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Exam Code: E20-385 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
E20-385 E20-385 Data Domain Specialist for Implementation Engineers

Exam Name Dell EMC Certified Specialist - Implementation Engineer - Data Domain (DECS-IE)
Exam Code E20-385
Duration 90 mins
Number of Questions 60
Passing Score 63%

- Explain the key differentiators of the Dell EMC Data Domain deduplication technology, including SISL, DIA, In-line versus Post Process deduplication, and file versus block storage.
- Identify typical Dell EMC Data Domain backup and recovery solutions and describe Dell EMC Data Domain product positioning.
- Identify and describe various Dell EMC Data Domain software options and the functionality they enable.
- Describe how to prepare the Dell EMC Data Domain system for installation, including rail and rack the system hardware, and connect and cable the system to external storage.
- Describe how to perform the initial configurations of the Dell EMC Data Domain system; configure the network for administrative access, and verify interoperability with connected devices.
- Describe DD Extended Retention features, benefits, and use cases. Describe basic architecture for systems with the DD Extended Retention option and DD Extended Retention licensing requirements.
- Describe how to install and configure Dell EMC Data Domain systems with DD Extended Retention; including system racking and cabling, configuration of the active and archive tiers, establishment of data movement policies and upgrading the system.
- Describe how to perform administrative tasks on Dell EMC Data Domain systems with the DD Extended Retention option, including adding and expanding storage, adjusting compression settings, deleting or reusing storage units, configuring replication and disaster recovery.
- Describe DD Cloud Tier features, benefits, and use cases. Describe basic architecture for systems with the DD Extended Retention option and DD Extended Retention licensing requirements.
- Describe how to install and configure Dell EMC Data Domain systems with DD Cloud Tier; including system racking and cabling, configuration of the active and archive tiers, establishment of data movement policies and upgrading the system.
- Describe how to perform administrative tasks on Dell EMC Data Domain systems with the DD Cloud Tier option, including adding and expanding storage, adjusting compression settings, deleting or reusing storage units, configuring replication and disaster recovery.
- Distinguish between key backup software components. Recognize the packet flow in a typical backup environment with and without a Dell EMC Data Domain system. Describe key information points for a backup and recovery solution using Data Domain Boost/OST technology.
- Implement the Data Domain system as a CIFS or NFS to a backup server running Veritas NetBackup and/or Backup Exec, Dell EMC NetWorker, CommVault Simpana, and IBM Spectrum Protect. Validate the backup and recovery functionalities.
- Implement and validate the Data Domain system as a VTL. Implement and validate Data Domain Boost in Veritas NetBackup and Backup Exec environments, Oracle Recovery Manager (RMAN) environments, as well as in Dell EMC NetWorker and Dell EMC Avamar environments.
- Implement best practices and system tuning procedures for optimal performance of backup environments including integrated EMC Data Domain systems.
- Implement Dell EMC Data Domain system with key protocols, including NFS/CIFS, DD Boost, VTL, and NDMP.
- Implement Dell EMC Data Domain system with key technologies, including data security, link aggregation/failover, fibre channel connections, secure multi-tenancy, DDMC, snapshots, fastcopy, retention lock, sanitization, encryption, storage migration, replication, and recovery functionalities.
- Manage system access, describe and configure autosupport, Support bundle, SNMP, Syslog, monitor system activity and performance, and evaluate the cleaning frequency.
- Verify hardware, analyze and interpret space utilization and compression graphs. Monitor Data Domain capacity and storage burn rate.

E20-385 Data Domain Specialist for Implementation Engineers
EMC Implementation tricks
Killexams : EMC Implementation tricks - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-385 Search results Killexams : EMC Implementation tricks - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-385 https://killexams.com/exam_list/EMC Killexams : Ausenco and Dimension Data Collaborate on Disaster Recovery Solution

