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Exam Code: CISA Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
CISA ISACA CISA ( Certified Information Systems Auditor )

Module 1 – The Process of Auditing Information Systems
This helps the candidate gain the knowledge required to comply with the highest standards of information systems and provide the best audit practices as well. For organizations, this would mean thorough control and protection of their business and information systems.

Module 2 – CISAs Role in IT Governance
Topics covered in Module 2 helps develop sound IS control practices and management mechanisms. Organizations benefit from certified professionals who will provide the assurance of best practices including policies, accountability, and structures of monitoring, in order to arrive at the desired IT governance.

Module 3 – CISAs Role in Systems and Infrastructure Lifecycle Management
This Module covers the processes and methodologies that modern organizations employ while changing or reinventing the infrastructure components of their application systems. Like the material covered in the other topics, this module prepares students for the CISA exam as well as the real world.

Module 4 – CISAs Role in IT Service Delivery and Support
During this module, the candidate is required to review the processes and methodologies applicable to different IT systems. Further, it will deliver learning of the IS audit in the event of a disruption. Businesses can gain by hiring certified candidates who are able to enact disaster recovery methodologies and timely resumption of database services, thus minimizing the negative impact on a range of business processes.

Module 5 – CISAs Role in Protection of Information Assets
The key component of Module 5 enables a professional to be able to ensure the integrity, availability, and confidentiality of information assets while instituting physical and logical access controls and other security measures.

ISACA CISA ( Certified Information Systems Auditor )
ISACA Information test
Killexams : ISACA Information test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CISA Search results Killexams : ISACA Information test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CISA https://killexams.com/exam_list/ISACA Killexams : Best InfoSec and Cybersecurity Certifications of 2022
  • The U.S. job market has almost 600,000 openings requesting cybersecurity-related skills. 
  • Employers are struggling to fill these openings due to a general cyber-skill shortage, with many openings remaining vacant each year. 
  • When evaluating prospective information-security candidates, employers should look for certifications as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality.
  • This article is for business owners looking to hire cybersecurity experts, or for individuals interested in pursuing a cybersecurity career. 

Cybersecurity is one of the most crucial areas for ensuring a business’s success and longevity. With cyberattacks growing in sophistication, it’s essential for business owners to protect their companies by hiring qualified cybersecurity experts to manage this aspect of their business. The best candidates will have a certification in information security and cybersecurity. This guide breaks down the top certifications and other guidance you’ll need to make the right hire for your company. It’s also a great primer for individuals who are embarking on a cybersecurity career.

Best information security and cybersecurity certifications

When evaluating prospective InfoSec candidates, employers frequently look to certification as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality. We examined five InfoSec certifications we consider to be leaders in the field of information security today.

This year’s list includes entry-level credentials, such as Security+, as well as more advanced certifications, like Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA). According to CyberSeek, more employers are seeking CISA, CISM and CISSP certification holders than there are credential holders, which makes these credentials a welcome addition to any certification portfolio.

Absent from our list of the top five is SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC). Although this certification is still a very worthy credential, the job board numbers for CISA were so solid that it merited a spot in the top five. Farther down in this guide, we offer some additional certification options because the field of information security is both wide and varied.

1. CEH: Certified Ethical Hacker

The CEH (ANSI) certification is an intermediate-level credential offered by the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants (EC-Council). It’s a must-have for IT professionals who are pursuing careers in white hat hacking and certifies their competence in the five phases of ethical hacking: reconnaissance, enumeration, gaining of access, access maintenance and track covering. 

CEH credential holders possess skills and knowledge of hacking practices in areas such as footprinting and reconnaissance, network scanning, enumeration, system hacking, Trojans, worms and viruses, sniffers, denial-of-service attacks, social engineering, session hijacking, web server hacking, wireless networks and web applications, SQL injection, cryptography, penetration testing, IDS evasion, firewalls and honeypots. CEH V11 provides a remapping of the course to the NIST/NICE framework’s Protect and Defend (PR) job role category, as well as an additional focus on emerging threats in cloud, OT and IT security, such as fileless malware.

To obtain a CEH (ANSI) certification, candidates must pass one exam. A comprehensive five-day CEH training course is recommended, with the exam presented at the course’s conclusion. Candidates may self-study for the exam but must submit documentation of at least two years of work experience in information security with employer verification. Self-study candidates must also pay an additional $100 application fee. Education may be substituted for experience, but this is evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Candidates who complete any EC-Council-approved training (including with the iClass platform, academic institutions or an accredited training center) do not need to submit an application prior to attempting the exam.

Because technology in the field of hacking changes almost daily, CEH credential holders are required to obtain 120 continuing-education credits for each three-year cycle.

Once a candidate obtains the CEH (ANSI) designation, a logical progression on the EC-Council certification ladder is the CEH (Practical) credential. The CEH (Practical) designation targets the application of CEH skills to real-world security audit challenges and related scenarios. To obtain the credential, candidates must pass a rigorous six-hour practical examination. Conducted on live virtual machines, candidates are presented 20 scenarios with questions designed to validate a candidate’s ability to perform tasks such as vulnerability analysis, identification of threat vectors, web app and system hacking, OS detection, network scanning, packet sniffing, steganography and virus identification. Candidates who pass both the CEH (ANSI) and the CEH (Practical) exams earn the CEH (Master) designation.

CEH facts and figures

Certification name Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) (ANSI)
Prerequisites and required courses Training is highly recommended. Without formal training, candidates must have at least two years of information security-related experience and an educational background in information security, pay a nonrefundable eligibility application fee of $100 and submit an exam eligibility form before purchasing an exam voucher.
Number of exams One: 312-50 (ECC Exam)/312-50 (VUE) (125 multiple-choice questions, four hours)
Cost of exam $950 (ECC exam voucher) Note: An ECC exam voucher allows candidates to test via computer at a location of their choice. Pearson VUE exam vouchers allow candidates to test in a Pearson VUE facility and cost $1,199.
URL https://www.eccouncil.org/programs/certified-ethical-hacker-ceh
Self-study materials EC-Council instructor-led courses, computer-based training, online courses and more are available at ECCouncil.org. A CEH skills assessment is also available for credential seekers. Additionally, Udemy offers CEH practice exams. CEH-approved educational materials are available for $850 from EC-Council.

Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) training

While EC-Council offers both instructor-led and online training for its CEH certification, IT professionals have plenty of other options for self-study materials, including video training, practice exams and books.

Pluralsight currently offers an ethical-hacking learning path geared toward the 312-50 exam. With a monthly subscription, you get access to all of these courses, plus everything else in Pluralsight’s training library. Through Pluralsight’s learning path, students can prepare for all of the domains covered in the CEH exam.  

CyberVista offers a practice exam for the CEH 312-50 certification that includes several sets of exam-like questions, custom quizzes, flash cards and more. An exam prep subscription for 180 days costs $149 and gives candidates access to online study materials, as well as the ability to get the materials for offline study. Backed by its “pass guarantee,” CyberVista is so confident its practice exam will prepare you for the CEH exam that the company will refund its practice exam costs if you don’t pass.

Did you know?FYI: Besides certifications in information security and cybersecurity, the best IT certifications cover areas such as disaster recovery, virtualization and telecommunications.

2. CISM: Certified Information Security Manager

The CISM certification is a top credential for IT professionals who are responsible for managing, developing and overseeing information security systems in enterprise-level applications or for developing organizational security best practices. The CISM credential was introduced to security professionals in 2003 by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA).

ISACA’s organizational goals are specifically geared toward IT professionals who are interested in the highest-quality standards with respect to the auditing, control and security of information systems. The CISM credential targets the needs of IT security professionals with enterprise-level security management responsibilities. Credential holders possess advanced and proven skills in security risk management, program development and management, governance, and incident management and response.

