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation.
o Facilitate assessment & qualification of EMC test activities by an external Competent Body according to international standards.
o Provide and maintain uncertainty budgets, work instructions and verification procedures.
o Arrange EMC test equipment periodic calibration, maintenance, repair activities and EMC test lab maintenance activities.

Education and experience

• Bachelor or Master degree in Electrical Engineering or equivalent.
• Experience in managing an (accredited) EMC laboratory
• Experience with ISO17025
• Has worked no less than 3 years ago as EMC engineer
• 10+ years of EMC engineer experience
• Expert in EMC testing
• Knowledge of EMC standards, testing and measurement techniques
• Writing of technical documentation
• Familiar with electrical safety basics
• Working in multidisciplinary and preferable international environment
• Basic knowledge of software

Skills

Working at the cutting edge of tech, you'll always have new challenges and new problems to solve - and working together is the only way to do that. You won't work in a silo. Instead, you'll be part of a creative, dynamic work environment where you'll collaborate with supportive colleagues. There is always space for creative and unique points of view. You'll have the flexibility and trust to choose how best to tackle tasks and solve problems.
To thrive in this job, you'll need the following skills:

• Initiative and pro-active;
• Highly motivated team player with good social and communication skills;
• Structured with eye for details;
• Accurate and problem-solving;
• Pragmatic attitude;
• Drive and ownership;
• Excellent knowledge of the English language, both spoken and written;

ASML is an Equal Opportunity Employer that values and respects the importance of a diverse and inclusive workforce. It is the policy of the company to recruit, hire, train and promote persons in all job titles without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, veteran status, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity. We recognize that diversity and inclusion is a driving force in the success of our company.

The sector Development & Engineering (D&E) of ASML is responsible for the specification, design, and realization of products in the ASML portfolio. Within the sector D&E the Cluster Electronic Development (EDEV) is responsible for the definition, realization, qualification, and integration of electronic functions and modules within these products. The EMC Test Engineer/ EMC Lab Coordinator reports to the Group Manager System Electrical Architecture and multiple program related projects.
*This position requires access to U.S. controlled technology, as defined in the United States Export Administration Regulations. Qualified candidates must be legally authorized to access such U.S. controlled technology prior to beginning work. Business demands may require ASML to proceed with applicants who are immediately eligible to access U.S. controlled technology.
Please share your resume and cover letter when applying for this position.

Need to know more about applying for a job at ASML? Read our frequently asked questions .

About the location

  • Veldhoven, the Netherlands
  • The Netherlands

About ASML

  • ASML at a glance
  • Working at ASML

Meld Misbruik

Tue, 05 Jul 2022 20:48:00 -0500 NL text/html https://tweakers.net/carriere/it-banen/471254/emc-lab-coordinator-veldhoven-asml
Killexams : Cast Your Vote for the 2019 Engineer of the Year

The time has come to cast your vote for the DesignCon 2019 Engineer of the Year. This award is given out each year during the DesignCon event to recognize the best of the best in engineering and new product advancements at the chip, board, or system level, with a special emphasis on signal and power integrity.

Editors of Design News and the staff of DesignCon would like to offer hearty congratulations to the finalists. For this year’s award, the winner (or his/her representative) will be able to direct a $1,000 donation to any secondary educational institution in the United States. The details on each nominee are below as provided in their published biographies and by the person/s who made the nomination. Please cast your vote by following this link.

Voting closes at noon Eastern Time on Friday, December 28. The winner will be announced at DesignCon 2019, January 28-31, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA.

The four finalists for the 2018 DesignCon Engineer of the Year Award are (click each name to see finalist’s bio and community activity):

Cast your vote for the 2019 Engineer of the Year by noon ET, December 28.

See the Official Rules of the Engineer of the Year Award.

Please click here to learn more about DesignCon and register to attend.

Al Neves

Founder & Chief Technologist, Wild River Technology

Al has 30 years of experience in the design and application development of semiconductor products, capital equipment design focused on jitter and signal integrity analysis, and has been involved with numerous successful business developments and startup activities for the last 13 years. Al is involved with the Signal Integrity community as a consultant, high-speed system-level design manager, and engineer. exact technical accomplishments include development of platforms and methods to Boost 3D electromagnetic correspondence to measure-based methods, including advancing time and frequency domain calibration methods. Al focuses on measure-based model development, package characterization, high-speed board design, low jitter design, analysis, and training. He earned a B.S. in Applied Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts.

Al has created a niche company that has shown tremendous foresight in the application of simulation techniques to design. Wild River Technology’s products, training, and practices have shed a lot of light on how to make accurate simulations.

Al has published multiple industry papers, is a member of IEEE, and a long-time, active member of the DesignCon Technical Program Committee, where he is a co-chair on Track 13.

This year at DesignCon, Al is presenting at the technical session, “S-Parameter Measurement & Fixture De-Embedding Variation Across Multiple Teams, Equipment & De-embedding Tools.”

Cast your vote for the 2019 Engineer of the Year by noon ET, December 28.

Istvan Novak

Principle SI and PI Engineer, Samtec

Istvan Novak is a Principle Signal and Power Integrity Engineer at Samtec, working on advanced signal and power integrity designs. Prior to 2018, he was a Distinguished Engineer at SUN Microsystems, later Oracle. He worked on new technology development, advanced power distribution, and signal integrity design and validation methodologies for SUN's successful workgroup server families. He introduced the industry's first 25um power-ground laminates for large rigid computer boards, and worked with component vendors to create a series of low-inductance and controlled-ESR bypass capacitors. He also served as SUN's representative on the Copper Cable and Connector Workgroup of InfiniBand, and was engaged in the methodologies, designs, and characterization of power-distribution networks from silicon to DC-DC converters. He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE with twenty-five patents to his name, author of two books on power integrity, teaches signal and power integrity courses, and maintains a popular SI/PI website.

