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Killexams : IBM Systems Braindumps - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C4040-250 Search results Killexams : IBM Systems Braindumps - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C4040-250 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : Can IBM Get Back Into HPC With Power10?

The “Cirrus” Power10 processor from IBM, which we codenamed for Big Blue because it refused to do it publicly and because we understand the value of a synonym here at The Next Platform, shipped last September in the “Denali” Power E1080 big iron NUMA machine. And today, the rest of the Power10-based Power Systems product line is being fleshed out with the launch of entry and midrange machines – many of which are suitable for supporting HPC and AI workloads as well as in-memory databases and other workloads in large enterprises.

The question is, will IBM care about traditional HPC simulation and modeling ever again with the same vigor that it has in past decades? And can Power10 help reinvigorate the HPC and AI business at IBM. We are not sure about the answer to the first question, and got the distinct impression from Ken King, the general manager of the Power Systems business, that HPC proper was not a high priority when we spoke to him back in February about this. But we continue to believe that the Power10 platform has some attributes that make it appealing for data analytics and other workloads that need to be either scaled out across small machines or scaled up across big ones.

Today, we are just going to talk about the five entry Power10 machines, which have one or two processor sockets in a standard 2U or 4U form factor, and then we will follow up with an analysis of the Power E1050, which is a four socket machine that fits into a 4U form factor. And the question we wanted to answer was simple: Can a Power10 processor hold its own against X86 server chips from Intel and AMD when it comes to basic CPU-only floating point computing.

This is an important question because there are plenty of workloads that have not been accelerated by GPUs in the HPC arena, and for these workloads, the Power10 architecture could prove to be very interesting if IBM thought outside of the box a little. This is particularly true when considering the feature called memory inception, which is in effect the ability to build a memory area network across clusters of machines and which we have discussed a little in the past.

We went deep into the architecture of the Power10 chip two years ago when it was presented at the Hot Chip conference, and we are not going to go over that ground again here. Suffice it to say that this chip can hold its own against Intel’s current “Ice Lake” Xeon SPs, launched in April 2021, and AMD’s current “Milan” Epyc 7003s, launched in March 2021. And this makes sense because the original plan was to have a Power10 chip in the field with 24 fat cores and 48 skinny ones, using dual-chip modules, using 10 nanometer processes from IBM’s former foundry partner, Globalfoundries, sometime in 2021, three years after the Power9 chip launched in 2018. Globalfoundries did not get the 10 nanometer processes working, and it botched a jump to 7 nanometers and spiked it, and that left IBM jumping to Samsung to be its first server chip partner for its foundry using its 7 nanometer processes. IBM took the opportunity of the Power10 delay to reimplement the Power ISA in a new Power10 core and then added some matrix math overlays to its vector units to make it a good AI inference engine.

IBM also created a beefier core and dropped the core count back to 16 on a die in SMT8 mode, which is an implementation of simultaneous multithreading that has up to eight processing threads per core, and also was thinking about an SMT4 design which would double the core count to 32 per chip. But we have not seen that today, and with IBM not chasing Google and other hyperscalers with Power10, we may never see it. But it was in the roadmaps way back when.

What IBM has done in the entry machines is put two Power10 chips inside of a single socket to increase the core count, but it is looking like the yields on the chips are not as high as IBM might have wanted. When IBM first started talking about the Power10 chip, it said it would have 15 or 30 cores, which was a strange number, and that is because it kept one SMT8 core or two SMT4 cores in reserve as a hedge against bad yields. In the products that IBM is rolling out today, mostly for its existing AIX Unix and IBM i (formerly OS/400) enterprise accounts, the core counts on the dies are much lower, with 4, 8, 10, or 12 of the 16 cores active. The Power10 cores have roughly 70 percent more performance than the Power9 cores in these entry machines, and that is a lot of performance for many enterprise customers – enough to get through a few years of growth on their workloads. IBM is charging a bit more for the Power10 machines compared to the Power9 machines, according to Steve Sibley, vice president of Power product management at IBM, but the bang for the buck is definitely improving across the generations. At the very low end with the Power S1014 machine that is aimed at small and midrange businesses running ERP workloads on the IBM i software stack, that improvement is in the range of 40 percent, give or take, and the price increase is somewhere between 20 percent and 25 percent depending on the configuration.

Pricing is not yet available on any of these entry Power10 machines, which ship on July 22. When we find out more, we will do more analysis of the price/performance.

