100% free download of CV0-002 questions and answers and boot camp

We have valid and up-to-date CV0-002 Exam Questions, that really work in the actual CV0-002 exam. This website provides the latest tips and tricks to pass CV0-002 exam with our braindumps. With the information base of CV0-002 questions bank, you do not have to squander your chance on perusing CompTIA Cloud+ Certification reference books, Just go through 24 hours to master our CV0-002 practice test and answers and step through the exam.

Exam Code: CV0-002 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
CV0-002 CompTIA Cloud+ Certification

Exam Name CompTIA Cloud+
Exam Code CV0-002
Duration 90 mins
Number of Questions 90
Passing Score 750 / 900

Configuration and Deployment 24%
1. Appropriate commands, structure, tools, and automation/orchestration as needed
2. Platforms and applications
3. Interaction of cloud components and services
Network components
Application components
Storage components
Compute components
Security components
4. Interaction of non-cloud components and services
5. Baselines
6. Target hosts
7. Existing systems
8. Cloud architecture
9. Cloud elements/target objects

1. Apply the change management process
Approvals
Scheduling
2. Refer to documentation and follow standard operating procedures
3. Execute workflow
4. Configure automation and orchestration, where appropriate, for the system being deployed
5. Use commands and tools as needed
6. Document results
1. Underlying environmental considerations included in the testing plan
Shared components
Production vs. development vs. QA
Sizing
Performance
High availability
Connectivity
Data integrity
Proper function
Replication
Load balancing
Automation/orchestration
2. Testing techniques
Vulnerability testing
Penetration testing
Load testing
1. Consider success factor indicators of the testing environment
Sizing
Performance
Availability
Connectivity
Data integrity
Proper functionality
2. Document results
3. Baseline comparisons
4. SLA comparisons
5. Cloud performance fluctuation variables
1. Cloud deployment models
Public
Private
Hybrid
Community
2. Network components
3. Applicable port and protocol considerations when extending to the cloud
4. Determine configuration for the applicable platform as it applies to the network
VPN
IDS/IPS
DMZ
VXLAN
Address space required
Network segmentation and microsegmentation
5. Determine if cloud resources are consistent with the SLA and/or change management requirement
1. Available vs. proposed resources
CPU
RAM
2. Memory technologies
Bursting and ballooning
Overcommitment ratio
3. CPU technologies
Hyperthreading
VT-x
Overcommitment ratio
4. Effect to HA/DR
5. Performance considerations
6. Cost considerations
7. Energy savings

Dedicated compute environment vs. shared compute environment
1. Requested IOPS and read/ write throughput
2. Protection capabilities
High availability
Failover zones
Storage replication
Regional
Multiregional
Synchronous and asynchronous
Storage mirroring
Cloning
Redundancy level/factor
3. Storage types
NAS
DAS
SAN
Object storage
4. Access protocols
5. Management differences
6. Provisioning model
Thick provisioned
Thin provisioned
Encryption requirements
Tokenization
7. Storage technologies
Deduplication technologies
Compression technologies
8. Storage tiers
9. Overcommitting storage
10. Security configurations for applicable platforms
ACLs
Obfuscation
Zoning
User/host authentication and authorization
1. Migration types
P2V
V2V
V2P
P2P
Storage migrations
Online vs. offline migrations
2. Source and destination format of the workload

Virtualization format
Application and data portability
3. Network connections and data transfer methodologies
4. Standard operating procedures for the workload migration
5. Environmental constraints

Bandwidth
Working hour restrictions
Downtime impact
Peak timeframes
Legal restrictions
Follow-the-sun constraints/time zones
1. Identity management elements
Identification
Authentication
Authorization
Approvals
Access policy
Federation
Single sign-on
2. Appropriate protocols given requirements
3. Element considerations to deploy infrastructure services such as:
DNS
DHCP
Certificate services
Local agents
Antivirus
Load balancer
Multifactor authentication
Firewall
IPS/IDS
Security 16%
1. Company security policies
2. Apply security standards for the selected platform
3. Compliance and audit requirements governing the environment
Laws and regulations as they apply to the data
4. Encryption technologies
IPSec
SSL/TLS
Other ciphers
5. Key and certificate management PKI
6. Tunneling protocols
L2TP
PPTP
GRE
7. Implement automation and orchestration processes as applicable
8. Appropriate configuration for the applicable platform as it applies to compute
Disabling unneeded ports and services
Account management policies
Host-based/software firewalls
Antivirus/anti-malware software
Patching
Deactivating default accounts
1. Authorization to objects in the cloud
Processes
Resources
Users
Groups
System
Compute
Networks
Storage
Services
2. Effect of cloud service models on security implementations
3. Effect of cloud deployment models on security implementations
4. Access control methods
Role-based administration
Mandatory access controls
Discretionary access contros
Non-discretionary access contros
Multifactor authentication
Single sign-on
1. Data classification
2. Concepts of segmentation and microsegmentation
Network
Storage
Compute
3. Use encryption as defined
4. Use multifactor authentication as defined
5. Apply defined audit/ compliance requirements
1. Tools
APIs
Vendor applications
CLI
Web GUI
Cloud portal
2. Techniques
Orchestration
Scripting
Custom programming
3. Security services
Firewall
Antivirus/anti-malware
IPS/IDS
HIPS
4. Impact of security tools to systems and services Scope of impact
5. Impact of security automation techniques as they relate to the criticality of systems