Holders of the CISM credential, which is designed for experienced security professionals, must agree to ISACA’s code of ethics, pass a comprehensive examination, possess at least five years of experience in information security management, comply with the organization’s continuing education policy and submit a written application. Some combinations of education and experience may be substituted for the full experience requirement.

The CISM credential is valid for three years, and credential holders must pay an annual maintenance fee of $45 (ISACA members) or $85 (nonmembers). Credential holders are also required to obtain a minimum of 120 continuing professional education (CPE) credits over the three-year term to maintain the credential. At least 20 CPE credits must be earned every year.

CISM facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISM credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISM exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy
  4. Possess a minimum of five years of information security work experience in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years of exam passage. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  5. Apply for CISM certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of exam passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

Exam fees: $575 (members), $760 (nonmembers)

Exam fees are nontransferable and nonrefundable.

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cism

Self-study materials

Training and study materials in various languages, information on job practice areas, primary references, publications, articles, the ISACA Journal, review courses, an exam prep community, terminology lists, a glossary and more are available at ISACA.org. Additionally, Udemy offers comprehensive training for the certification exam.

Other ISACA certification program elements

In addition to CISM, ISACA offers numerous certifications for those interested in information security and best practices. Other credentials worth considering include the following:

  • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT)
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)

The CISA designation was created for professionals working with information systems auditing, control or security and is popular enough with employers to earn it a place on the leaderboard. The CGEIT credential targets IT professionals working in enterprise IT management, governance, strategic alignment, value delivery, and risk and resource performance management. IT professionals who are seeking careers in all aspects of risk management will find that the CRISC credential nicely meets their needs.

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) training

Pluralsight offers a CISM learning path containing five courses and 17 hours of instruction. The courses cover the domains addressed in the exam, but the learning path is aimed at the CISM job practice areas. 

CyberVista offers a CISM online training course in both live and on-demand formats. The course includes more than 16 hours of training videos, supplementary lessons, custom quizzes, practice exam questions and access to experts through the instructor. As with other CyberVista courses, the CISM training course comes with a “pass guarantee.” 

Did you know?Did you know?: According to CyberSeek, there are enough workers to fill only 68% of the cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. A cybersecurity certification is an important way to demonstrate the knowledge and ability to succeed in these job roles.

3. CompTIA Security+

CompTIA’s Security+ is a well-respected, vendor-neutral security certification. Security+ credential holders are recognized as possessing superior technical skills, broad knowledge and expertise in multiple security-related disciplines.

Although Security+ is an entry-level certification, the ideal candidates possess at least two years of experience working in network security and should consider first obtaining the Network+ certification. IT pros who obtain this certification have expertise in areas such as threat management, cryptography, identity management, security systems, security risk identification and mitigation, network access control, and security infrastructure. The CompTIA Security+ credential is approved by the U.S. Department of Defense to meet Directive 8140/8570.01-M requirements. In addition, the Security+ credential complies with the standards for ISO 17024.

The Security+ credential requires a single exam, currently priced at $381. (Discounts may apply to employees of CompTIA member companies and full-time students.) Training is available but not required.

IT professionals who earned the Security+ certification prior to Jan. 1, 2011, remain certified for life. Those who certify after that date must renew the certification every three years to stay current. To renew, candidates must obtain 50 continuing-education units (CEUs) or complete the CertMaster CE online course prior to the expiration of the three-year period. CEUs can be obtained by engaging in activities such as teaching, blogging, publishing articles or whitepapers, and participating in professional conferences and similar activities.

CompTIA Security+ facts and figures

Certification name

CompTIA Security+

Prerequisites and required courses

None. CompTIA recommends at least two years of experience in IT administration (with a security focus) and the Network+ credential before the Security+ exam. Udemy offers a complete and comprehensive course for the certification.

Number of exams

One: SY0-601 (maximum of 90 questions, 90 minutes to complete; 750 on a scale of 100-900 required to pass)

Cost of exam

$381 (discounts may apply; search for “SY0-601 voucher”)

URL

https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/security

Self-study materials

Exam objectives, trial questions, the CertMaster online training tool, training kits, computer-based training and a comprehensive study guide are available at CompTIA.org.

CompTIA Security+ training

You’ll find several companies offering online training, instructor-led and self-study courses, practice exams and books to help you prepare for and pass the Security+ exam.

Pluralsight offers a Security+ learning path as a part of its monthly subscription plan for the latest SY0-601 exam. Split into six sections, the training series is more than 24 hours long and covers attacks, threats and vulnerabilities; architecture and design; implementation of secure solutions; operations and incident response; and governance, risk and compliance.

CyberVista offers a Security+ practice exam so you can test your security knowledge before attempting the SY0-601 exam. The test comes with a 180-day access period and includes multiple sets of exam questions, key concept flash cards, access to InstructorLink experts, a performance tracker and more. As with CyberVista’s other offerings, this practice exam comes with a “pass guarantee.”

4. CISSP: Certified Information Systems Security Professional

CISSP is an advanced-level certification for IT pros who are serious about careers in information security. Offered by the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, known as (ISC)2 (pronounced “ISC squared”), this vendor-neutral credential is recognized worldwide for its standards of excellence.

CISSP credential holders are decision-makers who possess the expert knowledge and technical skills necessary to develop, guide and manage security standards, policies and procedures within their organizations. The CISSP certification continues to be highly sought after by IT professionals and is well recognized by IT organizations. It is a regular fixture on most-wanted and must-have security certification surveys.

CISSP is designed for experienced security professionals. A minimum of five years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s eight common body of knowledge (CBK) domains, or four years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s CBK domains and a college degree or an approved credential, is required for this certification. The CBK domains are security and risk management, asset security, security architecture and engineering, communications and network security, identity and access management, security assessment and testing, security operations, and software development security.

(ISC)2 also offers three CISSP concentrations targeting specific areas of interest in IT security:

  • Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Each CISSP concentration exam is $599, and credential seekers must currently possess a valid CISSP.

An annual fee of $125 is required to maintain the CISSP credential. Recertification is required every three years. To recertify, candidates must earn 40 CPE credits each year, for a total of 120 CPE credits within the three-year cycle.

CISSP facts and figures 

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) 

Optional CISSP concentrations:  

  • CISSP Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • CISSP Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • CISSP Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Prerequisites and required courses

At least five years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains or four years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains and a college degree or an approved credential are required. Candidates must also do the following:

  • Agree to the (ISC)2 code of ethics.
  • Submit the CISSP application.
  • Complete the endorsement process.

Number of exams

One for CISSP (English CAT exam: 100-150 questions, three hours to complete; non-English exam: 250 questions, six hours) 

One for each concentration area

Cost of exam

CISSP is $749; each CISSP concentration is $599.

URL

https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP

Self-study materials

Training materials include instructor-led, live online, on-demand and private training. There is an exam outline available for review, as well as study guides, a study app, interactive flash cards and practice tests.

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) training

Given the popularity of the CISSP certification, there is no shortage of available training options. These include classroom-based training offered by (ISC)2, as well as online video courses, practice exams and books from third-party companies.

Pluralsight’s CISSP learning path includes 12 courses and 25 hours of e-learning covering the security concepts required for the certification exam. Available for a low monthly fee, the CISSP courses are part of a subscription plan that gives IT professionals access to Pluralsight’s complete library of video training courses.

When you’re ready to test your security knowledge, you can take a simulated exam that mimics the format and content of the real CISSP exam. Udemy offers CISSP practice tests to help you prepare for this challenging exam.

5. CISA: Certified Information Systems Auditor

ISACA’s globally recognized CISA certification is the gold standard for IT workers seeking to practice in information security, audit control and assurance. Ideal candidates can identify and assess organizational threats and vulnerabilities, assess compliance, and provide guidance and organizational security controls. CISA-certified professionals demonstrate knowledge and skill across the CISA job practice areas of auditing, governance and management, acquisition, development and implementation, maintenance and service management, and asset protection.

