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Exam Code: C2150-508 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
IBM Endpoint Manager V9.0 Fundamentals
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Killexams : IBM Fundamentals Free PDF - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C2150-508 Search results Killexams : IBM Fundamentals Free PDF - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C2150-508 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : The best free tools and services for college students

Whether or not you’re returning to in-person classes this fall, you’ll likely need a slew of services and software to get your classwork done, manage your time and relax after a long day of lectures. Don’t worry about adding to your ever-growing student debt in the process, though. There’s an increasing number of free services and tools that have surprisingly robust features, ranging from office suites to pro-quality media editors. You might not need to pay a cent to listen to a hot new album or indulge in a TV marathon, either. Our recommendations could help you thrive this school year while leaving some money for extracurricular fun.

Google Docs

Google Docs

You’re probably going to need a productivity suite at school. Thankfully, the days of having to buy an expensive software bundle are long gone. Google Docs can handle the document creation you’ll need over a semester, whether it’s writing term papers, crunching data in spreadsheets or whipping up group presentations. Automatic cloud saves can spare you the heartache of losing progress.

You may want to subscribe to a Google One plan if the free 15GB of Drive storage proves too limiting. And as capable as Docs may be, there may be some classes where professors insist on paid services like Microsoft 365. If you’re free to choose your work tools, however, Docs is an easy choice — particularly if you already rely on Calendar, Meet and other parts of the Google ecosystem.

Todoist

Todoist

Student life is defined by time management. You’ll likely have to juggle multiple assignments, study sessions and a personal life (remember that?) without missing a beat. Todoist is our pick for keeping yourself on track. You can not only create the usual to-do lists, but set up task boards, set priorities and even delegate items to others — helpful if it’s a roommate’s turn to buy dinner.

The free Todoist plan will likely be enough for school with support for five active projects, five collaborators and 5MB file uploads. You’ll only want to shell out $36 per year for a Pro account if you have many on-the-go projects (up to 300), need to upload large files or want to set reminder alerts. Whatever you need, this might be key to getting a paper done on time.

Inmagine Pixlr E

Inmagine Pixlr E

It used to be that free image editors were underpowered or ungainly, and you could generally forget about web versions. That’s not the case with Pixlr E. Inmagine’s more advanced free editor offers many of the tools that previously required a subscription or a hefty offline app, such as image healing, visual effects and multi-layer compositing. It works with Photoshop files (PSD) and other common formats, too. You might not need much more if you want to touch up a presentation picture or crop a snapshot for photography class.

There are limitations. Pixlr E is ad-supported, and you’ll miss out on the $59 Premium level’s AI-powered tools, 8K by 8K resolution support and templates. You’ll also want to investigate tools like Inkscape if you’re creating vector illustrations or need a host of artistic apps. Pixlr is far more affordable than Adobe Creative Suite, mind you, and the browser-based technology might prove a lifesaver if you have to edit a project on an unfamiliar computer.

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve

You might not have to pay for a costly video editing package to make it through film school. Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve provides an in-depth bundle of editing, color correction, audio and effects tools at no cost. You could make a short film for class using the same core tools used to produce Hollywood blockbusters, complete with multi-user collaboration.

In fact, you’ll likely have little need for paid editing products unless your coursework has very specific requirements. You’ll only want to think about spending $295 for DaVinci Resolve Studio if you want to edit footage beyond 4K at 60 frames per second, work with more video formats or rely on advanced 3D, AI and HDR tools. Unless your professors demand that you use a rival tool like Final Cut Pro or Premiere Pro, this should be enough to learn the fundamentals.

Blender

Blender

If you’re creating 3D artwork for games or videos at school, you’ll want a strong modeling suite — and one of the more capable packages happens to be free. Blender provides a wide range of modeling, animation and sculpting tools for 3D content, while budding movie producers can take advantage of built-in compositing, motion tracking, story art drawing and simple video editing. You might have everything you need to create a CG short film.

You’ll want to be sure that Blender can fulfill your class requirements, and you might want more focused software like Natron (an equally free compositing tool) to supplement your work. With that said, Blender’s open source code and extensible design work in its favor. It’s easy to find a bevy of free or low-cost add-ons that can meet your needs, and you can even write your own extensions if you’re comfortable with scripting.