Scope of impact
Maintenance 18%
1. Scope of cloud elements to be patched
Hypervisors
Virtual machines
Virtual appliances
Networking components
Applications
Storage components
Clusters
2. Patching methodologies and standard operating procedures
Production vs. development vs. QA
Rolling update
Blue-green deployment
Failover cluster
3. Use order of operations as it pertains to elements that will be patched
4. Dependency considerations
1. Types of updates
Hotfix
Patch
Version update
Rollback
2. Automation workflow
Runbook management
Single node
Orchestration
Multiple nodes
Multiple runbooks
3. Activities to be performed by automation tools
Snapshot
Cloning
Patching
Restarting
Shut down
Maintenance mode
Enable/disable alerts
Snapshot/redirect-on-write
Clone
Full
Differential
Incremental
Change block/delta tracking
2. Backup target
Replicas
Local
Remote
3. Other considerations
SLAs
Backup schedule
Configurations
Objects
Dependencies
Online/offline
1. DR capabilities of a cloud service provider
2. Other considerations
SLAs for DR
RPO
RTO
Corporate guidelines
Cloud service provider guidelines
Bandwidth or ISP limitations
Techniques
Site mirroring
Replication
File transfer
Archiving
Third-party sites
1. Business continuity plan
Alternate sites
Continuity of operations
Connectivity
Edge sites
Equipment
Availability
Partners/third parties
2. SLAs for BCP and HA
1. Maintenance schedules
2. Impact and scope of maintenance tasks
3. Impact and scope of maintenance automation techniques
4. Include orchestration as appropriate
5. Maintenance automation tasks
Clearing logs
Archiving logs
Compressing drives
Removing inactive accounts
Removing stale DNS entries
Removing orphaned resources
Removing outdated rules from firewall
Removing outdated rules from security
Resource reclamation
Maintain ACLs for the target object
Management 20%
1. Monitoring
Target object baselines
Target object anomalies
Common alert methods/messaging
Alerting based on deviation from baseline
Event collection
2. Event correlation
3. Forecasting resource capacity
Upsize/increase
Downsize/decrease
4. Policies in support of event collection
Policies to communicate alerts appropriately
1. Resources needed based on cloud deployment models
Hybrid
Community
Public
Private
2. Capacity/elasticity of cloud environment
3. Support agreements
Cloud service model maintenance responsibility
4. Configuration management tool
5. Resource balancing techniques
6. Change management
Advisory board
Approval process
Document actions taken
CMDB
Spreadsheet
1. Usage patterns
2. Cloud bursting
Auto-scaling technology
3. Cloud provider migrations
4. Extending cloud scope
5. Application life cycle
Application deployment
Application upgrade
Application retirement
Application replacement
Application migration
Application feature use
Increase/decrease
6. Business need change
Mergers/acquisitions/divestitures
Cloud service requirement changes
Impact of regulation and law changes
1. Identification
2. Authentication methods
Federation
Single sign-on
3. Authorization methods
ACLs
Permissions
4. Account life cycle
5. Account management policy
Lockout
Password complexity rules
6. Automation and orchestration activities
User account creation
Permission settings
Resource access
User account removal
User account disablement
1. Procedures to confirm results
CPU usage
RAM usage
Storage utilization
Patch versions
Network utilization
Application version
Auditing enable
Management tool compliance
1. Analyze performance trends
2. Refer to baselines
3. Refer to SLAs
4. Tuning of cloud target objects
Compute
Network
Storage
Service/application resources
5. Recommend changes to meet expected performance/capacity
Scale up/down (vertically)
Scale in/out (horizontally)
Reporting based on company policies
Reporting based on SLAs
2. Dashboard and reporting
Elasticity usage
Connectivity
Latency
Capacity
Overall utilization
Cost
Incidents
Health
System availability
Uptime
Downtime
Troubleshooting 22%
Given a scenario, troubleshoot a deployment issue. 1. Common issues in the deployments
Breakdowns in the workflow
Integration issues related to different cloud platforms
Resource contention
Connectivity issues
Cloud service provider outage
Licensing issues
Template misconfiguration
Time synchronization issues
Language support
Automation issues
1. Exceeded cloud capacity boundaries
Compute
Storage
Networking
IP address limitations
Bandwidth limitations
Licensing
Variance in number of users
API request limit
Batch job scheduling issues
2. Deviation from original baseline
3. Unplanned expansions
Account mismatch issues
Change management failure
Server name changes
IP address changes
Location changes
Version/feature mismatch
Automation tool incompatibility
Job validation issue
Incorrect subnet
Incorrect IP address
Incorrect gateway
Incorrect routing
DNS errors
QoS issues
Misconfigured VLAN or VXLAN
Misconfigured firewall rule
Insufficient bandwidth
Latency
Misconfigured MTU/MSS
Misconfigured proxy
2. Network tool outputs
3. Network connectivity tools
ping
tracert/traceroute
telnet
netstat
nslookup/dig
ipconfig/ifconfig
route
arp
ssh
tcpdump
4. Remote access tools for troubleshooting
Given a scenario, troubleshoot security issues. 1. Authentication issues
Account lockout/expiration
2. Authorization issues
3. Federation and single sign-on issues
4. Certificate expiration
5. Certification misconfiguration
6. External attacks
7. Internal attacks
8. Privilege escalation
9. Internal role change
10. External role change
11. Security device failure
12. Incorrect hardening settings
13. Unencrypted communication
14. Unauthorized physical access
15. Unencrypted data
16. Weak or obsolete security technologies
17. Insufficient security controls and processes
18. Tunneling or encryption issues
implementing changes
1. Identify the problem
Question the user and identify user changes to computer and perform backups before making change
2. Establish a theory of probable cause (question the obvious)
If necessary, conduct internal or external research based on symptoms
3. Test the theory to determine cause
Once theory is confirmed, determine the next steps to resolve the problem
If the theory is not confirmed, reestablish a new theory or escalate
4. Establish a plan of action to resolve the problem and implement the solution
5. Verify full system functionality and, if applicable, implement preventive measures
6. Document findings, actions and outcomes
CompTIA Cloud+ Certification
CompTIA Certification learning
Killexams : CompTIA Certification learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CV0-002 Search results Killexams : CompTIA Certification learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CV0-002 https://killexams.com/exam_list/CompTIA Killexams : CompTIA® A+ Certification Training
Hardware

Identifying, using, and connecting hardware components and devices

Operating Systems

Install and support Windows OS including command line & client support. Understand Mac, OS, Linux and mobile OS

Software Troubleshooting

Troubleshoot PC and mobile device issues including application security support

Hardware & Network Troubleshooting

Troubleshoot device and network issues

Networking

Explain types of networks and connections including TCP/IP, WIFI and SOHO

Security

Identify and protect against security vulnerabilities for devices and their network connections

Mobile Devices

Install & configure laptops and other mobile devices

Virtualization and Cloud Computing

Compare and contrast cloud computing concepts and setup client-side virtualization

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Killexams : A CompTIA certification may provide you a better shot at a tech job, and these 8 prep courses are on sale.

Person working on cybersecurity on a laptop.

TL;DR: As of Oct. 1, you can get the Professional CompTIA exam Certification Prep Bundle for just $34.99 instead of $1,600 — that's a 97% discount.

The IT industry is still growing, and some projections predict 178,000 new tech jobs by the end of 2022. That’s promising for hopeful tech workers, but actually getting in the door at your first job may be a bit harder. Something that may provide you an edge is a certification proving your expertise in the fundamentals of IT and cybersecurity.

One of the bigger names in tech certification is CompTIA. Their exams might be challenging, but these eight courses on CompTIA exam training may help you get ready. Each course is valued at $200, but for a limited time, you can get them all for $34.99.

Get certified and get in the door to your first IT job

A CompTIA certification is a big step if you’re trying to get your first tech job. It may not be the end of your career training, but it might be the thing that lands you that first gig. A certification shows you have experience, some mastery, and that you’re dedicated enough to lead yourself through some pretty tough material, and employers may reward that.

The material itself runs the gamut of IT and cybersecurity fundamentals. Study up on basic IT knowledge and skills including hardware and software, databases, networking security, and software development in CompTIA ITF+ Fundamentals exam Essentials, or start learning about penetration testing, virtual environments, Kali Linux, and more in TOTAL: CompTIA PenTest+ (PT0-002).