There are six new entry Power10 machines, the feeds and speeds of which are shown below:

For the HPC crowd, the Power L1022 and the Power L1024 are probably the most interesting ones because they are designed to only run Linux and, if they are like prior L classified machines in the Power8 and Power9 families, will have lower pricing for CPU, memory, and storage, allowing them to better compete against X86 systems running Linux in cluster environments. This will be particularly important as IBM pushed Red Hat OpenShift as a container platform for not only enterprise workloads but also for HPC and data analytic workloads that are also being containerized these days.

One thing to note about these machines: IBM is using its OpenCAPI Memory Interface, which as we explained in the past is using the “Bluelink” I/O interconnect for NUMA links and accelerator attachment as a memory controller. IBM is now calling this the Open Memory Interface, and these systems have twice as many memory channels as a typical X86 server chip and therefore have a lot more aggregate bandwidth coming off the sockets. The OMI memory makes use of a Differential DIMM form factor that employs DDR4 memory running at 3.2 GHz, and it will be no big deal for IBM to swap in DDR5 memory chips into its DDIMMs when they are out and the price is not crazy. IBM is offering memory features with 32 GB, 64 GB, and 128 GB capacities today in these machines and will offer 256 GB DDIMMs on November 14, which is how you get the maximum capacities shown in the table above. The important thing for HPC customers is that IBM is delivering 409 GB/sec of memory bandwidth per socket and 2 TB of memory per socket.

By the way, the only storage in these machines is NVM-Express flash drives. No disk, no plain vanilla flash SSDs. The machines also support a mix of PCI-Express 4.0 and PCI-Express 5.0 slots, and do not yet support the CXL protocol created by Intel and backed by IBM even though it loves its own Bluelink OpenCAPI interconnect for linking memory and accelerators to the Power compute engines.

Here are the different processor SKUs offered in the Power10 entry machines:

As far as we are concerned, the 24-core Power10 DCM feature EPGK processor in the Power L1024 is the only interesting one for HPC work, aside from what a theoretical 32-core Power10 DCM might be able to do. And just for fun, we sat down and figured out the peak theoretical 64-bit floating point performance, at all-core base and all-core turbo clock speeds, for these two Power10 chips and their rivals in the Intel and AMD CPU lineups. Take a gander at this:

We have no idea what the pricing will be for a processor module in these entry Power10 machines, so we took a stab at what the 24-core variant might cost to be competitive with the X86 alternatives based solely on FP64 throughput and then reckoned the performance of what a full-on 32-core Power10 DCM might be.

The answer is that IBM can absolutely compete, flops to flops, with the best Intel and AMD have right now. And it has a very good matrix math engine as well, which these chips do not.

The problem is, Intel has “Sapphire Rapids” Xeon SPs in the works, which we think will have four 18-core chiplets for a total of 72 cores, but only 56 of them will be exposed because of yield issues that Intel has with its SuperFIN 10 nanometer (Intel 7) process. And AMD has 96-core “Genoa” Epyc 7004s in the works, too. Power11 is several years away, so if IBM wants to play in HPC, Samsung has to get the yields up on the Power10 chips so IBM can sell more cores in a box. Big Blue already has the memory capacity and memory bandwidth advantage. We will see if its L-class Power10 systems can compete on price and performance once we find out more. And we will also explore how memory clustering might make for a very interesting compute platform based on a mix of fat NUMA and memory-less skinny nodes. We have some ideas about how this might play out.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 12:01:00 -0500 Timothy Prickett Morgan en-US text/html https://www.nextplatform.com/2022/07/12/can-ibm-get-back-into-hpc-with-power10/
Killexams : How IBM Could Become A Digital Winner

Last week, after IBM’s report of positive quarterly earnings, CEO Arvind Krishna and CNBC’s Jim Cramer shared their frustration that IBM’s stock “got clobbered.” IBM’s stock price immediately fell by10%, while the S&P500 remained steady (Figure 1)

While a five-day stock price fluctuation is by itself meaningless, questions remain about the IBM’s longer-term picture. “These are great numbers,” declared Krishna.

“You gave solid revenue growth and solid earnings,” Cramer sympathized. “You far exceeded expectations. Maybe someone is changing the goal posts here?”