Audacity

Audacity

Some courses may need an audio editor, whether it’s to create a podcast, tweak game sound effects or finesse a song. If you’re in that boat, Audacity can sometimes do the trick. The free, open source editor gives you the essentials for capturing and editing multi-track recordings, including support for effects and plugins.

Audacity won’t replace heavy-duty digital audio workstations like Audition, Logic Pro, Pro Tools or Reason. Those offer non-destructive editing, and often include a slew of effects generators and other tools aimed at music and video production. This is a good place to learn some basics, though, and may well be all you need if a class isn’t particularly demanding.

Evernote Scannable

Evernote Scannable

Paper is still a reality in the classroom, whether it comes in the form of a handout, a sketched diagram or a friend’s handwritten notes. But you won’t have to worry about how you’ll digitize them. There are a number of free document scanning apps available, and Evernote Scannable is one of the best. You just have to point your camera at documents to produce easily readable PDF and JPEG files you can share with the rest of the class. While you can sync content with Evernote, it’s not required.

Scannable is limited to iPads and iPhones as of this writing, so you’ll want to look to alternatives like Microsoft Lens if you prefer Android (there’s also an iOS version). Microsoft’s app is also a good pick if you want to export scans in Office formats or convert handwritten text. Either way, you might not have to worry about lugging a binder around campus.

Spotify

Spotify

Let’s be frank: you’re going to need some study music, and Spotify still provides the best free soundtrack for those lengthy learning sessions. The no-charge tier will periodically interrupt your listening with ads, but you can create playlists, follow podcasts and enjoy much of the core Spotify experience. You can stream songs on mobile and smart speakers, too, so the music won’t stop when you leave your desk.

You may still want to pay for service. Spotify’s mobile app makes you listen to all but a handful of playlists in shuffle mode, and you’ll have a limited number of skips per hour. The higher maximum audio quality (320Kbps versus 160Kbps) is also worthwhile if your audio system can do it justice. Mercifully, you might not have to deal with the full $10 monthly fee if you upgrade. Students can get Premium for $5 per month, and you’re eligible for up to four years. The free plan is nonetheless a good way to test the waters, and might just do the trick if you’re searching for some background tunes.

PDF Candy

PDF Candy

There’s a distinct possibility you’ll encounter PDF documents at school, whether it’s a research paper or the class syllabus. You won’t have to pay for apps like Adobe Acrobat to edit those files, at least. PDF Candy offers a free web-based editor. You can modify PDFs, convert to and from common formats (including Word and PowerPoint), extract images and otherwise take control. This might do the job if you need to flesh out scanned class notes or extract a quote from a scientific study.

There are time and size limits for the free version (up to 500MB per task), and you should also consider the $48 yearly or $99 lifetime plans if you want faster web processing or the Windows app’s offline editing. Alternatives like Acrobat are also better if you need commenting, mobile editing and other advanced features. Still, the free web tool is difficult to beat for basic utilities.

Peacock

NBC Peacock

You won’t need to pay for a streaming video service to help yourself unwind after a mind-frying midterm. NBCUniversal’s Peacock is one of the few major streamers to offer completely free viewing. You’ll have to live with ads and won’t get the full breadth of content (more on that in a moment), but it might be just what you need if you’d rather watch back-to-back episodes of The Office than hunt down YouTube videos.

The no-cost version only includes a portion of what the service has to offer. You may want to spend $5 per month for Peacock Premium to get originals like Bel-Air, every season of The Office, next-day access to current NBC shows and live sports. And if you despise ads with a bitter passion, your only choice is to pay for a $10 per month Premium Plus membership. Competing services like Amazon Prime Video and Netflix often don’t have any free option, however. This lets you splurge for a sports event or must-see show without losing access to the entire video catalog when you stop paying.

Mon, 18 Jul 2022 02:44:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/free-stuff-for-college-students-143051840.html
Killexams : Startups News No result found, try new keyword!Showcase your company news with guaranteed exposure both in print and online Ready to embrace the fast-paced future we’re all experiencing? Join us for tech… Outstanding Women in Business are ... Fri, 05 Aug 2022 06:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bizjournals.com/news/technology/startups Killexams : Holding A Mirror Up In Front Of GNU/Linux

We’re guessing that we have something in common with a substantial number of our readers in that this post is being written on an open-source operating system. A well-known GNU/Linux distribution provides everything you might expect from a PC, but of course it’s not the only open-source game in town. A year-old piece from [Unixsheikh] caught the eye with the title “Why you should migrate everything from Linux to BSD“, and being naturally curious, it was worth a read.  It’s interesting enough to talk about here not because of its BSD advocacy, but because of its examination of some of GNU/Linux’s shortcomings. Using and appreciating an operating system shouldn’t mean slavish fandom, it’s worth every Linux user taking a moment to consider its points.

