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Killexams : CA-Technologies Administrator information search - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CAT-380 Search results Killexams : CA-Technologies Administrator information search - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CAT-380 https://killexams.com/exam_list/CA-Technologies Killexams : California Gov. Newsom Names Deputy CIO, Several Tech Leaders
Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday filled a key opening in state technology leadership with the appointment of a new deputy state chief information officer.

A veteran of more than 20 years’ service in state government, Jared C. Johnson, will hold the dual role of deputy state CIO and chief deputy director of the California Department of Technology.

Johnson, 46, joins a leadership team led by state CIO and CDT Director Liana Bailey-Crimmins. He succeeds Russ Nichols, who retired in November after serving as deputy state CIO and acting state CIO before Bailey-Crimmins’ appointment in June. Nichols was the award-winning agency chief information officer for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation before his elevation to the CDT role in March 2021.


Johnson had served as deputy director of CDT’s Data Center Support Services since 2021. Previously, he held several positions at the California Franchise Tax Board from 2005 to 2021, including as director of the Operations Management Bureau, section manager for IT Service Support and Data Processing Services, senior manager of the Data Processing Services Section, manager of the Command Center, and lead for eService Infrastructure Support.

Johnson was supervisor of the IT Business and Support Services Unit at the Department of Pesticide Regulation from 2003 to 2005. He was a system test analyst on the INC Project at the California Franchise Tax Board from 2005 to 2006. Before that, he was an IT analyst for what was then the California Technology, Trade and Commerce Agency from 1999 to 2003.

The appointment does not require Senate confirmation, and the annual salary is $198,000.


In addition to Johnson’s promotion, Newsom’s office also announced appointments in the California Government Operations Agency (GovOps), CDT’s parent organization:
  • Christina Spagnoli, 41, of Fair Oaks has been appointed senior adviser at GovOps, where she has served as deputy secretary of legislation since 2019. Spagnoli was vice president of State Government Relations at the California Bankers Association from 2018 to 2019. She was capitol director for Assemblymember Blanca Rubio from 2016 to 2018, chief lobbyist and legislative director for Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California from 2014 to 2016, and legislative director in the office of Assembly Majority Whip Jimmy Gomez from 2013 to 2014. She held several other legislative roles before that.
  • Luis Larios, 32, of Sacramento has been appointed GovOps’ deputy secretary of Legislation and External Affairs after serving as a deputy appointments secretary for Newsom since 2020. He was a senior assistant to Assemblymember Miguel Santiago from 2019 to 2020 and a legislative aide for Assemblymember Mike Gipson from 2017 to 2019, in addition to several previous legislative roles.
  • Sergio Gutierrez, 47, of Wilton has been appointed chief deputy director in the Office of Data and Innovation (ODI). Gutierrez had been agency chief information officer at the California Environmental Protection Agency since 2010 and acting deputy director and CIO at the California Department of Toxic Substances Control from 2012 to 2013. Before that, Gutierrez was chief of the Statewide Network Support Bureau at the California Department of Insurance from 2007 to 2010, among other previous roles.
  • Kimberly Hicks, 40, of Fairfax has been appointed deputy director of Advanced Analytics and Evaluation for ODI. Hicks has served on the math faculty at the City College of San Francisco since 2022 and has been a data scientist at Marin Data Science Consultants and the city and county of San Francisco. Hicks worked in the private sector before her work in government.

This article was originally published by Industry Insider-California, Government Technology's sister publication.

Dennis Noone is the managing editor of Techwire.

Fri, 02 Dec 2022 08:53:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.govtech.com/workforce/california-gov-newsom-names-deputy-cio-several-tech-leaders
Killexams : Can big data save the ocean? © Provided by The Hill

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the National Marine Sanctuaries, a crowning conservation achievement akin to National Parks. Places with this designation protect 620,000 square miles of beautiful and diverse ocean and Great Lakes habitats for future generations. By protecting ecosystems and sustainable fisheries, as well as promoting tourism and recreational opportunities, the sanctuaries and other coastal habitats contribute $160 billion to the $373 billion blue economy, according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimates. Sanctuary managers are turning to new information technology to identify emerging threats to ocean life caused by the absorption of excess heat and carbon dioxide produced by human industrial activity.

From 2014-2015, a massive marine heat wave, dubbed “the blob,” developed in the Gulf of Alaska and spread down the West Coast triggering a cascade of harmful events from Washington to Southern California. Higher ocean temperatures can stress ecosystems by decreasing marine productivity and oxygen levels and disrupting the balance of microscopic algal species, called phytoplankton, to favor harmful species. Some toxic algae produce high levels of a neurotoxin that accumulates in the marine food chain — including important shellfish species such as mussels, clams and crabs — and poisons shellfish-consuming marine mammals and humans.