The Goal Posts To Become A Digital Winner

It is also possible that Krishna and Cramer missed where today’s goal posts are located. Strong quarterly numbers do not a digital winner make. They may induce the stock market to regard a firm as a valuable cash cow, like other remnants of the industrial era. But to become a digital winner, a firm must take the kind of steps that Satya Nadella took at Microsoft to become a digital winner: kill its dogs, commit to a mission of customer primacy, identify real growth opportunities, transform its culture, make empathy central, and unleash its agilists. (Figure 2)

Since becoming CEO, Nadella has been brilliantly successful at Microsoft, growing market capitalization by more than a trillion dollars.

Krishna’s Two Years As CEO

Krishna has been IBM CEO since April 2020. He began his career at IBM in 1990, and had been managing IBM’s cloud and research divisions since 2015. He was a principal architect of the Red Hat acquisition.

They are remarkable parallels between the careers of Krishna and Nadella.

· Both are Indian-American engineers, who were born in India.

· Both worked at the firm for several decades before they became CEOs.

· Prior to becoming CEOs, both were in charge of cloud computing.

Both inherited companies in trouble. Microsoft was stagnating after CEO Steve Ballmer, while IBM was also in rapid decline, after CEO Ginny Rometty: the once famous “Big Blue” had become known as a “Big Bruise.”

Although it is still early days in Krishna’s CEO tenure, IBM is under-performing the S&P500 since he took over (Figure 3).

More worrying is the fact that Krishna has not yet completed the steps that Nadella took in his first 27 months. (Figure 1).

1. Jettison Losing Baggage

Nadella wrote off the Nokia phone and declared that IBM would no longer sell its flagship Windows as a business. This freed up energy and resources to focus on creating winning businesses.

By contrast, Krishna has yet to jettison, IBM’s most distracting baggage:

· Commitment to maximizing shareholder value (MSV): For the two prior decades, IBM was the public champion of MSV, first under CEO Palmisano 2001-2011, and again under Rometty 2012-2020—a key reason behind IBM’s calamitous decline (Figure 2) Krishna has yet to explicitly renounce IBM’s MSV heritage.

· Top-down bureaucracy: The necessary accompaniment of MSV is top-down bureaucracy, which flourished under CEOs Palmisano and Rometty. Here too, bureaucratic processes must be explicitly eradicated, otherwise they become permanent weeds.

· The ‘Watson problem’: IBM’s famous computer, Watson, may have won ‘Jeopardy!’ but it continues to have problems in the business marketplace. In January 2022, IBM reported that it had sold Watson Health assets to an investment firm for around $1 billion, after acquisitions that had cost some $4 billion. Efforts to monetize Watson continue.

· Infrastructure Services: By spinning off its Cloud computing business as a publicly listed company (Kyndryl), IBM created nominal separation, but Kyndryl immediately lost 57% of its share value.

· Quantum Computing: IBM pours resources into research on quantum computing and touts its potential to revolutionize computing. However unsolved technical problems of “decoherence” and “entanglement” mean that any meaningful benefits are still some years away.

· Self-importance: Perhaps the heaviest baggage that IBM has yet to jettison is the over-confidence reflected in sales slogans like “no one ever got fired for hiring IBM”. The subtext is that firms “can leave IT to IBM” and that the safe choice for any CIO is to stick with IBM. It’s a status quo mindset—the opposite of the clients that IBM needs to attract.

2. Commit To A Clear Customer-Obsessed Mission

At the outset of his tenure as CEO of Microsoft, Nadella spent the first nine months getting consensus on a simple customer-driven mission statement.

Krishna did write at the end of the letter to staff on day one as CEO, and he added at the end:“Third, we all must be obsessed with continually delighting our clients. At every interaction, we must strive to offer them the best experience and value. The only way to lead in today’s ever-changing marketplace is to constantly innovate according to what our clients want and need.” This would have been more persuasive if it had come at the beginning of the letter, and if there had been stronger follow-up.

What is IBM’s mission? No clear answer appears from IBM’s own website. The best one gets from About IBM is the fuzzy do-gooder declaration: “IBMers believe in progress — that the application of intelligence, reason and science can Excellerate business, society and the human condition.” Customer primacy is not explicit, thereby running the risk that IBM’s 280,000 employees will assume that the noxious MSV goal is still in play.

3. Focus On Major Growth Opportunities

At Microsoft, Nadella dismissed competing with Apple on phones or with Google on Search. He defined the two main areas of opportunity—mobility and the cloud.