There are two main thrusts to the argument, firstly that GNU/Linux has become a bloated kernel with a fragmented operating system, and secondly that the interests of the various big businesses that derive income from Linux-based products have led to the resulting ecosystem being shaped by those businesses and in their interests. The piece points to the huge disconnect between kernel developers and operating system users, and the seeming lack of concern over some of the problems this can create. It’s a jarring read for an open-source software enthusiast because while there is much good in the world of free software even the most devoted of fans should admit that it’s not without problems. We think it’s worth a read not necessarily to agree with but in order to stir discussion and debate. Every community needs to look in the mirror sometimes.

As for BSD, it’s worth admitting there lies a shameful gap in a Hackaday scribe’s knowledge. One that deserves to be plugged, in the interests of better understanding.

Header: Tux, Larry Ewing, CC0.

Sat, 06 Aug 2022 11:59:00 -0500 Jenny List en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2021/02/07/holding-a-mirror-up-in-front-of-gnu-linux/
Killexams : The Curse of Round Numbers

Tobias Levkovich is chief U.S. equity strategist for Citigroup Global Markets, in New York City. We talked with him about why the Dow Jones industrial average sometimes seems to hover around round numbers for a long time ... and what it will take to reach Dow 100,000.

The Dow Jones industrial average recently made big headlines when it breached the 10,000 level -- again. It seems as though the market gets stuck at these round numbers.

It does. Dow 100 was hit in August 1922, and markets stayed within a range of 100 for nearly 20 years. Dow 1000 was no different. After coming within 1% of that level in January 1966, it traded around that number for roughly 17 years. We reached 10,000 when Rudy Giuliani was still mayor of New York City, and we’ve been there for ten and a half years. These big, round numbers tend to be sticky.

How come?

It’s psychological. And a lot of it may be a generational thing. Every generation has experienced an economic period that’s been meaningfully difficult. Our grandparents had the Great Depression; our parents had the 1970s, with a steep recession and high inflation. We’re going through a difficult period now.

So, are we stuck?

We’ve had a 60% rally off the bottom in March. This is the fourth-largest rally off a bear-market bottom since 1929. After you get these big moves, the market has to consolidate. And you still have to address some economic fundamentals lurking in the background -- prospects for corporate earnings and higher interest rates, for example. It takes time for these things to be addressed. When you hit big landmarks, it tends to take longer [see Kiplinger’s 2010 market outlook].

The next big, round number on the Dow seems impossibly far away.

The time that the Dow spends hovering around big, round numbers has grown shorter, given the greater amounts of money invested in stocks and the ease of trading. Sometime in the next five years would be par for the course for a new bull market to break out.

Dow 100,000 seems like an almost outrageous level to consider. But if it took 40 years from the day the Dow broke above 10,000 for the first time to achieve ten times that figure, it would require less than a 6% compound annual return -- which is not altogether implausible.

Sun, 17 Jul 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.kiplinger.com/article/investing/t038-c000-s002-the-curse-of-round-numbers.html
Killexams : The emergence of spin electronics in data storage
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    Killexams : Market Strategist: Invest in Tech, Financials in 2018

    Samantha Azzarello is a global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Asset Management. Here's an excerpt from our interview:

    KIPLINGER’S: Where do you see the U.S. stock market headed in 2018?

    AZZARELLO: We see a continuation of the bull market. The backdrop for that is economic growth that remains on the path it’s on, corporate earnings growth that continues and revenue growth that maintains a positive trend. If all that stays the same, we think the chances of a bear market in 2018 are close to zero. That said, we are in the later stages of the economic expansion in the U.S., so being more selective and taking some risk out of your portfolio is a good idea.