To earn the CISA certification, candidates must pass one exam, submit an application, agree to the code of professional ethics, agree to the CPE requirements and agree to the organization’s information systems auditing standards. In addition, candidates must possess at least five years of experience working with information systems. Some substitutions for education and experience with auditing are permitted.

To maintain the CISA certification, candidates must earn 120 CPE credits over a three-year period, with a minimum of 20 CPE credits earned annually. Candidates must also pay an annual maintenance fee ($45 for members; $85 for nonmembers).

CISA facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISA credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISA exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy.
  4. Agree to the information auditing standards.
  5. Possess a minimum of five years of information systems auditing, control or security work in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years after the exam is passed. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  6. Apply for CISA certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of exam passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

$575 (members); $760 (nonmembers)

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cisa

Self-study materials

ISACA offers a variety of training options, including virtual instructor-led courses, online and on-demand training, review manuals and question databases. Numerous books and self-study materials are also available on Amazon.

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) training

Training opportunities for the CISA certification are plentiful. Udemy offers more than 160 CISA-related courses, lectures, practice exams, question sets and more. On Pluralsight, you’ll find 12 courses with 27 hours of information systems auditor training covering all CISA job practice domains for the CISA job practice areas.

Beyond the top 5: More cybersecurity certifications

In addition to these must-have credentials, many other certifications are available to fit the career needs of any IT professional interested in information security. Business owners should consider employing workers with these credentials as well.

  • The SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC) certification remains an excellent entry-level credential for IT professionals seeking to demonstrate that they not only understand information security terminology and concepts but also possess the skills and technical expertise necessary to occupy “hands-on” security roles.
  • If you find incident response and investigation intriguing, check out the Logical Operations CyberSec First Responder (CFR) certification. This ANSI-accredited and U.S. DoD-8570-compliant credential recognizes security professionals who can design secure IT environments, perform threat analysis, and respond appropriately and effectively to cyberattacks. Logical Operations also offers other certifications, including Master Mobile Application Developer (MMAD), Certified Virtualization Professional (CVP), Cyber Secure Coder and CloudMASTER.
  • The associate-level Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate certification is aimed at analysts in security operations centers at large companies and organizations. Candidates who qualify through Cisco’s global scholarship program may receive free training, mentoring and testing to help them achieve a range of entry-level to expert certifications that the company offers. CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+), which launched in 2017, is a vendor-neutral certification designed for professionals with three to four years of security and behavioral analytics experience.
  • The Identity Management Institute offers several credentials for identity and access management, data protection, identity protection, identity governance and more. The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), which focuses on privacy, has a small but growing number of certifications as well.
  • The SECO-Institute, in cooperation with the Security Academy Netherlands and APMG, is behind the Cyber Security & Governance Certification Program; SECO-Institute certifications aren’t well known in the United States, but their popularity is growing. 
  • It also may be worth your time to browse the Chartered Institute of Information Security accreditations, the U.K. equivalent of the U.S. DoD 8570 certifications and the corresponding 8140 framework.

Also, consider these five entry-level cybersecurity certifications for more options.

TipTip: Before you decide to purchase training for a certification or an exam voucher, see if your employer will cover the cost. Employers may cover all or part of the cost if you have a continuing education or training allowance, or if the certification is in line with your current or potential job duties.

Information security and cybersecurity jobs

According to CyberSeek, the number of cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. stands at almost 598,000, with about 1.05 million cybersecurity professionals employed in today’s workforce. Projections continue to be robust: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects 33% growth in information security analyst positions between 2020 and 2030; in comparison, the average rate of growth for all occupations is about 8%.

Security-related job roles include information security specialist, security analyst, network security administrator, system administrator (with security as a responsibility) and security engineer, as well as specialized roles, like malware engineer, intrusion analyst and penetration tester.

Average salaries for information security specialists and security engineers – two of the most common job roles – vary depending on the source. For example, SimplyHired reports about $74,000 for specialist positions, whereas Glassdoor‘s national average is about $108,000. For security engineers, SimplyHired reports almost $112,000, while Glassdoor’s average is more than $111,000, with salaries on the high end reported at $261,000. Note that these numbers frequently change as the sources regularly update their data. [Meet the man who kept Microsoft safe and secure for more than a decade.]

Our informal job board survey from April 2022 reports the number of job posts nationwide in which our featured certifications were mentioned on a given day. This should supply you an idea of the relative popularity of each certification.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order by cybersecurity certification)

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

TechCareers

Total

CEH (EC-Council)

1,989

3,907

7,952

2,829

16,677

CISA (ISACA)

5,389

12,507

20,573

4,701

43,170

CISM (ISACA)

3,467

6,656

14,503

4,072

28,698

CISSP [(ISC)2]

11,472

23,463

34,716

11,060

80,711

Security+ (CompTIA)

5,953

6,680

5,998

1,851

20,482

Did you know?Did you know?: Cybersecurity matters even when you’re traveling. Find out how to keep your computer secure when you’re on the road for business or pleasure.

The importance of hiring information security and cybersecurity professionals

According to Risk Based Security‘s 2021 Year End Data Breach Quickview Report, there were 4,145 publicly disclosed breaches throughout 2021, containing over 22 billion records. This is the second-highest number of breached records, after an all-time high the year before. The U.S. was particularly affected, with the number of breaches increasing 10% compared with the previous year. More than 80% of the records exposed throughout 2021 were due to human error, highlighting an ever-increasing need for cybersecurity education, as well as for highly skilled and trained cybersecurity professionals. [Learn how to recover from a data breach.]

If you’re serious about advancing your career in the IT field and are interested in specializing in security, certification is a great choice. It’s an effective way to validate your skills and show a current or prospective employer that you’re qualified and properly trained. If you’re a business owner, hiring certified professionals and skilled IT managers can help prevent cyberattacks and provide confidence that your company’s security is in the right hands. In the meantime, review our quick cybersecurity tips to Excellerate your company’s protection.

Jeremy Bender contributed to the writing and research in this article.

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10708-information-security-certifications.html
Killexams : 5 Great ‘Starter’ Cybersecurity Certifications

Looking for a career change in the new year? There’s no better time to consider a career in cybersecurity: U.S. businesses and government agencies are spending billions of dollars each year to protect their data and assets from malicious attacks, with Forbes reporting that $170 billion will be spent worldwide by 2020.

With the demand for qualified security professionals soaring, certification is a logical way for you to verify your skills and knowledge, and to get your resume noticed. Here are five certifications that can help launch your cybersecurity career.

1. Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) Security Fundamentals

Of the certifications featured in this article, the MTA Security Fundamentals is the most “entry-level” one of the bunch. Aimed at high school and early college students, as well as those in the workforce who are looking to change careers, the MTA Security Fundamentals recognizes knowledge of core security principles as well as the basics of operating system, network and software security. To achieve certification, you must pass a single exam, which costs $127.

To Excellerate your chances of achieving the MTA Security Fundamentals certification, Microsoft recommends that you have some hands-on experience with Windows Server, Windows-based networking, firewalls and other common security products.

2. ISACA CSX Cybersecurity Fundamentals Certificate

Folks in the security industry know ISACA for such long-running certificates as its Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) and similar certifications, all of which grant intermediate to advanced credentials. The CSX Cybersecurity Fundamentals Certificate is relatively new to the ISACA certification program and was designed to fill the entry-level niche. Geared toward latest post-secondary graduates and those seeking career changes, this certificate covers five cybersecurity-related domains: concepts; architecture principles; network, system, application and data security; incident response; and security of evolving technology.

