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Exam Code: C2040-405 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
C2040-405 IBM Notes and Domino 9.0 Social Edition System Administration Update

Exam Title : IBM Certified Advanced Application Developer - Notes and Domino 9.0
Exam ID : C2040-405
Exam Duration : 75 mins
Questions in test : 48
Passing Score : 70%
Official Training : TLCC's Notes Domino 9.0 System Administration Update distance learning course
Exam Center : Pearson VUE
Real Questions : IBM Notes and Domino Social Edition System Administration Update Real Questions
VCE practice test : IBM C2040-405 Certification VCE Practice Test

General Administration
- Implement Group Messages by Date, Abbreviated Dates and Snippets features
- Use server group names and pattern matching characters in Program documents
- Use "Mark new contacts as private by default" in desktop policy document
- Set policy settings for return receipts
- Understand and configure Database Maintenance Tool (dbmt)
- Understand and configure Quality of Service (QoS)
- Configure policy settings documents
- Understand client features introduced in IBM Notes 9.0

Install and Configure
- Configure IBM Connections Files with IBM iNotes
- Configure IBM Domino Social Edition Open Social Component for IBM iNotes clients
- Configure OpenSocial components
- Configure widget catalog
- Install and configure IBM Notes Browser Plug-in
- Render embedded experiences in IBM Notes mail

Integration
- Configure IBM HTTP Server on an IBM Domino server
- Configure IBM Domino to Use IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager as the identity provider
- Integrate IBM Docs with IBM iNotes
- Integrate IBM Sametime with IBM iNotes and IBM Notes

Security
- Configure and setup SAML
- Configure TLS
- Understand how to use a credential store application
- Understand Secure Hash Algorithm-2 (SHA-2)
- Understand uses of SAML
- Use SAML to configure federated identity authentication

Troubleshooting
- Configure the Fault Analyzer task
- Troubleshoot the widget catalog, locked domains, and the IBM Domino OpenSocial Component
- Troubleshoot SAML

IBM Notes and Domino 9.0 Social Edition System Administration Update
IBM Administration benefits
Killexams : IBM Administration benefits - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C2040-405 Search results Killexams : IBM Administration benefits - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/C2040-405 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : Yes, IBM is in the insurance technology business

“We do business with … the top 100 insurance companies in the world,” said Mark McLaughlin (pictured), IBM’s general manager of insurance.

That reality appears to be not widely known.

“The number one complaint I hear from our customers, from our insurtech partners and from our salespeople is ‘I didn’t know IBM did that,’” McLaughlin said during the recent ITC 2022 conference in Las Vegas. “I don’t think we’ve gotten the word out as much as we need to.”

McLaughlin, speaking during the recent ITC 2022 conference in Las Vegas, explained that the company’s insurance industry business is quite substantive, helping insurer clients pull together software, data, AI, security, and services. IBM also offers process consulting, process automation, technical assistance support and hardware capabilities.

IBM’s insurance reach includes personal lines, commercial lines, life insurance, group benefits and reinsurance, McLaughlin noted.

McLaughlin, in his current position for about six months, handled R&D strategies for the insurance industry at IBM before that. Going back further, he’s a 15-year veteran of IBM’s insurance practice.

Beyond mainframe

McLaughlin noted that many insurers still use mainframes and have huge investments in their core operational systems, while others are looking at cloud-based applications and trying to figure out how to customize that technology to their needs. Still others are trying to partner with insurtechs to take advantage of their distribution, digital capabilities, models and newer sources of data. IBM, he said, works in all scenarios.

“We catalyze [products and services] across that,” McLaughlin said. “IBM is really investing a great deal of money to provide the sort of connective glue that helps connect the legacy systems that you might still need, and also modernize the systems that you decide you don’t need.”

The goal, he said is to connect those technology pieces to data in the insurtech “layer.”

IBM also helps insurance companies automate, he said.

“I’ve got automation tools, AI models, I’ve got different AI capabilities, but I have to deploy those across an average of 14 policy administration systems that insurance companies carry,” McLaughlin said. 

IBM has long provided business consulting to insurance companies, via its database tools, to help them with challenges such as pricing more efficiently. The emergence of insurtechs has led IBM to expand its focus toward helping clients partner with startups. Insurers have plenty in this area with which they need help, McLaughlin explained.

“People think the insurtechs are trying to displace the insurers … but most of them, honestly, just want to partner with the insurer and build a better mousetrap and do claims faster or market better,” McLaughlin said. “We are about, how do you connect with [them] quickly. The number one thing that insurers complain to us about is speed to market. They know they have to roll-out value added services. They know they have to have a mobile experience that connects with insurers. Doing that and the sprawl of IT that insurers have today –it’s really hard and takes a long time.”

Legacy versus the cloud

In the insurtech age, some insurers are getting rid of their old legacy systems and replacing them with cloud-based platforms that are easier to adapt and modernize. Insurtechs, in turn, often pronounce those older networks as outdated and unnecessary in today’s market. According to McLaughlin, it’s not as simple as getting rid of an older system and replacing it with something new.

“You have to think about ‘what are the characteristics of your insurance workload’ and ‘where is the best place to run that workload?’ In that world, theirs is going to be a mix of public cloud, private cloud, mainframe and specialized data appliances in … an existing data center,” McLaughlin said. “Most insurers report that as the future.”

At the same time, McLaughlin declined to advocate for a specific must-have technology for insurers in the insurtech age. Instead, he urges insurers to avoid “locking” themselves into a rigid technology option.

“If you are stuck on one core, if you are stuck with one cloud, you are limited in your ability to compete relative to insurance companies,” McLaughlin said.

 AI and in-depth data analytics are also particularly useful these days toward helping insurers strengthen their customer base, he added.

“We have to know our customers better [and] we have to know our risks better,” McLaughlin said. “We have to be able to deploy those insights in ways that help insurance and healthcare distributors serve insurance more effectively.”

