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C2090-312 IBM DB2 11 DBA for z/OS

Exam Title : IBM Certified Database Administrator - DB2 11 DBA for z/OS
Exam ID : C2090-312
Exam Duration : 90 mins
Questions in test : 67
Passing Score : 59%
Official Training : DB2 11 for zOS Implementation Workshop
Exam Center : Pearson VUE
Real Questions : IBM DB2 DBA for z/OS Real Questions
VCE practice test : IBM C2090-312 Certification VCE Practice Test

Database Design and Implementation
- Design tables and views (columns, data type considerations for large objects, XML, column sequences, user-defined data types, temp tables, clone tables, temporal tables, MQTs, new archive transparency, etc.)
- Explain the different performance implications of identity column, row ID, and sequence column definitions (applications, utilities), hash access
- Design indexes (key structures, type of index, index page structure, index column order, index space, clustering, compression, index on expression, include column)
- Design table spaces (choose a DB2 page size, clustering) and determine space attributes
- Perform partitioning (table partitioning, index partitioning, DPSI, universal table space)
- Normalize data (E-R model, process model) and translate data model into physical model (denormalize tables)
- Implement user-defined integrity rules (referential integrity, user-defined functions & data types, check constraints, triggers)
- Use the appropriate method to alter DB2 objects (table, column, drop column, alter limit key, index, table space, database, online schema)
- Understand impacts of different encoding schemes 24%
Operation and Recovery
- Knowledge of commands for normal operational conditions (START, STOP, DISPLAY)
- Knowledge of commands and utility control statements for use in abnormal conditions (RECOVER, RESTART)
- Load and unload data into and from the created tables
- Reorganize objects when necessary (reorg avoidance, automatic mapping table, new reorg features)
- Monitor the object by collecting statistics (run stats, improved in-line statistics, real time stats, autonomic stats, and statistics related stored procedures)
- Monitor and manage threads and utilities (distributed, local, MODIFY DDF)
- Identify and respond to advisory/restrictive statuses on objects
- Identify and perform problem determination (traces and other utilities, plans and packages)
- Perform health checks (check utilities, offline utilities, catalog queries)
- Identify and perform actions that are needed to protect databases from planned and unplanned outages (tables spaces; indexes; full pack; hardware; Flash copies; full, incremental, reference update; copy-to-copy, non-data objects; catalog) and recovery scenarios (off-site recovery, data sharing, table spaces, indexes, roll forward, roll back, current point in time, prior point in time, system point in time copy and restore, catalog and directory, offline utilities (DSN1), new Extended RBA and LRSN) 22%
Security and Auditing
- Understanding privileges and authorities
- Protect access to DB2 and its objects
- Audit DB2 activity and resources and identify primary audit techniques
- Identify and respond appropriately to symptoms from trace output or error messages that signify security problems 6%
Performance
- Plan for performance monitoring by setting up and running monitoring procedures (continuous, detailed, periodic, exception)
- Analyze performance (manage and tune CPU requirements, memory, I/O, locks, response time, index and table compression)
- Analyze and respond to RUNSTATS statistics analysis (real-time, batch, catalog queries, reports, histograms)
- Determine when and how to perform REBIND (APCOMPARE and APREUSE)
- Describe DB2 interaction with WLM (distributed, stored procedures, user-defined functions, RRS)
- Interpret traces (statistics, accounting, performance) & explain the performance impact of different DB2 traces
- Identify and respond to critical performance metrics (excessive I/O wait times, lock-latch waits and CPU waits; deadlocks, timeouts, RID failures)
- Review and tune SQL (access paths, EXPLAIN tables, awareness of query transformation and predicate processing, use of Virtual Indexes)
- Dynamic SQL Performance (DSN_STATEMENT_CACHE_TABLE, parameter markers, literal replacement, REOPT)
- Design features for performance (hash row access, inline LOBs)
- Knowledge of controlling access paths (SYSSTATSFEEDBACK table, SYSQUERY) 22%
Installation and Migration / Upgrade
- Knowledge and understanding of the critical ZPARMs (database-, object- and application-oriented, application compatibility - no DDF)
- Identify and explain Datasharing components and commands
- Knowledge of pre-migration checklists
- Knowledge of catalog and directory (new tables, change tables, new objects) 7%
Additional Database Functionality
- Knowledge of SQL constructs (temporal, archive, table functions, built-in scalar functions, recursive, common table expresssions)
- Knowledge of SQL/PL (Array data type, new array data type functions, functions and procedures)
- Knowledge of SQL/XML (results database, XML functions, cross loader with XML, xpath expressions, FLWOR, pattern matching and regular expressions)
- Knowledge of Stored Procedures (native, external, autonomous, ziip considerations)
- Knowledge of User-defined functions (scalar functions, table functions, SQL/external functions)
- Knowledge of global variables (in stored procedures, in SQL/PL, distributed considerations) 10%
Distributed Access
- Implementing distributed data access (communications database)
- Knowledge of ZPARMs (for DDF)
- Knowledge of DDF setup (DB2 Connect, Client, Drivers, profile tables, RLMT)
- Understanding and implementing distributed data access (perf settings for DDF access) 7%

IBM DB2 11 DBA for z/OS
IBM z/OS test Questions
Killexams : IBM z/OS test Questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C2090-312 Search results Killexams : IBM z/OS test Questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C2090-312 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : Will The Real UNIX Please Stand Up?
Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie at a PDP-11. Peter Hamer [CC BY-SA 2.0]
Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie at a PDP-11. Peter Hamer [CC BY-SA 2.0]
Last week the computing world celebrated an important anniversary: the UNIX operating system turned 50 years old. What was originally developed in 1969 as a lighter weight timesharing system for a DEC minicomputer at Bell Labs has exerted a huge influence over every place that we encounter computing, from our personal and embedded devices to the unseen servers in the cloud. But in a story that has seen countless twists and turns over those five decades just what is UNIX these days?