    What’s your forecast for economic growth? It’s more of the same. We think the trend is for about 2.5% growth in gross domestic product for 2018. That’s not fireworks-worthy. But one of the silver linings to growing slower is that we can grow for so much longer. U.S. companies also benefit from global growth picking up—I don’t think that’s emphasized enough. And the fundamentals for stocks are supportive.

    Such as? When I think of equity fundamentals, I think of two questions: One, are companies more profitable than they were the year before or the quarter before? And two, are stocks cheap? Earnings growth is there, and it’s real. It’s not just cost-cutting to prop up earnings, it’s real revenue growth that’s coming in positive—and you can’t fudge that. We’re expecting revenue growth of about 5% for Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index and earnings growth in the high single digits. Corporate profit margins are high now, but we think they can be sustained. If you keep profit margins high, then any bump to revenues supercharges earnings.

    But stocks aren’t cheap. What about valuations? Stock valuations are more art than science. There’s no clear price-earnings ratio that’s going to tell you when to get out of the market. Think of a traffic light. There’s nothing about valuations now that screams green light. But at the same time, there’s no red light, either. We’re somewhere in the middle—a yellow light. That’s harder to navigate, which is why you need to be more selective, why you need to be picky, when it comes to investment styles, themes and sectors—that’s what’s going to matter to your return over the next few years, because valuations are so elevated.

    Where should investors put their money now? We still like stocks of large companies with faster-than-average earnings growth. They’ve worked well in this environment, and we think they’re here to stay for a while longer. We don’t like relying on something coming from Washington for tax reform or deregulation to rally behind small-cap stocks. We could get behind small caps in 2018, but it depends on things that really are outside anybody’s control. Within sectors, we like technology, and not just the sexy, social media story. We like tech across the board. There are a lot of interesting things going on in tech, and it’s all underpinned by long-term growth in the industry. We also like financials. People think financials are a rising-rate story. That’s part of it; they’ll benefit as rates rise. But at the heart of why we like financials is that we think they’re undervalued. And we think they’re the next yield play. People need dividends, and financials are going to start returning a lot more cash to investors. That’s going to be a long-term trend for that sector.

    Are there other themes you’d emphasize? Something we’re talking about with clients is that we are late in the bull-market cycle. No one can call the end. But we’re looking for overheating or significant imbalances and watching GDP growth, inflation and corporate debt levels. Risk-averse investors should make sure there’s a quality bias to the stocks they’re buying. By high-quality, I mean strong balance sheets, strong management, and the ability to pay out dividends and to produce long-run sustainable returns. And you still need good, high-quality fixed income in your portfolio, such as Treasuries or high-quality corporates. They’re the counterbalance to stocks. They’re like an umbrella—you need them in a storm. The problem is that you can’t buy the umbrella once the storm hits.

    Fri, 01 Dec 2017 15:07:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.kiplinger.com/article/investing/t038-c000-s002-market-strategist-invest-in-tech-financials-2018.html
    Killexams : Lean NOx Traps (LNT) Market Research, Development, Top Companies, Trends and Growth 2022 To 2028

    The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

    Jul 13, 2022 (The Expresswire) -- The Lean NOx Traps (LNT) Market 2022 report provides global investors with a revolutionary decision-making tool covering the key fundamentals of the global Lean NOx Traps (LNT) market. The research analysts provide an elaborate description of the value chain and its distributor analysis. This study provides comprehensive data that enhances the understanding, scope, and application of this report. The report evaluates the scope, size, and growth of the industry including success factors. Industry forecasts has been provided combined with growth rates and an analysis of the industry key players and their market shares.

    Get a trial PDF of the report at - https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/request-sample/20146852

    The Lean NOx Traps (LNT) market report provides a detailed analysis of global market size, regional and country-level market size, segmentation market growth, market share, competitive Landscape, sales analysis, impact of domestic and global market players, value chain optimization, trade regulations, latest developments, opportunities analysis, strategic market growth analysis, product launches, area marketplace expanding, and technological innovations.

    Further, the report presents profiles of competitors in the market, key players include:

    • BASF Catalysts
    • Tenneco
    • Johnson Matthey
    • Umicore
    • Continental
    • N.E. Chemcat

    COVID-19 Impact Analysis:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a dramatic loss of human life worldwide and presents an unprecedented challenge to public health, food systems and the world of work. The economic and social disruption caused by the pandemic is devastating: tens of millions of people are at risk of falling into extreme poverty, while the number of undernourished people, currently estimated at nearly 690 million, could increase by up to 132 million by the end of the year.

