CHFP dump are must for success in actual test

killexams.com CHFP Exam dumps contains Finish Pool of Queries and Answers plus braindumps checked and accredited along with referrals and explanations (where applicable). Our focus on collecting the particular CHFP Questions and Solutions is not simply in order to pass the CHFP test at the very first attempt but Actually Transform your Knowledge regarding the CHFP test subjects.

Exam Code: CHFP Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
CHFP Certified Healthcare Financial Professional (CHFP) - 2022

Module I - Business of Health Care: Participation and successful end-of-course assessment of the HFMA Business of Health Care® online program offering participants an overview of healthcare finance, risk mitigation, evolving payment models, healthcare accounting and cost analysis, strategic finance, and managing financial resources.

Module II - Operational Excellence: CHFP aspirants must also complete HFMA's Operational Excellence exam, which includes exercises and case studies on the application of business acumen in health care.

Please note HFMA membership is a required aspect for earning and maintaining the CHFP credential.

Paid student members are eligible to register for and to take both modules of the CHFP certification program (included with membership). Student members who successfully complete the CHFP requirements (two modules) will earn their designation upon assuming Professional or Business Partner level member status.

The Big Picture Healthcare environment

- Reform/Current State of US Healthcare
- Transformation Under Reform
- Payment System Overview
- The Role of Financial Management in Health Care Organizations
- Management Roles & Hierarchy
- What Keeps CFOs Up at Night?

Financial Accounting Concepts Accounting Principles

- Analysis of Financial Statements
- Management Reports
- Accounting Terminology
- Reports for financial analysis

Cost Analysis Principles Cost Management

- Definitions
- Traditional Cost-Finding Methods
- Setting Prices
- Profit analysis

Strategic Financial Issues Basics of Strategic Planning

- Budgeting Concepts
- Variance Analysis
- Revenue & Performance Budgeting
- Controlling Operating Results
- Benchmarking, Productivity, and Cost-Benefit/Cost-Effectiveness
- Analysis

Managing Financial Resources Financing the Healthcare System: Revenue Cycle

- Working capital management
- The Use of Metrics and Data
- Long-Term Financial Resources

Looking to the Future ACA, ACOs & Bundled Payments:
Evolving Reimbursement
The Need for Business Intelligence & Analytics
Population Health Management
Aligning Clinicians and Finance Professionals to Drive Value
Accountable Care Organizations – Payer Cancers
Premium Growth in a Shifting Environment
Denials of coverage
Limitations on profits
Health Insurance Exchanges
Payer consolidations
Unsustainable rates
Payer Differentiation
Rise of Business Process Outsourcing
Consumerism and physicians
Physician –Hospital alignment
Demand for Physician Collegiality
Emerging Ancillary Positions
Physician Burnout
Physician Independence
Physician Shortages (Leakage)
Physicians as Entrepreneurs
Reform and Physician Liability
Physician – Hospital Financial
Relationships
Hospital Consolidations
Hospital – Physician Alignment
Hospital Facing Bankruptcy
Provider- Payer Consolidations
Physician Engagement and Leadership
Integrated Care Delivery
Physicians Remaining
Independent
Accountable Care Organizations
Sustainability of Physician
Employment

Module I Concept Guide – It is recommended that you preview this guide prior to working through the online materials. For example, the pages in this guide associated with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) may be viewed before working in the first course, Healthcare Finance -- The Big Picture. This preview indicates the key concepts that will be covered and attunes you to areas of professional practice that may be less familiar. Feel free to make notes in this document. By taking the time to customize this guide, you can develop a handy reference tool as you continue your work in health care.

• Module II Concept Guide - It is recommended that candidates preview the key‐concept guide prior to working through this online course. The module is itself an examination with three (3) hours allowed for completion. This preview indicates the key business challenges that will be presented and attunes candidates to areas of professional practice that may be less familiar. The learner guide can then be used to focus additional outside studying and study on unfamiliar issues

Certified Healthcare Financial Professional (CHFP) - 2022
Financial Professional student
Killexams : Financial Professional student - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CHFP Search results Killexams : Financial Professional student - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CHFP https://killexams.com/exam_list/Financial Killexams : Coerced Debt: An Insidious Type Of Financial Abuse

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

Lauren Cobello’s last relationship cost her $100,000.

When Cobello met her now ex-husband, he had just relocated and was looking for a job. He was quick to help the mother of four with errands and chores, so when he eventually asked for a financial favor, she agreed.

“I’m a financial professional and I was raised in a traditional sense that couples combine finances and build each other up,” she says. “So I said ‘yes’ when he asked me to put him on my credit cards to help him build up his credit scores.”

But the financial problems escalated quickly. The two planned a wedding and honeymoon, and at the last minute, he confessed that he couldn’t pay. Cobello footed the bill.

Then she cosigned on his truck loan. When her ex-husband defaulted, Cobello took money out of her retirement savings to pay the bill. She even helped him start a construction company.

After less than a year of marriage, Cobello says her ex-husband walked away with a paid-off truck and a business. She was left with $100,000 in debt, an ex she saysid was stalking her and a restraining order that was minimally effective at keeping him away.

Cobello, who would later discover that her ex had done the same thing to a string of other women, used the experience as inspiration to launch Hard Money Talks, a podcast about taboo financial topics.

Like Cobello, nearly all people who go through domestic abuse experience a financial abuse component. Being coerced into debt can keep victims trapped in relationships and cause them to suffer financial consequences for years after they figure out how to leave.

What Is Debt Coercion?

Debt coercion is a form of financial abuse that happens when an abuser uses fraud, theft, force or misinformation to get their partner into debt.

According to a spokesperson for Surviving Economic Abuse (SEA), a U.K.-based advocacy group, this type of abuse is “an effective and lasting trap that drains what money a victim does have available, reducing their space to act.”

