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Exam Code: AD0-300 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
AD0-300 Adobe Campaign Business Practitioner

• exam name: Adobe Campaign Business Practitioner
• exam number: AD0-300
• Number of questions: 54
• Time limit: 85 minutes
• Passing score: All Adobe exams are reported on a scale of 300 to 700. The passing score for each exam is 550.

To be an Adobe Certified Expert is to demonstrate expertise in helping clients realize value in an Adobe solution.
Adobe's Certification exams follow industry-accepted procedures to ensure validity and reliability.We work with industry experts to create our exams, which represent real-world requirements andobjectives for the job roles we certify.
This guide is designed to provide the recommendations needed to prepare for your AdobeCertified Expert exam, and help you determine when you are ready to take the exam. It will outline the knowledge and skills required of a "minimally qualified candidate" for a specific job role, which will be evaluated in the exam.

The tasks measured on the exam are grouped into the followingdomains:
• Campaign Management
• Workflow Management
• Data Management
• Delivery Management
• Reporting
• Administration
Within each domain, there are specific tasks that you should be able to perform as an Adobe Campaign Business Practitioner:
• Campaign Management
You should be able to create campaigns, configure campaigns, and determine the correct campaign template.
• Workflow Management
You should be able to interpret campaign requirements and setup approvals. You should also be able to solve workflow errors and determine a correct design for a marketing workflow. You should be able to build technical workflows and also execute workflows.
• Data Management
You should be able to import data, export data, and perform data investigations. You should also be able to build lists and configure a predefined filter.
• Delivery Management
You should be able to create and configure deliveries. You should also be able to correct proofs for approvals, interpret deliver audits, and deploy a delivery.
• Reporting
You should able to identify the steps required to generate delivery reports, determine the appropriate report(s) to generate, and interpret campaign reports.
• Administration
You should be able to manage users and folder structures.

Domain Percent of Exam
Campaign Management 17%
Workflow Management 33%
Data Management 15%
Delivery Management 23%
Reporting 10%
Administration 2%

Adobe Campaign Business Practitioner you should be able to perform the following tasks without any assistance: • Translate campaign requirements into an actionable workflow
• Create delivery, campaign, control groups, and seed templates
• Configure enrichments
• Create read lists
• Control user access
• Manipulate data for use in a campaign (external or internal data)
• Extract data from tools
• Explain set theory
• Interpret out-of-the-box reports
• Use descriptive analysis or query analysis tools
• Explain how data is brought into the environment
• Explain what personalization blocks are used for
• Interpret the journal logs
• Configure targeting, delivery, and flow control activities within the Adobe Campaign workflow
• Pre-define filters
• Explain the difference between a targeted dimension and a filtering dimension and how to use them
• Configure a multi-touch retargeting campaign
• Trigger or an automation campaign
• Analyze a delivery and send proofs
• Monitor deliveries to determine deliverability issues
• Set-up approvals
• Manage typologies
• Explain cadences
• Install and set-up of configurations on desktop
• Maintain folder structure of plans and programs
• Implement campaign tactics in the workflow (e.g. identifying responders, and identifyingbuyers)
• Import and export lists

Adobe Campaign Business Practitioner
Adobe Practitioner course outline
Killexams : Adobe Practitioner course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AD0-300 Search results Killexams : Adobe Practitioner course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AD0-300 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Adobe Killexams : COMP_SCI 217 : Data Management and Information Processing

Quarter Offered

Fall : 9:30-10:50 TuTh ; Hummel
Winter : 12:30-1:50 TuTh ; Hu
Spring : 9:30-10:50 TuTh ; Hu

Prerequisites

COMP_SCI 110 or COMP_SCI 111 or COMP_SCI 150 or COMP_SCI 211 or other programming experience

Description

This course will teach students how to organize and analyze real-world data sets using tools that are most commonly used in the business world. In particular, students will learn the SQL language for analyzing data in relational databases. Students will also learn the details of common data encodings (integer, floating point, fixed point, text, date and time), how such data are structured in data files, and how to model complex data sets as a series of SQL tables. In other words, students will learn how to organize large data sets, and to answer questions using that data. The SQL skills taught in COMP_SCI 217 are essential for “data science” practitioners, especially when working with business data. COMP_SCI 217 is all about data, but not really about statistics, visualization, or programming (except SQL, which will be taught). Homework assignments will use the SQ database management systems. Some homework needs basic python programming as well.
COMP_SCI 217 is different from the COMP_SCI 339 and ELEC_ENG/COMP_ENG 495 “Introduction to Databases” courses that we offer to computer science students in that COMP_SCI 217 does not teach the details of how database management systems are built. In other words, the students in this class will learn how to use a database system, not how to build it from scratch.Formerly COMP_SCI 317.