Istvan has, in many cases, singlehandedly helped the test and measurement industry develop completely new instruments and methods of measurement. New VNA types and Scope probes and methodologies are in the market today, thanks to Istvan's efforts and openness to help others. He was responsible for the power distribution and high-speed signal integrity designs of SUN’s V880, V480, V890, V490, V440, T1000, T2000, T5120, and T5220 midrange server families. Last, but not least, Istvan has been a tremendous contributor to SI List, educating and helping engineers across the world with their SI/PI problems. Istvan is an active member of the DesignCon Technical Program Committee, sharing his expertise by participating in the review of content for multiple tracks. He is an IEEE Fellow and has been a tutor at the University of Oxford, Oxford, UK for the past 10 years. He has also been a faculty member at CEI Europe AB since 1991 and served as Vice Dean of Faculty, Associate Professor at the Technical University of Budapest.

At DesignCon 2019, Istvan will be participating in the tutorial, “How to Design Good PDN Filters,” and the technical sessions, “Effect of Power Plane Inductance on Power Delivery Networks,” “Etch Factor Impact on SI & PI,” and “How the Braid Impedance of Instrumentation Cables Impact PI & SI Measurements.”

Cast your vote for the 2019 Engineer of the Year by noon ET, December 28.

Vishram Pandit

Technology Lead (Signal/Power Integrity), Intel

Vishram Pandit has been working in the Power Integrity, Signal Integrity, and EMC field for more than 21 years—of which ~15 years were at Intel. He has been a key contributor to methodologies in on-chip power integrity, system-level power integrity impact, and signal/power integrity co-design, and successfully deploying those on various Intel products. Vishram led Power Delivery & Integrity for memory technology at Intel California from 2004 to 2008. He established SoC and DRAM device PDN solution space and chip, package, and PCB Power Integrity requirements and was Global Power Delivery Lead at the SoC Development Group from 2008 to 2011. As a part of the IP team, he worked with all global IPs spread across various geos and proliferated IP-SoC-Platform Power Integrity methodology. He is currently a Platform Architect finding ways to Boost and co-optimize system power delivery spanning across PCB, Package, and Chip. He is evaluating platform PDN architecture, power rail merging, power management impact, IP/SoC PDN spec definition, decoupling strategy, and signal integrity impact on a future mobility product. Overall, during his time at Intel, Vishram led or provided technical guidance on developing various new PI/SI methodologies that helped in spec development, optimization, area savings, Platform BOM cost reduction, and product quality improvement. He had significant impact on different business units’ bottom line and certainly to the SI/PI community.

During his tenure at Intel, Vishram has received various awards for his technical contributions. He is co-author of a book, “Power Integrity for I/O Interfaces: with Signal Integrity/Power Integrity co-design,” published by Prentice-Hall in 2010, and is co-author of approximately 30 conference/ journal publications, out of which 19 publications were at DesignCon, including 3 best paper awards and 3 finalists. He received the 2018 Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to the Signal/Power integrity field.

Vishram is an active member of the DesignCon Technical Program Committee and serves as a co-chair for Track 11, covering power integrity in power distribution networks. 

This year at DesignCon, Vishram will be presenting at the technical session, “Electrical Integrity for LPDDR5 Memory Technology.”

Cast your vote for the 2019 Engineer of the Year by noon ET, December 28.

Yuriy Shlepnev

President and Founder, Simberian

Yuriy Shlepnev is President and Founder of Simberian Inc., where he develops Simbeor electromagnetic signal integrity software. He received an M.S. degree in radio engineering from Novosibirsk State Technical University in 1983, and a Ph.D. in computational electromagnetics from Siberian State University of Telecommunications and Informatics. He was principal developer of the electromagnetic simulator for Eagleware Corporation and leading developer of electromagnetic software for simulation of signal and power distribution networks at Mentor Graphics. The results of his research are published in multiple papers and conference proceedings.

Yuriy conceived and brought to market a state of the art electromagnetic field solver tool suite and is considered an expert in his field and regularly posts teaching videos. He is a senior member of IEEE AP, MYY, EMC, and CPMT societies. He is also a Fellow of Kong’s Electromagnetics Academy and a member of the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES).

Yuriy is active in the Technical Program Committee for DesignCon and serves as a co-chair for Track 14. At DesignCon this year, he will be speaking in the technical session, “Effect of PCB Fabrication Variations on Interconnect Loss, Delay, Impedance & Identified Material Models for 56-Gbps Interconnect Designs.”

Cast your vote for the 2019 Engineer of the Year by noon ET, December 28.

Learn more about DesignCon and register to attend.

Tue, 14 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.designnews.com/cast-your-vote-2019-engineer-year
Killexams : ESW EMI test receiver bandwidth goes to 1 GHz

The R&S ESW EMI test receiver will offer the possibility to increase its FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) bandwidth to 350 MHz with the new R&S ESW-B350 option, and to a market-leading 970 MHz with the new R&S ESW-B1000 option. This makes the R&S ESW not only an instrument of highest performance in RF, functionality, versatility and hardware quality, but also in high-speed testing especially for pretests and general EMI analysis.

With the R&S ESW-B1000 offering 970 MHz of FFT bandwidth, the R&S ESW can process the CISPR Bands C and D in one shot–even with quasi-peak and CISPR average detectors Rohde schwarzworking in parallel–offering a significant gain in measurement speed. The 970 MHz wide spectrum is measured in real time; users benefit from a truly gapless spectrogram. Infrequent emissions can be observed over a significantly longer time and are detected with a much higher probability. Emissions from equipment under test going through a duty cycle are recorded over a broad spectrum of 970 MHz without missing the shortest pulse.

EMC engineers working in commercial, military, aerospace and automotive applications will benefit from the faster speed and better signal insights provided by the new FFT bandwidth extensions of the R&S ESW. The R&S ESW-B1000 and R&S ESW-B350 will be available by the fourth quarter of 2022. Both options are hardware extensions to the R&S ESW EMI test receiver and can be retrofitted to every R&S ESW (S/N ≥ 103000).