Krishna has identified the Hybrid Cloud and AI as IBM’s main opportunities. Thus, Krishna wrote in his newsletter to staff on day one as CEO: “Hybrid cloud and AI are two dominant forces driving change for our clients and must have the maniacal focus of the entire company.”

However, both fields are now very crowded. IBM is now a tiny player in Cloud in comparison to Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. In conversations, Krishna portrays IBM as forging working partnerships with the big Cloud players, and “integrating their offerings in IBM’s hybrid Cloud.” One risk here is whether the big Cloud players will facilitate this. The other risk is that IBM will attract only lower-performing firms that use IBM as a crutch so that they can cling to familiar legacy programs.

4. Address Culture And The Importance Of Empathy Upfront

At Microsoft, Nadella addressed culture upfront, rejecting Microsoft’s notoriously confrontational culture, and set about instilling a collaborative customer-driven culture throughout the firm.

Although Krishna talks openly to the press, he has not, to my knowledge, frontally addressed the “top-down” “we know best” culture that prevailed in IBM under his predecessor CEOs. He has, to his credit, pledged “neutrality” with respect to the innovative, customer-centric Red Hat, rather than applying the “Blue washing” that the old IBM systematically applied to its acquisitions to bring them into line with IBM’s top-down culture, and is said to have honored its pledge—so far. But there is little indication that IBM is ready to adopt Red Hat’s innovative culture for itself. It is hard to see these two opposed cultures remain “neutral” forever. Given the size differential between IBM and Red Hat, the likely winner is easy to predict, unless Krishna makes a more determined effort to transform IBM’s culture.

5. Empower The Hidden Agilists

As in any large tech firm, when Nadella and Krishna took over their respective firms, there were large hidden armies of agilists waiting in the shadows but hamstrung by top-down bureaucracies. At Microsoft, Nadella’s commitment to “agile, agile, agile” combined with a growth mindset, enabled a fast start.. At IBM, if Krishna has any passion for Agile, it has not yet shared it widely.

Bottom Line

Although IBM has made progress under Krishna, it is not yet on a path to become a clear digital winner.

And read also:

Is Your Firm A Cash-Cow Or A Growth-Stock?

Why Companies Must Learn To Discuss The Undiscussable

Sun, 24 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Steve Denning en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2022/07/25/how-ibm-could-become-a-digital-winner/
Killexams : Big Blue Turns In A Solid Quarter For Systems

By all accounts, Big Blue had a pretty good quarter ending in June, with sales of its System z16 mainframes skyrocketing upwards as they do every couple of years at the beginning of a new cycle and sales of its high-end Power10 machines also getting some traction. If everything goes as planned, with the entry and midrange Power10 machines just launched and shipping at the end of this week, then the second half of 2022 should be a pretty good one for systems for IBM.

Nonetheless, Wall Street is giving IBM a bit of a drubbing as we go to press with this analysis of the company’s second quarter financial results, and that has more to do with the company shutting down its operations in Russia and the strength of the US dollar, which makes it more expensive to sell its products and services overseas. But a strong US dollar also makes every item sold overseas worth more dollars, which helps bolster revenues and profits. So there is that.

In the June quarter, IBM’s sales grew in a way that we have not seen in a long time, but also in a way we expected given the timing of the System z16 and Power10 product cycles. In a year and a half or so, unless IBM rolls out some upgraded processors – call them the z16+ and the Power10+, perhaps with refined chip 7 nanometer manufacturing processes from foundry partner Samsung as well as higher yields to boost the core count on the devices – then we expect for a pretty big lull in system sales at IBM.

The other good news on the systems front is that Red Hat keeps plugging along, although with only 12 percent growth this quarter, to $1.47 billion, that Linux and Kubernetes business is considerably off the 20-ish percent growth Red Hat was sustaining when IBM agreed to acquire it back in October 2018 for $34 billion. In our models, we reckon that about 70 percent of the Red Hat revenue stream is for datacenter infrastructure software, such as Enterprise Linux, OpenShift, OpenStack, and a few things like Java middleware and software-defined storage. And based on that estimate, we also reckon that Red Hat broke through $1 billion in sales for subscriptions and services for such software, the second time it has done that in its history. (The first time was in Q4 2021, with $1.05 billion in sales and in this quarter it was $1.03 billion.)