Altogether, it’s over 100 hours of prep materials. Courses are primarily taught by instructors from Oak Academy, a group of tech experts that have specialized in cybersecurity, IT, game development, and app monetization. It’s a lot to study, but all the course materials are available to you for life.

Prepare for your IT certifications the smart way

Get unlimited access to over 1,000 IT and cybersecurity lessons when you get the Professional CompTIA exam Certification Prep Bundle for just $34.99.

Prices subject to change.

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Killexams : Best InfoSec and Cybersecurity Certifications of 2022
  • The U.S. job market has almost 600,000 openings requesting cybersecurity-related skills. 
  • Employers are struggling to fill these openings due to a general cyber-skill shortage, with many openings remaining vacant each year. 
  • When evaluating prospective information-security candidates, employers should look for certifications as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality.
  • This article is for business owners looking to hire cybersecurity experts, or for individuals interested in pursuing a cybersecurity career. 

Cybersecurity is one of the most crucial areas for ensuring a business’s success and longevity. With cyberattacks growing in sophistication, it’s essential for business owners to protect their companies by hiring qualified cybersecurity experts to manage this aspect of their business. The best candidates will have a certification in information security and cybersecurity. This guide breaks down the top certifications and other guidance you’ll need to make the right hire for your company. It’s also a great primer for individuals who are embarking on a cybersecurity career.

Best information security and cybersecurity certifications

When evaluating prospective InfoSec candidates, employers frequently look to certification as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality. We examined five InfoSec certifications we consider to be leaders in the field of information security today.

This year’s list includes entry-level credentials, such as Security+, as well as more advanced certifications, like Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA). According to CyberSeek, more employers are seeking CISA, CISM and CISSP certification holders than there are credential holders, which makes these credentials a welcome addition to any certification portfolio.

Absent from our list of the top five is SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC). Although this certification is still a very worthy credential, the job board numbers for CISA were so solid that it merited a spot in the top five. Farther down in this guide, we offer some additional certification options because the field of information security is both wide and varied.

1. CEH: Certified Ethical Hacker

The CEH (ANSI) certification is an intermediate-level credential offered by the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants (EC-Council). It’s a must-have for IT professionals who are pursuing careers in white hat hacking and certifies their competence in the five phases of ethical hacking: reconnaissance, enumeration, gaining of access, access maintenance and track covering. 

CEH credential holders possess skills and knowledge of hacking practices in areas such as footprinting and reconnaissance, network scanning, enumeration, system hacking, Trojans, worms and viruses, sniffers, denial-of-service attacks, social engineering, session hijacking, web server hacking, wireless networks and web applications, SQL injection, cryptography, penetration testing, IDS evasion, firewalls and honeypots. CEH V11 provides a remapping of the course to the NIST/NICE framework’s Protect and Defend (PR) job role category, as well as an additional focus on emerging threats in cloud, OT and IT security, such as fileless malware.

To obtain a CEH (ANSI) certification, candidates must pass one exam. A comprehensive five-day CEH training course is recommended, with the exam presented at the course’s conclusion. Candidates may self-study for the exam but must submit documentation of at least two years of work experience in information security with employer verification. Self-study candidates must also pay an additional $100 application fee. Education may be substituted for experience, but this is evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Candidates who complete any EC-Council-approved training (including with the iClass platform, academic institutions or an accredited training center) do not need to submit an application prior to attempting the exam.

Because technology in the field of hacking changes almost daily, CEH credential holders are required to obtain 120 continuing-education credits for each three-year cycle.

Once a candidate obtains the CEH (ANSI) designation, a logical progression on the EC-Council certification ladder is the CEH (Practical) credential. The CEH (Practical) designation targets the application of CEH skills to real-world security audit challenges and related scenarios. To obtain the credential, candidates must pass a rigorous six-hour practical examination. Conducted on live virtual machines, candidates are presented 20 scenarios with questions designed to validate a candidate’s ability to perform tasks such as vulnerability analysis, identification of threat vectors, web app and system hacking, OS detection, network scanning, packet sniffing, steganography and virus identification. Candidates who pass both the CEH (ANSI) and the CEH (Practical) exams earn the CEH (Master) designation.

CEH facts and figures

Certification name Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) (ANSI)
Prerequisites and required courses Training is highly recommended. Without formal training, candidates must have at least two years of information security-related experience and an educational background in information security, pay a nonrefundable eligibility application fee of $100 and submit an exam eligibility form before purchasing an exam voucher.
Number of exams One: 312-50 (ECC Exam)/312-50 (VUE) (125 multiple-choice questions, four hours)
Cost of exam $950 (ECC exam voucher) Note: An ECC exam voucher allows candidates to test via computer at a location of their choice. Pearson VUE exam vouchers allow candidates to test in a Pearson VUE facility and cost $1,199.
URL https://www.eccouncil.org/programs/certified-ethical-hacker-ceh
Self-study materials EC-Council instructor-led courses, computer-based training, online courses and more are available at ECCouncil.org. A CEH skills assessment is also available for credential seekers. Additionally, Udemy offers CEH practice exams. CEH-approved educational materials are available for $850 from EC-Council.

Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) training

While EC-Council offers both instructor-led and online training for its CEH certification, IT professionals have plenty of other options for self-study materials, including video training, practice exams and books.

Pluralsight currently offers an ethical-hacking learning path geared toward the 312-50 exam. With a monthly subscription, you get access to all of these courses, plus everything else in Pluralsight’s training library. Through Pluralsight’s learning path, students can prepare for all of the domains covered in the CEH exam.  

CyberVista offers a practice exam for the CEH 312-50 certification that includes several sets of exam-like questions, custom quizzes, flash cards and more. An exam prep subscription for 180 days costs $149 and gives candidates access to online study materials, as well as the ability to get the materials for offline study. Backed by its “pass guarantee,” CyberVista is so confident its practice exam will prepare you for the CEH exam that the company will refund its practice exam costs if you don’t pass.

Did you know?FYI: Besides certifications in information security and cybersecurity, the best IT certifications cover areas such as disaster recovery, virtualization and telecommunications.

2. CISM: Certified Information Security Manager

The CISM certification is a top credential for IT professionals who are responsible for managing, developing and overseeing information security systems in enterprise-level applications or for developing organizational security best practices. The CISM credential was introduced to security professionals in 2003 by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA).

ISACA’s organizational goals are specifically geared toward IT professionals who are interested in the highest-quality standards with respect to the auditing, control and security of information systems. The CISM credential targets the needs of IT security professionals with enterprise-level security management responsibilities. Credential holders possess advanced and proven skills in security risk management, program development and management, governance, and incident management and response.

Holders of the CISM credential, which is designed for experienced security professionals, must agree to ISACA’s code of ethics, pass a comprehensive examination, possess at least five years of experience in information security management, comply with the organization’s continuing education policy and submit a written application. Some combinations of education and experience may be substituted for the full experience requirement.

The CISM credential is valid for three years, and credential holders must pay an annual maintenance fee of $45 (ISACA members) or $85 (nonmembers). Credential holders are also required to obtain a minimum of 120 continuing professional education (CPE) credits over the three-year term to maintain the credential. At least 20 CPE credits must be earned every year.