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 05:30:00 -0500 Lee Teschler en-US text/html https://www.eeworldonline.com/rohde-schwarz-esw-emi-test-receiver-bandwidth-goes-to-1-ghz/
Killexams : Converged vs. Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Solutions

What differentiates converged and hyper-converged infrastructure? We take a look at several systems in both spaces.

Building a converged infrastructure in a corporate environment means more than just replacing a few network devices. It requires an entirely different way of looking at a company’s network infrastructure and the kinds of IT staff needed to support it.

Traditional IT infrastructures were made up of the proverbial technology silos. They included experts in networking, storage, systems administration, and software. But much of that has changed over the past decade or so as virtualization has become a prominent technology tying networks and servers together.

Today’s virtual environments can be likened to the ubiquitous smartphone. Smartphone users generally don’t concern themselves with issues such as storage or systems management; everything they need is just an app. Similarly, storage management on converged infrastructure systems, such as EMC’s VMAX family, are provisioned essentially as an app as well, says Colin Gallagher, director of product marketing for the VMAX family.

Generally speaking, there are two approaches companies can take to building a converged infrastructure:

  • The hardware-focused, building-block approach of VCE (a joint venture of EMC, Cisco, and VMware), simply known as converged infrastructure;
  • The software defined approach of Nutanix, VMware, and others called hyper-converged infrastructure.

The most important difference between the two technologies is that in a converged infrastructure, each of the components in the building block is a discrete component that can be used for its intended purpose — the server can be separated and used as a server, just as the storage can be separated and used as functional storage. In a hyper-converged infrastructure, the technology is software defined, so that the technology is, in essence, all integrated and cannot be broken out into separate components.

Hyper-converged infrastructure: main differentiators

Let’s say a company is implementing server or desktop virtualization. In a non-converged architecture, physical servers run a virtualization hypervisor, which then manages each of the virtual machines (VMs) created on that server. The data storage for those physical and virtual machines is provided by direct attached storage (DAS), network attached storage (NAS) or a storage area network (SAN).

In a converged architecture, the storage is attached directly to the physical servers. Flash storage generally is used for high-performance applications and for caching storage from the attached disk-based storage.

The hyper-converged infrastructure has the storage controller function running as a service on each node in the cluster to Boost scalability and resilience. Even VMware is getting into the act. The company’s new reference architecture, called EVO (previously known as Project Mystic or Marvin) is a hyper-converged offering designed to compete with companies such as Nutanix, SimpliVity or NIMBOXX. The two systems, EVO:RAIL and EVO:RACK, were announced at VMworld 2014 in August. Previously, VMware was active only in the converged infrastructure market with the VCE partnership.

Using Nutanix as an example, the storage logic controller, which normally is part of SAN hardware, becomes a software service attached to each VM at the hypervisor level. The software defined storage takes all of the local storage across the cluster and configures it as a single storage pool. Data that needs to be kept local for the fastest response could be stored locally, while data that is used less frequently can be stored on one of the servers that might have spare capacity.

Hyper-converged infrastructure costs

Like traditional infrastructures, the cost of a hyper-converged infrastructure can vary dramatically depending on the underlying hypervisor. An infrastructure built on VMware’s vSphere or Microsoft’s Hyper-V can have fairly costly licensing built in. Nutanix, which supports Hyper-V, also supports the free, open source KVM, the default hypervisor in OpenStack cloud software. However, as with any open source application, “free” can be a relative term, since there are other costs involved in configuring the software for use in a given environment.

Because the storage controller is a software service, there is no need for the expensive SAN or NAS hardware in the hyper-converged infrastructure, the company says. The hypervisor communicates to the software from the Nutanix software vendor in the same manner as it did to the SAN or NAS so there is no reconfiguring of the storage, the company says. However, the Nutanix software eliminates the need for the IT team to configure Logical Unit Numbers (LUNs), volumes or read groups, simplifying the storage management function.

Niel Miles, software defined data center solutions manager at Hewlett-Packard, described “software defined” as programmatic controls of the corporate infrastructure as a company moves forward, while speaking at the HP Discover 2014 conference in Las Vegas earlier this year. He said this approach adds “business agility,” noting that it increases the company’s ability to address automation, orchestration, and control more quickly and effectively. Existing technology cannot keep up with these changes, requiring the additional software layer to respond more quickly than was possible in the past.

For those looking to reuse their existing hardware to take advantage of a hyper-converged infrastructure, several companies offer approaches more similiar to the converged infrastructure approach of discrete server, storage and network devices, but with software defined technology added to Boost performance and capabilities.

One such company is Atlantis of Mountain View, CA, which offers software defined storage system that can convert direct-attached storage (DAS) into a pooled array, increasing the number of VMs that can share the storage and effectively creating a hyper-converged infrastructure. The technological secret sauce is Atlantis USX, a software platform that resides between the VM and storage infrastructures, the company says.

In August, Sunnyvale CA-based Maxta introduced the MaxDeploy Hyperconverged Reference Architecture built on Intel server boards and systems. MaxDeploy pre-validations include testing with server-side flash technology and magnetic disk drives to support a spectrum of cost / performance options, the company says. Maxta’s VM-centric offering simplified IT management and reduces storage administration by enabling customers to manage VMs and not storage.

Generally speaking, the investment in a converged infrastructure system will be made in conjunction with a greenfield project rather than a forklift upgrade, says Todd Pavone, executive VP of product development and strategy for VCE. Companies that consider a converged infrastructure will know already that they need to expand their computing environment so a pilot project with a converged infrastructure system will be cost-effective. Rolling out x86-based servers in a building-block chassis permits the company to test the new environment with new hardware that would have already been budgeted for expansion.