These are examples of what debt coercion can look like:

  • Using a partner’s information to obtain credit cards or loans (also known as identity theft)
  • Using a partner’s credit card without their knowledge or permission
  • Forcing a partner to take on debt or sign financial documents
  • Refinancing a mortgage or car loan without a partner’s knowledge

All of these behaviors can prevent someone from leaving an abusive relationship, says Lauren Duff from the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence (PCADV). The abuse can make it difficult to rent an apartment, open a bank account or even get a job.

“It can prevent survivors from being self-sufficient and accessing resources needed to leave and not return back to an abusive relationship,” Duff says.

Anyone can be a victim of this type of abuse, but people from some demographics are more susceptible. Because women earn less money than men—particularly women of color and mothers—they are at higher risk of experiencing financial abuse, reports show.

What is Financial Abuse?

According to the PCADV, financial or economic abuse happens when one intimate partner has control of the other partner’s ability to access, acquire, use or maintain economic resources.

On her podcast, Cobello says it’s easy to miss the red flags for financial abuse because it’s often disguised as love.

“[My abuser] and I had been together since middle school, and you couldn’t convince me we weren’t in love,” says Jane, another financial abuse survivor. Her name has been changed to protect her identity. “You could not convince me he was taking advantage of me,” she adds.

After she became pregnant with their third child, Jane’s partner convinced her to stop working and apply for government assistance.

“He had all of these financial plans for our family,” Jane says, “and I thought he was smarter than me so I believed what he said. But I also felt like I didn’t have a choice. I had nowhere else to go. In hindsight, that was part of the plan to take away my independence.”

Later he encouraged her to use student loan money to buy a home for their family. But there was a catch. All of their assets had to be in his name, he told her, since Jane was receiving government benefits.

Eventually Jane’s partner kicked the family out of the house, and the property was later repossessed. Jane is still paying off those student loans. She initially took out $80,000 but now owes over $125,000 because of interest charges.

Jane experienced several tactics of financial abuse. According to the PCADV, these are some of the most common behaviors:

  • Attempting to control or depriving a partner of access to their income and financial accounts
  • Preventing a partner from holding a job or attending school
  • Withholding resources to limit your partner’s independence
  • Forcing a partner to take on debt, or racking up debt in their name
  • Stealing or destroying a partner’s personal belongings
  • Hiding or lying about financial dealings that affect the household
  • Misinforming a partner about how money works in general

A 2018 Allstate Foundation study on domestic violence and financial abuse found that for people who’d experienced domestic abuse, the financial aspect of the abuse was one of the main reasons they couldn’t leave their partner.

How Can You Recover From Financial Abuse?

For survivors of financial abuse, the road to recovery can be long and expensive. It’s difficult to prove that debt was accrued as a result of coercion, and even if you can, the law may not offer protection.

According to the PCADV, there may be some ways to prevent and mitigate the damage, depending on your situation. Once you’re safe, the organization recommends taking the following actions:

  • Contact financial institutions. Update your passwords and work with your financial institutions to ensure that all account information is confidential. Open your own new accounts where possible.
  • Report unauthorized credit activity. Review your free credit reports on a regular basis and report unauthorized accounts and charges.
  • Work with law enforcement. Work with the local police or district attorney to seek criminal charges against the abuser and restitution for financial loss and harm.
  • Seek court intervention. The court may be able to order the addition or removal of names from financial or service accounts.
  • Start divorce proceedings. File for child or spousal support as soon as possible through your local Domestic Relations Office (DRO) or a private attorney.

The PCADV recommends saving financial documents, like proof of your former partner’s employment and income. You should also document your correspondence with financial institutions and save communications with the abuser, including texts and emails.

According to Duff, holding on to these items can be the key to proving you were abused.

Tips for Escaping and Recovering From Financial Abuse

Getting out of an abusive relationship can feel impossible when you don’t have control of your finances, or when your partner is monitoring your every move or threatening violence, but taking small steps can open the door to leaving safely. Here’s what you can do:

1. Make a Plan

You might not be ready to leave yet, but you can make a plan in case you eventually decide to go. Consider these details:

  • If you have children or pets, think about where they’ll stay.
  • Make copies of important documents and keys.
  • Get a rough idea of how much money you’ll need in order to get away and get on your feet, even if it’s just a few dollars for a bus ride to a local shelter.
  • Write down or memorize important phone numbers.

2. Start Saving Money

“Start saving your little secret stash,” says Jane, “because one day you’re gonna get tired of this and you’re gonna leave and you’re gonna need money and resources lined up.”

If you can set aside a few dollars, whether it’s hidden in your house, in your own checking account, or a friend holds onto it for you, the money could help you pay for transportation to a safe location. If you can save more, you may be able to buy your own cell phone, purchase a flight, or make a deposit on an apartment or a down payment on a car.

3. Tell a Trusted Friend or Family Member

“A common tactic used by abusive partners is isolation: making the survivor believe the lie that the abusive partner is the only one who cares for them, understands, and supports them,” says Duff.

Even if you’re not ready to talk about all of the details, try reaching out to a loved one for support. They may be able to offer resources, hold onto cash or important documents for you, or simply offer a listening ear.

“I think women know they want to leave someday, but they need a friend to help them make a plan,” says Jane. “It would have made a big difference if I knew I didn’t have to do it alone.”

4. Use Local Resources

Cobello says she got support from a local domestic violence shelter. “They offer free counseling,” she says. “I did six months of anonymous free therapy, and my counselor understood the financial side of the abuse.”

A financial therapist or counselor can also help address financial trauma or other emotional effects, and help you reset your goals, Cobello adds.