CISM facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISM credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISM exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy
  4. Possess a minimum of five years of information security work experience in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years of exam passage. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  5. Apply for CISM certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of exam passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

Exam fees: $575 (members), $760 (nonmembers)

Exam fees are nontransferable and nonrefundable.

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cism

Self-study materials

Training and study materials in various languages, information on job practice areas, primary references, publications, articles, the ISACA Journal, review courses, an exam prep community, terminology lists, a glossary and more are available at ISACA.org. Additionally, Udemy offers comprehensive training for the certification exam.

Other ISACA certification program elements

In addition to CISM, ISACA offers numerous certifications for those interested in information security and best practices. Other credentials worth considering include the following:

  • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT)
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)

The CISA designation was created for professionals working with information systems auditing, control or security and is popular enough with employers to earn it a place on the leaderboard. The CGEIT credential targets IT professionals working in enterprise IT management, governance, strategic alignment, value delivery, and risk and resource performance management. IT professionals who are seeking careers in all aspects of risk management will find that the CRISC credential nicely meets their needs.

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) training

Pluralsight offers a CISM learning path containing five courses and 17 hours of instruction. The courses cover the domains addressed in the exam, but the learning path is aimed at the CISM job practice areas. 

CyberVista offers a CISM online training course in both live and on-demand formats. The course includes more than 16 hours of training videos, supplementary lessons, custom quizzes, practice exam questions and access to experts through the instructor. As with other CyberVista courses, the CISM training course comes with a “pass guarantee.” 

Did you know?Did you know?: According to CyberSeek, there are enough workers to fill only 68% of the cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. A cybersecurity certification is an important way to demonstrate the knowledge and ability to succeed in these job roles.

3. CompTIA Security+

CompTIA’s Security+ is a well-respected, vendor-neutral security certification. Security+ credential holders are recognized as possessing superior technical skills, broad knowledge and expertise in multiple security-related disciplines.

Although Security+ is an entry-level certification, the ideal candidates possess at least two years of experience working in network security and should consider first obtaining the Network+ certification. IT pros who obtain this certification have expertise in areas such as threat management, cryptography, identity management, security systems, security risk identification and mitigation, network access control, and security infrastructure. The CompTIA Security+ credential is approved by the U.S. Department of Defense to meet Directive 8140/8570.01-M requirements. In addition, the Security+ credential complies with the standards for ISO 17024.

The Security+ credential requires a single exam, currently priced at $381. (Discounts may apply to employees of CompTIA member companies and full-time students.) Training is available but not required.

IT professionals who earned the Security+ certification prior to Jan. 1, 2011, remain certified for life. Those who certify after that date must renew the certification every three years to stay current. To renew, candidates must obtain 50 continuing-education units (CEUs) or complete the CertMaster CE online course prior to the expiration of the three-year period. CEUs can be obtained by engaging in activities such as teaching, blogging, publishing articles or whitepapers, and participating in professional conferences and similar activities.

CompTIA Security+ facts and figures

Certification name

CompTIA Security+

Prerequisites and required courses

None. CompTIA recommends at least two years of experience in IT administration (with a security focus) and the Network+ credential before the Security+ exam. Udemy offers a complete and comprehensive course for the certification.

Number of exams

One: SY0-601 (maximum of 90 questions, 90 minutes to complete; 750 on a scale of 100-900 required to pass)

Cost of exam

$381 (discounts may apply; search for “SY0-601 voucher”)

URL

https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/security

Self-study materials

Exam objectives, trial questions, the CertMaster online training tool, training kits, computer-based training and a comprehensive study guide are available at CompTIA.org.

CompTIA Security+ training

You’ll find several companies offering online training, instructor-led and self-study courses, practice exams and books to help you prepare for and pass the Security+ exam.

Pluralsight offers a Security+ learning path as a part of its monthly subscription plan for the latest SY0-601 exam. Split into six sections, the training series is more than 24 hours long and covers attacks, threats and vulnerabilities; architecture and design; implementation of secure solutions; operations and incident response; and governance, risk and compliance.

CyberVista offers a Security+ practice exam so you can test your security knowledge before attempting the SY0-601 exam. The test comes with a 180-day access period and includes multiple sets of exam questions, key concept flash cards, access to InstructorLink experts, a performance tracker and more. As with CyberVista’s other offerings, this practice exam comes with a “pass guarantee.”

4. CISSP: Certified Information Systems Security Professional

CISSP is an advanced-level certification for IT pros who are serious about careers in information security. Offered by the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, known as (ISC)2 (pronounced “ISC squared”), this vendor-neutral credential is recognized worldwide for its standards of excellence.

CISSP credential holders are decision-makers who possess the expert knowledge and technical skills necessary to develop, guide and manage security standards, policies and procedures within their organizations. The CISSP certification continues to be highly sought after by IT professionals and is well recognized by IT organizations. It is a regular fixture on most-wanted and must-have security certification surveys.

CISSP is designed for experienced security professionals. A minimum of five years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s eight common body of knowledge (CBK) domains, or four years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s CBK domains and a college degree or an approved credential, is required for this certification. The CBK domains are security and risk management, asset security, security architecture and engineering, communications and network security, identity and access management, security assessment and testing, security operations, and software development security.

(ISC)2 also offers three CISSP concentrations targeting specific areas of interest in IT security:

  • Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Each CISSP concentration exam is $599, and credential seekers must currently possess a valid CISSP.

An annual fee of $125 is required to maintain the CISSP credential. Recertification is required every three years. To recertify, candidates must earn 40 CPE credits each year, for a total of 120 CPE credits within the three-year cycle.

CISSP facts and figures 

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) 

Optional CISSP concentrations:  

  • CISSP Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • CISSP Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • CISSP Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Prerequisites and required courses

At least five years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains or four years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains and a college degree or an approved credential are required. Candidates must also do the following:

  • Agree to the (ISC)2 code of ethics.
  • Submit the CISSP application.
  • Complete the endorsement process.

Number of exams

One for CISSP (English CAT exam: 100-150 questions, three hours to complete; non-English exam: 250 questions, six hours) 

One for each concentration area

Cost of exam

CISSP is $749; each CISSP concentration is $599.

URL

https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP

Self-study materials

Training materials include instructor-led, live online, on-demand and private training. There is an exam outline available for review, as well as study guides, a study app, interactive flash cards and practice tests.

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) training

Given the popularity of the CISSP certification, there is no shortage of available training options. These include classroom-based training offered by (ISC)2, as well as online video courses, practice exams and books from third-party companies.

Pluralsight’s CISSP learning path includes 12 courses and 25 hours of e-learning covering the security concepts required for the certification exam. Available for a low monthly fee, the CISSP courses are part of a subscription plan that gives IT professionals access to Pluralsight’s complete library of video training courses.