IBM always talks about its groups and divisions in terms of constant currency, which means reckoning their value without taking into account the exchange rate elevation IBM gets when it converts overseas sales to US dollars. We like to think in terms of as-reported figures, just to keep it all consistent, and are happy to keep in mind the constant currency sales.

Sales in the Infrastructure group, which includes servers and storage and technical support for both, rose by 19 percent to $4.24 billion, and gross profit was only up 12.1 percent to $2,28 billion, with overall gross margins for IBM’s hardware business at 53.8 percent. Pre-tax income was $757 million, or 17.9 percent of revenues, which is the kind of profitability that a software development house can usually expect. (Somewhere between 15 percent and 20 percent is typical.) Within this Infrastructure group, sales of hybrid infrastructure – what you and I would call hardware or systems, and it is still not clear what the heck “hybrid” means when a big bank buys a mainframe to keep track of our money – rose by 34.3 percent (according to our model), hitting $2.77 billion. IBM does not provide specific revenue figures for its system sales, but said that at constant currency, the System z mainframe division had sales rose by 77 percent, and that its Distributed Infrastructure division, which includes storage as well as Power Systems servers, had a more modest 17 percent uptick (again at constant currency). Storage was the big driver here, although Jim Kavanaugh, IBM’s chief financial officer, did say that IBM “had good performance in high-end Power10.” Infrastructure support revenues came in at $1.47 billion, down 2.1 percent.

IBM’s Hybrid Platforms & Solutions division within its Software group had $4.4 billion in sales, up a smidgen, and its Transaction Processing software division, which includes mainframe databases and middleware, had sales of $1.77 billion, up 11.6 percent year on year.

If you take chunks of its Software, Consulting, and Financing groups and allocate them to systems, as we have done for years, you can come up with a proxy for IBM’s overall “real” systems business, which we think is the thing that Wall Street and customers should be looking at and panic about. We reckon that including that Red Hat systems business in the mix, IBM’s overall real systems business was just a tad under $8.2 billion, up 11.6 percent, and was $7.17 billion without those Red Hat subscriptions into the datacenter, up 11.5 percent.

As we projected many years ago, the Red Hat business has IBM’s overall systems business back on the track of growth, but remember that sales of IBM’s Power Systems and System z servers are very choppy, not the relatively smooth line that Red Hat is able to pull off each quarter – well, most quarters, anyway. The question we have is whether Red Hat can resume its historical growth rate of 20 percent, give or take.

The answer is probably no, but it is possible if not probable. We shall see.

IBM did not say much about Power10 in the call, except what we noted above and that the entry and midrange machines launched on July 12 would start shipping this week.

Add it all up, and IBM had $15.54 billion in sales, up 9.3 percent, with gross profit of $8.29 billion, up 5.6 percent and representing 53.4 percent of revenues. Pre-tax income was up by 1.9X to $1.72 billion and net income was up by 1.72X to $1.39 billion.

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 08:43:00 -0500 Timothy Prickett Morgan en-US text/html https://www.nextplatform.com/2022/07/19/big-blue-turns-in-a-solid-quarter-for-systems/
Killexams : IBM (IBM) Q2 Earnings and Revenues Beat Estimates No result found, try new keyword!IBM, which belongs to the Zacks Computer - Integrated Systems industry ... There are no easy answers to this key question, but one reliable measure that can help investors address this is the ... Mon, 18 Jul 2022 21:18:00 -0500 text/html https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/ibm-ibm-q2-earnings-and-revenues-beat-estimates Killexams : Has the cloud caught up with the mainframe?

Yes, you read that right. For much of the last couple of decades, it’s felt as if everyone has been talking about the impending demise of the mainframe, whilst simultaneously attempting to emulate as many as possible of its key operational characteristics.

Originally this emulation was via industry-standard servers, but in the last few years “the cloud” has taken up this challenge. It began with cloud computing promising the same level of scalability, flexibility and operational efficiency that mainframe systems have long provided, and on scalability going somewhat further. For a while these were more words than reality, but now cloud capabilities are (finally) getting close to what mainframe users have long taken for granted.

More recently, attention in cloud circles has turned to other – what we might regard as core – mainframe attributes such as security, privacy, resilience and failover. Whether you believe the marketing of cloud providers on this is up to you (as it is with any vendor marketing messages). But ensuring such things certainly requires very careful studying of the service level guarantees and contractual small print.