    Two years into the pandemic, health systems are still facing significant challenges in providing essential health services. Ongoing disruptions have been reported in over 90% of countries surveyed in the third round of WHO’s Global pulse survey on continuity of essential health services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    To know How COVID-19 Pandemic Will Impact This Market/Industry-Request a trial copy of the report-:https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/request-covid19/20146852

    Market segmentation

    Lean NOx Traps (LNT) market is split by Type and by Application. For the period 2017-2028, the growth among segments provide accurate calculations and forecasts for revenue by Type and by Application. This analysis can help you expand your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

    By the product type, the market is primarily split into

    By the end users/application, this report covers the following segments

    • Vehicle
    • Off-highway Vehicle

    Enquire before purchasing this report -https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/20146852

    This market study covers the global and regional market with an in-depth analysis of the overall growth prospects in the market. Furthermore, it sheds light on the comprehensive competitive landscape of the global market. The report further offers a dashboard overview of leading companies encompassing their successful marketing strategies, market contribution, latest developments in both historic and present contexts.

    Market segment by regions, regional analysis covers

    North America (United States, Canada, and Mexico)

    Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia, Italy, and Rest of Europe)

    Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, South Korea, India, Southeast Asia, Australia, and Rest of Asia-Pacific)

    South America (Brazil, Argentina, Rest of South America)

    Middle East and Africa (Turkey, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Rest of Middle East and Africa)

    The content of the study subjects, includes a total of 15 chapters:

    Chapter 1, to describe Lean NOx Traps (LNT) product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market driving force and market risks.

    Chapter 2, to profile the top manufacturers of Lean NOx Traps (LNT), with price, sales, revenue and global market share of Lean NOx Traps (LNT) from 2019 to 2022.

    Chapter 3, the Lean NOx Traps (LNT) competitive situation, sales, revenue and global market share of top manufacturers are analyzed emphatically by landscape contrast.

    Chapter 4, the Lean NOx Traps (LNT) breakdown data are shown at the regional level, to show the sales, revenue and growth by regions, from 2017 to 2028.

    Chapter 5 and 6, to segment the sales by Type and application, with sales market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2017 to 2028.

    Chapter 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, to break the sales data at the country level, with sales, revenue and market share for key countries in the world, from 2017 to 2022.and Lean NOx Traps (LNT) market forecast, by regions, type and application, with sales and revenue, from 2023 to 2028.

    Chapter 12, the key raw materials and key suppliers, and industry chain of Lean NOx Traps (LNT).

    Chapter 13, 14, and 15, to describe Lean NOx Traps (LNT) sales channel, distributors, customers, research findings and conclusion, appendix and data source.

    Purchase this report (Price USD 3480 for a single-user license) -https://www.researchreportsworld.com/purchase/20146852

    Detailed TOC of Global Lean NOx Traps (LNT) Market 2022 by Company, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2028