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 23:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.insurancebusinessmag.com/us/news/technology/yes-ibm-is-in-the-insurance-technology-business-423505.aspx
Killexams : WATCH: Biden says IBM investment will help competition with China

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. (AP) — President Joe Biden said Thursday that a $20 billion investment by IBM in New York’s Hudson River Valley would help deliver the United States a technological edge against China, hailing the expansion during an appearance with two House Democrats in competitive races in next month’s critical elections.

Watch Biden’s remarks in the player above.

The president cited IBM’s commitment as part of a larger manufacturing boom, spurred by this summer’s passage of a $280 billion measure intended to boost the semiconductor industry and scientific research. That legislation was needed for national and economic security, Biden said in Poughkeepsie, adding that “the Chinese Communist Party actively lobbied against” it.

“The United States has to lead the world of producing these advanced chips — this law is going to make sure that it will,” Biden said.

Democratic candidates have largely avoided election-year appearances with Biden, whose approval ratings remain underwater. Bucking that trend in New York were Reps. Sean Patrick Maloney and Pat Ryan.

The lawmakers, along with Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul, greeted Biden upon his arrival at Stewart Air National Guard Base.

“When I heard @POTUS was looking to see the benefits of the CHIPS & Science Act first-hand, I told him that the Hudson Valley was the perfect place,” Maloney wrote Wednesday on Twitter. “I’m thrilled to host him in Poughkeepsie this week to celebrate the major wins and good-paying jobs we are delivering here in NY.”

READ MORE: Why a third of American workers changed jobs during the Great Resignation

The CHIPS and Science Act, which Biden signed in August, was a rare bill for which the president was able to win bipartisan support.

IBM’s $20 billion investment over the next decade is intended to bolster research and development and manufacturing of semiconductors, mainframe technology, artificial intelligence and quantum computing.

“As we tackle large-scale technological challenges in climate, energy, transportation and more, we must continue to invest in innovation and discovery — because advanced technologies are key to solving these problems and driving economic prosperity, including better jobs, for millions of Americans,” said Arvind Krishna, IBM’s chairman and CEO.

IBM’s commitment comes on the heels of chipmaker Micron announcing this week an investment of up to $100 billion over the next 20-plus years to build a plant in upstate New York that could create 9,000 factory jobs. In his remarks, Biden also celebrated Intel’s plant groundbreaking in Ohio and an investment by WolfSpeed for chip production in North Carolina.

Maloney, chairman of the powerful Democratic congressional campaign fundraising arm, is running against Republican state Assemblyman Mike Lawler in the 17th Congressional District. Ryan faces state Assemblyman Colin Schmitt in the 18th District.

The boundaries of most New York districts, including Maloney’s and Ryan’s, have been affected by redistricting.

Ryan in August won a close special election to serve out the term of Democrat Antonio Delgado, who vacated his 19th District seat after he was appointed lieutenant governor by Hochul. Ryan is running for a full term in the 18th District, where he lives.

READ MORE: OPEC+ makes sharp production cut to boost prices; gasoline costs may rise

Maloney, who had represented that district since 2013, decided to run in the 17th District. His Hudson Valley home fell inside the new boundaries after redistricting.

Hochul, who took office last year after Democrat Andrew Cuomo resigned amid sexual harassment allegations, is looking to win a full term. Her opponent is Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin.

Later Thursday, Biden was scheduled to be in central New Jersey for a fundraiser at the home of Gov. Phil Murphy in support of the Democratic National Committee. In the evening, Biden planned to attend a Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee fundraiser in Manhattan hosted by James Murdoch, the son of News Corp. publisher Rupert Murdoch.

James Murdoch and his wife, Kathryn, a climate change activist, were major donors to Biden’s 2020 presidential campaign. In 2020, Murdoch resigned from the board of News Corp. amid differences over editorial content at his father’s company, which operates The Wall Street Journal and the New York Post. The elder Murdoch is also chairman of Fox Corp., which includes Fox News Channel.

While Biden has been kept at arms length by many Democratic candidates, he’s been a prodigious fundraiser for his party this election cycle, raising more than $19.6 million for the Democratic National Committee.

Associated Press writers Michelle L. Price in New York City and Michael Catalini in Trenton, New Jersey, contributed to this report.

Correction: This story incorrectly stated that President Joe Biden spoke in Pennsylvania on Thursday; he made his remarks in New York state. We regret the error.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 05:33:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.pbs.org/newshour/politics/watch-live-biden-makes-remarks-on-jobs-and-the-economy-in-pennsylvania
Killexams : Biden hails IBM's $20 billion New York manufacturing deal

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y., Oct 6 (Reuters) - President Joe Biden on Thursday championed his administration's push to subsidize U.S. semiconductor chip manufacturing and boost blue-collar jobs at a visit to an IBM Corp (IBM.N) facility in New York.

IBM plans to invest $20 billion in New York's Hudson Valley region, once a manufacturing powerhouse, over the next decade to make and develop semiconductors, mainframe technology, artificial intelligence and quantum computing.

"Where is it written that we can’t lead manufacturing in the world?” Biden said. "The supply chain is going to start here and end here, in the United States."

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Government funding is essential to boost manufacturing and ensure U.S. national security by producing critical goods now made abroad, Biden said. His administration and fellow Democrats have directed billions in federal funding to encourage private- sector spending and create jobs.

IBM's announcement is the latest in a string of investments unveiled since Biden signed the Chips and Science bill in August which funded $52 billion to subsidize semiconductor chips manufacturing and research.

"America invented these chips," Biden said.

Hefty subsidies for private businesses are necessary because China and the European Union had been awarding billions in incentives to chip companies, the White House says.

U.S. President Joe Biden tours areas damaged by Hurricane Ian during a visit to Florida, in Fort Myers Beach, Florida, U.S., October 5, 2022. REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

Biden has sought to capitalize on the investment announcements ahead of next month's midterm congressional elections. Last month, he traveled to Ohio to speak at the site of Intel Corp's (INTC.O) planned $20 billion semiconductor manufacturing facility.