The single exam costs $150, and the certificate doesn’t expire or require periodic recertification.

3. CompTIA Security+

Perhaps the most well-known entry-level security certification is the Security+, which covers a wide array of security and information assurance topics, including network security, threats and vulnerabilities, access controls, cryptography, risk management principles, and application, host and data security. The certification meets U.S. Department of Defense Directive 8570.01-M requirements — an important item for anyone looking to work in IT security for the federal government — and complies with the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA).

CompTIA recommends that candidates have two years of relevant experience and achieve the Network+ credential before taking the Security+ exam. At $311, this exam lands roughly midway between least and most expensive, compared to other entry-level certifications. The Security+ leads to such jobs as security administrator, security specialist and network administrator, among others.

4. GIAC Information Security Fundamentals (GISF)

GIAC gears the GISF toward system administrators, managers and information security officers who need a solid overview of information assurance principles, defense-in-depth techniques, risk management, security policies, and business continuity and disaster recovery plans. The Topics covered on the single GISF exam are similar to those for the CompTIA Security+, but GISF is considered to be more challenging. GIAC exams in general require test takers to apply knowledge and problem-solving skills, so hands-on experience that has been gained through training or on-the-job experience is recommended.

If you take a SANS training course and then sit for the GISF exam, the exam cost alone is $689. Taking the exam without completing training, referred to as a “certification attempt” by GIAC, bumps the exam cost to a whopping $1,249. GIAC includes two practice exams in the certification-attempt package.

After achieving the GISF, consider pursuing the GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC), an intermediate-level certification that takes a big step beyond foundational information security concepts.

5. (ISC)2 Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP)

The (ISC)2 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) is probably the most recognizable and popular security certification today. But (ISC)2 offers several security-related certifications, with the ANSI-accredited SSCP filling the entry-level slot. The SSCP prepares you for such jobs as systems security analyst, network security engineer and security administrator, which typically start at the junior level if you don’t already have technical or engineering-related information technology experience.

To achieve the SSCP, you must pass a single exam that includes questions that span seven common body of knowledge (CBK) domains: (1) Access Controls, (2) Security Operations and Administration, (3) Risk Identification, Monitoring, and Analysis, (4) Incident Response and Recovery, (5) Cryptography, (6) Network and Communications Security, and (7) Systems and Application Security.

To ensure that you have sufficient hands-on security knowledge before taking the exam, (ISC)2 recommends that you attend training courses or conference workshops, participate in webinars, and read white papers and books.

The exam costs $250, and (ISC)2 offers a variety of study resources for purchase on its website.

Preparing for your exams

Regardless of which certification seems like a best fit for you, be prepared to devote ample self-study time to the effort. Many test takers prefer to use a top-rated study guide along with some practice tests and flash cards when preparing for a certification exam. If your learning style is more conducive to formal instructor-led training, factor the costs and required time into your plans. Although training costs vary by certification, they typically run from $400 to over $5,000, depending on whether you choose online, virtual classroom or in-classroom delivery.

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/9661-cybersecurity-certifications.html
Killexams : Cybersecurity for Contractors, Part 2: What To Do When You're Attacked

In the last few years, cybersecurity has become a big issue in the construction world. Contractors are vulnerable and easily targeted by hackers, with ransoms and work stoppages costing millions of dollars.

In Part 1 of this series, we discussed why construction companies are so frequently targeted by cyber-attacks. In this article, we’ll show you what to do when you are attacked and how to set up a cybersecurity program for your company that will help prevent these attacks.

When disaster strikes

If you haven’t hired a cybersecurity consultant before you get hit with an attack, you will definitely need one when you do. A probable course of action a consultant would take would look something like this:

  • Create an incident response plan.
  • Identify the threat.
  • Find the holes in your defenses
  • Plug the leak/remove the virus.
  • Identify additional weaknesses and fix those.
  • Then negotiate to reduce the ransom

Negotiating with criminals

Nick Espinosa is a cybersecurity expert and founder of Security Fanatics.Nick EspinosaUnless you have your data backed up where the cyber-criminals cannot get to it, you’re likely going to have to pay the ransom. But it can be negotiated.

“I have yet to pay full price for ransom,” says Nick Espinosa, chief security fanatic at the cybersecurity firm Security Fanatics. “Last year we had an AEC (architecture, engineering and construction) firm, get hit with a ransom for $5 million, and we got it down to $1.2 million. I had a small mechanical contractor get hit for $85,000 We got them down to $10,000. So you can negotiate these things.”

Negotiations often supply cybersecurity contractors time to figure out the hack, plug the holes and rebuild the system as well, says Espinosa. And once the system is more secure, there is more incentive for the hackers to lower their demands. “There's an entire methodology we use and it makes for some interesting conversations,” he says.

Hacker tech support

After a ransom has been negotiated and paid, hackers will usually restore your data—but not always perfectly. “You might get your Word documents back, Excel files, PDFs and photos, but databases are tricky,” says Espinosa. “They are easy to break, so some of these big files are not recoverable, or recovering them may take a lot of work.”

Reporting compliance

There is no standard set of laws for notifying law enforcement or other agencies after you have experienced a cyber-attack. However, depending on the work you do, you may have to let different agencies know. For example:

  • If you experience damages or pay a ransom, you’ll have to notify your insurance company.
  • If you are a business that takes credit cards, there is a reporting requirement.
  • If you are a business doing work for the Department of Defense or the federal government, the FBI may need to be notified.
  • If you are a publicly traded company you may need to notify the SEC, or the Federal Trade Commission.

State and local officials may also have shield laws and privacy laws which protect consumers. Regulations typically require you to notify any customer whose email or other data may have also been breached.  “My recommendation is to check with your state and local jurisdictions because you never know what laws you’re going to fall under,” says Espinosa.

How to establish a cybersecurity program

To defend your company against cyber-attacks, understand one thing. A complete cybersecurity defense is not something your IT department or IT person (assuming you have one) can usually provide.

Cybersecurity and IT are two different animals. Espinosa says that people who do this kind of work have different educations and credentials. Most networked systems for home, office or field come with a minimum level of security, but to build a firewall against attacks requires an entirely new layer of protection on top of your IT and network system.

Training for everybody

“First and foremost, all of your people need training,” says Espinosa. “This is the biggest problem we have in cybersecurity. Everybody needs to learn, from the janitor to the CEO.”

Along with training, cybersecurity companies will update your systems, firewalls, and wireless access points. They will also fix potential vulnerabilities that are known and can be exploited and set up encryption systems for your data. Understand also that protecting your company from cyber-attacks is not a one-time fix.

Hackers are always inventing new techniques. Anti-virus software goes out of date. New or untrained employees, vendors or subcontractors start using your system. And all these scenarios bring new risks. Cyber security has to become a part of your company culture, with constant vigilance, much like safety culture.

Backup plans

By far, the most critical part of your defense is to have all your data backed up, either to the cloud or a remote server that you control that is not plugged into the internet, or both.

“I can't tell you how many times I've seen the cloud or cloud backup pull a company out of the fire,” says Espinosa. Even if hackers aren’t a threat, backups can protect your data against floods, fires and other natural disasters, making this a no-brainer for every company.

The cloud services provided by Amazon, Apple and Google are typically well hardened against attacks. Unless you set up your cloud services wrong, hackers should not be able to attack these.

Time and cost

Establishing a cyber-secure operating environment for your company is not cheap, nor can it be done quickly. Six-figure costs are the low end of this kind of consulting work and seven figures are common. Analysis of your company’s vulnerabilities can take up to six months.

But for this, you should get things like firewalls, spam filters, anti-virus programs, training, an annual vulnerability assessment, and penetration test, and data backup plans.

In evaluating cyber consultants look for companies whose people have certifications such as Certified Information Security Manager and Certified Business Continuity Professional. Also, seek out providers who are members of the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA) and the Disaster Recovery Institute International (DRII).