When you’re ready to test your security knowledge, you can take a simulated exam that mimics the format and content of the real CISSP exam. Udemy offers CISSP practice questions to help you prepare for this challenging exam.

5. CISA: Certified Information Systems Auditor

ISACA’s globally recognized CISA certification is the gold standard for IT workers seeking to practice in information security, audit control and assurance. Ideal candidates can identify and assess organizational threats and vulnerabilities, assess compliance, and provide guidance and organizational security controls. CISA-certified professionals demonstrate knowledge and skill across the CISA job practice areas of auditing, governance and management, acquisition, development and implementation, maintenance and service management, and asset protection.

To earn the CISA certification, candidates must pass one exam, submit an application, agree to the code of professional ethics, agree to the CPE requirements and agree to the organization’s information systems auditing standards. In addition, candidates must possess at least five years of experience working with information systems. Some substitutions for education and experience with auditing are permitted.

To maintain the CISA certification, candidates must earn 120 CPE credits over a three-year period, with a minimum of 20 CPE credits earned annually. Candidates must also pay an annual maintenance fee ($45 for members; $85 for nonmembers).

CISA facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISA credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISA exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy.
  4. Agree to the information auditing standards.
  5. Possess a minimum of five years of information systems auditing, control or security work in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years after the exam is passed. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  6. Apply for CISA certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of exam passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

$575 (members); $760 (nonmembers)

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cisa

Self-study materials

ISACA offers a variety of training options, including virtual instructor-led courses, online and on-demand training, review manuals and question databases. Numerous books and self-study materials are also available on Amazon.

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) training

Training opportunities for the CISA certification are plentiful. Udemy offers more than 160 CISA-related courses, lectures, practice exams, question sets and more. On Pluralsight, you’ll find 12 courses with 27 hours of information systems auditor training covering all CISA job practice domains for the CISA job practice areas.

Beyond the top 5: More cybersecurity certifications

In addition to these must-have credentials, many other certifications are available to fit the career needs of any IT professional interested in information security. Business owners should consider employing workers with these credentials as well.

  • The SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC) certification remains an excellent entry-level credential for IT professionals seeking to demonstrate that they not only understand information security terminology and concepts but also possess the skills and technical expertise necessary to occupy “hands-on” security roles.
  • If you find incident response and investigation intriguing, check out the Logical Operations CyberSec First Responder (CFR) certification. This ANSI-accredited and U.S. DoD-8570-compliant credential recognizes security professionals who can design secure IT environments, perform threat analysis, and respond appropriately and effectively to cyberattacks. Logical Operations also offers other certifications, including Master Mobile Application Developer (MMAD), Certified Virtualization Professional (CVP), Cyber Secure Coder and CloudMASTER.
  • The associate-level Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate certification is aimed at analysts in security operations centers at large companies and organizations. Candidates who qualify through Cisco’s global scholarship program may receive free training, mentoring and testing to help them achieve a range of entry-level to expert certifications that the company offers. CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+), which launched in 2017, is a vendor-neutral certification designed for professionals with three to four years of security and behavioral analytics experience.
  • The Identity Management Institute offers several credentials for identity and access management, data protection, identity protection, identity governance and more. The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), which focuses on privacy, has a small but growing number of certifications as well.
  • The SECO-Institute, in cooperation with the Security Academy Netherlands and APMG, is behind the Cyber Security & Governance Certification Program; SECO-Institute certifications aren’t well known in the United States, but their popularity is growing. 
  • It also may be worth your time to browse the Chartered Institute of Information Security accreditations, the U.K. equivalent of the U.S. DoD 8570 certifications and the corresponding 8140 framework.

Also, consider these five entry-level cybersecurity certifications for more options.

TipTip: Before you decide to purchase training for a certification or an exam voucher, see if your employer will cover the cost. Employers may cover all or part of the cost if you have a continuing education or training allowance, or if the certification is in line with your current or potential job duties.

Information security and cybersecurity jobs

According to CyberSeek, the number of cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. stands at almost 598,000, with about 1.05 million cybersecurity professionals employed in today’s workforce. Projections continue to be robust: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects 33% growth in information security analyst positions between 2020 and 2030; in comparison, the average rate of growth for all occupations is about 8%.

Security-related job roles include information security specialist, security analyst, network security administrator, system administrator (with security as a responsibility) and security engineer, as well as specialized roles, like malware engineer, intrusion analyst and penetration tester.

Average salaries for information security certified and security engineers – two of the most common job roles – vary depending on the source. For example, SimplyHired reports about $74,000 for specialist positions, whereas Glassdoor‘s national average is about $108,000. For security engineers, SimplyHired reports almost $112,000, while Glassdoor’s average is more than $111,000, with salaries on the high end reported at $261,000. Note that these numbers frequently change as the sources regularly update their data. [Meet the man who kept Microsoft safe and secure for more than a decade.]

Our informal job board survey from April 2022 reports the number of job posts nationwide in which our featured certifications were mentioned on a given day. This should provide you an idea of the relative popularity of each certification.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order by cybersecurity certification)

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

TechCareers

Total

CEH (EC-Council)

1,989

3,907

7,952

2,829

16,677

CISA (ISACA)

5,389

12,507

20,573

4,701

43,170

CISM (ISACA)

3,467

6,656

14,503

4,072

28,698

CISSP [(ISC)2]

11,472

23,463

34,716

11,060

80,711

Security+ (CompTIA)

5,953

6,680

5,998

1,851

20,482

Did you know?Did you know?: Cybersecurity matters even when you’re traveling. Find out how to keep your computer secure when you’re on the road for business or pleasure.

The importance of hiring information security and cybersecurity professionals

According to Risk Based Security‘s 2021 Year End Data Breach Quickview Report, there were 4,145 publicly disclosed breaches throughout 2021, containing over 22 billion records. This is the second-highest number of breached records, after an all-time high the year before. The U.S. was particularly affected, with the number of breaches increasing 10% compared with the previous year. More than 80% of the records exposed throughout 2021 were due to human error, highlighting an ever-increasing need for cybersecurity education, as well as for highly skilled and trained cybersecurity professionals. [Learn how to recover from a data breach.]

If you’re serious about advancing your career in the IT field and are interested in specializing in security, certification is a great choice. It’s an effective way to validate your skills and show a current or prospective employer that you’re qualified and properly trained. If you’re a business owner, hiring certified professionals and skilled IT managers can help prevent cyberattacks and provide confidence that your company’s security is in the right hands. In the meantime, review our quick cybersecurity tips to Strengthen your company’s protection.

Jeremy Bender contributed to the writing and research in this article.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10708-information-security-certifications.html
Killexams : Cybersecurity remains one of the most in demand professions, new data from CyberSeek confirms

Record-setting year for cybersecurity job postings signals need for innovative approaches

WASHINGTON, Oct. 17, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Employer demand for cybersecurity professionals continues to strain talent availability according to new data from CyberSeek™, the cybersecurity workforce analytics platform developed in partnership by the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education at NIST, Lightcast and CompTIA.