The Hudson Valley, home of IBM's Poughkeepsie site, was an economic powerhouse during America's Industrial Revolution, but regional jobs dried up during the second half of the last century, as companies fled to lower-cost locations.

IBM, which laid off thousands of people in the region in the 1990s when it moved chip and other manufacturing, said it now plans to make the site "a global hub of the company's quantum computing development, just as it is today for mainframes."

IBM did not provide a detailed breakdown of its $20 billion investment plans.

The White House said it was sparked by Biden's economic policies.

"The industrial strategy is really helping to drive a renaissance in American manufacturing, and domestic investment ... that we haven’t seen in generations," White House National Economic Director Brian Deese told reporters en route to the IBM site.

On Tuesday, Micron Technology (MU.O) said it would invest up to $100 billion over the next 20-plus years to build a semiconductor fabrication facility in New York that is expected to create nearly 50,000 jobs, with the first phase investment of $20 billion planned this decade.

Biden was joined by IBM Chief Executive Arvind Krishna.

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Reporting by Nandita Bose in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and David Shepardson in Washington Editing by Heather Timmons and Matthew Lewis

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 12:16:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.reuters.com/technology/biden-tout-ibms-20-bln-investment-new-york-over-next-decade-2022-10-06/
Killexams : When it comes to health care, ‘you can’t take a one-size-fits-all-approach’ © Kristy Walker for Fortune

Creating a healthy business starts with healthy employees—and employers are redefining what it means to take care of their employees and their changing needs coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“[At Johnson & Johnson], we have the health of the employee front and center, whether that be physical health, whether that be mental health, even financial health and wellness,” said Vanessa Broadhurst, executive vice president of global corporate affairs at Johnson & Johnson. “But when I think about that, I also think about the holistic environment we are trying to create in the workplace.” 

The need for a community prevailed during the pandemic, as more employees relied on their company to guide them through finding reliable health care information than ever before. IBM senior vice president and chief human resources officer Nickle LaMoreaux emphasized that businesses don’t need to be in the health care space to ensure that health is central to their workforce during a panel discussion on Tuesday at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women summit in Laguna Niguel, Calif. 

The responsibility for the employer has shifted over the last few years, and IBM learned that its role was to meet employees where they were at in their personal health journey. “You can’t take a one-size-fits-all approach,” said LaMoreaux. And part of fine-tuning IBM’s approach to providing better quality health care included listening to employee feedback from micro-cultures within their team. 

Like LaMoreaux, LaFawn Davis, senior vice president of environmental, social, and governance at Indeed, believes understanding intersectionality is important to providing benefits that actually work for their employees.

“We cannot look at the workforce as just one big organization. It really has to be tailored towards different demographics and not just individual demographics, but intersections," Davis said. “Normally when I introduce myself, I say I am black. I’m queer. I’m a woman. I am of a mature age. I am a mother of an adult child. And I’m fabulous.

Each layer of her individuality, Davis explained, gives her a different experience of the workforce than other people. And understanding how these experiences make employees feel allows Indeed to create a place where people feel a sense of well-being. 

But employees bear the responsibility of vocalizing these experiences so employers can meet their needs.

“Resource groups are a great voice for change,” Davis said, explaining they allow the employer to ask specific questions about which benefits are working for them, which aren’t, and which are missing from their package. And this open conversation gives the companies greater insight to keep up with the changing health care needs within their workforces.

This story was originally featured on Fortune.com

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 13:55:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/when-it-comes-to-health-care-you-can-t-take-a-one-size-fits-all-approach/ar-AA12TXe1
Killexams : Social Security recipients get 8.7% cost-of-living increase, the highest in more than 40 years

(CNN) — Social Security recipients will receive an annual cost-of-living adjustment of 8.7% next year, the largest increase since 1981, the Social Security Administration announced Thursday.

The spike will boost retirees’ monthly payments by $146 to an estimated average of $1,827 for 2023.

The hefty increase, which follows a 5.9% adjustment for this year, is aimed at helping Social Security’s roughly 70millionrecipients contend with the high inflation that’s been plaguing the US since last year.

“Will the COLA be enough to keep up with inflation? It’s too early to say,” said Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare policy analyst at The Senior Citizens League, an advocacy group. “It depends on what inflation is going to do from October onwards.”

The adjustment is the highest that most current beneficiaries have ever seen, but that’s because it is based on an inflation metric from August through October, which is also around 40-year highs.

A related metric, the Consumer Price Index, increased 8.2% in September, compared with a year ago, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced Thursday.

Medicare premiums see a rare decrease

Senior citizens will also see their Medicare Part B premiums drop in 2023, the first time in more than a decade that the tab will be lower than the year before, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced last month.

It’s only the fourth time that premiums are set to decline since Medicare was created in 1965.

“This is a once-in-a-retirement event,” said Johnson. “We have a historically high COLA, and at the same time, Part B premiums are going down next year.”

The standard monthly premiums will be $164.90 in 2023, a decrease of $5.20 from 2022.

The reduction comes after a large spike in 2022 premiums, which raised the standard monthly premium to $170.10, up from $148.50 in 2021.

A key driver of the 2022 hike was a projected jump in spending due to a costly new drug for Alzheimer’s disease, Aduhelm. However, since then, Aduhelm’s manufacturer cut the price and CMS limited coverage of the drug.

Also, spending was lower than projected on other Part B items and services, which resulted in much larger reserves in the Part B trust fund, allowing the agency to limit future premium increases.

The combination of the large Social Security adjustment and the reduction in Medicare premiums for 2023 “will deliver seniors more peace of mind and breathing room,” said Kilolo Kijakazi, acting commissioner of the Social Security Administration.