From a CapEx perspective, Pavone says, hardware is essentially neutral. The downstream savings is from lower support and maintenance costs.

New investments for a hyper-converged infrastructure differs because the hardware cannot be decoupled should the pilot program prove unsuccessful. Because the software is a key component to a hyper-converged infrastructure, initial entry costs could be higher, Pavone says.

But Duncan Epping from VMware’s EVO:RAIL (aka MARVIN) team suggests that upfront costs for converged systems need to be taken into account when considering upgrading a company’s infrastructure. For hyper-converged systems, he says integration with existing infrastructure and figuring out how to manage different platform needs to be included in the financial considerations as well.

While many of the vendors that provide components and systems in the converged market are established vendors, EMC, Cisco, NetApp, Hewlett-Packard, for example, Epping says, “Some vendors in the hyper-converged space are relatively new; can you trust them with your mission-critical workloads?”  

Not all of the companies offering hyper-converged offerings are new, however. Among the established IT vendors with hyper-converged products are the aforementioned EMC, Dell, Nutanix and Epping’s own VMware. Though VMware is a bit unique, as Epping explains, “EVO:RAIL is not a pure VMware offering, it is a partner program that enables customers to select a hyper-converged offering from their preferred vendor.”

Among the relative newcomers in the hyper-converged space are Gridstore, SimplVity, Yottabyte, Pivot3, and Maxta.

Converged infrastructure: main differentiators

There are two approaches to building a converged infrastructure, explains Bharat Badrinath, senior vice president of solutions marketing at EMC. The first is using the building-block approach, such as that used in the VCE Vblock environment, where fully configured systems — including servers, storage, networking and virtualization software — are installed in a large chassis as a single building block. The infrastructure is expanded by adding additional building blocks.

While one of the main arguments in favor of a converged infrastructure is that it comes pre-configured and simply snaps into place, that also is one of the key arguments against this building-block technology approach as well. As Chris Ward noted in his Tom’s IT Pro article To Converge Infrastructure or not, That is the Question, because all the parts are pre-configured, the users of the products have a predefined configuration. If the IT manager wants a configuration that is different from the system a provider offers, they are essentially out of luck.

The same holds true for the components themselves. Because each component is selected and configured by the vendor, the user does not have the option to choose a router or storage array customized for them. Also, the building-block approach ties the user in to updating patches on the vendor’s timetable, rather than the user’s. Patches must be updated in the pre-configured systems in order to maintain support.

It is possible to build a converged infrastructure without using the building block approach. The second approach is using a reference architecture, such as the one dubbed VSPEX by EMC, which allows the company to use existing hardware, such as a conforming router, storage array or server, to build the equivalent of a pre-configured Vblock system.

Converged infrastructure costs

As noted, each building block consists of separate hardware that is prepackaged and tested to work almost as a plug-and-play module. Unlike the hyper-converged infrastructure, the separate components of the converged infrastructure can be decoupled from the rest of the components and used in a standalone environment, Bardinath says. The simplicity of simply adding a fully configured and tested infrastructure block makes it easier to expand and maintain the network without needing to spend a lot of time reconfiguring the various components, he says. The blocks effectively snap together similar to the colorful Lego-brand building blocks found in a child’s toy box.

Pricing for converged infrastructure building blocks will vary by vendor, of course, but Unisys provides the following comparison: the base price for a Unisys Forward! system starts at $89,000. By contrast, a customer buying the same equipment and software a la carte would pay in excess of $100,000.

Companies that plan to migrate to the VSPEX reference design and use their existing server, storage and network hardware can work with a reseller or use a do-it-yourself approach to configure their existing hardware to meet the VSPEX design, he says. Such an approach would permit a company with a more modern network to migrate to the converged infrastructure at a lower cost. However, he says, most companies tend to deploy converged infrastructures in pilot projects, such as migrating from Microsoft Exchange 2010 to 2014, or in new data centers to reduce the hardware expense.

One advantage of the converged infrastructure is lower support and maintenance costs, he says. Data centers with hardware from a variety of vendors can run into finger-pointing problems when hardware issues arise. A Vblock is supported by a single vendor that takes responsibility for all of the internal components, regardless of the manufacturer.

“Technology is the easy part,” Badrinath says. “The people part is much more tricky.” Finding qualified engineers that can work on the wide variety of hardware from various vendors found in many data centers can be a real challenge, he notes.

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.business.com/articles/converged-vs-hyper-converged-infrastructure-solutions/
Killexams : Does a DC-DC Converter Have to be Synchronous for Low Emissions?

Members can download this article in PDF format.

What you'll learn:

  • How nonsynchronous converters can offer low emissions by implementing catch diodes.
  • Layout considerations for nonsynchronous converters.
  • The highly beneficial aspect of controlled switching.

Synchronous Silent Switcher converters have set the standard for powerful, compact, and quiet dc-dc conversion. We’ve been introduced to a plethora of these low-electromagnetic-interference (EMI) synchronous buck and boost converters in the past 5+ years.

Such dc-dc converters have simplified the system-level electromagnetic-compatibility (EMC) design in high-power, noise-sensitive environments such as cold-crank preboosts, driving high-current LED strings, and high-voltage power-amplifier sound systems. Monolithic (integrated power switch) boost regulators provide an efficient and more compact solution compared to a controller-based design and are commonly used from source voltages of 5, 12, and 24 V.

Integrated synchronous switches and their unique layout within the silicon1 are part of the secret sauce of Silent Switcher converters (Fig. 1). On-board (integrated) switches create super-tiny hot loops, which help keep emissions at a bare minimum. However, this can come with a cost, and synchronous switches may not be necessary in all applications.

Switching converters can be lower cost if only a single power switch is integrated into the silicon, and we can rely on an external, low-cost, discrete catch diode to act as the second switch. This is common practice for lower-cost converters, but is this okay to do when low emissions are important?