You can also locate your local domestic violence program by calling 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) for 24/7 help in more than 200+ languages.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 06:14:00 -0500 Sarah Brady en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/personal-finance/coerced-debt-financial-abuse/
Killexams : Biden's student loan forgiveness application form is here: How to apply now
Loan forgiveness is shown using the text
You can now officially apply for student loan forgiveness under Biden's new plan. Getty Images/iStockphoto

Student loan forgiveness applications are officially open after the U.S. Department of Education ran a weekend-long beta test to ensure a smooth process before launch. 

"It's easy, simple and fast -- and it's a new day for millions of Americans all across our nation," said President Biden on Monday as he announced that the student loan forgiveness application is now available.

President Biden announced in August that he's canceling up to $20,000 in student loan debt for millions of Americans. In fact, nearly 20 million people will be eligible to have their debt fully canceled under the new plan. He also extended the federal student loan payment pause through December 31, 2022 (payments resume in January).

However, the loan forgiveness element does not apply to private student loan borrowers who account for an estimated 8% of total outstanding student loan debt in the U.S., according to a 2021 report from MeasureOne. If you fall within this category, then you may want to consider exploring some other ways to save money such as a student loan refinance. See what private lenders have to offer.

For those who are federal student loan borrowers, here's how you can apply for debt relief.

Who can apply for Biden's student loan forgiveness plan?

Before you even worry about applying for student loan forgiveness under the Biden administration's new plan, you'll need to make sure you actually qualify. Here are the criteria you need to meet.

  • You're a current federal student loan holder
  • You earn less than $125,000 a year or your household earns less than $250,000 a year
  • You're a Pell Grant recipient with loans held by the Department of Education (this is required for additional forgiveness)

If none of the above applies to you or you have a private student loan, then make sure to review what private loan lenders have to offer. A student loan refinance, which essentially means replacing your existing loan with another loan with a potentially more favorable interest rate, is a good option if you're looking to save money long-term. Here's how you can get started.

How to submit Biden's student loan forgiveness application

screen-shot-2022-10-17-at-4-13-37-pm.png
Apply now for student loan forgiveness under President Biden's new plan on the Department of Education website. Screenshot/Department of Education

If you check the above boxes, then you are likely eligible for student loan forgiveness under this new plan. Just note that your relief will be capped at the amount outstanding (so you won't get to pocket any extra money if you have less than $10,000 in federal student debt). 

Now that you know you meet the qualifications, you can submit an application through the Department of Education, which will outline the exact steps you need to take. You will likely need to demonstrate that you meet the above income threshold and have federal student loan debt, so make sure to gather the appropriate documents and have them when applying.

Qualifying borrowers are being advised to apply prior to November 15, 2022 "in order to receive relief before the payment pause expires on December 31, 2022." But, you'll have plenty of time. The deadline to apply is December 31, 2023. 

The White House said in a statement that 8 million borrowers may be able to automatically get relief because their financial records and income data are already available to the Department of Education.

"Thanks to the American Rescue Plan, this debt relief will not be treated as taxable income for federal income tax purposes," the White House added.

Student loan forgiveness FAQs

Following Mr. Biden's student loan forgiveness announcement, searches on Google spiked — and the Federal Student Aid received an overwhelming volume of traffic that caused some site delays. So, here are some frequently asked questions related to the news.

What is a Pell Grant?

While researching the Biden administration's student loan forgiveness plan, you'll come across the term "Pell Grant" a lot. A Pell Grant is a form of financial aid you may be rewarded based on your financial needs, which are determined by the Department of Education during the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application process

Your expected income, student status, school-related expenses and more are taken into account. Additionally, your school has to be enrolled in the program. Make sure to contact your school's financial aid office if you'd like more details.

This type of financial aid, which doesn't usually need to be paid back, is reserved for undergraduate students "who display exceptional financial need and have not earned a bachelor's, graduate, or professional degree," according to Federal Student Aid.

The maximum Pell Grant award for the 2022-23 school year was just under $7,000, Federal Student Aid states on its website.

"Since 1980, the total cost of both four-year public and four-year private college has nearly tripled, even after accounting for inflation. Federal support has not kept up: Pell Grants once covered nearly 80 percent of the cost of a four-year public college degree for students from working families, but now only cover a third. That has left many students from low- and middle-income families with no choice but to borrow if they want to get a degree," the White House said as they announced their decision on student loan forgiveness, noting that Department of Education data shows undergraduate student on average leave school with nearly $25,000 in debt.

Will the student loan payment pause be extended again?

As mentioned, the "final" freeze on student loan payments was extended through December 31, 2022.

"While the economy continues to improve, COVID cases remain at an elevated level, and the President has made clear that pandemic-related relief should be phased out responsibly so that people do not suffer unnecessary financial harm," the Department of Education said in a news release.

Are there any other student loan forgiveness programs?

For those interested in student loan forgiveness, you may want to review the other programs available.

  • Teacher Loan Forgiveness: Check the American Federation of Teachers' website to get a list of loan forgiveness and other financial assistance opportunities. Generally, you need to be a full-time teacher who has worked five complete and consecutive years in certain low-income schools. You may also receive extra credits with this limited-time waiver available until the end of October. 
  • Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): You can qualify for a PSLF loan if you're a full-time employee of a federal, state, local or tribal government or a non-profit organization that has Direct Loans, repay using a certain income-driven repayment plan and you've made 120 qualifying payments.  
  • Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) Plans: The Department of Education is creating new rules involving income-driven repayment plans, which allow borrowers to set loan payments based on what they can afford (based on nondiscretionary income). After a certain time or number of payments, loans may be forgiven (learn more about the new rules).
  • Military Service: There are forgiveness opportunities for active military members and veterans. Military.com lists the different financial aid opportunities and assistance available. 
  • Volunteer Work: Volunteer organizations such as AmeriCorps and the Peace Corps may have forgiveness offerings.