The official answer to that question is simple. UNIX® is any operating system descended from that original Bell Labs software developed by Thompson, Ritchie et al in 1969 and bearing a licence from Bell Labs or its successor organisations in ownership of the UNIX® name. Thus, for example, HP-UX as shipped on Hewlett Packard’s enterprise machinery is one of several commercially available UNIXes, while the Ubuntu Linux distribution on which this is being written is not.

When You Could Write Off In The Mail For UNIX On A Tape

The real answer is considerably less clear, and depends upon how much you view UNIX as an ecosystem and how much instead depends upon heritage or specification compliance, and even the user experience. Names such as GNU, Linux, BSD, and MINIX enter the fray, and you could be forgiven for asking: would the real UNIX please stand up?

You too could have sent off for a copy of 1970s UNIX, if you'd had a DEC to run it on. Hannes Grobe 23:27 [CC BY-SA 2.5]
You too could have sent off for a copy of 1970s UNIX, if you’d had a DEC to run it on. Hannes Grobe 23:27 [CC BY-SA 2.5]
In the beginning, it was a relatively contiguous story. The Bell Labs team produced UNIX, and it was used internally by them and eventually released as source to interested organisations such as universities who ran it for themselves. A legal ruling from the 1950s precluded AT&T and its subsidiaries such as Bell Labs from selling software, so this was without charge. Those universities would take their UNIX version 4 or 5 tapes and install it on their DEC minicomputer, and in the manner of programmers everywhere would write their own extensions and improvements to fit their needs. The University of California did this to such an extent that by the late 1970s they had released it as their own distribution, the so-called Berkeley Software Distribution, or BSD. It still contained some of the original UNIX code so was still technically a UNIX, but was a significant departure from that codebase.

UNIX had by then become a significant business proposition for AT&T, owners of Bell Labs, and by extension a piece of commercial software that attracted hefty licence fees once Bell Labs was freed from its court-imposed obligations. This in turn led to developers seeking to break away from their monopoly, among them Richard Stallman whose GNU project started in 1983 had the aim of producing an entirely open-source UNIX-compatible operating system. Its name is a recursive acronym, “Gnu’s Not UNIX“, which states categorically its position with respect to the Bell Labs original, but provides many software components which, while they might not be UNIX as such, are certainly a lot like it. By the end of the 1980s it had been joined in the open-source camp by BSD Net/1 and its descendants newly freed from legacy UNIX code.

“It Won’t Be Big And Professional Like GNU”

In the closing years of the 1980s Andrew S. Tanenbaum, an academic at a Dutch university, wrote a book: “Operating Systems: Design and Implementation“. It contained as its teaching example a UNIX-like operating system called MINIX, which was widely adopted in universities and by enthusiasts as an accessible alternative to UNIX that would run on inexpensive desktop microcomputers such as i386 PCs or 68000-based Commodore Amigas and Atari STs. Among those enthusiasts in 1991 was a University of Helsinki student, Linus Torvalds, who having become dissatisfied with MINIX’s kernel set about writing his own. The result which was eventually released as Linux soon outgrew its MINIX roots and was combined with components of the GNU project instead of GNU’s own HURD kernel to produce the GNU/Linux operating system that many of us use today.

It won't be big and professional like GNU" Linus Torvalds' first announcement of what would become the Linux kernel.
Linus Torvalds’ first announcement of what would become the Linux kernel.

So, here we are in 2019, and despite a few lesser known operating systems and some bumps in the road such as Caldera Systems’ attempted legal attack on Linux in 2003, we have three broad groupings in the mainstream UNIX-like arena. There is “real” closed-source UNIX® such as IBM AIX, Solaris, or HP-UX, there is “Has roots in UNIX” such as the BSD family including MacOS, and there is “Definitely not UNIX but really similar to it” such as the GNU/Linux family of distributions. In terms of what they are capable of, there is less distinction between them than vendors would have you believe unless you are fond of splitting operating-system hairs. Indeed even users of the closed-source variants will frequently find themselves running open-source code from GNU and other origins.

At 50 years old then, the broader UNIX-like ecosystem which we’ll take to include the likes of GNU/Linux and BSD is in great shape. At our level it’s not worth worrying too much about which is the “real” UNIX, because all of these projects have benefitted greatly from the five decades of collective development. But it does raise an interesting question: what about the next five decades? Can a solution for timesharing on a 1960s minicomputer continue to adapt for the hardware and demands of mid-21st-century computing? Our guess is that it will, not in that your UNIX clone in twenty years will be identical to the one you have now, but the things that have kept it relevant for 50 years will continue to do so for the forseeable future. We are using UNIX and its clones at 50 because they have proved versatile enough to evolve to fit the needs of each successive generation, and it’s not unreasonable to expect this to continue. We look forward to seeing the directions it takes.

As always, the comments are open.

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Jenny List en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2019/11/05/will-the-real-unix-please-stand-up/
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