  • Formerly COMP_SCI 317
  • NOTE: This course does not count for credit for CS and CE majors (they are expected to take COMP_SCI 339) – however, it counts for other majors.

COURSE INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Joe Hummel (Fall) and Prof. Huiling Hu (Winter & Spring)

COURSE COORDINATOR: Prof. Hu

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Structured Query Language (SQL)
    • Basic SQL statements
    • JOINs and aggregates
    • Subqueries and combining selects
    • Advanced queries
  • Data modeling for relational databases
    • Primary and foreign keys
    • Table relationships (many-to-one, many-to-many, and subsets)
    • Design database model
    • Representation of data: Integers, Floating-point numbers, text, etc
  • Beyond SQL database
    • Databases in a distributed setting
    • NoSQL

GRADING:

  • Homework assignments (60%, 6 assignments)
  • Exam I (20%)
  • Exam II (20%)

COURSE OUTCOMES: After completing this course, a student should be able to:

  • Draw a data model diagram to represent a complex data set.
  • Choose appropriate data types to store various data.
  • Define data integrity constraints using primary, foreign, and unique keys.
  • Define indexes to optimize the performance of particular queries on a database.
  • Implement a data model with “CREATE TABLE” commands in the SQL language.
  • Load data into the database tables from CSV and other data file formats.
  • Write complex SQL SELECT queries to answer various questions using the database.
Sun, 03 Nov 2019 07:17:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/computer-science/academics/courses/descriptions/217.html
Killexams : computerworld
tt22 029 iphone 14 thumb pod

Today in Tech

iPhone 14: What's the buzz?

Join Macworld executive editor Michael Simon and Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis as they talk about the latest iPhone 14 rumors – everything from anticipated release date to price to design changes. Plus, they'll talk about...


Wed, 27 Jul 2022 04:41:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.computerworld.com/
Killexams : Digital health tech expected to unlock $230bn globally No result found, try new keyword!The report was produced by the World Government Summit (WGS) in collaboration with McKinsey & Company and released as part of a broader knowledge partnership, outlines how governments can start ... Wed, 06 Jul 2022 22:18:00 -0500 text/html https://www.itp.net/business/digital-health-tech-expected-to-unlock-230bn-globally Killexams : Stop telling clients to pay ransomware gangs, solicitors told

The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) have joined forces to call on the legal profession to stop advising organisations to pay off ransomware demands.

In a letter to the Law Society, the NCSC and the ICO said there was clear evidence of a rising number of organisations making ransomware payments, some of them on the advice of legal professionals acting on the erroneous belief that doing so will preserve the integrity of their data, or lead to lesser penalties from the ICO should the regulator become involved.

The letter notes the very clear NCSC guidance that paying ransomware gangs guarantees nothing, and reaffirms that the belief that the ICO views ransom payments as a mitigating factor is completely false. It urges the Law Society to remind its members of this, as some legal practitioners are clearly giving inaccurate advice and putting their clients at risk. “Ransomware remains the biggest online threat to the UK and we do not encourage or condone paying ransom demands to criminal organisations,” said NCSC CEO Lindy Cameron.

“Unfortunately, we have seen a latest rise in payments to ransomware criminals and the legal sector has a vital role to play in helping reverse that trend. Cyber security is a collective effort and we urge the legal sector to work with us as we continue our efforts to fight ransomware and keep the UK safe online.”

Information commissioner John Edwards added: “Engaging with cyber criminals and paying ransoms only incentivises other criminals and will not certain that compromised files are released. It certainly does not reduce the scale or type of enforcement action from the ICO or the risk to individuals affected by an attack.

“We’ve seen cyber crime costing UK firms billions over the past five years,” he said. “The response to that must be vigilance, good cyber hygiene – including keeping appropriate back up files, and proper staff training to identify and stop attacks. Organisations will get more credit from those arrangements than by paying off the criminals.

“I want to work with the legal profession and NCSC to ensure that companies understand how we will consider cases and how they can take practical steps to safeguard themselves in a way that we will recognise in our response should the worst happen.”