Nonsynchronous converters with discrete catch diodes can still achieve low emissions. It’s possible to design low-EMI switching applications with nonsynchronous converters by paying special attention to both the hot-loop layout and the dV/dt switching edge rate (Fig. 1, again).

Incorporating additional emission reduction with spread-spectrum frequency modulation (SSFM) is a must. Monolithic switching regulators such as the LT3950 60-V, 1.5-A nonsynchronous LED driver and the LT8334 40-V, 5-A nonsynchronous boost converter each have a single, low-side power switch integrated into their devices. However, they rely on external catch diodes while still achieving low emissions! How does this work?

Catch Diodes vs. Dead Time

Integrating a single power switch vs. two in a monolithic converter can reduce die size by 30% to 40%. Die-size reduction has direct silicon cost savings and an additional, secondary cost savings when the silicon can fit into a smaller package. Although some PCB space still needs to be dedicated to an external, discrete catch diode, these diodes are plentiful, robust, and cheap. In a boost converter, the Schottky diodes with low VF perform with high efficiency at high output voltage and low duty cycle—arguably outperforming expensive high voltage power FETs.

One reason might be due to dead time. In typical synchronous converters, power-switch body-diode conduction occurs during a preset dead time to prevent potential shoot-through disasters. Shoot-through occurs when the synchronous switch turns on before the main switch can completely turn off—creating a direct short to GND from the input or output (buck or boost).

Dead-time control can be a limiting aspect of switcher design at high switching frequency and minimum and maximum duty-cycle limits. Low-cost catch diodes with low forward voltage eliminate the need for dead-time logic in a switcher—simple. In most cases, they also outperform the forward voltage drop of the inherent body diodes inside the power switches (which do conduct during dead time).

Simple Layouts and Packages

First, we can start with a simple monolithic boost converter to demonstrate a basic layout. The LT3950 LED driver in Figure 2 has a simple PCB hot loop. This hot loop, highlighted in Figure 3, only includes the small, ceramic output capacitor and the discrete catch diode of similar size, PMEG6010CEH. These components fit snuggly with the LT3950 16-lead MSE package and the switching pins and GND plane of the thermal pad.

Is this enough for low emissions? It sure is part of the equation. The wire-bonded, 16-lead MSE package and tight hot loop can achieve low emissions when combined with SSFM and well-controlled switching behavior (switching edge transitions that don’t ring due to very high speed and parasitic trace inductance).

Next, the single switch of a nonsynchronous converter can be used to create a SEPIC topology (step-up and step-down), extending the usefulness beyond just the intended boost designation. The single switch makes it easy to break the hot loop of the boost and add the SEPIC coupling capacitor shown in Figures 4 and 5.

Most synchronous boost converters whose top and bottom switches are connected permanently at a single switch node can’t be converted into a SEPIC. The SEPIC hot loop can remain small if attention is paid to the loop formed by the coupling capacitor, the catch diode, and the output capacitor.

The LT8334 nonsynchronous boost converter has an integrated 5-A, 40-V switch. This monolithic step-up converter IC is useful for making 12-V output SEPIC converters.

Figure 4 shows a standard 12-V, 2-A+ SEPIC converter with coupling capacitor C1 and two inductive windings of a coupled inductor. Since the tiny PMEG4030ER catch diode (D1) isn’t affixed directly to the switching node, the 4.7-μF 0805 ceramic, dc-blocking, coupling capacitor can be placed between the diode and the switching node with ease. The hot-loop layout remains small on the EVAL-LT8334-AZ SEPIC evaluation board.

Keeping the switching-node copper as small as possible and as close to the switching pin as possible helps minimize radiated emissions. Please note that the entire hot loop is placed on Layer 1 and there are no vias on either the switching node or the coupled switching node on the other side of the coupling capacitor. Both switching nodes should be kept to minimum size and as close as possible for the best results. The 12-lead DFN package of the LT8334 helps keep the hot loop and emissions as small as possible.

Controlled Switching Is Effective

Monolithic (switch-included) switching converters are quite effective at emission reduction when combined with SSFM, 2-MHz fundamental switching frequency, excellent PCB layout, and well-controlled switching. If they’re effective enough, they may not need the extreme benefits of Silent Switcher architecture for low emissions (the Silent Switcher is recognized as the top architecture for ultra-low emissions, but not necessary in all circumstances just to pass emission standards).

In the LT3950 and LT8334, SSFM spreads from the fundamental frequency to about 20% higher and back in a triangle pattern. SSFM is a common feature among low-EMI switching regulators.

There are a variety of SSFM types, but the overall goal of each is to spread out the emission energy and reduce the highest points of peak and average emissions below the required limits. One goal of 2-MHz switching frequency is to set the fundamental switching frequency above the AM radio band (530 kHz to 1.8 MHz) limit. Therefore, the fundamental itself and all of its harmonics create emissions without disturbing the radio. When there’s no concern for the AM band, a lower switching frequency can be used.

Independent of switching frequency, the internal switch and driver should be designed carefully to avoid certain unwanted behaviors that deteriorate EMI performance in switching converters. Ultra-fast, ringing switch waveforms can cause unwanted emissions in the 100- to 400-MHz range, which can be most noticeable on radiated emission measurements.

A well-controlled switch inside the IC should act less like an emission hammer and more like an effective rubber mallet with its switching edges dampened. A controlled power switch moves high voltage and current up and down at a slightly reduced rate below what’s possible.

The 2-V/ns switch rate and lack of ringing in Figure 6b is a great example of this controlled switching in a monolithic converter. You can see how soft this internal switching turns on and lands gently at 0 V, without a harsh ring beyond. This is a major contributor to the emission results of the LT3950 (see figures 9 to 11 below). Normally, in a monolithic switching regulator, the speed of the switch drives up the maximum power and reduces the thermal dissipation. However, when carefully designed, less can be more.