The most severe harmful algal bloom (HAB) ever recorded in Monterey Bay and along the West Coast occurred in the aftermath of the blob and led to the closure of the West Coast Dungeness crab season, costing the fishery some $100 million. The marine heat wave also contributed to a 95 percent decline in coastal kelp forests in California and Oregon and the loss of countless seabirds, sea lions and whales.

The severity of the 2015 marine heat wave took the oceanographic community by surprise; no climate records or forecasts had predicted such a devastating event on the West Coast. Seven years on, fishery scientists and ecologists are still working to document and understand the long-term impacts of heat-laden waters on important and productive marine ecosystems and develop strategies to provide early-warning alerts and forecasts and to develop effective habitat restoration.

Monitoring marine life is difficult, as marine plants and animals are usually hidden from view below the ocean’s surface. Plankton, which feed ocean food webs and can cause harmful algal blooms, are microscopic and spread in three dimensions with the tides and currents. Whales and other marine mammals come to the surface to breathe, but can swim hundreds of miles in a day, making their detection a hit-or-miss affair. Sharks and turtles along with large, commercially valuable fish traverse ocean basins to feed and mate. Kelp forests canopies are visible on the surface, but life among the fronds and on the seafloor is typically hidden to all but the occasional scuba diver.

To meet this challenge, teams of engineers, oceanographers and biologists have been working on new and expanding technologies to document and study life in the changing ocean and advance our understanding of the ways that physical and biological systems interact. Autonomous observing systems have the potential to contribute to expansive biological datasets that are otherwise scant or unavailable to scientists and marine managers.

These new technologies include eDNA, which uses adapted genome technology to detect the molecular presence of species through fragments of DNA left in the water column. Like forensic scientists on the scene of a crime, autonomous eDNA sampling from a ship or robotic underwater vehicle can detect if whales have been nearby or whether an area is a biodiversity hotspot and worthy of becoming a marine sanctuary.

Another promising new tool is the Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a robotic microscope that photographs and counts individual phytoplankton cells and, using artificial intelligence similar to facial recognition software, identifies individual harmful and beneficial species in near real time. Other biological observing platforms deploy underwater cameras and ocean sound recordings, which can detect nearby fish schools and distant whales as well as tagged sharks and seals that carry a sensor package to record their movements and the physical environment they swim through. Data from these animal oceanographers is even being relayed by satellite to Improve daily weather forecasts.

This wealth of biological data is being added to a growing worldwide database of physical and geochemical observations. These data come from continuously operated buoys, ocean gliders and drones, ship-based data collection, cabled ocean-floor observatories and other environmental sensors. The devices record oceanographic and biogeochemical conditions in real time including temperature, salinity, currents, oxygen and dissolved carbon dioxide that can lead to harmful ocean acidification.

Like all “big data,” these observational datasets hold great promise for understanding complex systems and forecasting future scenarios. For marine scientists, this can mean the prediction of individual events, like a coming marine heat wave or harmful algal bloom, or the creeping impacts of warming ocean temperatures and ocean acidification on marine ecosystems and fisheries. But this emerging informational wealth is running a race against the growing use of and damage to ocean resources. Harnessing trillions of observations into actionable science and conservation depends on making datasets accessible, interoperable and translatable into visualizations, tools and forecasts that decision-makers, scientists and the public can use to change humanity’s relationship to the ocean and help us become more sustainable and responsible in our actions. Ocean data will be critical in determining optimum locations for offshore wind farms and measuring how wind turbines affect fisheries and ocean life.

Biological data can also help sanctuary managers monitor the effectiveness of ecosystem restoration, including the Northern California kelp forests. Scientists there are monitoring kelp canopies using satellites and drones as well as identifying refuge locations where divers can plant and protect kelp from over-predation, giving the forests an opportunity to grow and regain their former range. While continuing to monitor the ecosystem and environmental conditions by traditional methods, eDNA can detect the presence and relative abundances of predators and kelp-grazers and track the health of the underwater forest.

On both local and global scales, these maturing marine life observing capabilities will provide critical information to continue protecting and managing important marine resources and to find new ocean-based solutions to mitigate global environmental change.

Henry Ruhl, Ph.D., is director of the Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System (CeNCOOS), a regional association of the national Integrated Ocean Observing System. Ruhl is also an investigator in the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) and other related initiatives.

Mary K. Miller is a science and environment writer and emeritus program director for environmental science at the San Francisco Exploratorium. She works closely with the ocean observing and conservation communities in California and serves on the board of CeNCOOS and the Sanctuary Advisory Council for the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary.