Still losing ground

Many senior citizens depend heavily on Social Security. Some 42% of elderly women and 37% of elderly men rely on the monthly payments for at least half their income, according to the Social Security Administration.

Despite the annual increases, benefits have not kept up with the rising cost of living for years.

As of March, inflation has caused Social Security payments to lose 40% of their buying power since 2000, according to a study released earlier this year by The Senior Citizens League. Monthly benefits would have to increase by $540 to maintain the same level of buying power as in 2000.

The league saw a spike in emails from seniors who said they were struggling to afford food, housing and other necessities starting in the summer of 2021, Johnson said. Some said they were down to one meal a day or were being evicted from their homes.

‘Insignificant’ increase

Though he is happy to get the annual adjustment, Richard Moore sees it as “insignificant” since the cost of food, home heating oil and other necessities have shot up.

Compounding the problem is that both Moore and his wife, Linda, have to take very expensive medications, and their retirement savings have been “clobbered” by the steep decline in the stock market.

“It’s really a trivial increase as far as I’m concerned because right now, my expenses are much greater than my income,” said Moore, 84, who lives in Fishkill, New York, and worked as an electrical engineer at IBM.

Madeline Heller relies on Social Security, alimony and a small pension from her days as a teacher. Her limited funds have forced her to clip coupons, only buy what she absolutely needs and think twice about any extra purchases. She’s looking to restart her career as an arbitrator or mediator but feels she’s being discriminated against because of her age.

The annual adjustment will provide her with roughly an extra $15 a month, the senior citizen calculates.

“I can buy two more loaves of bread?” the Santa Monica, California, resident asked sarcastically. “There’s nothing that this kind of increase is going to do for me or anybody.”

Though this year’s 5.9% increase was supposed to combat inflation, it is covering only half of the spike in Patty McCarthy’s monthly expenses. She’s getting about $60 more a month in Social Security benefits but is spending $120 more on food, gas and other necessary items.

Inflation is prompting the 67-year-old to apply for jobs stocking shelves at stores around her Mount Shasta, California, home, but so far she hasn’t gotten any responses.

“It’s plain scary. What do you have to cut back on next?” she said. “You know, retirement is supposed to be fun and easier than this. And it’s just not.”

The downsides of a large increase

The big annual adjustment could actually end up hurting some seniors, Johnson said.

For instance, the resulting increase in income could push them above the thresholds for certain government benefits, such as Medicare Extra Help, Medicaid, food stamps and rental assistance, leaving them eligible for less or no aid. Or they could have to pay more for their Medicare Part B premiums, which are adjusted for income.

Also, they could have to start paying taxes — or owe higher levies — on their Social Security benefits if their income rises above a certain level.

Plus, the increase could leave Social Security’s finances on even shakier ground. The combined trust funds that pay benefits to retirees, survivors and the disabled will be depleted by 2035 and only able to distribute roughly three-quarters of promised payments unless Congress addresses the program’s long-term funding shortfall, according to the most recent Social Security trustees’ report.

The maximum earnings subject to the Social Security tax will rise to $160,200for 2023, up from $147,000 this year.

(Copyright (c) 2022 CNN. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 01:27:00 -0500 CNN en-US text/html https://whdh.com/news/social-security-recipients-get-8-7-cost-of-living-increase-the-highest-in-more-than-40-years/
Killexams : Social Security recipients get whopping 8.7% cost-of-living increase

(CNN) — Social Security recipients will receive an annual cost-of-living adjustment of 8.7% next year, the largest increase since 1981, the Social Security Administration announced Thursday.

The spike will boost retirees’ monthly payments by $146 to an estimated average of $1,827 for 2023.

The hefty increase, which follows a 5.9% adjustment for this year, is aimed at helping Social Security’s roughly 70 million recipients contend with the high inflation that’s been plaguing the US since last year.

“Will the COLA be enough to keep up with inflation? It’s too early to say,” said Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare policy analyst at The Senior Citizens League, an advocacy group. “It depends on what inflation is going to do from October onwards.”

The adjustment is the highest that most current beneficiaries have ever seen, but that’s because it is based on an inflation metric from August through October, which is also around 40-year highs.

A related metric, the Consumer Price Index, increased 8.2% in September, compared with a year ago, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced Thursday.

Medicare premiums see a rare decrease

Senior citizens will also see their Medicare Part B premiums drop in 2023, the first time in more than a decade that the tab will be lower than the year before, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced last month.

It’s only the fourth time that premiums are set to decline since Medicare was created in 1965.

“This is a once-in-a-retirement event,” said Johnson. “We have a historically high COLA, and at the same time, Part B premiums are going down next year.”

The standard monthly premiums will be $164.90 in 2023, a decrease of $5.20 from 2022.

The reduction comes after a large spike in 2022 premiums, which raised the standard monthly premium to $170.10, up from $148.50 in 2021.

A key driver of the 2022 hike was a projected jump in spending due to a costly new drug for Alzheimer’s disease, Aduhelm. However, since then, Aduhelm’s manufacturer cut the price and CMS limited coverage of the drug.

Also, spending was lower than projected on other Part B items and services, which resulted in much larger reserves in the Part B trust fund, allowing the agency to limit future premium increases.

The combination of the large Social Security adjustment and the reduction in Medicare premiums for 2023 “will deliver seniors more peace of mind and breathing room,” said Kilolo Kijakazi, acting commissioner of the Social Security Administration.

Still losing ground

Many senior citizens depend heavily on Social Security. Some 42% of elderly women and 37% of elderly men rely on the monthly payments for at least half their income, according to the Social Security Administration.

Despite the annual increases, benefits have not kept up with the rising cost of living for years.

As of March, inflation has caused Social Security payments to lose 40% of their buying power since 2000, according to a study released earlier this year by The Senior Citizens League. Monthly benefits would have to increase by $540 to maintain the same level of buying power as in 2000.