Federal Student Aid lists more specific criteria and details you need to know to apply to each.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 08:52:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/student-loan-forgiveness-application-biden-relief-plan/
Killexams : How to apply for student loan forgiveness right now
Loan forgiveness is shown using the text
You can now officially apply for student loan forgiveness under Biden's new plan. Getty Images/iStockphoto

Student loan forgiveness applications are officially open after the U.S. Department of Education ran a weekend-long beta test to ensure a smooth process before launch. 

"It's easy, simple and fast -- and it's a new day for millions of Americans all across our nation," said President Biden on Monday as he announced that the student loan forgiveness application is now available.

President Biden announced in August that he's canceling up to $20,000 in student loan debt for millions of Americans. In fact, nearly 20 million people will be eligible to have their debt fully canceled under the new plan. He also extended the federal student loan payment pause through December 31, 2022 (payments resume in January).

However, the loan forgiveness element does not apply to private student loan borrowers who account for an estimated 8% of total outstanding student loan debt in the U.S., according to a 2021 report from MeasureOne. If you fall within this category, then you may want to consider exploring some other ways to save money such as a student loan refinance. See what private lenders have to offer.

For those who are federal student loan borrowers, here's how you can apply for debt relief.

Who can apply for Biden's student loan forgiveness plan?

Before you even worry about applying for student loan forgiveness under the Biden administration's new plan, you'll need to make sure you actually qualify. Here are the criteria you need to meet.

  • You're a current federal student loan holder
  • You earn less than $125,000 a year or your household earns less than $250,000 a year
  • You're a Pell Grant recipient with loans held by the Department of Education (this is required for additional forgiveness)

If none of the above applies to you or you have a private student loan, then make sure to review what private loan lenders have to offer. A student loan refinance, which essentially means replacing your existing loan with another loan with a potentially more favorable interest rate, is a good option if you're looking to save money long-term. Here's how you can get started.

How to submit Biden's student loan forgiveness application

screen-shot-2022-10-17-at-4-13-37-pm.png
Apply now for student loan forgiveness under President Biden's new plan on the Department of Education website. Screenshot/Department of Education

If you check the above boxes, then you are likely eligible for student loan forgiveness under this new plan. Just note that your relief will be capped at the amount outstanding (so you won't get to pocket any extra money if you have less than $10,000 in federal student debt). 

Now that you know you meet the qualifications, you can submit an application through the Department of Education, which will outline the exact steps you need to take. You will likely need to demonstrate that you meet the above income threshold and have federal student loan debt, so make sure to gather the appropriate documents and have them when applying.

Qualifying borrowers are being advised to apply prior to November 15, 2022 "in order to receive relief before the payment pause expires on December 31, 2022." But, you'll have plenty of time. The deadline to apply is December 31, 2023. 

The White House said in a statement that 8 million borrowers may be able to automatically get relief because their financial records and income data are already available to the Department of Education.

"Thanks to the American Rescue Plan, this debt relief will not be treated as taxable income for federal income tax purposes," the White House added.

Student loan forgiveness FAQs

Following Mr. Biden's student loan forgiveness announcement, searches on Google spiked — and the Federal Student Aid received an overwhelming volume of traffic that caused some site delays. So, here are some frequently asked questions related to the news.

What is a Pell Grant?

While researching the Biden administration's student loan forgiveness plan, you'll come across the term "Pell Grant" a lot. A Pell Grant is a form of financial aid you may be rewarded based on your financial needs, which are determined by the Department of Education during the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application process

Your expected income, student status, school-related expenses and more are taken into account. Additionally, your school has to be enrolled in the program. Make sure to contact your school's financial aid office if you'd like more details.

This type of financial aid, which doesn't usually need to be paid back, is reserved for undergraduate students "who display exceptional financial need and have not earned a bachelor's, graduate, or professional degree," according to Federal Student Aid.

The maximum Pell Grant award for the 2022-23 school year was just under $7,000, Federal Student Aid states on its website.

"Since 1980, the total cost of both four-year public and four-year private college has nearly tripled, even after accounting for inflation. Federal support has not kept up: Pell Grants once covered nearly 80 percent of the cost of a four-year public college degree for students from working families, but now only cover a third. That has left many students from low- and middle-income families with no choice but to borrow if they want to get a degree," the White House said as they announced their decision on student loan forgiveness, noting that Department of Education data shows undergraduate student on average leave school with nearly $25,000 in debt.

Will the student loan payment pause be extended again?

As mentioned, the "final" freeze on student loan payments was extended through December 31, 2022.

"While the economy continues to improve, COVID cases remain at an elevated level, and the President has made clear that pandemic-related relief should be phased out responsibly so that people do not suffer unnecessary financial harm," the Department of Education said in a news release.

Are there any other student loan forgiveness programs?

For those interested in student loan forgiveness, you may want to review the other programs available.

  • Teacher Loan Forgiveness: Check the American Federation of Teachers' website to get a list of loan forgiveness and other financial assistance opportunities. Generally, you need to be a full-time teacher who has worked five complete and consecutive years in certain low-income schools. You may also receive extra credits with this limited-time waiver available until the end of October. 
  • Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): You can qualify for a PSLF loan if you're a full-time employee of a federal, state, local or tribal government or a non-profit organization that has Direct Loans, repay using a certain income-driven repayment plan and you've made 120 qualifying payments.  
  • Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) Plans: The Department of Education is creating new rules involving income-driven repayment plans, which allow borrowers to set loan payments based on what they can afford (based on nondiscretionary income). After a certain time or number of payments, loans may be forgiven (learn more about the new rules).
  • Military Service: There are forgiveness opportunities for active military members and veterans. Military.com lists the different financial aid opportunities and assistance available. 
  • Volunteer Work: Volunteer organizations such as AmeriCorps and the Peace Corps may have forgiveness offerings.