For the latest news, weather, sports, and streaming video, head to The Hill.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 08:30:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/can-big-data-save-the-ocean/ar-AA151KWz
Killexams : Self-Driving Taxis Are Causing All Kinds of Trouble in San Francisco

When transit systems experience delays, the reason usually isn’t very interesting: congested streets, medical emergencies, mechanical problems. But the cause of a accurate holdup on San Francisco’s MUNI system at least had the virtue of being novel.

On Sept. 30 at around 11 p.m., an N Line streetcar ground to a halt at the intersection of Carl Street and Cole Street because an autonomous vehicle from Cruise, a subsidiary of General Motors, had halted on the streetcar tracks and wouldn’t budge. According to the city’s transportation department, the 140 passengers riding the N line that evening were stuck in place for seven minutes before a Cruise employee arrived and moved the driverless conveyance. (Cruise did not respond to questions about what happened that night.)

This incident, which was not reported in the media at the time, is one of many in which autonomous vehicles roaming San Francisco’s streets have disrupted the city’s transportation network. In April, a Cruise vehicle blocked a travel lane needed by a siren-blaring fire engine, delaying its arrival at a three-alarm fire. Last fall, dozens of self-driving cars from Google’s Waymo subsidiary drove daily into a quiet cul-de-sac before turning around, much to the frustration of nearby residents.

Because of California’s insufficient and outdated AV reporting requirements, many incidents like these have escaped both public attention and regulatory consequences. Facing minimal scrutiny, AV companies have little incentive to avoid mucking up the public right of way—or even keep city officials informed about what’s happening on their streets.

With Silicon Valley a few miles away, San Francisco has become the top urban location for AV testing and deployment. With California officials granting their first AV deployment permits allowing passenger service this year, the city now offers a preview of what’s to come in other places where self-driving companies are now fanning out, with expansions announced for Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Austin.

Based on San Francisco’s experience, residents and officials in those cities should brace for strange, disruptive, and dangerous happenings on their streets. And they should demand that state officials offer the protection that California is failing to provide.

After a decade of testing and hype, it suddenly felt this year as if self-driving cars were everywhere in San Francisco. While individuals—in California or anywhere else—can’t buy these vehicles for themselves, companies are competing to Improve the technology and roll out taxi services that resemble ride hail. In San Francisco, Cruise and Waymo allow residents to request a ride on their app, summoning a driverless vehicle that brings them to their destination. (Waymo transports passengers using safety drivers who can intervene if something goes wrong; Cruise does not.) Joining Cruise and Waymo robotaxis on San Francisco streets are testing vehicles from a number of other AV companies.

Two California agencies decide which autonomous companies have permission to operate within the state. The Department of Motor Vehicles issues permits for the vehicle itself (dozens of companies have obtained one), while the California Public Utilities Commission provides permits for passenger service. Earlier this year the CPUC issued Cruise and Waymo the state’s first robotaxi permits to transport paying passengers.

California requires that companies conducting AV testing submit information about collisions as well as “disengagements,” or moments when the autonomous system is forced to transfer driving responsibility to a human. The DMV publishes this information, along with each company’s total number of miles of autonomous driving on state roads. But AV executives—joined by some outside observers—have criticized disengagements as a deceptive metric, since it does not take into account the higher degree of difficulty navigating urban streets compared with interstates. Companies could also tinker with their disengagement data to seem safer than they are, something that the Chinese company AutoX has been accused of doing.

“It’s an open question whether or not disengagement data gives you anything useful,” said Billy Riggs, a professor at the University of San Francisco’s School of Management who has followed the state’s AV deployments closely. Even so, California’s regulatory focus on disengagements has powerfully shaped national media coverage of AV safety.

Strange as it may seem, California stops requiring that AV companies share disengagement data and collision locations as soon as they begin collecting passenger fares, as Waymo and Cruise now do. From that point forward, if an AV vehicle jeopardizes safety on the street—for instance, by causing a crash or blocking a transit line—the public won’t know unless the AV company chooses to publicize it (unlikely) or if a passerby reports the incident to 911 or posts about it on social media (unreliable).

Relaxing oversight for AVs with paying passengers might have seemed appropriate during the industry’s age of optimism several years ago, when policymakers could assume that companies would have “solved” autonomous driving before they started charging people for trips. If so, San Francisco’s experience shows that the reality is something else entirely.

Cities, for their part, play no defined role in the state’s AV regulatory structure, leaving them struggling to obtain information about AV-induced roadway blockages or even a list of companies deploying testing vehicles on their streets. Asked by email under what specific conditions Cruise notifies local leaders about an incident, spokesperson Hannah Lindow replied only that the company “maintains an open line of communication and meets regularly with city officials.”

A Cruise taxi on a test drive. Andrej Sokolow/picture alliance via Getty Images

Urban leaders anticipated these problems and tried to forestall them. In 2020 officials from Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego asked the CPUC “not [to] create a deployment program that would deliver participants blanket authority to operate a fared service anywhere in the State.” The CPUC rejected that request, which has hobbled cities’ ability to manage their streets.