<p>Dimension Data announced today that the company is in the final stages of implementation and testing a disaster recovery (‘DR’) project with global engineering, project management and operations services group Ausenco Limited.</p>
<p>The project covers the design, supply and implementation of a leading edge DR solution, including storage, backup, virtualisation, archiving and data de-duplication technologies. Specifically, this encompasses the integration of technology including EMC CLARiiON storage, Cisco MDS switches, EMC Avamar data deduplication and VMware Virtual Infrastructure, running on a Sun X4600 server platform. Dimension Data also ratified the network design developed in-house by Ausenco, utilising Cisco Nexus 5000 and 2000 series next-generation switching.</p>
<p>The solution positions Ausenco to further develop “private cloud”-based (network-based) services to reduce hosting costs through increased asset utilisation - such as switch or server utilisation - from virtualisation and better data management, and increased service level agreements for critical business applications through disaster recovery.</p>
<p>Dimension Data was awarded the contract based on its solution-focused approach, and worked closely with Ausenco personnel to develop a detailed understanding of the business and technical requirements driving its disaster recovery strategy. Once the requirements were understood, Dimension Data developed a cost-effective day-one solution, which worked within Ausenco’s budgetary requirements, with a strategy roadmap for future expansion and refinement.</p>
<p>The solution was able to work within the major constraints of costs, data centre locations internationally, network, and applications to deliver an integrated solution in a timely low-risk manner.</p>
<p>Commenting on the benefits of the solution, Ausenco CIO Paul Young said: “Dimension Data provided a compelling leading-edge DR solution, which was carefully designed to accommodate Ausenco’s strategic plans for growth.</p>
<p>“Dimension Data also performed a significant amount of legwork in the solution’s design to provide a next-generation DR environment. This included recommending the purchase of SUN X4600 servers, to fit into the reduced VMware licensing requirements of the solution, resulting in significant cost savings.”</p>
<p>“Ultimately, Dimension Data met the challenge of the project, which was to maintain the backup and archiving efficiencies of our DR environment, within our IT budget,” Mr Young added.</p>
<p>Commenting on the contract, Dimension Data’s General Manager for Data Centre Solutions, Ronnie Altit said: “Dimension Data is proud to have the opportunity to collaborate with Ausenco on this project. This is a great example of Dimension Data’s solution-led approach to developing data management strategies for our clients, working closely to understand their requirements.”</p>
<p>“The solution protects Ausenco’s valuable intellectual property through archiving, backup and replication offsite to secure the niche processes and management approach that have made Ausenco the successful organisation it is today.”</p>
<p>“Dimension Data was awarded the contract because we were able to meet Ausenco’s requirements for a staged approach, ensuring that their short term decisions were underpinned by their long term goals, and therefore helped them to do more with less - which was vital in the current challenging economic climate,” Mr Altit said.</p>
<p>Dimension Data also worked closely with industry-leading vendor partners EMC, VMware and Sun on Ausenco’s behalf to ensure the overall strategy was understood by all parties, thereby ensuring that a robust, integrated, scalable and cost-effective solution could be developed, one that met the Ausenco businesses’ requirements.</p>
<p>-ENDS-</p>
<p>About Dimension Data</p>
<p>Dimension Data plc (LSE:DDT), a specialist IT services and solution provider, helps clients plan, build, support and manage their IT infrastructures. Dimension Data applies its expertise in networking, security, operating environments, storage and contact centre technologies and its unique skills in consulting, integration and managed services to create customised client solutions.</p>
<p>About Ausenco Limited</p>
<p>The Ausenco group provides world leading engineering, project management and operations solutions to the global resources and energy sectors. From 26 offices in 13 countries, the group combines expertise, experience and resource capabilities to deliver innovative solutions to the minerals, infrastructure, energy, oil and gas and consulting and environmental sectors across the full project lifecycle, from front end solutions, through innovative engineering and EPCM delivery to operational support.</p>
<p>For further information:</p>
<p>Helen Han</p>
<p>Dimension Data</p>
<p>Tel: +612 8249 5684</p>
<p>helen.han@didata.com.au</p>

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-AU text/html https://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/article/308359/ausenco_dimension_data_collaborate_disaster_recovery_solution/
Killexams : New Teensy 4.0 Blows Away Benchmarks, Implements Self-Recovery, Returns To Smaller Form

Paul Stoffregen did it again: the Teensy 4.0 has been released. The latest in the Teensy microcontroller development board line, the 4.0 returns to the smaller form-factor last seen with the 3.2, as opposed to the larger 3.5 and 3.6 boards.

Don’t let the smaller size fool you; the 4.0 is based on an ARM Cortex M7 running at 600 MHz (!), the fastest microcontroller you can get in 2019, and testing on real-world examples shows it executing code more than five times faster than the Teensy 3.6, and fifteen times faster than the Teensy 3.2. Of course, the new board is also packed with periperals, including two 480 Mbps USB ports, 3 digital audio interfaces, 3 CAN busses, and multiple SPI/I2C/serial interfaces backed with integrated FIFOs. Programming? Easy: there’s an add-on to the Arduino IDE called Teensyduino that “just works”. And it rings up at an MSRP of just $19.95; a welcomed price point, but not unexpected for a microcontroller breakout board.

The board launches today, but I had a chance to test drive a couple of them in one of the East Coast Hackaday labs over the past few days. So, let’s have a closer look.