Today much of the focus of cloud services has switched to support for specialist workloads, and again, we see cloud following in the footsteps of the mainframe by using dedicated offload engines designed to optimise workload performance, and in many cases to minimise software licensing costs as well. But it’s always seemed as if cloud has been in catch-up mode, and the mainframe has remained in the lead. Which leads to the question, has the cloud now caught up?

Has the cloud caught up?

In many ways, the answer is “yes”, but this is a qualified yes. When it comes to scalability, throughput, operational efficiency, and arguably even resilience and failover, cloud has arguably caught up with the mainframe of the 1990s or early 2000s. But there are other factors to bear in mind as the mainframe has not stood still.

For example, it is fair to say that cloud providers have made great strides on security and privacy, but in reality the mainframe is still recognised as the gold standard, with security baked into every layer in the systems stack.

Then there are questions such as latency and data location. With the mainframe, there is no doubt where the data resides and who can access it. Managing these details and the associated operational policies has been part of the platform for over fifty years. When it comes to latency, the mainframe is probably sitting very close to the data you are working with, making latency as low as possible in terms of system response times, something reinforced when considering the system’s very powerful processors and sophisticated, mature partitioning capabilities.

And the mainframe environment is getting even stronger when you look at the announcements made at the accurate launch of the IBM z16. These include quantum-safe cryptography to protect against the development of Quantum computers able to decrypt current encryption standards, on-chip AI acceleration to boost ML and AI execution, and flexible capacity combined with on-demand workload transfer across multiple locations to further reduce the chance of service disruption.

But there are places where things are arguably closer, one of which is in the area of workload optimisation, although the two environments are developing in different ways. For example, the mainframe strives to deliver a consistent environment that can handle a wide range of workloads, but managed through the same set of frameworks and tools. The cloud, on the other hand, allows you to spin up dedicated specialised environments, e.g. for AI or analytics.

What about developers?

Which leaves the question of where is “the cloud” ahead of the mainframe? The obvious place to start is in terms of the diverse geographic distribution of the major public clouds which spread across the globe with huge resources that no mainframe or mainframe cluster can match that. But this advantage is no longer quite so huge given that IBM will shortly be making “mainframe as a service” available from its IBM Cloud data centres around the world.

Not quite as a corollary, it is also fair to say that cloud was ahead for a while with regard to modern software delivery methods such as DevOps and the implementation of various agile delivery solutions. But we must recognise that it hasn’t taken long for the gap to close because the fundamental principles underlying things like DevOps, container, microservices, APIs, etc. have been intrinsic to the mainframe environment for decades, indeed pretty much since its beginning. In addition, IBM and the other software vendors in the mainframe ecosystem, such as Broadcom and BMC, have developed their offerings to such a degree that today there’s almost absolute parity.

In essence today’s mainframe environment is one where the latest generation of developers should not feel out of place. It uses the same standards-based, open tools they handle daily. And with the mainframe-as-a-service soon to be available, devs will be able to build code wherever they like and run it on the mainframe with a few clicks and no need to build a complex environment.

This is good news for the mainframe, but having the technological capabilities is less than half of the challenge. What’s really needed is for the mainframe to catch the eye of modern developers. IBM needs to ensure that developers understand that the mainframe is not a new and alien place, but instead is ready for them to exploit using the tools they are already comfortable with.

Some final thoughts

When you stand back and consider the modern mainframe, particularly the LinuxOne version and the new Z16, it’s pretty clear any claims of the mainframe being out of date or legacy stem from a fundamental lack of awareness. Indeed, the mainframe has continued to lead the way in many critical areas, delivering IT cost-effectively and securely at scale. The bottom line is, it’s not that the mainframe has been trying to keep up with industry developments, it’s that the mainframe is still very much leading the way.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 00:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.computerweekly.com/blog/Write-side-up-by-Freeform-Dynamics/Has-the-cloud-caught-up-with-the-mainframe
Killexams : Enterprise Knowledge Management System Market 2022 Depth Investigation And Analysis Report On Key Players 2030

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Aug 01, 2022 (Alliance News via COMTEX) -- Key Companies Covered in the Enterprise Knowledge Management System Research are Alfanar, Chris Lewis Group, Cisco, Enlighted, GoTo Room, IQBoard, Komstadt, Logitech, Microsoft, Poly, Scenariio, Smart Systems(Smarthomes Chattanooga), TecinteracaBloomfire, Callidus Software Inc., Chadha Software Technologies, ComAround, Computer Sciences Corporation(APQC), EduBrite Systems, EGain Ernst Young, IBM Global Services, Igloo, KMS Lighthouse, Knosys, Moxie Software, Open Text Corporation, ProProfs, Right Answers, Transversal, Yonyx, Glean, IntraFindtive, TIS Control, Vox Audio Visual, Webex, Yealink and other key market players.