Current ICO policy does recognise when organisations have taken steps to fully understand what has happened in the course of a ransomware attack, learned from their experience, and can evidence that if appropriate, they have raised the incident with the NCSC and can demonstrate compliance with its guidance – current NCSC advice can be accessed here, and the ICO has published similar guidance.

Ransomware attacks or other forms of cyber crime should in any case be reported via Action Fraud’s hotline – 0300 123 2040 – to the ICO in the case of GDPR-relevant data breaches, or the NCSC for major cyber incidents.

Charl van der Walt, head of security research at Orange Cyberdefense, said it was time to revisit the idea of regulating, if not banning outright, the payment of ransoms to cyber criminals. “If victims keep paying the ransoms demanded of them by cyber criminals, there is no reason to believe that the ransomware crime wave will abate,” said van der Walt.

“As Mr Edwards presciently points out, there is not just the impact on individual businesses to consider, but also broader societal harm. Crime theory teaches us that to tackle crime we must demotivate the offender, which, in this case, means cutting off their flow of money.

“However, because there is no legal barrier to victims claiming ransom payments back on cyber insurance, they are in some ways being incentivised to pay. Therefore, it is worth evaluating the pros and cons of regulating these payments.”

Van der Walt said that while it is clear that ransom payments fund further attacks and bring no guarantees vis-à-vis data recovery, over-regulation or criminalisation of payments risked shifting the focus of criminality to the victim, and could make organisations reluctant to report incidents and force ransomware deeper underground.

However, he added, whether criminalised or not, there was no question that victims should not pay a ransom.

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 03:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.computerweekly.com/news/252522513/Stop-telling-clients-to-pay-ransomware-gangs-solicitors-told
Killexams : Collaboration Program in Natural Resources

Building Collaborative Capacity in Wyoming and Beyond

2020 CPNR Cohort

COVID-19 NOTE: As of January 2022, we anticipate running a full, in-person program for 2022-2023 using the following precautions. Participants are strongly encouraged to be fully vaccinated by the time the program starts, including the booster shot. Participants may be asked to use two of the three COVID risk reduction strategies for in-person sessions: vaccination, masking, and testing. Some guest faculty may request that all participants be fully vaccinated for their workshops.

Natural resource problems are complex, involving more than science and policy decisions. These problems tap into people’s deeply held values and beliefs, local economic and conservation interests, and more.

Natural resource practitioners are often called upon and sometimes required to work collaboratively in complex and contentious settings with stakeholders, people and groups with a vested interest in whatever solutions are ultimately proposed and implemented. 

The Collaboration Program in Natural Resources works with mid- and upper-career natural resource professionals to help them maximize their impact in complex and often contentious collaborative settings. CPNR seeks to increase knowledge and skills in three main areas:

  • Collaborative leaderships skills in areas such as effective communication, conflict resolution, and innovative problem solving

  • Designing, convening, and facilitating collaborative problem-solving processes

  • Participating effectively in collaborative problem-solving processes

CPNR graduates go on to lead collaborative problem-solving processes throughout Wyoming and across the West, ensuring that natural resource management decisions are more inclusive, consider more community and stakeholder needs, and will be more robust and longer-lasting than they could ever be without collaboration.

The program brings up to 20 participants together for a ten-month training program focused on collaborative leadership and problem-solving. The first five sessions include interactive hands-on training in leadership, collaborative process design, negotiation, facilitation, and more. Participants then apply what they’ve learned to a practicum: a real-world collaboration project at work or in their community. The program culminates in April, with project presentations and a celebration for the graduates.

View the 2022 CPNR Recruitment Flier

View the 2022 CPNR Program Outline


Statement on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) 

The Collaboration Program in Natural Resources invites individuals to deepen their technical and leadership skills in the service of solving our state, region, and country's most complex natural resource and environmental problems. It is inspired by the core values of the University of Wyoming as described in its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategic Plan: inclusivity, multiplicity, fairness, and parity.

This work requires members of the CPNR community to develop the leadership skills necessary to effectively engage in sometimes difficult conversations with their colleagues and collaborators around identities, perspectives, and life experiences such as political identity, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and country of origin. 

CPNR is committed to furthering this work by recruiting diverse cohorts, integrating DEI into the curriculum, and convening/participating in related conversations locally, regionally, and nationally.