The league saw a spike in emails from seniors who said they were struggling to afford food, housing and other necessities starting in the summer of 2021, Johnson said. Some said they were down to one meal a day or were being evicted from their homes.

Based on the level of annual inflation as of September, seniors would have needed a monthly increase of $184 to keep up, rather than the $92 monthly adjustment they received for 2022, Johnson said.

To deal with the persistent shortfall in the annual adjustment, advocates are pushing Congress to make major reforms to the program. Many would like to see the increase tied to an experimental index that measures inflation experienced by the elderly, rather than the current metric, which reflects price changes for urban wage earners and clerical workers.

The former puts more weight on cost increases for health care, which makes up a much larger share of seniors’ spending.

“The underlying problem that has existed for so long with the COLA since the mid-’70s [when] the formula was put into place is that it does not reflect genuine cost of living changes as they apply to seniors,” said Max Richtman, CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.

‘Insignificant’ increase

Though he is happy to get the annual adjustment, Richard Moore sees it as “insignificant” since the cost of food, home heating oil and other necessities have shot up.

Compounding the problem is that both Moore and his wife, Linda, have to take very expensive medications, and their retirement savings have been “clobbered” by the steep decline in the stock market.

“It’s really a trivial increase as far as I’m concerned because right now, my expenses are much greater than my income,” said Moore, 84, who lives in Fishkill, New York, and worked as an electrical engineer at IBM.

Madeline Heller relies on Social Security, alimony and a small pension from her days as a teacher. Her limited funds have forced her to clip coupons, only buy what she absolutely needs and think twice about any extra purchases. She’s looking to restart her career as an arbitrator or mediator but feels she’s being discriminated against because of her age.

The annual adjustment will provide her with roughly an extra $15 a month, the senior citizen calculates.

“I can buy two more loaves of bread?” the Santa Monica, California, resident asked sarcastically. “There’s nothing that this kind of increase is going to do for me or anybody.”

Though this year’s 5.9% increase was supposed to combat inflation, it is covering only half of the spike in Patty McCarthy’s monthly expenses. She’s getting about $60 more a month in Social Security benefits but is spending $120 more on food, gas and other necessary items.

Inflation is prompting the 67-year-old to apply for jobs stocking shelves at stores around her Mount Shasta, California, home, but so far she hasn’t gotten any responses.

“It’s plain scary. What do you have to cut back on next?” she said. “You know, retirement is supposed to be fun and easier than this. And it’s just not.”

The downsides of a large increase

The big annual adjustment could actually end up hurting some seniors, Johnson said.

For instance, the resulting increase in income could push them above the thresholds for certain government benefits, such as Medicare Extra Help, Medicaid, food stamps and rental assistance, leaving them eligible for less or no aid. Or they could have to pay more for their Medicare Part B premiums, which are adjusted for income.

Also, they could have to start paying taxes — or owe higher levies — on their Social Security benefits if their income rises above a certain level.

Plus, the increase could leave Social Security’s finances on even shakier ground. The combined trust funds that pay benefits to retirees, survivors and the disabled will be depleted by 2035 and only able to distribute roughly three-quarters of promised payments unless Congress addresses the program’s long-term funding shortfall, according to the most recent Social Security trustees’ report.

The maximum earnings subject to the Social Security tax will rise to $160,200 for 2023, up from $147,000 this year.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 08:40:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.wishtv.com/news/national/social-security-recipients-get-8-7-cost-of-living-increase-the-highest-in-more-than-40-years/
Killexams : Biden contends a ‘historic manufacturing boom’ is underway — and can act as a bulwark for American democracy

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is working to create a manufacturing revival — even helping to put factory jobs in Republican territory under the belief it can restore faith in U.S. democracy.

The Micron investment announcement represented a commitment in a Republican congressional district that Biden and the company credited to the recently enacted $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act.

“Today is another win for America, and another massive new investment in America spurred by my economic plan,” Biden said in a statement, of the Micron investment. “Together, we are building an economy from the bottom up and the middle out, where we lower costs for our families and make it right here in America.”

Biden traveled to Poughkeepsie, N.Y., to herald the IBM commitment, whose focuses are to include semiconductors, computers, hybrid cloud, artificial intelligence and quantum computers. The company said its projects would directly benefit from Biden’s CHIPS and Science Act.

See: IBM to invest $20 billion in New York’s Hudson Valley region over 10 years

Biden has staked his presidency on what he has called “a historic manufacturing boom,” hoping to succeed where past presidents, governors and hordes of other politicians have struggled for a half-century. His goal is to keep opening new factories in states such as Ohio, Idaho, North Carolina and Georgia — where Democrats’ footholds are shaky at best. Administration officials say they want to spread the prosperity across the entire country, rather than let it cluster in centers of extreme wealth, in a bid to renew the middle class and a sense of national pride.

The push comes at a precarious moment for the global economy. Consumer-price inflation has hurt Biden’s popularity, despite some recent apparent improvement on both scores, and prompted recession concerns. Much of Europe faces a possible downturn due to the jump in energy prices after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, while the International Monetary Fund just downgraded growth in China. The world economy is defined by uncertainty just as Biden has called for investments in clean energy and technology that could take years to pay off.

The president is hopeful that whatever good manufacturing can do for the U.S. economy also turns out to yield political benefits for himself and other Democrats in 2022 and beyond. He told Democratic donors late last month that the manufacturing and technology investments mean “we have an opportunity” to strengthen the U.S. if Democratic governors and lawmakers are elected this year.

Washington Watch (September 2022): ‘More work still to do’: Biden celebrates Inflation Reduction Act, but latest CPI report tops forecasts, sparking fresh worries

Going into the midterm elections, Biden is telling voters that a factory renaissance has already started. The administration sees its infrastructure spending, computer-chip investments and clean-energy incentives as helping domestic manufacturing in unprecedented ways.