The global Enterprise Knowledge Management System market size will reach USD million in 2030, growing at a CAGR of % during the analysis period.

As the global economy recovers in 2021 and the supply of the industrial chain improves, the Enterprise Knowledge Management System market will undergo major changes. According to the latest research, the market size of the Enterprise Knowledge Management System industry in 2021 will increase by USD million compared to 2020, with a growth rate of %.

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Killexams : IBM Touts AI, Hybrid Cloud: ‘Demand For Our Solutions Remains Strong’

Cloud News

Joseph F. Kovar

‘Given its ability to boost innovation, productivity, resilience, and help organizations scale, IT has become a high priority in a company’s budget. As such, there is every reason to believe technology spending in the B2B space will continue to surpass GDP growth,’ says IBM CEO Arvind Krishna.

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A strengthening IT environment that is playing into IBM AI and hybrid cloud capabilities means a rosy future for IBM and its B2B business, CEO Arvind Krishna told investors Monday.

Krishna, in his prepared remarks for IBM’s second fiscal quarter 2022 financial analyst conference call, said that technology serves as a fundamental source of competitive advantage for businesses.

“It serves as both a deflationary force and a force multiplier, and is especially critical as clients face challenges on multiple fronts from supply chain bottlenecks to demographic shifts,” he said. “Given its ability to boost innovation, productivity, resilience, and help organizations scale, IT has become a high priority in a company’s budget. As such, there is every reason to believe technology spending in the B2B space will continue to surpass GDP growth.”

[Related: IBM STARTS ‘ORDERLY WIND-DOWN’ OF RUSSIA BUSINESS]

That plays well with IBM’s hybrid cloud and AI strategy where the company is investing in its offerings, technical talent, ecosystem, and go-to-market model, Krishna said.

“Demand for our solutions remains strong,” he said. “We continued to have double-digit performance in IBM Consulting, broad-based strength in software, and with the z16 [mainframe] platform launch, our infrastructure business had a good quarter. By integrating technology and expertise from IBM and our partners, our clients will continue to see our hybrid cloud and AI solutions as a crucial source of business opportunity and growth.”

Krishna said hybrid clouds are about offering clients a platform to straddle multiple public clouds, private clouds, on-premises infrastructures, and the edge, which is where Red Hat, which IBM acquired in 2019, comes into play, Krishna said.

“Our software has been optimized to run on that platform, and includes advanced data and AI, automation, and the security capabilities our clients need,” he said. “Our global team of consultants offers deep business expertise and co-creates with clients to accelerate their digital transformation journeys. Our infrastructure allows clients to take full advantage of an extended hybrid cloud environment.”

As a result, IBM now has over 4,000 hybrid cloud platform clients, with over 250 new clients added during the second fiscal quarter, Krishna said.

“Those who adopt our platform tend to consume more of our solutions across software, consulting, and infrastructure, [and] expanding our footprint within those clients,” he said.

IBM is also benefitting from the steady adoption by businesses of artificial intelligence technologies as those businesses try to process the enormous amount of data generated from hybrid cloud environments all the way to the edge, Krishna said. An IBM study released during the second fiscal quarter found that 35 percent of companies are now using some form of AI with automation in their business to address demographic shifts and move their employees to higher value work, he said.

“This is one of the many reasons we are investing heavily in both AI and automation,” he said. “These investments are paying off.”

IBM is also moving to develop leadership in quantum computing, Krishna said. The company currently has a 127-qubit quantum computer it its cloud, and is committed to demonstrate the first 400-plus-qubit system before year-end as part of its path to deliver a 1,000-plus-qubit system next year and a 4,000-plus-qubit system in 2025, he said.

“One of the implications of quantum computing will be the need to change how information is encrypted,” he said. “We are proud that technology developed by IBM and our collaborators has been selected by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) as the basis of the next generation of quantum-safe encryption protocols.”

IBM during the quarter also move forward in its mainframe technology with the release of its new z16 mainframe, Krishna said.