Nonsynchronous Boost Controller with Gate Rate Control

At some point, high power dc-dc conversion requires a controller and high-voltage, high-current switches external to the IC. In this case, the gate driver for an external switch remains inside the IC, but the entire switching hot loop moves outside of the IC. Some creative hot loops and layout are possible, but the hot loop itself typically grows due to the size of the discrete MOSFET(s) alone.

In one example, the LT8357 high-power (nonsynchronous) boost controller provides 24 V, 2 A (48 W) with very low emissions. It powers a 3.5- × 3.5-mm MOSFET at a low switching frequency for efficient conversion. In addition to the tight hot loop (Fig. 7), it also has rising and falling gate control pins for edge-rate control and emission reduction.

A simple 5.1-Ω resistor RP (on GATEP) is enough to reduce the turn-on edge rate of the M1 power MOSFET and keep radiated emissions at a minimum. Of course, some emission filters and SSFM help with emission reduction. An additional place for an emission shield is provided for the EVAL-LT8357-AZ evaluation board, but it might not be necessary for most applications.

Thus, this nonsynchronous boost controller, much like its monolithic counterparts, has all of the features necessary for high-power, low-EMI boost, and SEPIC applications (Fig. 8).

Passing CISPR 25 Class 5 Emissions

Low-EMI evaluation circuits like the LT3950 DC2788A have been tested extensively for radiated and conducted emissions. The emission test results shown in Figures 9 to 11 were captured with SSFM turned on, 12-V input, and 330-mA current through a 25-V LED string. Both current-probe and voltage-method CE results passed the most stringent limits. It’s common to have FM band CE challenges in switchers, but the LT3950 coasted by the FM band.

Setting the switching frequency to 2 MHz (300-kHz to 2-MHz adjustable range) allows the fundamental switching emissions to remain above the AM radio band (530 kHz to 1.8 MHz) and out of trouble while eliminating the need for a bulky LC AM band filter on the front end. Instead, the EMI filters used by the LT3950 can be small, high-frequency ferrite beads.

The LT8334 SEPIC also has low emissions despite the additional coupling capacitor in the hot loop and the extra terminals of the coupled inductor (which doubles the number of switching nodes). In addition, using 2 MHz and SSFM, the EVAL-LT8334-AZ SEPIC 12 VOUT evaluation kit has low emissions. The EVAL-LT8357-AZ boost controller can achieve similar performance.

ADI’s latest family of low-EMI nonsynchronous boost and SEPIC converters is listed in the table. Monolithic and controller ICs are useful for their simple construction, low cost, multiple topologies, high power capability, and low emissions. High-current Silent Switcher boost converters also are available when ultra-low emissions are needed above all else.

Conclusion

Both synchronous Silent Switcher and nonsynchronous monolithic switching regulators can be used in low-emission applications. Nonsynchronous boost converters are lower cost when compared to the high-performance Silent Switcher converters. The second switch is replaced by low-cost catch diode, which has some advantages at high voltage and adds flexibility when reconfigured as a SEPIC.

Small plastic packages and well-designed, small hot switching loop areas of the PCB have low emissions when the power switch edge rate is well controlled with limited ringing. These features should be combined with other low-EMI features such as SSFM and EMI filters. Even in high-power boost controllers, gate-drive control is useful to slow down and smooth out the switching edges for low emissions. Pay special attention to the best possible top-layer layout of the hot loop and choose your dc-dc converters wisely for low-emission designs.

Reference

1. Steve Knoth. “High Power Density in a Small Form Factor.” Analog Dialogue, Vo. 53, No. 4, October 2019.

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 07:47:00 -0500 text/html https://www.electronicdesign.com/power-management/whitepaper/21246389/analog-devices-does-a-dcdc-converter-have-to-be-synchronous-for-low-emissions
Killexams : Best Data Center Certifications

Job board search results (in alphabetical order, by certification)*

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

LinkUp

Total

CCNA Data Center (Cisco)

1,564 2,126 1,649 19 3,876

CCNP Data Center (Cisco)

1,025 1,339 1,508 14 3,145

JNCIP-DC (Juniper Networks)

125 37 14 4 130

VCE-CIAE (Dell)*

81 19 30 14 132

VCP6-DCV (VMware)

32 37 57 38 111

*Search results for the generic phrase “VCE data center engineer”

Regardless of which job board you use, you’ll find many employers looking for qualified people to join their data center teams. SimplyHired lists 114,000-plus data center jobs in the U.S., with more than 172,000 on Indeed, 50,000 on LinkedIn Jobs and 20,000 on LinkUp. With the right credential(s) in hand, one of these jobs is sure to be yours.

Data center job roles start at the network technician level and advance through senior architect. Most of the certifications covered would fit well with an associate- or professional-level network engineer position. According to SimplyHired, the average salary for network engineer jobs is about $79,000, and $111,000 for senior network engineers. Glassdoor reports a U.S. national average salary of about $73,000 for network engineers, and their average for senior network engineers climbs to $94,000.

Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Data Center

Cisco certifications continue to be some of the most recognizable and respected credentials in the industry. The CCNA Data Center certification is a great introductory certification for networking professionals who want to specialize in data center operations and support and have 1-3 years of experience.

Candidates for the CCNA Data Center certification need to understand basic data center networking concepts. These include addressing schemes, troubleshooting and configuring switches with VLANs and routers using Nexus OS, network and server virtualization, storage, and common network services such as load balancing, device management and network access controls.

The CCNA Data Center is valid for three years, after which credential holders must recertify. Recertification requires passing a current version of one of the following exams:

  • Associate-level test (except for ICND1 exam)
  • 642-XXX professional-level or 300-XXX professional-level exam
  • 642-XXX Cisco Specialist test (does not include Sales Specialist exams or MeetingPlace Specialist exams, Implementing Cisco TelePresence Installations (ITI) exams, Cisco Leading Virtual Classroom Instruction exams, or any 650 online exams)
  • Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) written exam
  • Cisco Certified Design Expert (CCDE) written test or current CCDE practical exam

Candidates can also sit through the Cisco Certified Architect (CCAr) interview and the CCAr board review to achieve recertification for CCNA Data Center.