Federal Student Aid lists more specific criteria and details you need to know to apply to each.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 08:12:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/miami/news/student-loan-forgiveness-application-biden-relief-plan/
Killexams : What's New on the 2023-2024 FAFSA No result found, try new keyword!student can inform financial aid offices directly about changes to their financial situations. Colleges then use professional judgment case by case to determine adjustments to the expected family ... Fri, 14 Oct 2022 14:30:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/articles/what's-new-on-the-fafsa Killexams : AG Morgan Financial Advisors: Scholarship for Business Students Available Now

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

AG Morgan Financial Advisors: Scholarship for Business Students Available Now

Oct 12, 2022 (PRNewswire via COMTEX) -- PR Newswire

NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2022

NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The AG Morgan Financial Advisors Scholarship for Business Students is a scholarship available for business students who live in the US. The scholarship is available for all business students in the US studying on the road to becoming future financial professionals in the future. Those who are enrolled in an accredited university undertaking a business course can apply for the scholarship; students who are in high school and would like to study a business course at a university can also apply. AG Morgan Financial Advisors are offering $1,000 in funds for the most deserving business student. The scholarship will be offered based on an essay competition. By offering their scholarship, the firm hopes that it will provide a little relief for a star student and generate awareness for more funding to become available.

A.G. Morgan Financial Advisors would like to reward the most deserving student with a scholarship as a way of easing the student's financial burden. They are also hoping that the scholarship will also raise awareness to the issues that financial students face on the road to becoming financial professionals. They hope that their scholarship will further open more opportunities for more business students to get the help that they deserve. All eligible students are advised to take this opportunity to apply for the scholarship as a way of earning money for their tuition fees.

AG Morgan Financial Advisors is the firm behind the scholarship for business students. The firm is focused on helping people achieve their financial goals. They are known for their financial and wealth planning expertise. Through A.G. Morgan Financial Advisors, many people have managed to define their financial goals. The firm has financial advisors who are dedicated to helping people take care of their families. They acknowledge that education is a very important aspect of becoming successful in the business and financial industry. That is one reason why they are now rewarding the most deserving student with a scholarship to assist with their tuition fees. Students who are eligible for the scholarship should visit A.G. Morgan's financial advisor's official scholarship page for details and submit their application.

Website: https://agmorganscholarship.com

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ag-morgan-financial-advisors-scholarship-for-business-students-available-now-301647843.html

SOURCE AG Morgan Scholarship

COMTEX_416489885/2454/2022-10-12T15:38:29

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Wed, 12 Oct 2022 07:38:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/ag-morgan-financial-advisors-scholarship-for-business-students-available-now-2022-10-12
Killexams : A.G. Morgan Financial Advisors Scholarship for Finance Professionals Still Open for Applications

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Oct 13, 2022 (IssueWire via Comtex) -- New York City, New York Oct 12, 2022 (Issuewire.com) - The AG Morgan Scholarship for Finance Professionals is a scholarship being offered by AG Morgan Financial Advisors. The scholarship is open to students residing in the United States with the dream to become entrepreneurs in the future. The scholarship is available for university students studying on the road to securing a career in the business industry. Students in high school who will attend a university and study a business course are also welcome to apply. The scholarship will be awarded to one lucky student to lessen their financial burden. A.G. Morgan Financial Advisors are offering a scholarship of $1,000 to the most deserving student.

Education plays a very important role in the business world. Education does not only sharpen your skills but also guides you on better ways to solve problems and handle business matters. It can be frustrating to navigate the financial and business industry without the right knowledge. Although many students dare to dream about becoming entrepreneurs and business professionals, a number are not privileged enough to get the required education and knowledge. This is because higher education has become too expensive and not all students are financially stable to afford it. Students are forced to work part-time or full-time to earn some money for their education. The saddest part is that some talented students are forced to give up on their dreams by settling for blue-collar jobs. Those who decide to start a business without the right education and knowledge may end up making many mistakes on the way.

AG Morgan Financial Advisors has a team with first-hand experience and information on how hard it can be for students studying on the road to becoming future entrepreneurs and financial professionals. The A.G. Morgan team is grateful for their educational opportunities and would like to give back to the community by offering their scholarship for business to the most deserving future business professionals. All eligible students are encouraged to apply for the scholarship since it is a great opportunity for them to earn money for their tuition. Apart from just giving back to the community, the A.G. Morgan team hopes that through their scholarship, more opportunities will open up. They also hope to raise awareness of the difficulties that students studying on the road to becoming future entrepreneurs face.

AG Morgan Financial Advisors have been helping families and individuals with financial services. The team is known for its financial planning expertise. The firm has been operating for many years and has financial advisors who are experts in what they do with 20+ years of success and experience. The team provides personalized financial services intending to help as many people in need. The team has a great track record and has earned itself a commendable reputation. They know how vital it is for entrepreneurs to get the required education and knowledge; that is the number one reason why they are now offering their scholarships to star financial students. If you are eligible for the scholarship, visit A.G Morgan Financial Advisor's official website to apply.

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Wed, 12 Oct 2022 18:56:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/ag-morgan-financial-advisors-scholarship-for-finance-professionals-still-open-for-applications-2022-10-13
Killexams : What Med Students Need to Know About Money to Avoid Financial Mistakes

For 10 weeks each spring, fourth-year medical students at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) gather for 2 hours on Monday evenings to talk all things money, from mutual funds and trusts to student loan repayment and contract pitfalls.

Jason Mizell, MD

The Business of Medicine (BOM) course began in 2012, and was initially offered only to surgery residents, says Jason Mizell, MD, a professor of surgery at UAMS and director of the BOM program. But given its popularity, the two-credit elective expanded to fourth-year medical students in 2015 and has grown steadily.