First Impressions

The board looks superficially similar to the older 3.2, at least from the top. There’s the usual dual row of pin headers you can plug into a breadboard, a micro-USB connector, and reset button. A new red LED near the USB connector gives you some status information, while the traditional “Arduino LED” is orange. Flip the board over, and you start to see some of the extra power this board wields. Besides ten more GPIO pins, there are pads for an SD card interface using 4-bit SDIO, and D+ and D- lines for the second 480 Mbps USB interface. The unmarked round pads are test points used in manufacturing and are no-connects from the end-user’s perspective.

Teensy 3.2 Everything Killer?

When doing hardware reviews it’s crucial to choose the right comparison hardware. I think the best comparison in this case is between the two boards that share the same form factor; the Teensy 4.0 and the 3.2. I’ve chosen not to make the comparison with the Teensy 3.5 and 3.6, which are priced a little higher, in a larger form factor, and have SD card slots soldered on.

Incredibly, the Teensy 4.0 is priced at $19.95, as opposed to the $19.80 Teensy 3.2. What does that extra fifteen cents buy? First, there’s performance. The 4.0’s 600 MHz clock vs the 72 MHz on the 3.2 doesn’t tell the whole story. The Cortex M7 on the 4.0 is a dual-issue superscalar processor capable of executing up to two 32-bit instructions per clock cycle; initial tests showed this happening between 40-50% of the time on Arduino-compiled code. Additionally, the Cortex-M7 is the first ARM microcontroller with branch prediction. While on the Cortex M4, a branch always takes 3 clock cycles, after a few passes through a loop, for instance, the Cortex M7 can begin executing correctly-predicted branches in a single clock. This is technology originally pioneered in supercomputers that you can use in your next Halloween costume.

Then, there’s floating-point. Veteran embedded programmers may have a bias against floating-point code, and with good reason. Without native floating-point instructions, these operations must be emulated, and run very slowly. The same thing happens with double-precision operations on a processor which only supports single-precision instructions. While Cortex-M4 processors support single-precision floating-point, the Cortex-M7’s include native double-precision instructions, so if you need the extra precision afforded by doubles, you’re not going to take a huge performance hit: basically, doubles seem to execute in only twice as many cycles as floats.

The Cortex-M7 on this board also supports tightly-coupled memory (TCM), which provides fast access like a cache, but without the non-determinism that can complicate hard real-time applications — one of the problems with other high-power microcontrollers. The 64-bit ITCM bus can fetch 64-bits, while two dedicated 32-bit buses (DTCM) can fetch up to two instructions from the TCM each cycle – these buses are separate from the main AXI bus used to communicate with other memory and peripherals. The Teensyduino environment automatically allocates code and statically allocated memory into the DTCM area, which can be up to 512K in size, although you can override the default behavior with some command-line switches. Memory that isn’t accessed by the tightly-coupled buses is optimized for access by the peripherals using DMA.

Spec Sheet

Despite its size, there’s a lot to this board and the chip it carries, so here’s condensed spec list:

  • ARM Cortex-M7 at 600 MHz
  • 1024K RAM (512K is tightly coupled)
  • 2048K Flash (64K reserved for recovery & EEPROM emulation)
  • 2 USB ports, both 480 MBit/sec
  • 3 CAN Bus (1 with CAN FD)
  • 2 I2S Digital Audio
  • 1 S/PDIF Digital Audio
  • 1 SDIO (4 bit) native SD
  • 3 SPI, all with 16 word FIFO
  • 3 I2C, all with 4 byte FIFO
  • 7 Serial, all with 4 byte FIFO
  • 32 general purpose DMA channels
  • 31 PWM pins
  • 40 digital pins, all interrupt capable
  • 14 analog pins, 2 ADCs on chip
  • Cryptographic Acceleration
  • Random Number Generator
  • RTC for date/time
  • Programmable FlexIO
  • Pixel Processing Pipeline
  • Peripheral cross triggering
  • Power On/Off management

The board consumes around 100 mA with a 600 MHz clock. Although I didn’t try it myself with the evaluation boards I have here, Paul notes that it can be overclocked for a performance boost. It also supports dynamic clock scaling: the instruction clock speed is decoupled from the peripherals, so that baud rates, audio trial rates, and timing functions continue to function properly if you change the CPU speed.

For the ultimate in power savings, you can shut the board off by adding a pushbutton to the On/Off pin. Pressing the button for more than five seconds disables the 3.3 V supply; a subsequent brief press will turn it back on. This doesn’t affect the real-time-clock (RTC) functionality, however: connecting a coin cell to the VBAT terminal will keep the time and date counter going.