CyberSeek Logo (PRNewsfoto/CompTIA)

"The data should compel us to double-down on efforts to raise awareness of cybersecurity career opportunities."

For the 12-month period ending in September 2022, employers listed 769,736 openings for cybersecurity positions or jobs requiring cybersecurity skills. Employer demand for cybersecurity workers grew 2.4 times faster than the overall rate across the U.S. economy. Nine of the 10 top months for cybersecurity job postings in the past 10 years have occurred in 2022.

"The data should compel us to double-down on efforts to raise awareness of cybersecurity career opportunities to youth and adults, especially during Cybersecurity Career Awareness Week which is an international campaign to inspire individuals to explore the variety of types of cybersecurity-related roles that are needed in both the public and private sectors," said Rodney Petersen, Director of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE).

Despite a slight pullback in hiring activity in the most exact months from the record volumes of earlier this year, total cybersecurity job postings for Q3 2022 tracked 30% higher than the same period in 2021 and 68% higher than 2020. The supply-demand ratio1 held steady at 65, indicating approximately 65 cybersecurity workers in the labor market – the vast majority already employed, for every 100 cybersecurity job postings.

The new CyberSeek data shows that requirements for cybersecurity skills for specific occupations have increased dramatically in the last 12 months. The cybersecurity profession continues to expand into specialized fields, such as penetration tester and threat analyst. There is a similar expansion of cybersecurity skills requirements in adjacent positions such as auditor (+336%), software developer (+87%), cloud architect (+83%) and technical support engineer (+48%).

"The CyberSeek data reaffirms the critical importance of feeder roles and thinking more creatively about on-ramps and career pathways," said Ron Culler, vice president cyber learning officer, CompTIA. "It is clear from the CyberSeek data that cybersecurity's importance and impact reaches all levels of the tech workforce. We see this trend continuing and are committed to ensuring that cybersecurity professionals are prepared for the current and future challenges this will bring."

"Demand for cybersecurity talent has been accelerating for years, and employers are showing no signs of taking their foot off the gas," said Will Markow, vice president of applied research at Lightcast. "That's why it is more important than ever to build robust talent pipelines to ensure a safer digital world. We can't accept leaving holes in our cybersecurity defenses simply because we don't have enough trained workers to plug them."

In addition to comprehensive data on the supply and demand of cybersecurity workers at the national, state and metro levels, CyberSeek features an interactive career pathway that shows key jobs within cybersecurity, common transition opportunities between them, and detailed information about the salaries, credentials, and skillsets associated with each role. To provide actionable next steps CyberSeek provides a training provider tab for users to connect directly to organizations providing training, education and industry-recognized certifications. Visit www.cyberseek.org to learn more. For information about the project partners NICE, Lightcast and CompTIA, please see the project partner page on the CyberSeek site.

1 A comparison of the number of available cybersecurity workers relative to employer demand in a particular location, displayed as a percentage.

Media Contact
Steven Ostrowski
CompTIA
sostrowski@comptia.org 
+1 630-678-8468

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SOURCE CyberSeek

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Killexams : Students invited to learn about the cybersecurity profession at free virtual event presented by CompTIA and Arizona State University AZNext

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill., Oct. 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Students interested in learning about career opportunities in cybersecurity are invited to participate in a free virtual event presented by CompTIA, the nonprofit association for the technology industry and workforce, and Arizona State University's AZNext Workforce Training Accelerator, a program that is building a sustainable workforce development ecosystem.

CompTIA is the voice of the world's information technology industry. (PRNewsFoto/CompTIA)

"Inside Perspectives: Cybersecurity Experts Share Stories from the Field," set for 11 a.m. (MT) on Oct. 18, is designed for broadcast to classrooms. Students, parents and educators are encouraged to register for the event at https://connect.comptia.org/events/view/inside-perspectives-cybersecurity-experts-share-stories.

"As organizations expand their reliance on technology, robust cyber defenses are imperative," said Angel L. Piñeiro, Jr., vice president, strategic academic relationships, CompTIA. "Those defenses start with people who, through education and professional certification, have developed robust cybersecurity skills."

Demand for cybersecurity jobs increased by 43% in the 12-month period between May 2021 and April 2022 compared to a nearly 18% increase in demand across the entire employment market, according to CyberSeek™, the most comprehensive source of data on America's cybersecurity workforce. Jobs are available at all career levels, including entry-level positions as cybersecurity specialists, cybercrime analysts and other roles.

The program will feature three experts who will share their "day in the life" experiences of working in cybersecurity and why their chosen career is so rewarding. Scheduled speakers include Brigadier General Bernard Skoch (retired), U.S. Air Force, Cyber Defense; Leo Cruz, technical solutions architect, security, U.S. Public Sector – Cisco; and Mike Semel, president and chief compliance officer, Semel Consulting. Howard M. Cohen, senior resultant and creator of compelling content, will moderate the session.

The event is co-sponsored by the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences and the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

Visit Inside Perspectives: Cybersecurity Experts Share Stories from the Field for more information and registration.

About CompTIA

The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is a leading voice and advocate for the $5 trillion global information technology ecosystem; and the estimated 75 million industry and tech professionals who design, implement, manage, and safeguard the technology that powers the world's economy. Through education, training, certifications, advocacy, philanthropy, and market research, CompTIA is the hub for unlocking the potential of the tech industry and its workforce. https://www.comptia.org/

About Arizona State University

Arizona State University is the largest provider of lifelong teaching and learning in the world, with more than 74,000 students on four academic campuses in the Phoenix metropolitan area and an additional 54,000 digital immersion students. https://www.asu.edu/

Media Contact
Steven Ostrowski
CompTIA
sostrowski@comptia.org
630-678-8468

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SOURCE CompTIA

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Killexams : How to launch your cybersecurity career using LinkedIn Learning courses

BY Sydney LakeOctober 04, 2022, 2:08 PM

A logo sits on the window of the LinkedIn Corp. European headquarters in Dublin, Ireland, as seen in June 2018. (Photographer: Jason Alden—Bloomberg/Getty Images)

While earning a master’s degree or another advanced degree can be a great way to make a career switch or earn a higher salary, these programs often require a significant investment of both time and money. For example, a master’s degree in cybersecurity from the University of California—Berkeley, which Fortune ranks as having the No. 1 program in the U.S., costs about $75,000 to complete.

However, these programs can help graduates achieve robust career outcomes. Some cybersecurity grads from UC Berkeley’s program manage to double their salaries post grad, to $200,000. Cybersecurity workers are also in high demand with more than 700,000 open positions in the U.S. alone. Worldwide, the number of unfilled cybersecurity jobs grew by 350%, from 1 million positions in 2013 to 3.5 million in 2021, according to Cybersecurity Ventures.