"About two-thirds of the med school class attend; this past year, we had about 120 residents sign up for the class as well," Mizell says. "Any given week, I have roughly 200 to 250 attendees."

Tyler Olson, a financial planner who works closely with attendings, says despite the efforts of financial aid offices, "students don't understand loan management and are really scared of making major mistakes with their loans and putting themselves into a difficult spot when transitioning from graduation to residency."

Students are frequently unprepared to pay fourth-year expenses, including moving costs and application and interview fees, and are given incorrect advice by school staff who "have just enough knowledge to be dangerous," says Olson, who advises medical students on Twitter. He cited instances in which schools instructed students to refinance their loans, not understanding that doing so permanently removes the possibility for public service loan forgiveness.

"If students could just have access to the right information and the opportunity to focus for a couple of hours and make decisions, it would make a significant difference" and lessen the likelihood that their "financial concerns become debilitating to their mental health, personal relationships, and a distraction from their training," Olson says.

Although medical school isn't a time when students are typically flush with cash and assets, it is a prime time to provide them with the tools to make prudent financial decisions in their personal and professional lives, says Mizell.

The Medscape Medical Student Lifestyle Report 2022 found that medical students want to become more financially savvy in the business of medicine, including debt management, running a practice, negotiating contracts, and investing — a sign that medical schools may not cover these subjects sufficiently or at all.

As part of the UAMS course, Mizell invites guest speakers to share real-world scenarios and advice on becoming financially independent, finding side gigs, and managing burnout. Past guests have included James Dahle, MD, founder of The White Coat Investor; Nisha Mehta, MD, founder of Physician Side Gigs; and Jimmy Turner, MD, owner of The Physician Philosopher.

Mizell also created an Honors in Finance track with a curriculum that spans the 4 years of medical school. Each year, students must read certain websites and books, complete small projects, and meet with a mentor. They also take the BOM course twice, once as first-year students and then again during their fourth year.

Reaching students early is imperative, he says, before they make "big mistakes" by taking out the full allotment of student loans, paying out of pocket for health insurance — in Arkansas, medical students often qualify for Medicaid — or purchasing an expensive car in anticipation of the "big fat salary" awaiting them after graduation.

"It's much more intensive than a 1-hour exit interview at the end of medical school," says Mizell. He pointed to similar courses for medical students recently launched at Wake Forest and the University of Wisconsin, for which he provided input.

Finance Guidance Varies Widely

Though medical schools are not required to provide extensive financial literacy education, accrediting bodies for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) require member schools to provide financial aid and debt management counseling.

Julie Fresne

But because financial aid offices have varying levels of resources, counseling plays out differently at each location, says Julie Fresne, senior director of student financial and career advising services at AAMC. For example, some administrators may have students complete entrance and exit counseling through the Department of Education's online portal, whereas others add one-on-one meetings with students, she says.

To supplement the schools' efforts, AAMC conducts on-site sessions on debt management, particularly in the spring for graduating classes and in the fall for incoming medical students.

The association has also developed a robust collection of videos, articles, and calculators that address key money topics, she adds. Through a exact partnership with AAMC, AACOM reported that these same reference materials are also available to their member schools.

Specifically, AAMC's FIRST program is an online repository offering medical guidance on money management and student loan repayment. An accompanying web-based program, AAMC Financial Wellness, provides various tools and modules to help students form a budget, manage credit, purchase insurance, and buy a home or car.

The use of AAMC resources varies widely among schools. Fresne says some administrators use the platform to create their own financial literacy programs, and some assign or suggest only specific components for student completion. As for anything more intensive, Fresne says she "would be surprised to see a semester-long [financial literacy] course or elective in medical school because the challenge would be they can't fit it into the curriculum."

Diana Sanders, EdD

First-year medical students at Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (OSU-COM) are introduced to the AAMC modules at orientation and encouraged to fill out a budget sheet, says Diana Sanders, EdD, director of financial aid at the university and vice chair of the Council of Student Financial Aid Administrators at AACOM.

Neither the modules nor the budget sheet is mandatory, and the number of students who create AAMC accounts, a must to access the modules, is very low, she says. Still, "the earlier we can touch base about what the financial burden is going to look like, the better."

In September, first- and second-year students at OSU-COM must attend a presentation by a certified financial planner, who discusses the basics of budgeting, borrowing, loan repayment, and any other money-related questions.

Subsequently, the financial aid office hosts mandatory informational sessions during transition and didactic weeks for third- and fourth-year students.

Sanders says these frequent reminders have lowered the average debt at graduation from $194,000 to $161,000.

Six years ago, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine in Scranton, Pennsylvania, implemented a new financial literacy curriculum requiring students to attend two financial aid sessions each year. And like OSU-COM, Geisinger encourages students to take advantage of other "highly suggested" resources, such as AAMC webinars, monthly podcasts, and pop-up events on campus, says Suzanne McNamara, director of financial aid at the school.

"We initially thought that our elective sessions would not yield the same participation rate, but our most popular sessions, customized loan portfolio review and loan repayment strategy, have an 85-90% attendance rate," she says.

As is common with many schools and in line with accreditation standards, the Geisinger financial literacy curriculum centers on debt management and repayment, as do financial education initiatives at Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine (ICOM).

"[Our] sessions tend to focus on financing your medical school education, budgeting, identity theft, credit information and scores, repayment strategies, and what to consider about refinancing" loans, says Nicole McMillan, director of financial aid at the university.

"Financial aid professionals don't usually provide guidance or advice outside of financial aid topics." However, she says some schools employ a financial planner, and ICOM's financial aid office encourages students to seek specialized advice elsewhere.