Program dates and locations

CPNR participants attend five rigorous, hands-on sessions to develop collaborative problem-solving skills for natural resource issues. They also complete a skills practicum. Sessions for the 2022 class run from noon Wednesdays to noon Fridays as follows:

(Updated January 2022)

  • July 13-15, 2022, Lander, WY

  • August 10–12, 2022, Ten Sleep, WY*

  • September 28-30, 2022, Laramie, WY

  • October 26-28, 2022, Saratoga, WY

  • Nov 30-Dec 2, 2022, Laramie, WY

  • April 19-21, 2023, Sheridan, WY

*Session 2 will begin at 8am August 10th. Participants will be asked to arrive in Ten Sleep the evening of August 9th. 


Program Requirements

  • Attend all six session from July—April

  • Complete one or more self-assessments and work to build collaborative leadership skills and behaviors

  • Engage with the program in between sessions by for example reviewing materials, watching brief videos, and participating in group calls and online discussion forums

  • Develop and make significant progress on a project that focuses on a collaborative problem-solving opportunity

Participants successfully completing the program have the option to earn graduate credit through the University of Wyoming.


How to Apply

Applications for the next round of CPNR in 2022–2023 are being accepted on a rolling basis. To apply, please complete the 2022 CPNR Application.


Tuition

The Program tuition is $1,300, which helps CPNR cover costs related to the program. The tuition must be paid in full by July 1. Tuition is not refundable if a participant withdraws from the program (though it may be applied to a future year). Transportation, lodging, and other related expenses are the responsibility of the participant.


Scholarships

Thanks to generous support from Rocky Mountain Power, CPNR is able to offer a limited number of scholarships to help cover tuition costs for participants who might not be able to otherwise participate. Please indicate on the application form whether you are seeking scholarship support.



Instructors

Deb Kleinman, CPNR Director

Deb Kleinman, CPNR Director

(307) 314-2385 | deb@lupinecollaborative.com | Website

Deb Kleinman is a facilitator, trainer, and leadership coach based out of Laramie, WY. She launched Lupine Collaborative in 2012 to help organizations work more effectively together, make better decisions, and increase their impact in ways that matter. She has over 20 years of experience working in and with nonprofits, academic institutions, public agencies, and private businesses on a wide range of strategic, collaborative, and training issues. Deb has extensive training and experience in facilitation, collaborative decision making, conflict resolution and conflict coaching, and leadership development, and is a certified professional coach.

Steve Smutko

Dr. Steve Smutko, Spicer Chair in Collaborative Practice

(307) 766-2703  |  steve.smutko@uwyo.edu  |  Website

Professor and Spicer Chair in Collaborative Practice, also at the Ruckelshaus Institute, Dr. Smutko co-teaches the CPNR training sessions. He has designed, convened, and facilitated numerous public policy decision processes on natural resources issues in the Rocky Mountain West and the southeast United States. Dr. Smutko also conducts research in collaborative decision-making and teaches courses to University of Wyoming students and to natural resource stakeholders in environmental decision making and negotiation analysis.


The Collaboration Program in Natural Resources is made possible by generous support from Rocky Mountain Power and The Spicer Fund for Collaborative Solutions.

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 23:39:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.uwyo.edu/haub/ruckelshaus-institute/collaborative-solutions/cpnr/index.html
Killexams : AWS re:Inforce marks a summer checkpoint on cybersecurity

After a two-year hiatus, Amazon Web Services Inc.’s re:Inforce is back on as an in-person event in Boston July 26 and 27. Like the All-Star break in baseball, re:Inforce gives us an opportunity to evaluate the cybersecurity market overall, the state of cloud security and what AWS is up to in the sector.

In this Breaking Analysis, we’ll share our view of what has changed since our last cyber update in May, we’ll look at the macro environment, how it’s affecting cybersecurity plays in the market, what the ETR data tells us and what to expect at next week’s AWS re:Inforce.

Reading the Wall Street tea leaves

We start this week with a checkpoint from Breaking Analysis contributor and stock trader Chip Symington. We asked for his assessment of the market generally and cyber stocks specifically. We summarize below.

We’ve kind of moved on from the sky is falling to the glass is half-empty but before today’s big selloff it was looking more and more like glass half-full. The Snap Inc. miss has dragged down many of the big names that comprise the major indexes.

Earnings season always brings heightened interest and this time we’re seeing many crosscurrents. It starts as usual with the banks and money centers. With the exception of JPMorgan Chase, the numbers were pretty good. Investment banks were not so great with Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs missing estimates but in general pretty positive outlooks. In big tech, however, the market shrugged off IBM Corp.’s growth and social media is getting hammered today.