Hands-On Benchmarks

Board CoreMark
Teensy 4.0 2313.57
Teensy 3.6 440.72
Sparkfun ESP32 Thing 351.33
Teensy 3.5 265.50
Metro M4 Grand Central
(overclocked CoreMark: 536.35)
214.85
Teensy 3.2
(overclocked CoreMark: 218.26)
126.76
Arduino Due 94.95
Arduino Zero 56.86
Arduino Mega 7.03

To see how fast this thing really is, Paul ported the CoreMark embedded-processor benchmark to the Arduino environment. (Note that CoreMark seems to be a registered trademark of the Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium (EEMBC)). This synthetic benchmark tests performance managing linked lists, doing matrix multiplies, and executing state machine code. He reports the following scores for a number of boards (larger numbers are better).

I was able to verify the Teensy 4.0 and 3.2 numbers; my 3.6 must have sprouted legs and walked off somewhere, and I didn’t have any of the other boards handy for testing. Using my numbers (nearly identical to those above), the 4.0 is around ten times as fast as the 3.2.

Since the CoreMark code is a “synthetic” benchmark, Paul wanted to test the new board in a more realistic scenario. In another GitHub repo, he has some code to do an RSA signature with a 2048-bit key. This is a processor-intensive operation, believe me — I had to implement it once in Lua (don’t ask!). Here are the scores for the same boards (lower numbers are better).

Lower is better
Board Seconds
Teensy 4.0 0.085
Teensy 3.6 0.474
Sparkfun ESP32 Thing 0.518
Metro M4 Grand Central 0.840
Teensy 3.5 0.909
Teensy 3.2 1.325
Arduino Due 1.901
Arduino Zero 9.638

Again, I was able to verify the numbers for the Teensy 3.2 and 4.0 boards. In this case, the 4.0 is around fifteen times as fast as the 3.2.

If you have any of these, or other Arduino-compatible boards lying around, clone one or both of these repos, open the respective *.ino file from either one, and test them out. Feel free to report results in the comments below.

15 Seconds to Sanity

One of the new features of the Teensy 4.0 is the automatic recovery process, which restores the board to a known good state without the need for a PC connection. If you press and hold the reset button for 15 seconds, the red LED will flash to indicate you’ve entered restore mode. Once you release the button, the red LED will illuminate while the flash memory is erased and re-written with the traditional Arduino “blink” program. Once the re-write is complete, the blink program is run and the orange LED begins blinking, just like on every Arduino-compatible for the past decade and a half. It’s DFU mode without the need for host computer or known-working binary. These used to be key components for hardware-based restore and now they’re part of the board itself.

Why would you want to do this? In a nutshell, because USB itself is a train-wreck. On top of an insanely sprawling and complex protocol, there are charge-only cables sans data pins lurking in your junk box, operating system bugs waiting to trip you up (looking at you, Windows 7), and a whole host of other issues that cause serious head-scratching when things stop working. This can be especially confusing with native-USB boards like the Teensy 4.0; while the built-in USB functionality is amazingly powerful, and can be used in a wide variety of ways, when something stops working, you’re not always sure how to get back on track. Now, you are – just press the button.

What Can You Do with a 600 MHz Microcontroller?

Paul envisions this Teensy 4.0 being used for polyphonic audio synthesis, running moderately complex machine learning algorithms, and real-time audio analysis. In many cases, the first level of processing on data-intensive input devices can now be moved from a host computer to the external microcontroller, narrowing the bandwidth required to the host system. And for projects driving a display, the built-in pixel processing pipeline can also accelerate graphics operations, offloading this work from the CPU.

There will be some fraction of hackers that will still wonder why we need a 600 MHz microcontroller; another fraction will have already needed it yesterday. In between, most users will take some time to figure out what doors this opens up. The reality is that our tools constrain not only our current designs, but also, to some extent, our imagination. A 15x performance improvement over the current tiny development board you may be using could enable some new and exciting applications, and you, dear reader, are the one who makes them happen. So, drive home a different way from work tonight, sleep on the sofa instead of the bed, or use whatever other tricks you have to shock your brain into creativity and figure out what you could really do with this thing. It’s a lot more than you can do with a 555. For that matter, it’s a lot more than most computers could do in the 90s.

Sat, 06 Aug 2022 11:59:00 -0500 Ted Yapo en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2019/08/07/new-teensy-4-0-blows-away-benchmarks-implements-self-recovery-returns-to-smaller-form/
Killexams : RD Kustom Wedges Buell S1 Lightning V-Twin Into Lightweight Chassis No result found, try new keyword!A Ducati 1198 fork and braking system shores up the front end, while French suspension specialists EMC helped Messina realize his own undercarriage-mounted reverse monoshock design. Items like the ... Mon, 25 Jul 2022 09:34:00 -0500 en-za text/html https://www.msn.com/en-za/news/other/rd-kustom-wedges-buell-s1-lightning-v-twin-into-lightweight-chassis/ar-AAZXy6k
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