There is an ominous precedent for this situation. When ride hail emerged a decade ago, Uber and Lyft lobbied, mostly successfully, for states rather than cities to oversee them. That preemption left urban leaders with few tools to control (or even monitor) ride hail, which researchers have found increases traffic congestion and reduces transit ridership. Early evidence suggests that an influx of AVs could create similar problems, but on a much larger scale.

It’s been less than a year since California granted its first AV deployment permits, but robotaxis have already caused a slew of problems in San Francisco. In April, a Cruise vehicle stopped by city police pulled over to the side of the street—and then promptly drove away from an officer who tried to look inside. (“Are you serious? How does that happen?” a baffled onlooker exclaimed.) In June, a phalanx of at least a dozen Cruise vehicles obstructed a city arterial. (“Oh no, they’re plotting,” someone quipped on Reddit.) According to city officials, 28 incidents involving Cruise were reported to 911 between May 29 and Sept. 5, including instances of vehicles driving on the sidewalk.

Cruise and other AV companies maintain a ”Critical Response Line” dedicated to handling emergencies, but no public data measure their responsiveness. Cruise does not include information about right-of-way blockages or response times in its self-written, 175-page “safety report.” Asked how quickly Cruise responds to an emergency involving one of its vehicles, Lindow, the company spokesperson, said Cruise is “striving to do so in 10 minutes or less.” She did not reply when asked how often it achieves that benchmark.

Cruise seems to cause the lion’s share of San Francisco’s AV headaches, but other companies have created problems too, such as the Waymo vehicles that constantly drove into the dead-end terminus of 15th Avenue, waking up the neighborhood.

Despite all the issues in San Francisco, California’s regulatory agencies have shown no signs of tightening or revising their oversight. Mark Rosekind, the former head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, or NHTSA, who now helms the nonprofit California Mobility Center, said authorities “should evolve their regulatory approach to reflect the current state of technology. What data are needed to effectively identify safety issues? That’s a conversation state officials should be having with AV companies and other stakeholders.”

In September, two San Francisco transportation departments took the unusual step of bringing their concerns about AV deployments—and Cruise in particular—directly to the federal government in a 39-page letter submitted to the NHTSA. The letter was prompted by General Motors’ request that NHTSA exempt Cruise’s new AV vehicle, the Origin, from federal vehicle safety rules. Although the city officials stated they neither “support nor oppose” GM’s request, accurate experiences have clearly given them pause. The letter highlighted Cruise’s patchy response to emergencies: “On one occasion on August 4, 2022, a City dispatcher placed four calls over six minutes [to Cruise’s emergency response line]; none of these calls were picked up.” Lindow did not respond when asked for comment on that allegation.

The National Association of City Transportation Officials, representing municipal transportation departments across North America, submitted its own letter to the NHTSA that flatly opposed GM’s request that the Cruise Origin receive an exemption from vehicle safety rules. (NHTSA has not yet made a decision.) Kate Fillin-Yeh, NACTO’s director of strategy, said urban transportation leaders nationwide are watching events unfold in San Francisco with growing concern. “I know that AV companies can make more money in cities because there is a density of people there,” she said, “but they’re unhelpful to the many people who rely on transit or walk.”

Indeed, beyond the wow factor of stepping inside a self-driving car, it’s unclear how exactly the introduction of robotaxis improves an urban transportation network. But the risks—including disruptions on public roadways, increased congestion, and reduced transit use—are very real.

Fillin-Yeh said her top request for federal and state policymakers is that they empower local leaders to monitor and manage AVs using their streets. “Cities need to be a part of these conversations about permitting and regulating AVs,” she said. “That isn’t always happening.”

In their letter to NHTSA, San Francisco officials proposed several ways to Improve AV oversight. They suggested that NHTSA treat “travel lane failures that block roadways” as a key measure of AV readiness, adding that NHTSA should also quantify and publicize AV companies’ response times to vehicle emergencies.

Riggs, the University of San Francisco professor, agreed on the need to evaluate AV companies’ emergency response times, adding that governments must be especially careful to protect so-called vulnerable road users. “We should be collecting autonomous vehicles’ near-misses with pedestrians and cyclists,” he said.

In an interview, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency director Jeffrey Tumlin insisted that his city’s goals do not conflict with those of AV companies. “It’s in the interest of both the city and the AV industry to minimize impacts to transit and emergency response time,” he said. “But the AV industry doesn’t work if all the vehicles are stuck in traffic congestion. And the industry doesn’t work if they lose all political support because they’re blocking transit and fire departments.”