The question, says Symington, is no longer recession or not… but rather how deep the recession will be. And today’s PMI data was the weakest since the start of the pandemic. Bond yields continue to weaken and there’s a growing consensus that fed tightening may be over after September as commodity prices weaken.

Although gas prices are still high, they’ve come down. Tesla Inc., Nokia Corp. and AT&T Inc. all indicated that supply issues were improving, which will also help with inflation.

So it’s no shock that the Nasdaq has done well lately as beaten-down tech stocks started to look oversold.

But… AT&T and Verizon Communications Inc. blamed their misses in part on people not paying their bills on time. Snap’s huge miss, even after guiding lower, and then refusing to offer future guidance, took that stock down nearly 40% today. And other social media stocks are off on sympathy – Meta Platforms Inc. and Google LLC owner Alphabet Inc. were off around 7% midday. And Google, Meta and Twitter Inc. have said they’re freezing new hires.

So as Symington points out, we’re starting to see for the first time in a long time the lower-income, younger generation feeling the pinch of inflation — along of course with struggling families that have to choose food and shelter over discretionary spend.

Back to the Nasdaq for a moment

As we’ve been reporting, in mid-June, the Nasdaq was off nearly 33% year to date and has since rallied – it’s down about 25% year to date as of midday today. But it has been breaking the downward trend we’ve talked about where the highs are lower and the lows are lower – that’s started to change… for now anyway. We’ll see if it holds. But chip stocks, software stocks and cyber names have broken those downtrends and have been trading above their 50-day moving averages for the first time in around four months, according to Symington. We’ll see if that holds.

Remember back on June 24, we recorded a Breaking Analysis and talked about Qualcomm trading at a 12X multiple with an implied 15% growth rate as an example of what looked like an oversold stock. On that day the stock was at 124 and it surpassed 155 this month – that was a great call by Symington.

Now looking at the performance of some cyber players on the chart above, SailPoint Technology Holdings Inc. is of course the anomaly with the Thoma Bravo $7 billion acquisition holding that stock up. But the Bug ETF comprised of cyber stocks has improved, When we last reported on cyber in May, CrowdStrike Holdings was off 23% year to date, and it’s now off 4%. Palo Alto Networks Inc. has held steady. Okta Inc. is still underperforming its peers as it works through the fallout from the breach and the ingestion of Auth0.

Meanwhile, while they’re shown above, Zscaler Inc. and SentinelOne Inc., the highfliers, are still well off year to date, with Ping Identity Corp. and CyberArk Inc. not getting hit as hard as their valuations hadn’t run up as much.

But virtually all these tech stocks generally and cyber issues specifically are breaking their downtrend. So it will now come down to earnings guidance in the coming months.

Is Snap a wrench in the works?

But the Snap reaction is quite stunning. The environment is slowing, we know that. Ad spending gets cut in that type of market. We know that. So it shouldn’t be a huge surprise that Snap missed, but as Chip Symington says:

The Snap reaction shows that sellers are still in control here, so it’s going to take a while to work through that, despite the positive signs we’re seeing.

ETR’s take on the market

We also turned to our friend Erik Bradley from Enterprise Technology Research, who follows these markets quite closely to get his take. Here’s what ETR is saying today:

As we’ve reported, while chief information officers and information technology buyers have tempered spending expectations since December and early January, when they called for 8%plus spending growth, they’re still expecting a 6% to 7% uptick in spend this year.

Security remains the No. 1 priority and also is the highest-ranked sector in the ETR data set in terms of pervasiveness in the study. Within security, endpoint detection and extended detection and response, along with identity and privileged account management, are the subsectors with the most spending momentum.

When you exclude Microsoft Corp., which is just dominant across the board in so many sectors, CrowdStrike has taken over the No. 1 spot in terms of ETR’s Net Score metric, with CyberArk and Tanium Inc. showing very strong as well.

Okta has seen a big drop in Net Score from 54% last survey to 45% in July, as customers put a pause on new Okta adoptions in this survey. Okta is still elevated but not in the dominant leadership position it once held in spend velocity.

Year on year, Tenable and Elastic are seeing the biggest jumps in spending momentum. With SailPoint, Tanium, Varonis Systems Inc., CrowdStrike and Zscaler seeing the biggest jump in new adoptions since the last survey.

On the downside, SonicWall Inc., Symantec Corp., Trellix (McAfee), Barracuda Networks Inc. and Trend Micro Inc. are seeing the highest percentage of defections and replacements.