Financial Literacy Integral to Wellness

Mizell acknowledges that it can be challenging to find faculty to lead a comprehensive financial literacy course and attract nonbiased guest speakers without an agenda. However, he says a school's reluctance to offer a dedicated course shows "a disconnect from wellness and from what the students are really freaking out about" — money.

"Other disciplines, like nursing and pharmacy, have a much more rigorous curriculum component that teaches billing, coding, and reimbursement. Now that reimbursement is being cut, doctors aren't going to make as much money, and they need to be smart with it," but medical schools haven't updated curricula to reflect that shift, says Mizell.

Brianne Howerton

Brianne Howerton is a fourth-year student at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) Bradenton, Florida, campus, who says she's had limited exposure to billing and sees it as a "major point to learn" and something there "could never be too much" of. So far, LECOM's curriculum has yet to delve into the financial implications and potential benefits of pursuing various practice models, critical aspects students should consider, says Howerton.

Ideally, medical schools would provide more "readily available resources" and explore money management beyond "basically anything more than 'the federal government gave you this money, use it wisely, and don't use it for unnecessary things,'" she says.

Howerton welcomes detailed discussions and hands-on activities around first-year budgeting, planning for ERAS fees and hidden expenses, investing, loan forgiveness options, and how to evaluate employee benefits during interview season. Combined with students' willingness to ask questions and be engaged in the process, expanded financial literacy education would help set graduates up for a successful practice, she says.

Mikaila Calcagni, MD, is a product of financial literacy training. She took Mizell's BOM course in 2018 and credits it with her ability to become debt free just 3 years after graduation.

"I was able to start my career and actually make money," she says. "Too often, students are 'sold' the idea that you can easily get a loan and all you have to do is simply pay it off," but she says they are never taught the ins and outs of finances to make that happen.

The short time investment in the course has yielded an "exponential" return, and elicited "genuine excitement" from attendings, says Calcagni. "They all wanted to know more about it and what I had learned. It was eye-opening to see that this course was changing my future and simultaneously breaking the decades-long cycle of physicians not being taught basic financial literacy."

Steph Weber is a Midwest-based freelance journalist specializing in healthcare and law.

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Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981315
Killexams : Security Risk Advisors sponsors scholarships for ‘red team’ cybersecurity students

Security Risk Advisors, a cybersecurity consulting firm, is sponsoring $125,000 in scholarships for RIT students interested in “red team” cybersecurity, also known as offensive security.

Security Risk Advisors (SRA) has committed to annually sponsoring $25,000 in scholarships for the next five years. Each year, four students will be awarded the $5,000 “SRA RITSEC Red Team Scholarship.” An additional $5,000 per year will be provided for selected students to pay for a premier red team certification.

The inaugural scholarship recipients include:

  • Michael Vaughan, a fourth-year computing security BS/MS major
  • Spencer Roth, a fourth-year computing security BS/MS major
  • Anthony Iopollo, a third-year computing security BS/MS major
  • Mohammad Eshan, a fourth-year computing security BS/MS major

RIT students seeking eligibility for upcoming scholarships must maintain a 3.0 GPA and will have their financial needs considered in evaluation.

In cybersecurity, offensive and defensive security are defined by color-coded teams. Red and blue team exercises fulfill an important role in how businesses and organizations defend against advanced cyberattacks.

Red teams are experts in attacking systems and breaking into defenses. Blue teams are responsible for maintaining internal network defenses against all cyberattacks and threats. In the exercises, red teams will actually plan and simulate attacks against blue teams, in order to test the effectiveness of a network’s security. Coordinating between red and blue teams, often referred to as a purple teaming, ensures strong defenses, while helping keep view of evolving threats.

RIT is nationally recognized for its computing security undergraduate and graduate degrees, having been designated as National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education and in Research by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security. At the university, students have the opportunity to practice red team security as part of the cybersecurity club RITSEC and through competitions. RIT is the founder of the Collegiate Penetration Testing Competition (CPTC), which is the premier ethical hacking competition for college students.

Security Risk Advisors delivers technology security services and provides cybersecurity expertise to Fortune and Global 1,000 companies. SRA is industry-known for their development of cybersecurity tools such as VECTR and world-class purple teams. SRA is committed to training the next generation of cyber professionals, and that support goes beyond hiring and mentoring teammates. The company has offices in Philadelphia; Rochester, N.Y.; and Kilkenny, Ireland.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 02:11:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.rit.edu/news/security-risk-advisors-sponsors-scholarships-red-team-cybersecurity-students
Killexams : Auburn University's Integrated Financial Leadership Program leads the way in student success

AUBURN, Ala., Oct. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Integrated Financial Leadership Program, or IFLP, at Auburn University's Harbert College of Business is leading the way in producing some of the very best financial students in the world.

The Integrated Financial Leadership Program at Auburn University’s Harbert College of Business is leading the way in producing some of the very best financial students in the world. Student accomplishments include the extraordinary record of the Financial Management Association chapter, which secured top international honors at the 2022 Kroll One Team Challenge for the second straight year. The team has taken the national title for the past three years.

The accomplishments of Auburn's IFLP students include the extraordinary record of the university's chapter of the Financial Management Association, or FMA, which secured top international honors at the 2022 Kroll One Team Challenge for the second straight year in May in London (the team has taken the national title for the past three years). This prestigious international contest pits teams from hundreds of colleges representing some of the highest-ranked programs in business education in the world who square off to conduct an analysis of a hypothetical company, establish a valuation and then develop a business strategy.

Since its inception in 2014, Auburn's FMA has been recognized as the premiere organization for preparing students for elite finance careers through professional development, industry exposure and alumni engagement. The exclusive student honor society in the Harbert College of Business consistently helps place Harbert graduates into some of the nation's top investment banking firms, including Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Truist, Wells Fargo and Regions, among others.