Best New Ideas in Money podcast: Making chips at home again

Also see: Kamala Harris seeks chip-manufacturing partners in Japan meetings

And: U.S., Mexico to cooperate on production of semiconductors, electric vehicles

Recent academic studies suggest that decades of layoffs due to offshoring contributed to the rise of Republican Donald Trump, with his opposition to immigration and global trade. But many of the authors of the studies doubt that Biden can make these demographic trends disappear through the promise of jobs for skilled workers.

Democratic Rep. Ro Khanna of California would like to see the president make a national tour of factory openings, so that his policies could stick better in voters’ minds. Khanna recently attended the groundbreaking of a $20 billion Intel plant in Ohio and laid out his belief that factory job losses helped cause today’s political schisms.

The Silicon Valley congressman reasons that too many Americans have lost faith in a government that seemed indifferent to their own well-being, leading them to embrace hucksters and authoritarians who thrive by exploiting and widening divisions in society.

“How do you get rid of people’s jobs and expect them to believe in democracy?” Khanna asks.

Exclusive: Starbucks urged to work with unions in letter from members of Congress

Factory jobs have risen during Biden’s tenure to the most since 2008 at 12.85 million, yet the task of steadying the country’s middle class and its democratic institutions is far from complete. The industrial Midwest has yet to recover the factory jobs shed in the pandemic, let alone decades of layoffs in which the economic challenges evolved into political tensions.

Labor Department data show that Ohio is still 10,000 factory jobs shy of its pre-pandemic level and 350,000 jobs below its total in 2000. The numbers are similar in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin — three states that were key to Biden’s 2020 victory and could help decide control of Congress in November’s elections.

Don’t miss: Biden touts U.S. economy’s progress at Intel plant’s groundbreaking in Ohio, but Democrats’ Senate nominee there suggests president shouldn’t run in 2024

The White House says Biden eschews thinking about Americans as consumers interested only in the cheapest prices and thus promoting outsourcing. Instead, his speeches are woven with talk about people as workers and the identity that working gives them.

What Biden can show with this year’s factory groundbreakings is progress, even if the total number of manufacturing jobs is unlikely to return to the 1979 peak of 19.55 million. Intel’s computer-chip plant being built in New Albany, Ohio, would add 3,000 jobs. Hyundai would add 8,100 jobs with its electric-vehicle plant in Georgia. Wolfspeed with plans to produce silicon carbide wafers in North Carolina, would add 1,800 jobs.

See: Biden team touts impact of policy successes as White House welcomes local government leaders

Jay Timmons, CEO of the National Association of Manufacturers, said the gains in factory jobs reflect five years of effort, starting with the 2017 tax overhaul by congressional Republicans and including Biden’s investments in infrastructure and computer chips as well as efforts to return jobs to the U.S. after global supply-chain disruptions caused by the pandemic.

“There’s a commitment by government at all levels to do more here and a desire by manufacturers to do more here,” Timmons said.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Daron Acemoglu applauded Biden’s plans for spreading factory work across the country. It’s too soon to tell if the administration is succeeding, he said, but Biden is challenging what was once conventional wisdom among economists that little could be done to expand factory work in the U.S.

“I believe the president is right,” said Acemoglu, the co-author of the book “Why Nations Fail.” “‘Good jobs,’ which pay decent wages, have job stability, offer career-addressing opportunities, and endow a sense of accomplishment and dignity, are important for the middle class and social cohesion.”

New academic research released in September suggests that the offshoring of factory jobs led white men to feel like victims and gave way to the rise of grievance politics that helped fuel Trump’s ascendancy among Republican voters. That movement in turn spawned election denialism and political violence that Biden has repeatedly said is “a dagger to the throat of our democracy.”

The research covering 3,500 U.S. citizens finds that factory job losses due to automation are less controversial among voters than the offshoring, which triggered a “self-victimization bias” for whites who were more likely to “view offshoring as leading to greater total harm to the American economy, and to the U.S. position in the world.”

One of the study’s authors, Leonardo Baccini of McGill University in Montreal, still expects factory-job totals to shrink, though a decline primarily due to automation would be less harmful to Democratic candidates. He still anticipates factory-job losses over the long term as advanced economies focus more on productive services to sustain growth.

“From an economic standpoint, the decline of U.S. manufacturing is inevitable and it is actually a good thing,” Baccini said. “Any attempt to stop this structural transformation with protectionism and government subsidies is likely to backfire.”

J. Lawrence Broz, a political scientist at the University of California San Diego, co-wrote a 2019 research paper that found populist support was strongest in communities that endured long-term economic and social decline, a contrast to the superstar cities where technology, finance and a highly educated workforce were magnets for wealth.

“It is unlikely that recent efforts to re-shore manufacturing jobs will produce the intended effects, either economically or politically,” Broz said. “The new factories won’t employ large numbers of less-skilled workers, leaving white industrial workers just as angry as they are now.”

That means the underlying test of Biden’s agenda might be whether enough workers can be educated to meet the needs of a manufacturing sector with higher standards than during the heights of its dominance in the 20th century.

MarketWatch contributed.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 10:22:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/biden-contends-a-e2-80-98historic-manufacturing-boom-e2-80-99-is-underway-e2-80-94-and-can-act-as-a-bulwark-for-american-democracy/ar-AA12MmKp
Killexams : Led by Schumer and Hochul, New York State Is Becoming a US Semiconductor Hub
President Joe Biden and IBM CEO Arvind Krishna at the Poughkeepsie IBM facility.
President Joe Biden and IBM CEO Arvind Krishna at the Poughkeepsie IBM facility. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)

New York state is emerging as a hub for computer chip investment and research amid the U.S.’s mission to regain influence in the semiconductor market, led by powerful politicians and fueled by significant federal and state incentives.

Two significant investments from major semiconductor facilities were announced this week, pledging billions of dollars to the region. Today (Oct. 6), President Joe Biden announced IBM’s plan to invest $20 billion in semiconductor development in the Hudson Valley over the next decade. Two days earlier, Micron announced its investment of $100 billion over the next 20 years to build a semiconductor facility — known as fabs — in central New York, which is expected to provide 50,000 jobs.