    1 Market Overview
    1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Online Classroom
    1.2 Classification of Online Classroom by Type
    1.2.1 Overview: Global Online Classroom Market Size by Type: 2017 Versus 2021 Versus 2028
    1.2.2 Global Online Classroom Revenue Market Share by Type in 2021
    1.2.3 Cloud
    1.2.4 On-premises
    1.3 Global Online Classroom Market by Application
    1.3.1 Overview: Global Online Classroom Market Size by Application: 2017 Versus 2021 Versus 2028
    1.3.2 K-12
    1.3.3 Higher Education
    1.3.4 Corporate Application
    1.4 Global Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast
    1.5 Global Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast by Region
    1.5.1 Global Online Classroom Market Size by Region: 2017 VS 2021 VS 2028
    1.5.2 Global Online Classroom Market Size by Region, (2017-2022)
    1.5.3 North America Online Classroom Market Size and Prospect (2017-2028)
    1.5.4 Europe Online Classroom Market Size and Prospect (2017-2028)
    1.5.5 Asia-Pacific Online Classroom Market Size and Prospect (2017-2028)
    1.5.6 South America Online Classroom Market Size and Prospect (2017-2028)
    1.5.7 Middle East and Africa Online Classroom Market Size and Prospect (2017-2028)
    1.6 Market Drivers, Restraints and Trends
    1.6.1 Online Classroom Market Drivers
    1.6.2 Online Classroom Market Restraints
    1.6.3 Online Classroom Trends Analysis
    2 Company Profiles
    2.1 Saba Software
    2.1.1 Saba Software Details
    2.1.2 Saba Software Major Business
    2.1.3 Saba Software Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.1.4 Saba Software Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.1.5 Saba Software latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.2 Google
    2.2.1 Google Details
    2.2.2 Google Major Business
    2.2.3 Google Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.2.4 Google Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.2.5 Google latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.3 Blackboard
    2.3.1 Blackboard Details
    2.3.2 Blackboard Major Business
    2.3.3 Blackboard Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.3.4 Blackboard Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.3.5 Blackboard latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.4 Microsoft
    2.4.1 Microsoft Details
    2.4.2 Microsoft Major Business
    2.4.3 Microsoft Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.4.4 Microsoft Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.4.5 Microsoft latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.5 IBM
    2.5.1 IBM Details
    2.5.2 IBM Major Business
    2.5.3 IBM Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.5.4 IBM Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.5.5 IBM latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.6 Cisco
    2.6.1 Cisco Details
    2.6.2 Cisco Major Business
    2.6.3 Cisco Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.6.4 Cisco Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.6.5 Cisco latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.7 Dell
    2.7.1 Dell Details
    2.7.2 Dell Major Business
    2.7.3 Dell Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.7.4 Dell Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.7.5 Dell latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.8 Oracle
    2.8.1 Oracle Details
    2.8.2 Oracle Major Business
    2.8.3 Oracle Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.8.4 Oracle Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.8.5 Oracle latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.9 HTC
    2.9.1 HTC Details
    2.9.2 HTC Major Business
    2.9.3 HTC Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.9.4 HTC Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.9.5 HTC latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.10 Samsung Electronics
    2.10.1 Samsung Electronics Details
    2.10.2 Samsung Electronics Major Business
    2.10.3 Samsung Electronics Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.10.4 Samsung Electronics Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.10.5 Samsung Electronics latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.11 Sony
    2.11.1 Sony Details
    2.11.2 Sony Major Business
    2.11.3 Sony Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.11.4 Sony Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.11.5 Sony latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.12 Hitachi
    2.12.1 Hitachi Details
    2.12.2 Hitachi Major Business
    2.12.3 Hitachi Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.12.4 Hitachi Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.12.5 Hitachi latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.13 Panasonic
    2.13.1 Panasonic Details
    2.13.2 Panasonic Major Business
    2.13.3 Panasonic Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.13.4 Panasonic Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.13.5 Panasonic latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.14 Barco
    2.14.1 Barco Details
    2.14.2 Barco Major Business
    2.14.3 Barco Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.14.4 Barco Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.14.5 Barco latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.15 LG Electronics
    2.15.1 LG Electronics Details
    2.15.2 LG Electronics Major Business
    2.15.3 LG Electronics Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.15.4 LG Electronics Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.15.5 LG Electronics latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.16 Edvance360
    2.16.1 Edvance360 Details
    2.16.2 Edvance360 Major Business
    2.16.3 Edvance360 Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.16.4 Edvance360 Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.16.5 Edvance360 latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.17 Electa Communication
    2.17.1 Electa Communication Details
    2.17.2 Electa Communication Major Business
    2.17.3 Electa Communication Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.17.4 Electa Communication Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.17.5 Electa Communication latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.18 Braincert
    2.18.1 Braincert Details
    2.18.2 Braincert Major Business