Meanwhile, AV companies are turning their attention far beyond the Bay Area. accurate press releases have announced new AV deployments in cities across the West and Southwest. Waymo recently declared that it will begin operating in Los Angeles, and a Lyft/Motional partnership plans to launch there as well. (It already operates in Las Vegas.) Cruise, meanwhile, has opened a waitlist for new service in Austin, Texas, and Phoenix, and chief operating officer Gil West told Reuters, “You’ll likely see us expand the number of markets in a large number [in 2023].” (Southwestern states like Nevada, Texas, and Arizona generally have more laissez-faire approaches toward AV regulation than California does.)

Problems resembling those in San Francisco are already surfacing elsewhere. In November Waymo announced that its robotaxi service was available in downtown Phoenix; less than 10 days later, a passenger tweeted that her autonomous ride there “was smooth sailing until it got stuck in the middle of an intersection.”

With the demise of Argo.ai, an AV company that had received billions in investment, remaining companies face growing pressure to showcase their deployment capabilities to antsy investors. Such competition can be healthy—if it doesn’t sacrifice societal goals around safety, equity, and a balanced transportation network.

But the experience of San Francisco suggests that it very well could, which would undermine support for AVs writ large. After all, it’s difficult to see why Americans should embrace robotaxi services that block intersections, delay transit service, and slow emergency response times. And it’s even harder to understand why any state would repeat California’s mistake of allowing AV companies to provide robotaxi service without collecting and sharing information about all crashes, roadway obstructions, and incident response times. At the federal level, Congress’ interest in restricting states’ few AV management tools would be a step in precisely the wrong direction.

Unfortunately, that now seems to be where autonomous-vehicle regulation is: stuck in an intersection, like that Waymo car in Phoenix, with no one in the driver’s seat.

Lucas Peilert provided research assistance.

Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, New America, and Arizona State University that examines emerging technologies, public policy, and society.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 02:44:00 -0600 en text/html https://slate.com/technology/2022/12/san-francisco-waymo-cruise-self-driving-cars-robotaxis.html
Killexams : Report: California gun data breach was unintentional

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's Department of Justice mistakenly posted the names, addresses and birthdays of nearly 200,000 gun owners on the internet because officials didn't follow policies or understand how to operate their website, according to an investigation released Wednesday.

The investigation, conducted by an outside law firm hired by the California Department of Justice, found that personal information for 192,000 people was downloaded 2,734 times by 507 unique IP addresses during a roughly 12-hour period in late June. All of those people had applied for a permit to carry a concealed gun.

The data was exposed just days after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that people have a right to carry guns in public. The decision invalidated a California law that said people must deliver a reason for wanting to carry a concealed weapon, such as a threat to their safety. Lawmakers then tried to pass new restrictions for concealed carry permits, but failed.

Investigators said they “did not uncover any evidence that the timing of the (data breach) was driven by a nefarious intent or was personally or politically motivated in any way.” Instead, they said state officials planned to publish what they thought was anonymous data “to meet anticipated heightened public interest in firearms-related data” following the court ruling.

An intentional breach of personal information carries more stiff fines and penalties under California law, according to Chuck Michel, an attorney and president of the California Rifle & Pistol Association. He said the association is preparing a lawsuit against the state and is encouraging people impacted by the exposure to talk with an attorney about filing their own lawsuits.

Michel noted the leaked data likely included information from people in sensitive positions — including judges, law enforcement personnel and domestic violence victims — who had sought gun permits.

“There is a lot of gaps and unanswered questions, perhaps deliberately so, and some spin on this whole notion of whether this was an intentional release or not,” he said. “This is not the end of the inquiry.”

The Department of Justice contracted with the Morrison Foerster law firm to investigate the data exposure. The firm said it had “the mandate and autonomy to conduct an independent investigation that followed the facts and evidence wherever they led.”

Officials at the California Department of Justice did not know about the breach until someone sent Attorney General Rob Bonta a private message on Twitter that included screenshots of the personal information that was available to obtain from the state's website, the investigation said.

State officials at first thought the report was a hoax. Two unnamed employees — identified only as “Data Analyst 1” and “Research Center Director” — investigated and mistakenly assured everyone that no personal information was publicly available.

Meanwhile, the website crashed because so many people were trying to obtain the data. Another group of state officials worked to bring the website back online, unaware of the breach. They got the website working again at about 9:30 p.m.

State officials would not disable the website until about noon the next day. By then, the information had already been downloaded thousands of times.

State officials thought they were providing anonymous information in the aggregate for research and media requests about the use of guns in California. But the employee who created the website included several datasets that contained personal information.

Investigators found that no one — neither the employee who compiled the data nor the officials that supervised the employee — knew the proper security settings to prevent the data from being available for public download.