Both projects will benefit from the Chips and Science Act of 2022, signed into law by President Joe Biden in August. The act is intended to build up the U.S’s semiconductor industry in order to counter the semiconductor market footholds of nations like China, and authorizes over $52 billion in grants and loans to incentivize semiconductor manufacturing over the next five years. Additionally, it establishes a 25 percent tax credit for semiconductor facility investors.

While the U.S. maintained nearly 40 percent of semiconductor production in the 1980s, it has since decreased to about 12 percent, according to Charles Wessner, a professor of science, technology and international affairs at Georgetown University.

States across the country are fiercely competing for semiconductor investments, said Wessner. The talent pool from New York’s institutions focused on semiconductor research, such as the State University of New York (SUNY) Polytechnic Institute, a public university with campuses in Utica and Albany, deliver the state a leg up, he said. “There’s no other facility with its quality in the country. You’ve got a generation of excellent talent.”

Companies attracted by New York’s talent pool and natural resources

New York’s resources, including its Great Lakes and Niagara Falls, also deliver the state an advantage. Onondaga County’s water system, pumped through pipes underneath Lake Ontario, was reportedly a key factor in Micron’s choice to build a fab in Clay, New York.  “Power and adequate water are critical in semiconductor development,” said Wessner.

Chuck Schumer, the U.S. Senate Majority Leader from New York, has for years urged for an increased semiconductor presence in New York and actively pushed for the Chips and Science Act.  “This is our Erie Canal moment,” Schumer said in a statement in response to Micron’s investment. “Just as the original Erie Canal did centuries ago, this 21st Century Erie Canal will flow through the heart of Central New York and redefine Upstate New York’s place in the global economy for generations to come.”

And in June, Governor Kathy Hochul, who is running for reelection next month, and the state legislature announced the Green Chips Bill, a tax incentive program aiming to attract chip manufacturers through $10 billion worth of investments over the next two decades.

While New York state was previously a manufacturing hub, Poughkeepsie and the Hudson Valley region saw mass layoffs from IBM in the 1990s. Now, it looks like the state is committed to re-entering the market. Semiconductor company GlobalFoundries constructed a new fab in July 2021 near its headquarter in Malta, New York, in addition to announcing a $1 billion investment. And another fab, this time from Wolfspeed, was opened just north of Utica in April.

“This renewed effort has created a hub,” said Wessner.

Led by Schumer and Hochul, New York State Is Becoming a US Semiconductor Hub
Thu, 06 Oct 2022 13:44:00 -0500 Alexandra Tremayne-Pengelly en-US text/html https://observer.com/2022/10/led-by-schumer-and-hochul-new-york-state-is-becoming-a-us-semiconductor-hub/
Killexams : How to Reset the Administrator Password on an IBM ThinkPad

Jeff Grundy has been writing computer-related articles and tutorials since 1995. Since that time, Grundy has written many guides to using various applications that are published on numerous how-to and tutorial sites. Born and raised in South Georgia, Grundy holds a Master of Science degree in mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 15:06:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://smallbusiness.chron.com/reset-administrator-password-ibm-thinkpad-73098.html
Killexams : What is Kyndryl? IBM’s managed infrastructure services spin-off explained

Kyndryl claims to be the world’s largest IT infrastructure provider. A division of IBM until November 2021, it is now a separate company. Initially, little changed for customers — except perhaps the logo on their invoice — but with time, Kyndryl is taking advantage of its freedom from IBM to introduce new services and work with new partners.

What does Kyndryl do?

Essentially, Kyndryl does exactly what the managed infrastructure services unit of IBM’s Global Technology Services segment did: outsource the management of enterprises’ IT infrastructure, whether it came from IBM or another vendor.

Under IBM’s stewardship, the activities since moved to Kyndryl were in slow decline, from $21.8 billion in annual revenue in 2018 down 7% to $20.28 billion in 2019, and down 4.6% to $19.35 billion in 2020, according to IBM filings with the SEC. That hasn’t changed since the split: Kyndryl’s first full-year filing as an independent company, barely two months after the separation, showed 2021 revenue down a further 4%, to $18.66 billion. The decline continued into 2022, with first quarter revenue down 7% year on year, and the second quarter down 10%.

However, Kyndryl is beginning to develop new services, and is forming partnerships in a bid to grow its revenue. It estimates that the $415 billion market opportunity it addresses is growing at 7% a year, with some areas it is targeting (including security, intelligent automation and public cloud managed services) growing even faster.

Kyndryl has organized itself into six global managed services practices, each of which manages a different aspect of technology. These are:

  • Applications, data and AI
  • Cloud
  • Core enterprise and zCloud, IBM’s mainframe-as-a-service offering
  • Digital workplace
  • Network and edge
  • Security and resiliency

There is also a customer advisory practice that combines managed services, advisory services, and implantation.

In September 2022, Kyndryl also launched two new branded services, Bridge and Vital. The company calls Kyndryl Bridge an open integration platform, an operational monitoring system, somewhat like HPE GreenLake or IBM vCenter, that Kyndryl staff will connect to an enterprise’s existing IT infrastructure to help CIOs keep ahead of problems. Kyndryl Vital is essentially a design workshop, during which Kyndryl consultants work alongside an enterprise’s employees to prototype applications.

Who are Kyndryl’s partners?

At the moment of their split, Kyndryl and IBM were one another’s biggest suppliers, and that will remain true for the time being. But Kyndryl is free to independently explore, with no preference for IBM’s software and services.

Kyndryl named Microsoft its first cloud infrastructure partner in November 2021, announcing a similar partnership with Google the following month. But it took it until February 2022 to form a pact with Amazon Web Services.