There are also two governing standards to pay attention to:

  • ISO/IEC27001 is an international standard for information security. 
  • NIST 801-171 is a federal standard for contractors working for a federal agency.

Government work

The Department of Defense also has a standard in the works that will become law in the next year or two that will directly affect construction contractors doing business with certain federal agencies, the CMMC 2.0. You may have heard about the original CMMC 1.0, which had a troublesome rollout. It’s not law yet, but it is being retooled to be easier and less cumbersome for contractors.

Two things to note about CMMC 2.0:

  1. In the near future, you won’t be able to bid on Department of Defense jobs unless you’ve had an audit and you meet the standards.
  2. It is anticipated the CMMC standards will eventually cover all federal agencies and will likely be adopted by states, counties and municipalities, meaning you won’t be able to do any public work without certification.

In Part 3 of this series, we will detail what you need to know to get your company ready for CMMC 2.0 audits and certification.

Nick Espinosa is a cybersecurity expert and founder of Security Fanatics. As the co-author of the bestselling cybersecurity book "Easy Prey," a TEDx Speaker and the host of The Deep Dive nationally syndicated radio show he has given presentations on this subject to numerous construction associations.

Espinosa contributed to the creation of the National Security Administration’s certified curriculum to help the cybersecurity/cyberwarfare community to defend our government, people and corporations from cyber threats globally. He is also a member of the Forbes Technology Council, and a frequent contributor to that magazine’s website.

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 06:06:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.equipmentworld.com/business/article/15293874/cybersecurity-for-contractors-what-to-do-when-you-are-attacked
Killexams : Certified Information Systems Security Professional Prep

Jessica Hazelrigg is a Senior Information Security Instructor for the Center for Infrastructure Assurance and Security (CIAS) at The University of Texas San Antonio. She began with the CIAS in 2017 and brings nearly 20 years of cybersecurity and intelligence experience to the organization.

Ms. Hazelrigg also serves as the Director of the Platform Threat Defense team for USAA, responsible for boundary defense (web and email security), endpoint security, public cloud security (AWS, GCP, Azure), and PKI services.

Ms. Hazelrigg previously led the Cyber Security Infrastructure team, responsible for establishing and maintaining hardening standards throughout the life cycle of platform technologies. The CSI team was also charged with hardening privileged access and managing the PKI infrastructure for USAA. Prior service at USAA includes serving as a lead security analyst on the Cyber Threat Operations Center (CTOC) team. Her responsibilities included improving threat detection and analysis capabilities to ensure the highest levels of protection at USAA. She was a key contributor in identifying new security solutions and data feeds, developing requirements for implementation, and operationalizing tools, techniques, and procedures. Ms. Hazelrigg was instrumental in formalizing the CTOC hunting program and moving the CTOC to a more proactive mindset. She also has six years of experience conducting incident response.

Prior to USAA, Ms. Hazelrigg served as an intelligence analyst in the US Army (1st Information Operations Command (Land)), and later at the Counterintelligence Field Activity. She supported various other intelligence missions over the course of her 11 years in the Intelligence Community.

Ms. Hazelrigg has a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Science from University of Maryland University College, and a Master of Science in Information Assurance from Capitol Technology University. She holds the GCIH, GCIA, and GMON certifications, and is a member of the GIAC Advisory Board.

She presents regularly at cybersecurity conferences and professional groups, to include DerbyCon, Texas Cyber Summit, CyberTexas Conference, DHS ATTEs, ISACA, ISC2, ISSA, and the Military Cyber Professionals Organization.

Fri, 31 Jul 2015 13:07:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.utsa.edu/pace/it/cissp.html
Killexams : The Future of Cybersecurity Certifications Crossroad

Security practitioners are increasingly conflicted about the role that certifications play in their career development. Phil Muncaster finds out why

If you enjoy spending time down the internet rabbit hole that is a Twitter debate, you may have seen an interesting latest thread. In it, a cybersecurity professional asks the online void whether anyone is still using certifications. After two decades of maintaining his own certs, the professional argues that continuing professional education (CPE) credits are becoming increasingly diluted, with the certifications themselves offering diminished value. It is difficult to find anyone in the succeeding – and lengthy – thread that disagrees.

Yet certifications are still hugely popular. They promise a higher salary, and many employers require said certifications for industry roles. The question is whether they can stay relevant in an industry characterized by rapid technological advances and a volatile and dynamic threat landscape.

A Brief History of Certs

Information security certificates have a long history. For as long as there have been complex IT products on the market, vendors have run accreditation courses for practitioners to prove their competence in using them. In the late 1980s, the need for a more generalist vendor-neutral certification program emerged, and the non-profit International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium (ISC)² was born. Over 152,000 practitioners worldwide now hold its Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification.

To keep such accreditations current and encourage participation, bodies like (ISC)² and professional association ISACA require holders to earn CPEs. Ways of earning CPEs include attending webinars and events (including Infosecurity Magazine webinars and online summits) and completing training courses. Data from (ISC)² claims that 72% of professionals are required by their employer to earn certifications and that those holding them earn an average salary of $91,700 in the US versus $58,800 without. Certificates remain the third most sought-after employee attribute for recruiters after problem-solving and curiosity, it claims.

Shrinking the Talent Pool

However, many practitioners are becoming disillusioned by industry certifications. While they may be useful for young professionals early in their careers, many argue that such qualifications have not aged well, offering limited value for those later in their careers.

Ed Tucker, senior director of cybersecurity at The Workshop, claims that certs have actually become a barrier to entry for many at a time of acute industry skills shortages.

“By its very nature, this narrows our potential talent pool, but also means we create something of an echo chamber, where people begin with an ingrained security prejudice, rather than a fresh and inquisitive mindset that looks at problems for what they are,” he tells Infosecurity. “Why are we still recruiting based on whether someone passed a test rather than who they are and the natural skills they bring?”

He argues that certifications may also be hitting the industry’s efforts to diversify.

“They narrow our pool of talent when what we need is the biggest possible net,” he continues. “How can we expect someone from a different socio-economic background to have attained certs without significant support? Frankly, why the hell would we want them to?”

Socura CEO, Andy Kays, says his firm doesn’t screen candidates by their certifications but rather their aptitude, experience and attitude.

“Not all certifications are created equal, and it’s not always clear which certs are truly valuable, especially when there is the potential for them to have been obtained illegitimately,” he tells Infosecurity. “It’s like writing. An English or journalism degree will infer to an editor that someone possesses strong writing skills and the kind of knowledge required to do the job. However, it is no guarantee. Likewise, many of the best writers have no formal qualifications, nor should they be required to attain them.”

A Useful Tool

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the member associations and accreditation bodies Infosecurity spoke to firmly defend their certifications as a useful tool for employers to judge candidates. (ISC)² chief qualifications officer, Casey Marks, argues that they level the playing field for candidates.

“Not every aspiring professional can obtain a university degree or knows ‘the right people’ to get an internship or apprenticeship to secure a cybersecurity career. Certifications are a cost-effective, targeted and efficient mechanism to assist in the demonstration of competence for employment,” he tells Infosecurity. “They are the only mechanism with an independently accredited process that allows individuals to publicly demonstrate a commitment to continued competence within the field.”

Rowland Johnson, president of certification body CREST, says certs can also bring clarity to proceedings in an industry where there is an “asymmetry of language between buyers and sellers,” although he acknowledges that they should not be used in isolation.

“People are able to build and develop skills through training and on-the-job experience, which should be actively encouraged and applauded as an essential ingredient for the sector. However, in an industry clamoring to define job definitions as well as skills and competency frameworks, cybersecurity certifications provide the only tangible measurement of capability,” he tells Infosecurity. 