    2.18.3 Braincert Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.18.4 Braincert Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.18.5 Braincert latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.19 Skyprep
    2.19.1 Skyprep Details
    2.19.2 Skyprep Major Business
    2.19.3 Skyprep Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.19.4 Skyprep Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.19.5 Skyprep latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.20 Impero Software
    2.20.1 Impero Software Details
    2.20.2 Impero Software Major Business
    2.20.3 Impero Software Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.20.4 Impero Software Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.20.5 Impero Software latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.21 Wiz IQ
    2.21.1 Wiz IQ Details
    2.21.2 Wiz IQ Major Business
    2.21.3 Wiz IQ Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.21.4 Wiz IQ Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.21.5 Wiz IQ latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.22 Bigbluebutton
    2.22.1 Bigbluebutton Details
    2.22.2 Bigbluebutton Major Business
    2.22.3 Bigbluebutton Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.22.4 Bigbluebutton Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.22.5 Bigbluebutton latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.23 Digital Samba
    2.23.1 Digital Samba Details
    2.23.2 Digital Samba Major Business
    2.23.3 Digital Samba Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.23.4 Digital Samba Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.23.5 Digital Samba latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.24 Tutorroom
    2.24.1 Tutorroom Details
    2.24.2 Tutorroom Major Business
    2.24.3 Tutorroom Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.24.4 Tutorroom Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.24.5 Tutorroom latest Developments and Future Plans
    2.25 Veative Labs
    2.25.1 Veative Labs Details
    2.25.2 Veative Labs Major Business
    2.25.3 Veative Labs Online Classroom Product and Solutions
    2.25.4 Veative Labs Online Classroom Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    2.25.5 Veative Labs latest Developments and Future Plans
    3 Market Competition, by Players
    3.1 Global Online Classroom Revenue and Share by Players (2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022)
    3.2 Market Concentration Rate
    3.2.1 Top 3 Online Classroom Players Market Share in 2021
    3.2.2 Top 10 Online Classroom Players Market Share in 2021
    3.2.3 Market Competition Trend
    3.3 Online Classroom Players Head Office, Products and Services Provided
    3.4 Online Classroom Mergers and Acquisitions
    3.5 Online Classroom New Entrants and Expansion Plans
    4 Market Size Segment by Type
    4.1 Global Online Classroom Revenue and Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
    4.2 Global Online Classroom Market Forecast by Type (2023-2028)
    5 Market Size Segment by Application
    5.1 Global Online Classroom Revenue Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
    5.2 Global Online Classroom Market Forecast by Application (2023-2028)
    6 North America by Country, by Type, and by Application
    6.1 North America Online Classroom Revenue by Type (2017-2028)
    6.2 North America Online Classroom Revenue by Application (2017-2028)
    6.3 North America Online Classroom Market Size by Country
    6.3.1 North America Online Classroom Revenue by Country (2017-2028)
    6.3.2 United States Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    6.3.3 Canada Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    6.3.4 Mexico Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    7 Europe by Country, by Type, and by Application
    7.1 Europe Online Classroom Revenue by Type (2017-2028)
    7.2 Europe Online Classroom Revenue by Application (2017-2028)
    7.3 Europe Online Classroom Market Size by Country
    7.3.1 Europe Online Classroom Revenue by Country (2017-2028)
    7.3.2 Germany Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    7.3.3 France Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    7.3.4 United Kingdom Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    7.3.5 Russia Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    7.3.6 Italy Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    8 Asia-Pacific by Region, by Type, and by Application
    8.1 Asia-Pacific Online Classroom Revenue by Type (2017-2028)
    8.2 Asia-Pacific Online Classroom Revenue by Application (2017-2028)
    8.3 Asia-Pacific Online Classroom Market Size by Region
    8.3.1 Asia-Pacific Online Classroom Revenue by Region (2017-2028)
    8.3.2 China Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    8.3.3 Japan Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    8.3.4 South Korea Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    8.3.5 India Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    8.3.6 Southeast Asia Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    8.3.7 Australia Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    9 South America by Country, by Type, and by Application
    9.1 South America Online Classroom Revenue by Type (2017-2028)
    9.2 South America Online Classroom Revenue by Application (2017-2028)
    9.3 South America Online Classroom Market Size by Country
    9.3.1 South America Online Classroom Revenue by Country (2017-2028)
    9.3.2 Brazil Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    9.3.3 Argentina Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    10 Middle East and Africa by Country, by Type, and by Application
    10.1 Middle East and Africa Online Classroom Revenue by Type (2017-2028)
    10.2 Middle East and Africa Online Classroom Revenue by Application (2017-2028)
    10.3 Middle East and Africa Online Classroom Market Size by Country
    10.3.1 Middle East and Africa Online Classroom Revenue by Country (2017-2028)
    10.3.2 Turkey Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    10.3.3 Saudi Arabia Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    10.3.4 UAE Online Classroom Market Size and Forecast (2017-2028)
    11 Research Findings and Conclusion
    12 Appendix
    12.1 Methodology
    12.2 Research Process and Data Source
    12.3 Disclaimer