IBM had partnerships with numerous software providers, and Kyndryl inherited or expanded some of those, including with Elastic, Lenovo, SAP, ServiceNow, and VMware.

Kyndryl has also formed new partnerships, including with Cisco Systems, Citrix, Cloudera, Dynatrace, EY, Field Safe Solutions, NetApp, Nokia, Oracle, Pure Storage, IBM subsidiary Red Hat, Teradata and Veritas Technologies. These partnerships expand Kyndryl’s repertoire when it comes to integrating products and services into Bridge, or incorporating them into co-creations with Vital.

How big is Kyndryl?

Kyndryl started with 4,600 customers (including 75 of the Fortune 100), over a quarter of IBM’s 350,000 staff, activities generating around $19 billion in annual revenue and an order backlog (or long-term maintenance contracts from all those customers) of around $62 billion. Where that puts Kyndryl in the rankings depends on what you’re measuring. Kyndryl says it’s the world’s largest IT infrastructure provider, although IT channel publication CRN says it’s only the fifth-largest solutions provider, a much broader category, behind Accenture, what’s left of IBM, DXC Technology, and Tata Consulting Services.

Is Kyndryl hiring?

Like crazy! Kyndryl hired over a dozen top executives in 2021, and by the end of the year had 88,683 employees. Although its hiring in the US has slowed, it had 1,141 lower-level job openings posted at press time, over half of them in the EU, with other significant concentrations in India and Japan. Half the openings are for technical specialists, with more than 100 openings in systems architecture and an emphasis on automation.

Who works at Kyndryl?

Most staff at Kyndryl simply changed email addresses, carrying on doing the same work for clients as they did at IBM before the split. Indeed, Kyndryl went out of its way to reassure customers that their key points of contact and support, and the other team members they work with, would not change, and that the company continues to work with experts in other divisions of IBM as it did before.

But the company brought in new blood for many of the most senior roles, either hiring in from other companies, or poaching from other divisions of IBM. CEO Martin Schroeter is ex-IBM, in fact. He left the company in June 2020, before the spin-off was announced, and came back to lead Kyndryl, then known as NewCo, in January 2021. He was previously SVP of global markets at IBM, and before that its CFO.

The next senior appointments, in March 2021, were chief marketing officer Maria Bartolome Winans, who came to the spin-off directly from her role as CMO for IBM Americas, and group president Elly Keinan, another former IBMer who took time out to work in venture capital after 33 years at the company.

Global head of corporate affairs Una Pulizzi was also a new hire in April 2021, previously in a similar role at GE, while general counsel Edward Sebold was chief legal officer for IBM’s Watson Health division.

Poaching of more senior IBMers continued in early May 2021. Chief transformation officer Nelly Akoth was previously with IBM Global Business Services; Leigh Price moved from one leadership role in strategy and corporate development to another; and Vineet Khurana became controller at Kyndryl after five years in three different CFO roles at IBM. Kyndryl’s global alliances and partnerships leader Stephen Leonard held a number of positions at IBM, most recently as general manager of the Power Systems division.

It wasn’t until the second half of May 2021 that Kyndryl began to name its top technical staff: CIO Michael Bradshaw is new to IBM, having previously served as CIO at NBC/Universal and as CIO for Mission Systems and Training at Lockheed Martin. CTO Antoine Shagoury is a former CIO of US bank State Street and of stock exchanges in London and the US. Most recently, he worked at strategic advisory partnership Ridge-Lane.

Other senior Kyndryl hires from outside IBM include Vic Bhagat, a former CIO for Verizon Enterprise Solutions, EMC, and several units of GE as the head of its customer advisory practice, and COO Harsh Chugh, most recently CFO at SaaS provider PlanSource.

Who is on Kyndryl’s board?

To provide the new company with more stability, Kyndryl’s board of directors will serve overlapping three-year terms through 2027, so it’ll take at least two elections for an outside group to take control of the board.

Kyndryl’s first 10 directors are:

  • CEO Martyn Schroeter, board chairman
  • Stephen Hester, lead independent director. He was CEO of RSA Insurance Group until June 2021, and is chairman of easyJet
  • Dominic Caruso, retired Johnson & Johnson CFO
  • John Harris, former VP of business development for Raytheon and board member at Cisco Systems
  • Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Janina Kugel, former CHRO and member of the managing board of German industrial conglomerate Siemens
  • Denis Machuel, CEO of temporary staffing firm Adecco
  • Rahul Merchant, former head of technology at retirement fund TIAA, Fannie Mae, and Merrill Lynch, and current board member at Convergint Technologies, Global Cloud Exchange, Juniper Networks, and Emulex
  • Jana Schreuder, retired COO of Northern Trust and current board member at Entrust Datacard and Blucora
  • Howard Ungerleider, president and CFO of commodity chemicals company Dow

What does Kyndryl’s split mean for IBM?

IBM is still one of the biggest technology businesses in the world. Its separation from Kyndryl freed it from a legacy business that wasn’t growing, and enabled it to reorganize into three main operating segments now called Software, Consulting (formerly Global Business Services), and Infrastructure. It’s doing well post-split: For the full year 2021 revenue from Software rose 5.3% to $24.1 billion, and Consulting made $17.8 billion, up 9.8%, although revenue from Infrastructure, the segment Kyndryl was spun out of, fell 2.4% to $14.2 billion. Those trends, both positive and negative, continued through the first half of 2022.

Customer needs for application services and infrastructure services are diverging, and so spinning off Kyndryl will allow IBM to focus on growing its open hybrid cloud platform and AI capabilities, IBM CEO Arvind Krishna said in October 2020. The split turns IBM from a services-led company to one making more than half its revenue from software and solutions.

But until that growth takes hold, Kyndryl and IBM remain close, as they began their separate lives as one another’s largest customers.

Thu, 14 Oct 2021 14:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cio.com/article/189224/what-is-kyndryl-ibms-managed-infrastructure-services-spin-off-explained.html
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