“This was more than an exposure of data, it was a breach of trust that falls far short of my expectations and the expectations Californians have of our department,” Bonta, the attorney general, said in a news release. “I remain deeply angered that this incident occurred and extend my deepest apologies on behalf of the Department of Justice to those who were affected.”

Other information was also mistakenly released, including data from firearms safety certificates, dealer record of sale and the state's assault weapons registry. That data included dates of birth, gender and driver's license numbers for more than 2 million people and 8.7 million gun transactions. But investigators said there wasn't enough information in those datasets to identify anyone.

Investigators recommended more training and planning for state officials, including a review and update of policies and procedures.

“This failure requires immediate correction, which is why we are implementing all of the recommendations from this independent report," Bonta said.

This story was first published on Nov. 30, 2022. It was updated on Dec. 1, 2022, to correct that the California Rifle & Pistol Association is preparing an individual lawsuit against the state, not a class action lawsuit.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 10:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://kdhnews.com/business/technology/report-california-gun-data-breach-was-unintentional/article_2b034c10-632b-5a9d-b129-d428f9635636.html
Killexams : 'Giga Fire' project aims to map all of California's wildfire fuels: 'This kind of information is critical'

Wildfire has always been a natural part of California's ecosystem. But a historical lack of forest management combined with climate change and human activity has contributed to larger and more destructive fires in accurate years.The biggest of those fires are called "giga fires," which burn at least 1 million acres. Fire officials also recently categorized any fire larger than 100,000 acres as a "megafire."In order to prevent the next big fire, Cal Fire is teaming up with the California Air Resources Board and a team of scientists at the University of Nevada at Reno. The goal is to optimize forest management programs through the "Giga Fire Project."Jonathan Greenberg is one of the lead researchers on the project at UNR. He said the name "Giga Fire" is a nod to the growing risk of major wildfires as well as the kinds of technology the project utilizes."We're bringing to bear a lot of advanced technologies including advanced modeling, machine learning, remote sensing — we are doing some field data in a 'big data' computational environment," Greenberg said.All of that big data is being used to make detailed maps of wildfire fuels throughout the state of California. That information is loaded into supercomputers, which use a trained artificial intelligence program to predict how all of those fuels may evolve over the next year, decade and even century.Erin Hanan is another lead scientist with the Giga Fire project. She said the models they create will allow scientists and land managers to explore a lot of "what ifs" that come up when planning controlled burns and other forest management strategies."We know the scale of treatments that are being done now. At what scale do we need to treat in the future and how should resources be allocated in the future in order to deal with the growing climate change problem and the growing wildfire problems," Hanan said.Data from the Giga Fire project will be used by Cal Fire and the California Air Resources Board to optimize forest management plans. The two organizations combined to provide more than $2 million in grant funding for the research. "These grants are all funded by California climate investments. So that means everything is funded by greenhouse gas reduction funds," said Kevin Welch, a senior environmental scientist with Cal Fire. Welch says this major investment can also help Cal Fire and other agencies plan to protect air and water quality. His role with Cal Fire involves evaluating the benefits and costs of controlled burns. Ideally, efforts limit the potential for out-of-control wildfires while also preserving important carbon stores like large trees."We're creating a treatment planner to be able to figure out where the best and most effective ways for us to treat the forest is," Welch said. "We're also integrating other co-benefits like watershed protection, fire safety, prevention, cultural heritage sites."He says striking that balance in controlled burns is critical in changing the future of wildfire season in the West."We're at a pivotal moment of climate, fire and forests here in California, and Cal Fire is trying the best it can to really address those three things together," Welch said.

Wildfire has always been a natural part of California's ecosystem. But a historical lack of forest management combined with climate change and human activity has contributed to larger and more destructive fires in accurate years.

The biggest of those fires are called "giga fires," which burn at least 1 million acres. Fire officials also recently categorized any fire larger than 100,000 acres as a "megafire."

In order to prevent the next big fire, Cal Fire is teaming up with the California Air Resources Board and a team of scientists at the University of Nevada at Reno. The goal is to optimize forest management programs through the "Giga Fire Project."

Jonathan Greenberg is one of the lead researchers on the project at UNR. He said the name "Giga Fire" is a nod to the growing risk of major wildfires as well as the kinds of technology the project utilizes.

"We're bringing to bear a lot of advanced technologies including advanced modeling, machine learning, remote sensing — we are doing some field data in a 'big data' computational environment," Greenberg said.

All of that big data is being used to make detailed maps of wildfire fuels throughout the state of California. That information is loaded into supercomputers, which use a trained artificial intelligence program to predict how all of those fuels may evolve over the next year, decade and even century.

Erin Hanan is another lead scientist with the Giga Fire project. She said the models they create will allow scientists and land managers to explore a lot of "what ifs" that come up when planning controlled burns and other forest management strategies.