“Today’s labor market is all about skills,” Jeff Kellum, senior content manager of tech content at LinkedIn Learning, tells Fortune. “With an estimated 3.5 million unfulfilled cybersecurity roles by 2025, the ability to learn and showcase in-demand skills is critical for anyone hoping to get their foot in the door in the space.”

One way to start on your journey to becoming a cybersecurity professional is to start with the basics. LinkedIn Learning offers a variety of courses focused on cybersecurity from a foundational level all the way to preparation for advanced certifications. 

“In the face of an uncertain macroeconomic climate, the ability to learn and showcase in-demand skills is critical to helping people get a foot in the door with a new company or finding a new role within their organization,” Hari Srinivasan, vice of product at LinkedIn, wrote in a late August blog post. “For many professions, certifications have emerged as key to this, with the number of people on LinkedIn who’ve added certifications to their profile increasing 44% over the last two years.”

Fortune has compiled a few cybersecurity courses to check out on LinkedIn Learning for people interested in learning more about the field. We’ve also included a list of the 19 learning paths and courses LinkedIn offers to prepare cybersecurity workers for the most in-demand certifications. LinkedIn Learning is available to LinkedIn users with a premium account, which can cost about $30 to $60 per month, depending on the package you purchase. 

Cybersecurity courses for beginners

  1. Cybersecurity Foundations

This course helps learners understand the basics of cybersecurity including explainers on cyber threats, cyber criminals, managing cyber risk, and responding to cybersecurity incidents. Cybersecurity Foundations is taught by Malcom Shore, who served as director of New Zealand’s Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB). The course takes roughly two hours total to complete, and includes instructional videos, chapter quizzes, and a final exam. 

  1. Transitioning to a Career in Cybersecurity

This course is tailor-made for professionals looking to make a career switch to cybersecurity. Transitioning to a Career in Cybersecurity helps learners to leverage their current skills, whether it’s in IT or a related field, in cybersecurity. The course also includes resume tips, interview strategies, and resources for finding a job in cybersecurity. The course, which takes a little over an hour to complete, is taught by Marc Menninger, who’s worked in cybersecurity for more than 20 years.

  1. Become a Cybersecurity Professional

LinkedIn also offers a complete learning path for professionals who are interested in pursuing a career in cybersecurity. The learning path, Become a Cybersecurity Professional, takes about six-and-a-half hours to complete, and includes five courses: Cybersecurity Foundations, The Cybersecurity Threat Landscape, Learning the OWASP Top 10, IT Security Careers and Certifications: First Steps, and Land Your First Cybersecurity Job. If you complete the entire learning path, you receive a certificate of completion for your work.

Certification paths 

LinkedIn Learning also offers 19 prep courses for the top cybersecurity-related certifications. Among the top 15 highest-paying IT certifications in 2022, three of them were cybersecurity-related, according to Skillsoft, which offers online training and courses on tech subjects. These certifications also helped professionals land paychecks of $150,000-plus.

“Security has always been well-paying and it really comes down to scarcity—both in the number of professionals and in the required skills,” Mike Hendrickson, Skillsoft’s vice president of tech and development, previously told Fortune. “With today’s limited pool of security professionals, organizations need to make their offers quite attractive, both in compensation and opportunities for professional development. Skills expectations are also high for these professionals.”

Here’s a list of the cybersecurity certification prep courses that LinkedIn offers:

See how the schools you’re considering fared in Fortune’s rankings of the best master’s degree programs in data science (in-person and online), nursing, computer science, cybersecurity, psychology, public health, and business analytics, as well as the doctorate in education programs MBA programs (part-time, executive, full-time, and online).

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 02:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://fortune.com/education/business/articles/2022/10/04/how-to-launch-your-cybersecurity-career-using-linkedin-learning-courses/
Killexams : Construction in-person bootcamp and Core classes offered via Zoom

AUBURN — The Center for Workforce and Professional Development at Central Maine Community College is offering free National Center for Construction Education and Research Core curriculum classes.

The NCCER core is the prerequisite to all other level 1 trade curriculum. Course modules include basic safety, construction math and drawings, power tools, basic rigging, communication, employability skills, material handling, fasteners and adhesives. Upon completion of each module, students sit for the exam, which are nationally recognized certifications and are included in the course.

Students can attend in person NCCER Core Boot Camp 80 hours at CMCC from Oct. 24 to Nov. 4 from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Or they may attend Zoom sessions starting Oct. 24 for a total of 90 hours, two nights a week (no Fridays) usually 5 to 7:30 p.m. or 4:30 to 7 p.m.

More information and links to register for the program are available at https:www.bit.ly/CWPDRegistration.

This training joins several other free trainings offered at CMCC, including, CompTIA Security+ and Network+ trainings, behavioral health professional, basic life support, certified pharmacy technician, computer support and information specialists, as well as the upcoming welding academy and general carpentry.

Programs are funded by the Maine Jobs and Recovery Program and Maine Quality Centers. Participants are eligible for one training and must be at least 18 years of age, possess a high school diploma, GED, or HiSet, and be a U.S. citizen and/or authorized to work in the U.S.

Criminal background check and COVID-19 vaccination records will be required. Additionally, candidates in the Maine Jobs and Recovery Program-funded programs must be a dislocated, unemployed, or underemployed worker, or someone whose job has been adversely affected by COVID-19. Underemployed can be considered as working part-time but looking for full-time work or working in an occupation below one’s skill set.

For more information or to register, contact Central Maine Community College’s Center for Workforce and Professional Development at [email protected] or 207-755-5280.

Central Maine Community College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution and employer. For more information visit www.cmcc.edu/eeoc or contact Human Resources at (207) 755-5396.


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Killexams : Help wanted, $80,000 & up: 700,000 cybersecurity jobs are open – 24,000 in NC alone

Editor’s note: It’s Cybersecurity Awareness Month and thousands of jobs are going unfilled across the United States as cyberthreats and crimes increase. Tech group CompTIA is seeking to help match people seeking cybersecurity careers with resources to develop one.

+++

Interested in a career in cybersecurity? With more than 700,000 job postings for open cybersecurity positions in the United States, you chose a great time to join a booming industry – but where to start? To help close the cybersecurity skills gap, CyberSeek provides detailed, actionable data about supply and demand in the cybersecurity job market, which helps job seekers identify what they need to transition between cybersecurity roles and advance in their careers.

By the way, more than 24,000 of those open jobs are in North Carolina.

In this blog post, we will share the top nine cybersecurity job titles requested by employers within the U.S. cybersecurity job market and the education requirements, certifications and skills needed to find a job in one of these high-demand roles.

To begin, here are the top cybersecurity job titles and their average salaries, according to CyberSeek:

  1. Cybersecurity analyst: $107,500
  2. Software developer/engineer: $110,140*
  3. Cybersecurity consultant: $92,504
  4. Vulnerability analyst/penetration tester: $101,091
  5. Cybersecurity manager/administrator: $130,000
  6. Network engineer/architect: $83,510*
  7. Systems engineer: $90,920*
  8. Senior software developer: $151,960^
  9. Systems administrator*: $80,600

* Salaries marked with (*) came from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
^ Salaries marked with (^) came from the CompTIA IT Salary Calculator.