Auburn's fifth-annual FMA Summit took place on Sept. 30, and will include keynotes, breakout sessions, panel discussions, a rooftop reception overlooking the Auburn campus and the Summit Tailgate. But the Auburn FMA's leadership in finance is just one of the components of the IFLP program that demonstrate how uniquely valuable this flagship initiative has become.

Real-World Investment Experience Matters, Too

The Auburn Student Investment Fund, or ASIF, within the IFLP works to foster members' interests in financial markets to help students develop investment analysis skills while instilling in each member the high standards of Wall Street investment ethics. ASIF members utilize Bloomberg terminals, SEC filings, current news and private equity research to analyze and manage their now $530,000 fund's investments in equities and other investment vehicles.

A Tradition Continues

Another highlight is the exact $3.2 million expansion of the Harbert Investment Center, a world-class, finance student-oriented center equipped with 12 Bloomberg terminals, a training center and collaboration spaces designed to accommodate a wide range of educational and professional development resources and services.

The lab itself began in 2007 thanks to Raymond J. Harbert's first gift to Auburn's College of Business, well before his landmark endowment that resulted in the school being named The Raymond J. Harbert College of Business in 2013. That initial investment has since been expanded by donations of time, energy and financial resources from Harbert and numerous other alumni, business partners and even students themselves over the years.

Joe Hanna, Regions Bank Professor and interim dean at Harbert, noted all the people who help make these initiatives possible.

"We are grateful for the vision of Raymond Harbert and all the others whose commitment and financial support have been so critical to the success of the Financial Lab and the IFLP, which includes both FMA and the ASIF. These entities have become the pillars of undergraduate and post-graduate finance education at the Harbert College of Business today," said Hanna.

Hanna also pointed to the students, faculty, alumni and business partners responsible for the IFLP's success.

"The Integrated Financial Leadership Program at Auburn represents the very best we have to offer our students and business partners who support our mission," said Hanna. "While success requires many contributions, I'd like to specifically acknowledge Tracy Richard, a faculty member in Harbert's Department of Finance, for her extraordinary leadership in helping to establish and build the IFLP into what it is today."

Richard concurred that Harbert finance students are making an impact: "On the world stage, not only are we winning competitions year after year, but we're also placing our students into career opportunities at some of the top investment banks on Wall Street. I couldn't be more excited about that."

Nick Iannone, a junior in finance at Harbert and leader of this year's winning FMA team, put the value of the IFLP, the FMA and recently expanded Financial Lab facilities of the Harbert Investment Center this way:

"The 'secret' to Harbert's unprecedented record of success in international competitions and in securing promising positions at premier financial institutions is two-fold:

  1. The willingness of all team members to go above and beyond.

  2. The tremendous, virtually unlimited support we are blessed with here at Auburn."

(PRNewsfoto/Auburn University)

Cision

View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/auburn-universitys-integrated-financial-leadership-program-leads-the-way-in-student-success-301639491.html

SOURCE Auburn University

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 01:05:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/auburn-universitys-integrated-financial-leadership-210900683.html
Killexams : In Business: Blaine-based credit union merges with Magnifi Financial Credit Union

Mangifi Financial Credit Union has merged with Financial One Credit Union.

Combined, Magnifi and Financial One has nearly $2 billion in assets, 25 branch locations across Minnesota and will operate under Magnifi's name, Magnifi said in a press release. Through the merger, Magnifi Financial will have a stronger presence in the greater Twin Cities area.

President/CEO of Financial One Ross Bloomquist is serving as Magnifi's Chief Experience Officer following the merger.

St. Cloud State University partners with CentraCare for athletes' sports medicine services

St. Cloud State University Athletics has chosen CentraCare M Physicians Orthopedics as its provider for athlete care.

CentraCare will provide sports medicine services, including mental health services, to SCSU athletes, SCSU and CentraCare said in a press release. CentraCare M Physicians started its services for SCSU with the beginning of the fall sports season.

“These new services are a game changer," SCSU Interim Director of Athletics Holly Schreiner said in the release. "What CentraCare is bringing to the table with their wide range of services will allow us to better serve our student-athlete population.”

Premier Marine opens new Big Lake headquarters

Pontoon manufacturer Premier Marine has opened its new corporate offices and manufacturing headquarters in Big Lake.

The 150,000-square-foot building took approximately 10 months to complete and has the ability to produce up to 5,000 boats every year, according to Premier Marine.

More:Minnesota pontoon company Premier Marine is moving its headquarters to Big Lake

Premier Marine is a 30-year-old company that was originally headquartered in Wyoming, Minnesota. 

Stearns County employee wins statewide emergency management award

Stearns County Emergency Management Specialist Kristen Tschida was recognized with the Association of Minnesota Emergency Management President's Award in September.

Tschida has served as the AMEM Professional Development Chair for a few years and was recognized due to her contributions through this role, including helping roll out a new Peer Support Network and generally raising the visibility of AMEM's work, according to the association.

Nahan and employees recognized with regional awards

Nahan and a handful of its team members have been recognized by a regional trade association.

The direct marketing and printing company received several awards from Printing Industry Midwest, including three awards of recognition for C-4 product catalogs and a catalog certificate of merit for a W-4 direct mail campaign.

Senior Marketing Strategist Camille Lehmann won Marketing Professional of the Year and Senior Account Manager Amanda Thompson won Customer Service Professional of the Year. Several other employees had been nominated for awards.

This article originally appeared on St. Cloud Times: In Business: Blaine-based credit union merges with Magnifi Financial Credit Union

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 22:33:21 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/other/in-business-blaine-based-credit-union-merges-with-magnifi-financial-credit-union/ar-AA13390M
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