"We know the scale of treatments that are being done now. At what scale do we need to treat in the future and how should resources be allocated in the future in order to deal with the growing climate change problem and the growing wildfire problems," Hanan said.

Data from the Giga Fire project will be used by Cal Fire and the California Air Resources Board to optimize forest management plans. The two organizations combined to provide more than $2 million in grant funding for the research.

"These grants are all funded by California climate investments. So that means everything is funded by greenhouse gas reduction funds," said Kevin Welch, a senior environmental scientist with Cal Fire.

Welch says this major investment can also help Cal Fire and other agencies plan to protect air and water quality. His role with Cal Fire involves evaluating the benefits and costs of controlled burns. Ideally, efforts limit the potential for out-of-control wildfires while also preserving important carbon stores like large trees.

"We're creating a treatment planner to be able to figure out where the best and most effective ways for us to treat the forest is," Welch said. "We're also integrating other co-benefits like watershed protection, fire safety, prevention, cultural heritage sites."

He says striking that balance in controlled burns is critical in changing the future of wildfire season in the West.

"We're at a pivotal moment of climate, fire and forests here in California, and Cal Fire is trying the best it can to really address those three things together," Welch said.

Fri, 25 Nov 2022 11:14:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.kcra.com/article/giga-fire-project-map-californias-wildfire-fuels/42070785
Killexams : Biden-Harris Administration Announces Groundbreaking Joint Initiative to Drive Investment to Entrepreneurs Scaling Critical and Emerging Technologies

Washington D.C., Dec. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) announced a new joint effort to establish the Small Business Investment Company Critical Technologies Initiative (SBICCT), designed to grow investment in critical technologies vital to U.S. national security. This new partnership will support the Biden-Harris Administration’s whole-of-government effort to bolster America’s leadership in global innovation and to strengthen our national security by incubating and scaling technologies.

Administrator Guzman joined Defense Secretary Austin at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, where they held a joint letter signing event, announcing this groundbreaking milestone in the longstanding partnership between SBA and DoD.

“SBA and DoD’s new historic initiative will help make sure America maintains its edge in technologies critical to national security,” said SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman. “DoD’s newly established Office of Strategic Capital will leverage SBA’s expertise and successes aligning and scaling public and private capital through its Small Business Investment Company program to address funding gaps in the innovation ecosystem. We are proud to be deepening SBA’s longstanding partnership with DoD to drive forward America’s technological and defensive strength – and in turn America’s national security and prosperity.”

“Earlier this week, I announced the creation of the Department’s Office of Strategic Capital and I’m delighted that OSC’s first official activity will be a partnership with the Small Business Administration,” said Defense Secretary Austin. “This partnership will help secure funding for critical areas for national defense—and ensure that our warfighters get the capabilities they need, before they need them.”

Underpinning this partnership is a new regulation that the SBA has proposed, which expands the SBIC program and introduces a new financial instrument called the Accrual Debenture. This instrument is designed to align with the cash flow patterns of startups, and supports the long duration often required to incubate and scale technology investments. Many defense technologies require heavy research and development investment, and this instrument is designed to attract the patient private capital necessary to support these innovations.

The partnership is made official through a letter of intent between SBA and DOD, which advances the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to growing our national security innovation base and establishing the U.S. as the world leader in innovative technologies.

###

About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration helps power the American dream of business ownership. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.

CONTACT: Press Offce United States Small Business Administration press_office@sba.gov
Sat, 03 Dec 2022 05:44:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/biden-harris-administration-announces-groundbreaking-194100382.html
Killexams : ClearSign Technologies Corporation Receives Concluding Purchase Order for California Refinery Multi Heater Project

Order Comprised of 16 Burners, Control Equipment and Spare Parts

TULSA, Okla., Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- ClearSign Technologies Corporation (Nasdaq: CLIR) ("ClearSign" or the "Company"), an emerging leader in industrial combustion and sensing technologies that Improve energy, operational efficiency and safety while dramatically reducing emissions, today announced that the Company has received the concluding purchase order to proceed with the last phase of the 20 burner project announced on March 29, 2022 for a California refinery.

ClearSign Logo (PRNewsFoto/ClearSign Combustion Corporation) (PRNewsfoto/ClearSign Combustion Corporation)

The purchase order is for the manufacture and delivery of the remaining 16 burners, control equipment and spare parts.  This purchase order follows the purchase order for a multi burner test and four burners required for that testing, and other ancillary items announced on September 1, 2022. Work associated with the September 1st purchase order has progressed into the final testing and demonstration phase.  The 20 burners are to be installed into two heaters at the customers refinery site in California in 2023 during their scheduled maintenance shutdown.