“Despite their ability to demonstrate an individual’s knowledge and skills, infosec certs are not a silver bullet. They provide an indicator, along with many other pointers, and should rarely be used as an exclusive measurement of competency.”

A Money Making Machine?

For Trend Micro VP of security research, Rik Ferguson, it is the industry that has grown up around certifications over the years that’s the problem, rather than certs per se.

“A whole acronym industry has emerged that competes to put letters after your name. The ones I was obliged to continue to pay for I let lapse because I felt I wasn’t getting anything in return from the certifying bodies year after year. It began to feel like a mechanism for milking me and thousands of other people,” he argues.

“I’ve direct experience of trying to hire people in tech support roles who were certified up to their eyeballs and on paper were incredible. However, they’d never done a day’s support work in their lives and didn’t have the skills required to do the job because these skills were not the same as the knowledge required to pass the exam.”

HP Inc CISO, Joanna Burkey, has also seen the industry change over the years. While she maintains they can serve a real purpose, there are drawbacks.

“Especially when cyber was a ‘new’ domain, [certs] were often used to reflect a degree of knowledge in this emerging space – which was useful. However, infosec certs have become somewhat diluted over the years and are used too often as a checkbox way to pre-qualify candidates,” she tells Infosecurity.

“This ‘expected by default’ mentality can be exclusionary to people without certs who may actually be the better candidate. Getting a cert is time-consuming, expensive and generally requires ongoing credits to be obtained year on year. Not everyone has the time, money or inclination to do that, and in my opinion, for many roles, it sets an unreasonably high bar and acts as a barrier to joining the industry. Considering the current shortfall in global cybersecurity talent, we need fewer, not more barriers.”

Vectra’s EMEA CTO, Steve Cottrell, echoes other experts in arguing that certifications can have diminished value for those in the latter stages of their careers. He also points to the heavy burden that maintaining the qualifications can put on individuals.

“As someone who has hired several hundred security professionals over the past decade or so, I can’t recall a single instance when a candidate having a particular certification was the deciding factor,” he tells Infosecurity.

“Plus, in addition to the financial outlay, you also must consider the personal development angle – requiring a set number of hours of education activities for each certification cycle can become burdensome for busy security professionals. For new candidates, the turn-off for many is the dated syllabus, which is at odds with today’s threat landscape and business challenges we are facing.”

Getting Certs Off Their Death Bed

So how can the industry turn things around and reaffirm the relevance of certifications in a post-pandemic world characterized by rapid change? For CREST’s Johnson, it comes down to what they certify.

“There is certification of knowledge – confirming that individuals know information – and certification of skills, confirming that individuals can apply that information in a real-world scenario. Then there is a certification of competency, which is much more challenging and draws upon knowledge, skills and experience,” he explains. 

“Currently, there are few yardsticks for measuring competency, with many more that assess skills and knowledge. CREST believes that all levels of certification have value, but the closer they are to a competency measurement, the closer the alignment for an individual to deliver effective services and outcomes.”

HP’s Burkey also offers her qualified support for certifications going forward and highlights certain ones like ISACA’s Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) as being well-regarded in the sector.

“Once people are hired, especially young people earlier in their career, I’m a big fan of supporting their pursuance of certs. Even if they obtain them and leave, it’s good growth for folks, and that is good for the industry overall,” she continues. “Yet I feel strongly they are an additional skill for many roles, not a foundational or required piece.”

Others aren’t as optimistic. Socura’s Kays feels that certs often run counter to the spirit of the profession and many of its practitioners.

“The security industry is difficult to formalize in the manner of a profession like accounting,” he adds. “There will always be a place for more non-conformist views, who tend to dislike certification schemes. We still need people with the hacker mindset of wanting to learn new things in their bedroom, not the classroom.”

For Trend Micro’s Ferguson, the certifications industry is at a crossroads, but a better future is possible.

“If the industry continues as it is, I don’t think it has a bright future because it is slowly killing itself with its own greed and irrelevance,” he concludes. “However, it can have a bright future if the infosecurity community is willing to address the historical strategic and corporate failures of the certification industry by coming up with new, potentially more relevant certifications that aren’t financially but professionally motivated.” 

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 00:19:00 -0500 Phil Muncaster text/html https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/magazine-features/future-cybersecurity-certifications/
Killexams : Executive Leadership Cyber Security Training

Jessica Hazelrigg is a Senior Information Security Instructor for the Center for Infrastructure Assurance and Security (CIAS) at The University of Texas San Antonio. She began with the CIAS in 2017 and brings nearly 20 years of cybersecurity and intelligence experience to the organization.

Ms. Hazelrigg also serves as the Director of the Platform Threat Defense team for USAA, responsible for boundary defense (web and email security), endpoint security, public cloud security (AWS, GCP, Azure), and PKI services.

Ms. Hazelrigg previously led the Cyber Security Infrastructure team, responsible for establishing and maintaining hardening standards throughout the life cycle of platform technologies. The CSI team was also charged with hardening privileged access and managing the PKI infrastructure for USAA. Prior service at USAA includes serving as a lead security analyst on the Cyber Threat Operations Center (CTOC) team. Her responsibilities included improving threat detection and analysis capabilities to ensure the highest levels of protection at USAA. She was a key contributor in identifying new security solutions and data feeds, developing requirements for implementation, and operationalizing tools, techniques, and procedures. Ms. Hazelrigg was instrumental in formalizing the CTOC hunting program and moving the CTOC to a more proactive mindset. She also has six years of experience conducting incident response.

Prior to USAA, Ms. Hazelrigg served as an intelligence analyst in the US Army (1st Information Operations Command (Land)), and later at the Counterintelligence Field Activity. She supported various other intelligence missions over the course of her 11 years in the Intelligence Community.

Ms. Hazelrigg has a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Science from University of Maryland University College, and a Master of Science in Information Assurance from Capitol Technology University. She holds the GCIH, GCIA, and GMON certifications, and is a member of the GIAC Advisory Board.

She presents regularly at cybersecurity conferences and professional groups, to include DerbyCon, Texas Cyber Summit, CyberTexas Conference, DHS ATTEs, ISACA, ISC2, ISSA, and the Military Cyber Professionals Organization.

Sat, 14 Apr 2018 05:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.utsa.edu/pace/it/executive-leadership-cybersecurity-training.html
Killexams : Consider governance, coordination and risk to secure supply chain

The Covid-19 pandemic, shifts in the global economy and the Ukraine conflict have further strained an already imperfect global supply chain. Based on a recent ISACA survey of more than 1,300 IT professionals, there is reason to be concerned about any supply chain-reliant organisation’s ability to fulfill business objectives.

Myriad global, geographic and geopolitical factors increase an already dynamic threat landscape, making governance, coordination and risk management all the more important. However, implementing, executing and optimising strategies, plans and processes are challenging with an increasingly complex global supply chain. Three of the top concerns from the ISACA survey are highlighted below, with recommendations on how to tackle each.              

84% of respondents say their organisation’s supply chain needs better governance

To Excellerate your organisation’s supply chain governance, identify critical business functions and how your particular supply chain impacts them. To do this:

  1. Perform a business impact analysis and determine the potential cost and impact of not having these resources.
  2. Develop a roadmap to prioritise your efforts on these critical parts of your supply chain. Be honest: can your organisation function without these resources, and are there other sources or suppliers for like items? Excellerate confidence in your supply chain by mapping it out, identifying key stakeholders, and regularly communicating with them.
  3. Develop contingency and communication plans. By working with your suppliers and identifying critical points of contact and contingency plans, your organisation will have workable controls to Excellerate your supply chain.
  4. Finally, ensure all stakeholders are engaged. The biggest surprises happen when all stakeholders are not involved, and suddenly an essential resource runs low or out. Overcommunicate with your stakeholders the importance of understanding their vital resources and what supplies they need to continue to operate. Only then can your organisation’s management plan and prioritise what needs to be done. We no longer have the luxury of a quick turnaround on needed supplies and resources.