CCNA Data Center facts and figures

Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Data Center

Networking professionals looking to validate their data center skills and achieve a competitive edge in the workplace can’t go wrong with the Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Data Center credential.

Geared toward technology architects, along with design and implementation engineers and solutions experts, the CCNP Data Center identifies individuals who can implement Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS) rack-mount servers; install, configure and manage Cisco Nexus switches; and implement and deploy automation of Cisco Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI). The CCNP Data Center is designed for candidates with 3-5 years of experience working with Cisco technologies.

When pursuing the CCNP Data Center, Cisco lets you choose either a design or troubleshooting track. Related data center certifications include the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA Data Center), for those with 1-3 years of experience, and the Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) Data Center, aimed at professionals with seven or more years of experience.

The CCNP Data Center is valid for three years, after which credential holders must recertify. The recertification process requires candidates to pass a single test to maintain the credential, or to sit for the Cisco Certified Architect (CCAr) interview and the CCAr board review. Credential holders should check the Cisco website for the current list of qualifying exams before attempting to recertify.

CCNP Data Center facts and figures

Certification name

Cisco Certified Network Professional Data Center (CCNP Data Center)

Prerequisites and required courses

Valid Cisco Certified Network Associate Data Center (CCNA Data Center) certification or any Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) certification. Training recommended but not required; classes are usually four or five days and start at $3,950.

Number of exams

Four exams:
  • 300-175 DCUCI – Implementing Cisco Data Center Unified Computing
  • 300-165 DCII – Implementing Cisco Data Center Infrastructure
  • 300-170 DCVAI – Implementing Cisco Data Center Virtualization and Automation
    AND
  • 300-160 DCID – Designing Cisco Data Center Infrastructure
    OR
  • 300-180 DCIT –  Troubleshooting Cisco Data Center Infrastructure

All exams are 90 minutes, 60-70 questions.

Cost per exam

$300 per exam; $1,200 total (price may vary by region). Exams administered by Pearson VUE.

URL

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/training-events/training-certifications/certifications/professional/ccnp-data-center.html

Self-study materials

The certification page provides links to self-study materials, including the syllabus, study groups, webinars, Cisco Learning Network resources and learning partner content.

JNCIP-DC: Juniper Networks Certified Professional Data Center

Juniper Networks, based in California and incorporated in 1997, develops and sells network infrastructure equipment and software aimed at corporations, network service providers, government agencies and educational institutions. The company has a large certification and training program designed to support its solutions, which includes Data Center, Junos Security, Enterprise Routing and Switching, and Service Provider Routing and Switching tracks.

The Data Center track recognizes networking professionals who deploy, manage and troubleshoot Juniper Networks Junos software and data center equipment. The single test (JN0-680) covers data center deployment and management, including implementation and maintenance of multi-chassis link aggregation group (LAG), virtual chassis and Internet Protocol (IP) fabric, virtual extensible LANs (VXLANs), and data center interconnections.

The JNCIP-DC certification is good for three years. To renew the certification, candidates must pass the current JNCIP-DC exam.

JNCIP-DC facts and figures

VCE-CIAE: VCE Converged Infrastructure Administration Engineer

VCE, short for Virtual Computing Environment, was part of EMC Corporation, which Dell acquired in 2016. The VCE line of converged infrastructure appliances are still being manufactured and widely sold, and the company has a handful of VCE certifications geared toward designing, maintaining and supporting those solutions.

VCE certifications are now part of the larger Dell EMC Proven Professional certification program but have retained some independence. The program currently offers the VCE Certified Converged Infrastructure Associate (VCE-CIA), VCE Converged Infrastructure Administration Engineer (VCE-CIAE) and VCE Converged Infrastructure Master Administration Engineer (VCE-CIMAE) credentials. We focus on the VCE Administration Engineer in this article because it’s available to the public as well as Dell employees and partners, and it ranks well in job board searches.

The VCE-CIAE is a professional-level credential that recognizes professionals who manage and support Vblock Systems. The single test includes Topics such as system concepts, administration, security, resource management, maintenance and troubleshooting.

Candidates must recertify every two years to maintain a VCE certification. To renew, credential holders must pass the current VCE-CIA test (this is the prerequisite for the VCE-CIAE certification), as well as pass the current VCE-CIAE test or earn a higher-level credential.

VCE-CIAE facts and figures

VCP6-DCV: VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization

The VCP6-DCV is one of those credentials that sits firmly on the line between traditional data center networking and cloud management. As such, it appeals to a wide networking audience. In fact, the VMware website states that more than 100,000 professionals have earned VMware VCP6-DCV certification, making it one of the company’s most popular certifications.

VMware offers an extensive certification program with a rigorous Data Center virtualization track, which includes the VCP6-DCV. Candidates must thoroughly understand Domain Name System (DNS), routing and database connectivity techniques, and how to deploy, configure, manage and scale VMware vSphere environments and storage. VMware recommends that candidates have a minimum of six months of experience with VMware vSphere 6 before attempting the VCP6-DCV certification.

New candidates must take a VMware training course and pass two exams. Training courses start at $4,125; pricing is based on the specific course, delivery format and learning partner.

VMware requires credential holders to recertify every two years. Recertification is achieved by taking whatever test is most current for the certification, earning a new VCP certification in a different solution track or advancing to the next-level VMware certification.

Note: VMware certifications are geared toward the VMware vSphere product, the latest incarnation of which is Version 6.5. As of April 2019, VMware is still rolling out various Version 6.5 exams. Currently, Version 6.5 exams are offered for the Professional and Advanced Professional (Design only) levels. We anticipate that Version 6.5 exams and credentials at the Associate, Advanced Professional Deploy and Expert levels will follow soon.