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    Killexams : DRaaS Market worth $23.5 billion by 2027 – Exclusive Report by MarketsandMarkets™

    MarketsandMarkets Research Pvt. Ltd.

    Chicago, July 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- According to a research report “DRaaS Market by Service Type (Backup & Restore, Real-Time Replication, Data Protection, and Professional Services), Deployment Mode (Public Cloud and Private Cloud), Organization Size, Vertical and Region - Global Forecast to 2027”, published by MarketsandMarkets™, the global DRaaS Market size is estimated to grow from USD 8.8 billion in 2022 to USD 23.5 billion by 2027, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 21.6% during the forecast period. The DRaaS Market is fueled by the compelling need to lower TCO, save time, and allow IT teams to shift focus to higher-value tasks. Moreover, the increased need for business continuity across SMEs plays a key role in driving the growth of the DRaaS Market.

    Browse in-depth TOC on “DRaaS Market
    248 – Tables
    46 – Figures
    240 – Pages

    Download PDF Brochure: https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/pdfdownloadNew.asp?id=962

    By Service Type, the backup & restore segment to hold the largest market size during the forecast period

    The backup & restore segment is estimated to account for the largest market share among service types. Backup is the process of copying data in cloud computing environments, while restore refers to the restoration of deleted or damaged files from storage media in the event of disasters. Backup & restore services offer various benefits to enterprises, including increased agility, data retention, lower costs, faster deployments, and improved data protection.

    By Organization Size, the SMEs segment to grow at a higher CAGR during the forecast period

    The Small & Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) segment is expected to have a higher CAGR growth during the forecast period. Organizations with less than 1,000 employees are categorized as SMEs. SMEs generally face critical challenges in the form of capital, skills, and scalability. To overcome these issues, SMEs adopt the pay-as-you-go model to ensure they are not tied to contracts that have tedious provisions. The pay-as-you-go payment model also provides SMEs a great deal of service scalability.

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    By Region, North America to account for the largest market size during the forecast period

    North America is expected to hold the largest share in the DRaaS Market. North America is the most mature market in terms of DRaaS adoption due to various factors such as the well-developed economy, penetration and adoption of innovative technologies, and increased competitiveness. The market in this region is already at a mature stage, and therefore, it is expected to witness slower growth compared to other regions. The presence of most of the top market vendors such as Microsoft, IBM, VMware, AWS, and Sungard AS also plays a vital role in the growth of the North American DRaaS Market.

    Market Players:

    Major vendors in the DRaaS Market include Microsoft (US), IBM (US), VMware (US), AWS (US), Sungard AS (US), iland (US), Recovery Point (US), InterVision (US), TierPoint (US), and Infrascale (US).

    Browse Adjacent Markets: Cloud Computing Market Research Reports & Consulting

    Related Reports:

    Cloud Computing Market by Service Model (Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS)), Deployment Model (Public and Private), Organization Size, Vertical, and Region - Global Forecast to 2026

    Cloud Storage Market by Component (Solutions and Services), Application (Primary Storage, Backup and Disaster Recovery, and Archiving), Deployment Type (Public Cloud and Private Cloud), Organization Size, Vertical, and Region - Global Forecast to 2025

    CONTACT: About MarketsandMarkets™ MarketsandMarkets™ provides quantified B2B research on 30,000 high growth niche opportunities/threats which will impact 70% to 80% of worldwide companies’ revenues. Currently servicing 7500 customers worldwide including 80% of global Fortune 1000 companies as clients. Almost 75,000 top officers across eight industries worldwide approach MarketsandMarkets™ for their painpoints around revenues decisions. Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets™ are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model – GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. MarketsandMarkets™ now coming up with 1,500 MicroQuadrants (Positioning top players across leaders, emerging companies, innovators, strategic players) annually in high growth emerging segments. MarketsandMarkets™ is determined to benefit more than 10,000 companies this year for their revenue planning and help them take their innovations/disruptions early to the market by providing them research ahead of the curve. MarketsandMarkets’s flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "Knowledge Store" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets. Contact: Mr. Aashish Mehra MarketsandMarkets™ INC. 630 Dundee Road Suite 430 Northbrook, IL 60062 USA: +1-888-600-6441 Email: sales@marketsandmarkets.com
    Fri, 15 Jul 2022 01:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/draas-market-worth-23-5-130000195.html
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