66% of respondents were concerned about poor information security practices by suppliers

Governance is all about prioritisation, communication and responsibility. Recommendations include:

  1. Meet with critical suppliers and have them demonstrate their information security practices. If they fail to do so, determine whether other suppliers can provide a similar product. Ensure your current suppliers understand that their lack of cooperation is endangering your business relationship.
  2. Ensure future contracts with all suppliers include methods for assessing the information security posture of a supplier, methods to verify the information security maturity of a supplier, and processes for information sharing, especially during incidents or crises.
  3. Prioritise onboarding and offboarding processes for all suppliers/vendors.
  4. Finally, have recurring meetings with your critical suppliers. Establish methods to plan and randomly test your supply chains with your suppliers. These tests can be walkthroughs, vulnerability assessments, security audits or penetration tests. Have agreements with the suppliers on how they will address or mitigate issues discovered during the testing. Have processes to verify that controls and mitigations are relevant and maintained for the current shared risks.

60% of respondents have not coordinated and practised supply chain-based incident response plans with their suppliers

Supply chain incident response can be addressed through governance, planning and risk management. Tabletop exercises are useful exercises and should include critical suppliers to review your supplier’s incident response plan alongside yours. Key outputs may include:

  1. Identify common themes and potential issues, conflicts or concerns with each incident response plan. Work with your suppliers to document how your suppliers and your organisation will deal with everyday incidents.
  2. Develop playbooks to address these common incidents.
  3. Develop responses to the loss of resources, attacks against the supply chain, or breakdowns in shared areas of responsibility.
  4. Develop secure methods of communication, including out-of-band methods that can be used if your supplier’s system or your organisation’s system is compromised.
  5. Finally, the most critical step – practise these playbooks with your suppliers.

Tabletop exercises should begin as basic common theoretical incidents. These initial exercises can help to identify concerns and issues, especially with roles, responsibilities and the incident management chain of authority. After completing several tabletops, conduct planned and unplanned walkthroughs of the shared incident playbooks. Walkthroughs help to identify potential issues before an actual incident, such as who the backups are if the primary contacts are not available or in what circumstances should you and your provider switch to alternative means of communication.

Of note, there are incident scenario vendors in the market that produce and facilitate training incidents, which increases the realism. In these situations, clearly scoped and approved rules of engagement make the training as authentic as possible without impacting operations. The key output is a list of lessons learned to Excellerate the resilience of your supply chain.

Good governance, secure, frequent communications and solid risk management are three basic components available to enterprises to Excellerate the strength of their supply chain. Communication is key – with suppliers/vendors, stakeholders and decision-makers to identify critical services and resources. Documentation is important to outline and carry out activities necessary to protect critical services and resources. Establishing and maintaining clear communication channels with critical suppliers is paramount. Frequently review risks to your organisation, especially critical services, resources and supply chains. Contingency processes and procedures Excellerate response and should be developed and handy when real-world events occur.

Good governance, communication and risk management will Excellerate the resilience of your supply chain and better prepare your organisation for the next global crisis.

Brian Fletcher is a cyber assessment practices advisor for ISACA.

Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.computerweekly.com/opinion/Consider-governance-coordination-and-risk-to-secure-supply-chain
Killexams : House Bill Tasks CISA With SolarWinds Report

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Mon, 11 Jul 2022 00:50:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2022/07/house-bill-tasks-cisa-solarwinds-report/374045/
Killexams : Cybersecurity, Privacy, Data and Regulatory Compliance Rank as Top IT Audit Risks

New study by Protiviti and ISACA underscores security risks looming large in today's dynamic threat landscape

MENLO PARK, Calif., June 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- A new survey conducted by Protiviti and ISACA found that cybersecurity is the chief risk for IT audit departments, with several related risks such as privacy and data as well as regulatory compliance also ranking as top concerns.

Protiviti logo. (PRNewsFoto/Protiviti) (PRNewsfoto/Protiviti)

The top risks cited in this year's survey highlight the vital yet sensitive role that data plays in organizations today.

Responses to this year's edition of the annual technology and audit benchmarking survey, titled "IT Audit Perspectives on Today's Top Technology Risks," indicate that IT audit teams are perceiving the current technology risk landscape as much more threatening than in the past. War-related cyberattacks are on the rise, the surge of sophisticated ransomware attacks is ongoing and remote work continues to subject many organizations to new cybersecurity risks. Yet despite heightened concerns, the survey revealed that one in five organizations do not expect their 2022 audit plans to address the risk of cybersecurity breaches.

"Given the increasingly complex and rapidly changing technology risk landscape we're in, it's imperative for IT audit leaders to understand they are responsible for maintaining a holistic view of IT risks impacting the entire organization," said Angelo Poulikakos, a managing director at Protiviti and global leader of the firm's Technology Audit practice. "This requires tech-enablement from an audit standpoint and regular calibration of risk assessments to suit the current environment, rather than 'rinsing and repeating' the work from previous years."

"The elevated cybersecurity concerns evidenced in this year's survey underscore that cyber threats are no longer concentrated within specific industries. This is an industry agnostic concern, and every organization should be mobilizing to protect itself. While IT audit teams may not be on the front lines managing these risks, it's essential that they take a proactive approach to regularly assess the efficacy of these efforts while confirming the proper controls and protections are in place," added Poulikakos.

The Top 10 IT Audit Risks for 2022
The survey asked respondents to rate the significance of 39 technology risk issues. Of those, the top 10 IT audit risks identified were as follows:

  1. Cyber breach
  2. Manage security incidents
  3. Privacy
  4. Monitor regulatory compliance
  5. Access risk
  6. Data integrity
  7. Disaster recovery
  8. Data governance
  9. Third-party risk
  10. Monitor/audit IT, legal and regulatory compliance

The top risks cited in this year's survey highlight the vital yet sensitive role that data plays in organizations today, with respondents expressing significant concerns regarding the way in which data is gathered, governed and secured. Respondents also demonstrated that IT audit professionals are acutely aware of the evolving compliance requirements facing their organizations, related to data stewardship, industry standards, and national and regional requirements.

"With a global focus on data regulation, it may be easy to view data solely through a lens of compliance," said Paul Phillips, ISACA director of Event Content Development and Risk Professional Practice lead. "However, consumer concern with how their data are used and stored and other operational matters that can quickly become reputational matters must not be discounted. As IT auditors assess risk and evaluate controls associated with data, the tremendous organizational value (and responsibility) of data and the importance of trust should always be top of mind."

The benchmarking report is based on a survey, fielded in the fourth quarter of 2021, of over 7,500 IT audit leaders and professionals, including chief audit executives (CAEs) and IT audit vice presidents and directors, representing a wide range of industries globally. The survey was conducted in collaboration with ISACA, a global professional association of more than 165,000 digital trust professionals.

Survey Resources Available
"IT Audit Perspectives on Today's Top Technology Risks" is available for complimentary download, along with an infographic and podcast about the survey results, here. On July 28, 2022, at 11:00 a.m. PDT, Protiviti will host a free one-hour webinar to further explore the implications of the survey. Featured speakers will be Poulikakos, Phillips and Maeve Raak, a director in Protiviti's Technology Audit practice. Please register here to attend the webinar.

About Protiviti
Protiviti (www.protiviti.com) is a global consulting firm that delivers deep expertise, objective insights, a tailored approach, and unparalleled collaboration to help leaders confidently face the future. Protiviti and its independent and locally owned Member Firms provide clients with consulting and managed solutions in finance, technology, operations, data, digital, legal, governance, risk and internal audit through its network of more than 85 offices in over 25 countries.