Visualizing the cyber spending landscape

Let’s take a deeper look at what the ETR data tells us about the cybersecurity market.

The above graphic depicts Net Score, or spending momentum, on the Y axis and Overlap, or pervasiveness in the data, on the X axis. The data that dictates the dot positions on the inserted table.

It’s important to note that this data is filtered for firms with at least 100 Ns in this survey. The red dotted line at 40% indicates highly elevated spending momentum and there are several firms above that mark. That includes, of course, Microsoft, which is literally off the charts on both dimensions – quite incredible, actually.

But for the rest of the pack, CrowdStrike has now taken back its No. 1 Net Score position in the survey, with CyberArk, Okta, Zscaler, Cloudflare and Auth0 (now Okta) all above the 40% mark.

You can stare at the data at your leisure, but here are three quick points: 1) Palo Alto Networks continues to impress and is steady as she goes; 2) The cyber market is still very crowded and complicated; and 3) There’s lots of spending in different pockets, with 12 companies having more than 100 responses and a Net Score above 30%. This market has too many tools and will continue to consolidate.

Drilling deeper into Okta, CrowdStrike, Zscaler and CyberArk

Let’s now dig into four firms’ Net Scores and pick out some of the pure plays that are leading.

The series of charts above shows the Net Score or spending velocity granularity for Okta, Crowdstrike, Zscaler and CyberArk. Four of the top pure plays in the ETR survey with over 100 N. The colors represent the following – bright red is defections, pink is spending less, gray is flat spend, forest green is spending more and lime green is adding new. The red dotted line is at the 40% Net Score mark. All four are elevated above that target. The blue line is the Net Score and the yellow line is pervasiveness in the data. The data represented by the bars goes back 10 surveys to January 2020.

First, let’s point out that all four are seeing downtrends in spending momentum as the overall market is off.

Okta is being hurt by fewer new adds to the platform, which is why we highlighted that area in the upper right of the Okta chart (note the lime green). And the gray for Okta – flat spending – is noticeably up. So it feels like people are pausing a bit and taking a breath. And as we said earlier, perhaps with the breach earlier this year and the ingestion of Auth0, the company is seeing some friction in its business. Now, having said that, you can see Okta’s yellow line or presence in the data continues to grow – and is a good proxy for market presence. Okta remains a leader in identity.

Again you can digest the data at your leisure, but despite some concerns on declining momentum, there’s very little red at these companies when it comes to the ETR survey data.

Charting the four-star cybersecurity firms

We have one more data slide which brings us to our four-star cyber firms.

We started a tradition a few years ago where we sort the ETR data by Net Score – that’s the lefthand side of the chart; and on the right we sort by Shared N or presence in the data set. Again, this is filtered by companies with at least 100 N. And we’ve excluded Microsoft just to level the playing field.

The red dotted line signifies the top 10. If a company cracks the top 10 in both categories, we supply them four stars. Palo Alto, CrowdStrike, Okta, Fortinet Inc. and Zscaler made the cut this time. As we pointed out in May, if you combine Auth0 with Okta, they jump to No. 2 on the righthand chart and would lead the pure plays there, although it would bring down Okta’s Net Score somewhat if you combined them.

The other point we’ll make is that Proofpoint Inc. and Splunk Inc. both dropped off the four-star list this time as they both saw marked declines in Net Score.

Re:Inforce is back, in person

We’re going to close on what to expect at re:Inforce this coming week.

Re:Inforce is AWS’ security event. It first held it in Boston back in 2019, dedicated to cloud security. The past two years has been virtual and it announced at re:Invent 2021 that it would take place in Houston in June… which was crazy and it postponed the event, thankfully, and it’s back in Boston starting Monday.

Stephen Schmidt had been the face of AWS security at all these previous events as the chief information security officer. He has dropped the “I” from his title and is now the chief security officer at Amazon.com Inc., going with Amazon Chief Executive Andy Jassy to the mother ship, presumably dropping the I because he deals with physical security now too, such as at the warehouses. Not that he didn’t have to worry about physical security at AWS data center, but he and CJ Moses, the new CISO at AWS, will be keynoting along with some others, including MongoDB Inc. CISO Lena Smart.

If you’ve been following AWS, you’ll note it likes to break things down into identity, detection and response, and data protection/privacy/GRC and we would expect a lot more talk on container security this year. So you’ll hear product updates on services such as GuardDuty (threat detection with machine learning), Security Hub (which centralizes views and alerts and automates security checks), Detective (root cause analysis) and tools to mitigate denial-of-service attacks. AWS will likely talk about security for Nitro and isolation of hardware resources… and again you’ll hear some updates on container security because it’s the hottest thing going right now.