It’s important to note that a cybersecurity salary can vary depending on a variety of factors including the size and scope of the employer, geographic location and a candidate’s experience.


Learn more about cybersecurity from CompTIA.

Entry-level Jobs in Cybersecurity

In addition to these top nine jobs in cybersecurity, CyberSeek data shows that there is a plethora of entry-level job postings for these job titles:

Mid & Advanced Level Jobs in Cybersecurity

While several of the top nine jobs in cybersecurity are mid-level and advanced-level job roles, these two cyber roles also boast a healthy number of job openings:

How to Get a Job in Cybersecurity

From network security to an incident responder or an ethical hacker, an IT security manager may be tasked with anything from installing, administering and troubleshooting security solutions to writing up security policies and training documents for colleagues. While other job roles are responsible for a specific part of the overall system, cybersecurity talent must be able to take a step back and see the big picture to keep it secure from cyberattacks and data breaches.

Is it Hard to Get a Job in Cybersecurity?

If you already have some technical skills under your belt, the first step is discovering how your knowledge transfers to the cybersecurity field. For example, if you understand code, you’ll be able to identify and protect against malicious code.

Of course, in technology there’s always something new to learn – and when fighting cybercrime, it’s even more true. Start by taking inventory of your transferable technical skills and make note of the skills you’d like to learn to land a job in cybersecurity. This applies to professional skills as well.

For those without a technical background, the entry to cybersecurity is a little different, but there’s still plenty of opportunity. For example, cyber policy analyst and technical writer are positions that you could obtain without the technical know-how. Think of these entry-level jobs as steppingstones to more advanced cybersecurity jobs as you gain more experience and training.

What Are the Benefits of a Career in Cybersecurity?

A cybersecurity career is extremely fulfilling! You get to do things like:

  • Protect your organization’s computer networks and computer systems from malware attacks
  • Perform risk assessments
  • Respond to security incidents, and more!

If you want to be a the cyber law enforcement at your organization in a field that continues to grow and offer financial stability, a cybersecurity career is calling your name.

Education Requirements for Cybersecurity Jobs

Many cybersecurity jobs require formal training and education. CyberSeek breaks down education requirements and shows the percentage of online job listings requiring either less than a bachelor’s degree, a bachelor’s degree or a graduate degree.

For example, cybersecurity specialist is a term used to categorize entry-level cybersecurity jobs or jobs that perform cybersecurity tasks in addition to other IT tasks, such as tech support or networking. Job titles may include IT specialist information security or IT security specialist. The job postings for this role don’t require as much education as others – 19% of cybersecurity specialist postings require less than a bachelor’s degree, which is higher than more advanced job titles.

In contrast, a cybersecurity engineer is on the advanced-level career track, so if you’re interested in a career as such, you should know that 89% of job openings require higher education. In fact, 66% of cybersecurity engineer postings require a bachelor’s degree and 23% require a graduate degree.

Even more training and experience is required to become a chief information security officer (CISO). Typically, a candidate for this type of position is expected to have a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field and 7-12 years of work experience – including at least half of those years in a management role. A CISO is also expected to have deep technical knowledge.

You can dig deep into CyberSeek’s data for any of the top nine job titles and discover what education level is most common for your dream job.

IT Certifications in Cybersecurity

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If you’ve done any research on the topic, you know that the choices in information technology (IT) certifications are endless! We’ve combed through the recommendations for these top nine cybersecurity job titles and identified the certifications most requested.

  • The CompTIA Cybersecurity Career Pathway: With CompTIA A+, CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Security+, CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+), CompTIA PenTest+ and CompTIA Advanced Security Practitioner (CASP), the CompTIA Cybersecurity Career Pathway helps technical certified achieve cybersecurity mastery, from beginning to end.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP): CISSP is an advanced-level cybersecurity certification put out by (ISC)2. It focuses on cybersecurity management skills.
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA): At the associate level is where Cisco certifications begin to specialize, and some of the most common ones include CCNA Routing and Switching, CCNA Security, CCNA Cyber Ops and CCNA Data Center.
  • GIAC: GIAC certifications cover syllabus including cyber defense, penetration testing, digital forensics and incident response, developer and information security management.

Skills Needed for Cybersecurity Jobs

It’s easy to assume that a top skill set recommended for any of these job titles would contain the word “security.” But what about the less obvious skills? As with IT certifications, we’ve filtered through the most popular skills on the job postings.

  • Linux: If you have an Android phone or a security system running at your house, they very well could be running on Linux. Because of its versatility and broad use, it can only help you in a cybersecurity career. CompTIA Linux+ will validate your Linux skills, showing employers that you have what it takes to work on a wide variety of operating systems and devices.
  • Project Management: IT professionals need to manage many projects at once, and strengthening this professional skill can provide you a leg up. Consider CompTIA’s project management certification, CompTIA Project+. CompTIA Project+ goes beyond one specific methodology or framework, covering essential project management concepts. Added bonus: CompTIA Project+ is one of the top-paying IT certifications, according to Global Knowledge.
  • Information Systems: An information system is an organized system for the collection, organization and storage of data. Having a knowledge of information systems is essential to a successful career in cybersecurity.

Get Into Cybersecurity From Other Roles

CyberSeek identified five feeder roles that often serve as steppingstones into an IT security  career because of the similarities in skill requirements and significant skill overlap with multiple core cybersecurity roles. Click below to learn more about what those career paths look like:

What Are The Best Locations for Jobs in Cybersecurity

The CyberSeek interactive heat map provides a granular snapshot of the demand for cybersecurity pros with the number of job openings in a state or metro area, and the number of active cybersecurity professionals in that area, too.

Top 3 States and Metro Areas for Cybersecurity Jobs

1. Texas: 83,126 job openings
Top metro area: Dallas-Forth Worth

2. California: 77,141 job openings
Top metro area: San Francisco

3. Virginia: 56,416 job openings
Top Metro area: Washington, DC

What Type of Jobs in Cybersecurity Can Be Done Remotely?

The COVID-19 pandemic forced IT pros to work remotely, and it even reinforced that many thrive in this type of work environment. You can check out our full list of top 11 remote IT jobs, and one particular cyber role made this list: cybersecurity analyst. If you’re hoping to score a full-time remote security job, check postings for this role first!

Now that you know more about what education, certifications and skills are recommended for these particular security job titles, you can plan your career journey accordingly. CyberSeek data is constantly updated, so come back often to find new skills or certifications you can add to your repertoire to make yourself a more attractive job candidate. If you are currently in an entry-level role and looking to get ahead, hone in on the items needed for that dream job, and you’ll be on your way to cybersecurity expert status.

Check out the CompTIA Cybersecurity Career Pathway to see how CompTIA certifications can help you get into cybersecurity and advance your cybersecurity career.

(C) CompTIA

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