VCP6-DCV facts and figures

Certification name

VMWare Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization (VCP6-DCV)

Prerequisites and required courses

Candidates who are new to VMware Data Center Virtualization technology: Six months’ vSphere 6 experience plus one of the following training courses:
  • VMware vSphere: Install, Configure, Manage [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Optimize and Scale [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Install, Configure, Manage plus Virtual SAN Fast Track [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Optimize & Scale [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Bootcamp [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Fast Track [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Design and Deploy Fast Track [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Troubleshooting [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Troubleshooting Workshop [V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Install, Configure and Manage plus Optimize and Scale Fast Track [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Optimize and Scale plus Troubleshooting Fast Track [V6]

Note: The cost of VMware training varies; expect to pay from $4,125 for classroom training to more than $6,000 for Bootcamps and Fast Track courses.

Number of exams

Two exams for new candidates, those with vSphere 5 training only, those with an expired VCP in a different solution track or those with an expired VCP5-DCV certification:

One test for candidates with valid VCP5-DCV certification: VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization Delta exam, 2V0-621D, 105 minutes, 65 questions

One test for candidates with valid VCP certification, any solution track: VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center

Exams administered by Pearson VUE.

Cost per exam

  • vSphere Foundations test (V6 or V6.5): $125
  • VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization exam: $250
  • VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization Delta exam: $250

URL

VCP6-DCV: https://mylearn.vmware.com/mgrReg/plan.cfm?plan=64178&ui=www_cert
VCP6.5-DCV: https://mylearn.vmware.com/mgrReg/plan.cfm?plan=100942&ui=www_cert

Self-study materials

Links to an test guide, training and a practice test (if available) appear on each test page (see the How to Prepare tab). VMware Learning Zone offers test prep subscriptions. Numerous VCP6-DCV study materials are available through Amazon. MeasureUp offers a VCP6-DCV practice test ($129) and a practice lab ($149).

Beyond the top 5: More data center certifications

While not featured in the top five this year, the BICSI Data Center Design Consultant (DCDC) is a terrific certification, designed for IT professionals with at least two years of experience in designing, planning and implementing data centers. This vendor-neutral certification is ideal for data center engineers, architects, designers and consultants. Another good vendor-neutral certification is Schneider Electric’s Data Center Certified Associate (DCCA), an entry-level credential for individuals who design, build and manage data centers as part of a data center-centric IT team.

CNet’s Certified Data Centre Management Professional (CDCMP) and Certified Data Centre Technician Professional (CDCTP) are also worthy of honorable mention. Based in the U.K., these certifications don’t appear in a lot of U.S. job board postings but still deliver solid results from a general Google search.

IT professionals who are serious about advancing their data center careers would do well to check out complementary certifications from our featured vendors. For example, Cisco also offers a number of certifications in data center design and support, including application services, networking infrastructure, storage networking and unified computing. VMware also offers additional data center virtualization certifications worth exploring, including the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization Design (VCAP6.5-DCV Design) and the VMware Certified Design Expert (VCDX6-DCV). Also, the Dell EMC Proven Professional certification program offers a bevy of data center-focused certifications, including the Dell EMC Implementation Engineer (EMCIE) and the Dell EMC Certified Cloud Architect (EMCCA).

Because of the proliferation of data center virtualization and cloud computing, you can expect the data center networking job market to continue to remain strong soon. Achieving a certification can be a real feather in your cap, opening the door to new and better work opportunities.

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10777-data-center-certifications.html
Killexams : Architects, Executives & App Modernization Projects: Why Do They Fail?

Architects, Executives & App Modernization Projects: Why Do They Fail?

Date: Thursday, August 4 at 11am PT / 2pm ET

A exact survey uncovered that 79% of application modernization projects fail. Jump into these findings reviewed by Moti Rafalin, CEO of vFunction, and Kelly Fitzpatrick, Senior Analyst at RedMonk. In this webinar, we will discuss the findings from both the architects' and executives' points of view.

In this webinar, you will discover:
  • Why app modernization projects fail
  • Insights on the biggest obstacles to modernization
  • Where architects and executives align - and how they see things differently
  • The secrets of successful app modernization projects

Register now!

About the presenters:

Moti Rafalin, CEO, vFunction

Moti Rafalin co-founded vFunction and serves as its CEO. He brings over 20 years of experience in the enterprise software market to his role, with a focus on infrastructure, applications, and security. Prior to co-founding vFunction, Moti co-founded and led WatchDox from inception until its acquisition by BlackBerry, growing the company over 20 consecutive quarters and establishing it as a leader in the secure enterprise mobility and collaboration space. Subsequently, he served as Senior Vice President at BlackBerry LTD.

Prior to co-founding WatchDox, he served as the General Manager of the Application Management Business at EMC. Moti served in the Israel Air Force where he led teams of engineers, technicians, and operational officers through cutting-edge technological projects. He is a graduate of the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, and holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School.

Kelly Fitzpatrick, Senior Industry Analyst, RedMonk

KellyAnn Fitzpatrick is a Senior Industry Analyst at RedMonk, the developer-focused industry analyst firm. Having previously worked as a QA analyst, test & release manager, and tech writer, she has experience with containers, CI/CD, testing frameworks, documentation, and training. She has also taught technical communication to computer science majors at the Georgia Institute of Technology as a Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow.

Holding a Ph.D. in English from the University at Albany and a B.A. in English and Medieval Studies from the University of Notre Dame, KellyAnn’s side projects include teaching, speaking, and writing about medievalism (the ways that post-medieval societies reimagine or appropriate the Middle Ages), and running to/from donut shops.

Date: August 4, 2022

Time: 11:00am PT

Duration: 1 hour


Fri, 08 Jul 2022 06:28:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://adtmag.com/webcasts/2022/08/vfunction-architects-executives-and-app-modernization-projects-why-do-they-fail.aspx?tc=page0
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