You’ll also get a lot of best practice advice from AWS – i.e., they’ll share the AWS dogfooding playbooks with you. AWS, like all good security practitioners, understands that they keys to a successful security strategy don’t start with the technology. Rather, they are about the methods and practices that you apply to solve security challenges, and a top-to-bottom cultural approach to security awareness, designing security into systems and training for continuous improvement.

So we’re going to get heavy doses of really strong best practices.

You’re also going to hear and see partners. They’ll be very visible at re:Inforce. AWS is all about ecosystem enablement and the event will host close to 100 security partners. This is key because AWS can’t and doesn’t do it all. They have to apply the shared responsibility model, not only with customers but partners as well in order to fill gaps and provide deeper problem-solving. And we expect the partners to be talking a lot about ransomware protection.

And you’ll hear a lot of positivity around how great cloud security is, and can be if done well. But the truth is this stuff is still incredibly complicated and challenging for practitioners, who are understaffed when it comes to top talent.

And finally, theCUBE will be at re:Inforce… in force. John Furrier will be co-hosting two days of broadcasts. Do stop by if you’re in Boston and say hello. We’ll have a chat, share some data and our overall impressions of the event, the market and what we’re seeing, learning and worrying about in this dynamic space.

Keep in touch

Thanks to Alex Myerson, who does the production, podcasts and media workflows for Breaking Analysis. Special thanks to Kristen Martin and Cheryl Knight, who help us keep our community informed and get the word out, and to Rob Hof, our editor in chief at SiliconANGLE.

Remember we publish each week on Wikibon and SiliconANGLE. These episodes are all available as podcasts wherever you listen.

Email david.vellante@siliconangle.com, DM @dvellante on Twitter and comment on our LinkedIn posts.

Also, check out this ETR Tutorial we created, which explains the spending methodology in more detail. Note: ETR is a separate company from Wikibon and SiliconANGLE. If you would like to cite or republish any of the company’s data, or inquire about its services, please contact ETR at legal@etr.ai.

Here’s the full video analysis:

All statements made regarding companies or securities are strictly beliefs, points of view and opinions held by SiliconANGLE media, Enterprise Technology Research, other guests on theCUBE and guest writers. Such statements are not recommendations by these individuals to buy, sell or hold any security. The content presented does not constitute investment advice and should not be used as the basis for any investment decision. You and only you are responsible for your investment decisions.

Disclosure: Many of the companies cited in Breaking Analysis are sponsors of theCUBE and/or clients of Wikibon. None of these firms or other companies have any editorial control over or advanced viewing of what’s published in Breaking Analysis. 

Mon, 25 Jul 2022 07:06:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://siliconangle.com/2022/07/22/aws-reinforce-marks-summer-checkpoint-cybersecurity/
Killexams : Collaboration Program in Natural Resources

Building Collaborative Capacity in Wyoming and Beyond

2020 CPNR Cohort

COVID-19 NOTE: As of January 2022, we anticipate running a full, in-person program for 2022-2023 using the following precautions. Participants are strongly encouraged to be fully vaccinated by the time the program starts, including the booster shot. Participants may be asked to use two of the three COVID risk reduction strategies for in-person sessions: vaccination, masking, and testing. Some guest faculty may request that all participants be fully vaccinated for their workshops.

Natural resource problems are complex, involving more than science and policy decisions. These problems tap into people’s deeply held values and beliefs, local economic and conservation interests, and more.

Natural resource practitioners are often called upon and sometimes required to work collaboratively in complex and contentious settings with stakeholders, people and groups with a vested interest in whatever solutions are ultimately proposed and implemented. 

The Collaboration Program in Natural Resources works with mid- and upper-career natural resource professionals to help them maximize their impact in complex and often contentious collaborative settings. CPNR seeks to increase knowledge and skills in three main areas:

  • Collaborative leaderships skills in areas such as effective communication, conflict resolution, and innovative problem solving

  • Designing, convening, and facilitating collaborative problem-solving processes

  • Participating effectively in collaborative problem-solving processes

CPNR graduates go on to lead collaborative problem-solving processes throughout Wyoming and across the West, ensuring that natural resource management decisions are more inclusive, consider more community and stakeholder needs, and will be more robust and longer-lasting than they could ever be without collaboration.