Named to the 2022 Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work For® list, Protiviti has served more than 80 percent of Fortune 100 and nearly 80 percent of Fortune  500 companies. The firm also works with smaller, growing companies, including those looking to go public, as well as with government agencies. Protiviti is a wholly owned subsidiary of Robert Half (NYSE: RHI). Founded in 1948, Robert Half is a member of the S&P 500 index.

About ISACA
ISACA® (www.isaca.org) is a global community advancing individuals and organizations in their pursuit of digital trust. For more than 50 years, ISACA has equipped individuals and enterprises with the knowledge, credentials, education, training and community to progress their careers, transform their organizations, and build a more trusted and ethical digital world. ISACA is a global professional association and learning organization that leverages the expertise of its more than 165,000 members who work in digital trust fields such as information security, governance, assurance, risk, privacy and quality. It has a presence in 188 countries, including 225 chapters worldwide. Through its foundation One In Tech, ISACA supports IT education and career pathways for under resourced and underrepresented populations.

Protiviti is not licensed or registered as a public accounting firm and does not issue opinions on financial statements or offer attestation services.

Editor's note: photos available upon request.

Cision View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cybersecurity-privacy-data-and-regulatory-compliance-rank-as-top-it-audit-risks-301576172.html

SOURCE Protiviti

Mon, 27 Jun 2022 09:17:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.klfy.com/business/press-releases/cision/20220627SF01751/cybersecurity-privacy-data-and-regulatory-compliance-rank-as-top-it-audit-risks/
Killexams : Class notes by the Decade

Class notes by the Decade

Robert Vince, PhD 1966, BS 1962, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Drug Design, was elected to the rank of fellow by the National Academy of Inventors for inventions that have improved “the welfare of society.” Vince and two colleagues developed an antidote to cyanide poisoning that converts cyanide in the body into a less toxic compound in under three minutes. Vince also helped develop a method designed to detect Alzheimer’s disease at an early stage through a noninvasive eye test. He lives in Mendota Heights, Minn.

Francis X. Daumen, BA 1971, was inducted into the Western New York Softball Hall of Fame after playing for nearly 20 years as a fast-pitch pitcher. A special education teacher in Buffalo schools for more than three decades, Daumen now works as a licensed financial planner in East Amherst, N.Y.

Randy Simon, BA 1977, of Montclair, N.J., a former executive coach, now works as a clinical psychologist. Simon, who also worked as a human resources executive for Fortune 500 companies, said she changed careers in order to help individuals as opposed to organizations.

Michele Softness, BS 1979, of Miami, Fla., joined the Carlton Fields real estate and commercial finance group, which includes more than 70 attorneys. Softness previously worked for the Miami law firm Isicoff, Ragatz & Koenigsberg. She also serves as a fundraiser for various civic and health organizations.

Elliott Brender, MD 1970, founder of Surgeons for Cambodia, Inc., completed his seventh trip to Cambodia, where he and his team of seven surgeons and two nurses performed 57 surgeries in two weeks. They also brought new equipment to donate to area hospitals and established a rotating, year-round residency program. Brender lives in Villa Park, Calif.

Christopher Tirabassi, BS 1980, was named CEO of Medical Health Associates of Western New York, the largest pediatric primary-care practice in the 17-county area. He lives in Getzville, N.Y.

Francis J. Carey, MLS 1989, is the new curator of the Historical Association of Lewiston and its museum. Carey previously worked for Daemen College in Amherst, N.Y., for UB’s Lockwood Library and for Duke University in Durham, N.C. He resides in Niagara Falls, N.Y.

Tara A. Ellis, BA 1992, is the new president and CEO of the Food Bank of Western New York. She previously was president and CEO of Meals on Wheels for Western New York. Ellis serves on the board of the National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs. She lives in Derby, N.Y.

Jonathan Loew, BA 1993, was appointed CEO of AppGuard, a cybersecurity company, after it acquired KeepTree, a secure video messaging service for which Loew was CEO. Loew also now serves as CMO 80 and board director of Blue Planet-works, of which AppGuard is a subsidiary. He lives in Merrick, N.Y.

Michele Alfano, MArch 1994, owns Michele Alfano Design, one of four firms selected to the 2017 DXV Design Panel. Alfano created DXV’s Modern campaign for luxury bath design, featured in such magazines as Elle Décor, Vanity Fair, Metropolitan Home and Architectural Digest. She resides in Montebello, N.Y.

David Lundvall, BS 1994, published his first novel, “Squish the Fish,” a comedy about Buffalo, under his pen name, Dave Lundy. Though his degree is in computer sciences, Lundvall credits UB with providing him “the tools to accomplish something outside my primary study focus.” He lives in San Francisco, Calif.

Michael McManus, BS 1996, won an Oticon Focus on People Award, which celebrates the contributions of outstanding individuals with hearing loss. McManus, a lieutenant commander in the Navy, served with the Marines in Kuwait during the Gulf War and was deployed multiple times with the Navy Seabees during the Iraq War. Today, he campaigns to reduce the stigma of hearing loss in the military. McManus is currently assigned to U.S. Pacific Command headquarters and lives in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Michelle Kiec, BA 1996, MusB 1995, was named dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Kutztown University. A clarinetist, she has performed with the Harrisburg, West Virginia and Kentucky symphony orchestras. She also previously taught music at the University of Mary in Bismarck, N.D. Kiec resides in Kutztown, Pa.

Nicole Gavigan, EdM 1997, BA 1993, is co-owner of the new interior design firm Gavigan & Gruppo in Williamsville, N.Y. Gavigan, who left a career in higher education, will oversee all management and business practices for the firm and will also be part of the creative process. She lives in Amherst, N.Y.

Ryan Renshaw, BPS 2000, has joined Foit-Albert Associates architecture group as a project manager. Renshaw has 18 years of experience in projects involving commercial buildings, hotels, casinos, and single- and multi-family dwellings. He resides in Kenmore, N.Y.

Melissa Franckowiak, MD 2003, BA 1999 & BS 1998, an anesthesiologist at several Western New York hospitals, won $5,000 in The Pitch business competition as part of 43North Week. Franckowiak will use the money to market her company, PneumaGlide PC, which provides gentle airway solutions to surgical services in emergency care communities. The holder of two patents for airway devices, Franckowiak is a volunteer faculty member at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She lives in Grand Island, N.Y.

Greg Bohall, MS 2007, a graduate of the UB rehabilitation counseling program, published the manual “The Psychologist’s Guide to Professional Development.” Bohall lives in Bellflower, Calif.

Mark Ziemba, BS 2008, has opened Thoughtful Plan, a financial advisory firm that donates a portion of its profits to nonprofit programs and services that benefit disadvantaged Buffalo residents. Ziemba resides in Blasdell, N.Y.

Hannah E. Borden, MS 2011, BS 2010, was promoted to manager of the accounting firm Brock, Schechter & Polakoff LLP in Buffalo. Borden’s work focuses on international tax, multistate businesses and construction contractors. She resides in Williamsville, N.Y.

Dominic Sellitto, MS 2014, BS 2013, co-authored a white paper, “Identifying Security Weaknesses in Your Enterprise,” that was published by ISACA, an international professional association focused on IT governance. Sellitto is a consultant at Loptr, an information security company in East Aurora, N.Y. He lives in Lancaster, N.Y.

Brigid E. Purcell, MS 2015, BS 2014, was promoted to senior accountant at the accounting firm Brock, Schechter & Polakoff LLP in Buffalo. Purcell prepares corporate, individual and estate income tax returns. She resides in Williamsville, N.Y.

Alyson Sion, MS 2017, BS 2016, joined the accounting firm Chiampou Travis Besaw & Kershner LLP in Amherst, N.Y., as a staff accountant. Sion lives in West Seneca, N.Y.

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