"We are very pleased about how this project is progressing, and to have received the final stage of this significant commercial purchase order," said Jim Deller, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of ClearSign.  "We had previously mentioned that the timeline for this project had been shortened and are glad to be able to meet the needs of our customer.  This installation of our best in class ultra low NOx technology will be significant for us as it is in our target market of California and at a notable refinery."

About ClearSign Technologies Corporation

ClearSign Technologies Corporation designs and develops products and technologies for the purpose of improving key performance characteristics of industrial and commercial systems, including operational performance, energy efficiency, emission reduction, safety and overall cost-effectiveness. Our patented technologies, embedded in established OEM products as ClearSign Core™, and ClearSign Eye™ and other sensing configurations, enhance the performance of combustion systems and fuel safety systems in a broad range of markets, including the energy (upstream oil production and down-stream refining), commercial/industrial boiler, chemical, petrochemical, transport and power industries. For more information, please visit www.clearsign.com.

Cautionary note on forward-looking statements

All statements in this press release that are not based on historical fact are "forward-looking statements." You can find many (but not all) of these statements by looking for words such as "approximates," "believes," "hopes," "expects," "anticipates," "estimates," "projects," "intends," "plans," "would," "should," "could," "may," "will" or other similar expressions. While management has based any forward-looking statements included in this press release on its current expectations on the Company's strategy, plans, intentions, performance, or future occurrences or results, the information on which such expectations were based may change. These forward-looking statements rely on a number of assumptions concerning future events and are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are outside of our control, that could cause genuine results to materially differ from such statements. Such risks, uncertainties and other factors include, but are not limited to, our ability to successfully install our burners in the California refinery and complete the anticipated project within the updated timeline, general business and economic conditions, the performance of management and our employees, our ability to obtain financing, competition, whether our technology will be accepted and adopted and other factors identified in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and available at www.sec.gov and other factors that are detailed in our periodic and current reports available for review at www.sec.gov. Furthermore, the Company operates in a competitive environment where new and unanticipated risks may arise. Accordingly, investors should not place any reliance on forward-looking statements as a prediction of genuine results. The Company disclaims any intention to, and, except as may be required by law, undertake no obligation to, update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that subsequently occur or of which the Company hereafter becomes aware.

Cision

View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/clearsign-technologies-corporation-receives-concluding-purchase-order-for-california-refinery-multi-heater-project-301689950.html

SOURCE ClearSign Technologies Corporation

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 00:05:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/clearsign-technologies-corporation-receives-concluding-133000154.html
Killexams : Biden-Harris Administration Announces Groundbreaking Joint Initiative to Drive Investment to Entrepreneurs Scaling Critical and Emerging Technologies

Washington D.C., Dec. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) announced a new joint effort to establish the Small Business Investment Company Critical Technologies Initiative (SBICCT), designed to grow investment in critical technologies vital to U.S. national security. This new partnership will support the Biden-Harris Administration’s whole-of-government effort to bolster America’s leadership in global innovation and to strengthen our national security by incubating and scaling technologies.

Administrator Guzman joined Defense Secretary Austin at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, where they held a joint letter signing event, announcing this groundbreaking milestone in the longstanding partnership between SBA and DoD.

“SBA and DoD’s new historic initiative will help make sure America maintains its edge in technologies critical to national security,” said SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman. “DoD’s newly established Office of Strategic Capital will leverage SBA’s expertise and successes aligning and scaling public and private capital through its Small Business Investment Company program to address funding gaps in the innovation ecosystem. We are proud to be deepening SBA’s longstanding partnership with DoD to drive forward America’s technological and defensive strength – and in turn America’s national security and prosperity.”

“Earlier this week, I announced the creation of the Department’s Office of Strategic Capital and I’m delighted that OSC’s first official activity will be a partnership with the Small Business Administration,” said Defense Secretary Austin. “This partnership will help secure funding for critical areas for national defense—and ensure that our warfighters get the capabilities they need, before they need them.”

Underpinning this partnership is a new regulation that the SBA has proposed, which expands the SBIC program and introduces a new financial instrument called the Accrual Debenture. This instrument is designed to align with the cash flow patterns of startups, and supports the long duration often required to incubate and scale technology investments. Many defense technologies require heavy research and development investment, and this instrument is designed to attract the patient private capital necessary to support these innovations.

The partnership is made official through a letter of intent between SBA and DOD, which advances the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to growing our national security innovation base and establishing the U.S. as the world leader in innovative technologies.

###

About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration helps power the American dream of business ownership. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.

CONTACT: Press Offce United States Small Business Administration press_office@sba.gov
Sat, 03 Dec 2022 05:44:00 -0600 en-CA text/html https://ca.sports.yahoo.com/news/biden-harris-administration-announces-groundbreaking-194100382.html
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