The program brings up to 20 participants together for a ten-month training program focused on collaborative leadership and problem-solving. The first five sessions include interactive hands-on training in leadership, collaborative process design, negotiation, facilitation, and more. Participants then apply what they’ve learned to a practicum: a real-world collaboration project at work or in their community. The program culminates in April, with project presentations and a celebration for the graduates.

View the 2022 CPNR Recruitment Flier

View the 2022 CPNR Program Outline


Statement on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) 

The Collaboration Program in Natural Resources invites individuals to deepen their technical and leadership skills in the service of solving our state, region, and country's most complex natural resource and environmental problems. It is inspired by the core values of the University of Wyoming as described in its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Strategic Plan: inclusivity, multiplicity, fairness, and parity.

This work requires members of the CPNR community to develop the leadership skills necessary to effectively engage in sometimes difficult conversations with their colleagues and collaborators around identities, perspectives, and life experiences such as political identity, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and country of origin. 

CPNR is committed to furthering this work by recruiting diverse cohorts, integrating DEI into the curriculum, and convening/participating in related conversations locally, regionally, and nationally.


Program dates and locations

CPNR participants attend five rigorous, hands-on sessions to develop collaborative problem-solving skills for natural resource issues. They also complete a skills practicum. Sessions for the 2022 class run from noon Wednesdays to noon Fridays as follows:

(Updated January 2022)

  • July 13-15, 2022, Lander, WY

  • August 10–12, 2022, Ten Sleep, WY*

  • September 28-30, 2022, Laramie, WY

  • October 26-28, 2022, Saratoga, WY

  • Nov 30-Dec 2, 2022, Laramie, WY

  • April 19-21, 2023, Sheridan, WY

*Session 2 will begin at 8am August 10th. Participants will be asked to arrive in Ten Sleep the evening of August 9th. 


Program Requirements

  • Attend all six session from July—April

  • Complete one or more self-assessments and work to build collaborative leadership skills and behaviors

  • Engage with the program in between sessions by for example reviewing materials, watching brief videos, and participating in group calls and online discussion forums

  • Develop and make significant progress on a project that focuses on a collaborative problem-solving opportunity

Participants successfully completing the program have the option to earn graduate credit through the University of Wyoming.


How to Apply

Applications for the next round of CPNR in 2022–2023 are being accepted on a rolling basis. To apply, please complete the 2022 CPNR Application.


Tuition

The Program tuition is $1,300, which helps CPNR cover costs related to the program. The tuition must be paid in full by July 1. Tuition is not refundable if a participant withdraws from the program (though it may be applied to a future year). Transportation, lodging, and other related expenses are the responsibility of the participant.


Scholarships

Thanks to generous support from Rocky Mountain Power, CPNR is able to offer a limited number of scholarships to help cover tuition costs for participants who might not be able to otherwise participate. Please indicate on the application form whether you are seeking scholarship support.



Instructors

Deb Kleinman, CPNR Director

Deb Kleinman, CPNR Director

(307) 314-2385 | deb@lupinecollaborative.com | Website

Deb Kleinman is a facilitator, trainer, and leadership coach based out of Laramie, WY. She launched Lupine Collaborative in 2012 to help organizations work more effectively together, make better decisions, and increase their impact in ways that matter. She has over 20 years of experience working in and with nonprofits, academic institutions, public agencies, and private businesses on a wide range of strategic, collaborative, and training issues. Deb has extensive training and experience in facilitation, collaborative decision making, conflict resolution and conflict coaching, and leadership development, and is a certified professional coach.

Steve Smutko

Dr. Steve Smutko, Spicer Chair in Collaborative Practice

(307) 766-2703  |  steve.smutko@uwyo.edu  |  Website

Professor and Spicer Chair in Collaborative Practice, also at the Ruckelshaus Institute, Dr. Smutko co-teaches the CPNR training sessions. He has designed, convened, and facilitated numerous public policy decision processes on natural resources issues in the Rocky Mountain West and the southeast United States. Dr. Smutko also conducts research in collaborative decision-making and teaches courses to University of Wyoming students and to natural resource stakeholders in environmental decision making and negotiation analysis.


The Collaboration Program in Natural Resources is made possible by generous support from Rocky Mountain Power and The Spicer Fund for Collaborative Solutions.

Mon, 30 Jan 2017 03:43:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.uwyo.edu/haub/ruckelshaus-institute/collaborative-solutions/cpnr/
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