“The z16 is designed for cloud-native development, cybersecurity resilience, [and] quantum-safe encryption, and includes an on-chip AI accelerator, which allows clients to reduce fraud within real-time transactions,” he said.

IBM also made two acquisitions during the quarter related to cybersecurity, Krishna said. The first was Randori, an attack surface management and offensive cybersecurity provider. That acquisition built on IBM’s November acquisition of ReaQta, an endpoint security firm, he said.

While analysts during the question and answer part of Monday’s financial analyst conference call did not ask about the news that IBM has brought in Matt Hicks as the new CEO of Red Hat, they did seem concerned about how the 17-percent growth in Red Had revenue over last year missed expectations.

When asked about Red Hat revenue, Krishna said IBM feels very good about the Red Hat business and expect continued strong demand.

“That said, we had said late last year that we expect growth in Red Hat to be in the upper teens,” he said. “That expectation is what we are going to continue with. … Deferred revenue accounts for the bulk of what has been the difference in the growth rates coming down from last year to this year.”

IBM CFO James Kavanaugh followed by saying that while IBM saw 17 percent growth overall for Red Hat, the company took market share with its core REL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) and in its Red Hat OpenShift hybrid cloud platform foundation. Red Hat OpenShift revenue is now four-and-a-half times the revenue before IBM acquired Red Hat, and Red Hat OpenShift bookings were up over 50 percent, Kavanaugh said.

“So we feel pretty good about our Red Hat portfolio overall. … Remember, we‘re three years into this acquisition right now,” he said. “And we couldn’t be more pleased as we move forward.”

When asked about the potential impact from an economic downturn, Krishna said IBM’s pipelines remain healthy and consistent with what the company saw in the first half of fiscal 2022, making him more optimistic than many of his peers.

“In an inflationary environment, when clients take our technology, deploy it, leverage our consulting, it acts as a counterbalance to all of the inflation and all of the labor demographics that people are facing all over the globe,” he said.

Krishna also said IBM’s consulting business is less likely than most vendors’ business to be impacted by the economic cycle as it involves a lot of work around deploying the kinds of applications critical to clients’ need to optimize their costs. Furthermore, he said. Because consulting is very labor-intensive, it is easy to hire or let go tens of thousands of employees as needed, he said.

The Numbers

For its second fiscal quarter 2022, which ended June 30, IBM reported total revenue of $15.5 billion, up about 9 percent from the $14.2 billion the company reported for its second fiscal quarter 2021.

This includes software revenue of $6.2 billion, up from $5.9 billion; consulting revenue of $4.8 billion, up from $4.4 billion; infrastructure revenue of $4.2 billion, up from $3.6 billion; financing revenue of $146 million, down from $209 million; and other revenue of $180 million, down from $277 million.

On the software side, IBM reported annual recurring revenue of $12.9 billion, which was up 8 percent over last year. Software revenue from its Red Hat business was up 17 percent over last year, while automation software was up 8 percent, data and AI software up 4 percent, and security software up 5 percent.

On the consulting side, technology consulting revenue was up 23 percent over last year, applications operations up 17 percent, and business transformation up 16 percent.

Infrastructure revenue growth was driven by hybrid infrastructure sales, which rose 7 percent over last year, and infrastructure support, which grew 5 percent. Hybrid infrastructure revenue saw a significant boost from zSystems mainframe sales, which rose 77 percent over last year.

IBM also reported revenue of $8.1 billion from sales to the Americas, up 15 percent over last year; sales to Europe, Middle East, and Africa of $4.5 billion, up 17 percent; and $2.9 billion to the Asia Pacific area, up 16 percent.

Sales to Kyndryl, which late last year was spun out of IBM, accounted for about 5 percent of revenue, including 3 percent of IBM’s Americas revenue.

IBM also reported net income for the quarter on a GAAP basis of $1.39 billion, or $1.53 per share, up from last year’s $1.33 billion, or $1.47 per share.

Joseph F. Kovar

Joseph F. Kovar is a senior editor and reporter for the storage and the non-tech-focused channel beats for CRN. He keeps readers abreast of the latest issues related to such areas as data life-cycle, business continuity and disaster recovery, and data centers, along with related services and software, while highlighting some of the key trends that impact the IT channel overall. He can be reached at jkovar@thechannelcompany.com.

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 13:17:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/cloud/ibm-touts-ai-hybrid-cloud-demand-for-our-solutions-remains-strong-
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