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Exam Code: 9A0-412 Practice test 2023 by Killexams.com team
9A0-412 Adobe Analytics Business Practitioner

• test name: Analytics Business Practitioner Exam
• test number: 4A0-412
• Number of questions: 69
• Time limit: 120 minutes
• Format: Multiple choice, multiple select
• Language offered: English
• Delivery: Online proctored (requires camera access) or Exam Center proctored
• Adobe exams are reported on a scale of 300 to 700. The passing score for each test is 550

Target Audience
• Digital marketers
• Business analysts
• Business consultants
• Data analysts
• Web analysts
• Digital analysts
• Media / marketing analysts
• Product owners and managers
• UI analysts
• Conversion / optimization specialists

At a minimum, the candidate seeking to become certified:
• Has 2 years experience in digital analytics, typically has a marketing background or comes from a marketing role but can come from a variety of job roles, possesses and in-depth understanding of digital analytics metrics and dimensions, understands the business value of web technologies, can translate business requirements into metrics or KPIs, build and interpret reports, communicate results and can propose a course of action based on analysis of reports.
• Helps clients understand how to extract/pull the information they want, and which are contextually relevant (e.g. help them define their business questions)
• Understands how the technology works and understands a clients implementation (e.g. where the data sits, how it can be collected, how it is tracked) from a functional standpoint
• Has at least one year of Adobe Analytics hands-on experience
• Has a basic understanding of how digital analytics is filtering/structuring data
• Has an awareness of the integration of Adobe Analytics with other Adobe solutions

The minimally-qualified Analytics Business Practitioner should be familiar with the following tools and comfortable in the following environments:
• Internet browser
• Microsoft Excel
• Microsoft PowerPoint
• Packet monitor
• FTP client
• Adobe Analytics Workspace
• Debugging tools relevant to Adobe Analytics (Adobe Debugger, Omnibug, Observepoint, Charles)
• Admin console (Report console and Experience Cloud console)
• Adobe Launch (high level)
• Apps, SPA
• Mobile services
• Adobe Experience Cloud (understand product profiles and user groups)
• Adobe Help Center
• Soft skills:
• Virtual and in-person interaction with technical resources (e.g. Analytics Developer, IT) and the client
• Data quality issues/ improvement discussions
• Client KPI/Goal discussion meetings

Section 1: Business Analysis 25%
Section 2: Reporting and Dashboarding for Projects 25%
Section 3: Segmentation and Calculated Metrics 25%
Section 4: General tool knowledge and troubleshooting 15%
Section 5: Administration 10%

Section 1: Business Analysis
• Given a business need/question, identify the most appropriate reporting strategy to perform an analysis
• Analyze data to answer business questions and recommend new optimization hypotheses
• Identify conversion funnels
• Interpret Solution Design Reference (SDR) to determine what data is available in reports
• Analyze report data to summarize and draw conclusions
• Understand outliers and anomalies in reports
Section 2: Reporting and Dashboarding for Projects
• Apply the process to configure projects using the most appropriate tool(s)
• Compare fallout and flow visualization and appropriate variable types for reporting
• Apply the process to schedule Projects, Report Builder and Data Warehouse
• Apply the process to share Projects and Reporting and Analytics dashboards for different users and/or groups
• Apply the process to set Alerts
• Apply the process to lookup the dimensions/components
• Apply the process to create a visualization
• Given a scenario, determine the appropriate item to use Section 3: Segmentation and Calculated Metrics
• Determine how to develop and configure segments
• Apply the process to share segments with others in the organization
• Compare segments
• Apply segments to Projects and Components
• Apply the process to generate calculated and/or segmented metrics
• Determine Metric Types
Section 4: General tool knowledge and troubleshooting
• Analyze reports and identify data quality issues
• Define different types of dimensions and parameters existing in Adobe Analytics
• Determine how to bring data in and out of Adobe Analytics
• Apply the process to configure Report Builder
Section 5: Administration
• Apply the process to configure the Marketing Channel reports with Marketing Channel processing rules
• Apply the process to configure Classification Importer and Rule Builder
• Identify information from marketing URLs
• Apply the process to configure a virtual report suite based upon an existing segment
• Understand Report Suite Admin Console Settings

Adobe Analytics Business Practitioner
Adobe Practitioner thinking
Killexams : Adobe Practitioner thinking - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9A0-412 Search results Killexams : Adobe Practitioner thinking - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9A0-412 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Adobe Killexams : Creator Economy Attracts Healthcare Educators

Physician burnout is at an all-time high of 62.8%, with one in five physicians planning to quit their jobs over the next two years. This correlates with data that suggests health workers are facing a mental health crisis.

Among the challenges that medical students face in American colleges, a Medscape survey points out the culture of medical school as a major contributor to current hurdles. According to the survey, aspiring physicians must regularly endure sleep deprivation, long nights, and work after hours and on days off.

It [survey] indicates that two-thirds of residents work greater than 50 hours per week, with a large percentage of residents exceeding 70-80 hours per week. This culture is carried on into professional medical practice and, by most accounts, is not adequately compensated.

The realities of a stretched profession and sector have some professionals eyeing side opportunities to maximize their knowledge base in a world comfortable with online learning and social media mechanisms. Many of these professional onlookers are discovering that the creator economy and its estimated 200 million content contributors are carving out niche revenue opportunities.

The time to independently create digestible and revenue-generating content appears closer than previously thought. Adobe’s Future of Creativity study finds that 23% of professionals worldwide actively contribute to the global economy. In addition, results indicating nearly one in four people are creators imply previous constraints may be waning.

Kyle Denhoff, HubSpot’s Director of New Media, opines that lowered entry costs have provided an accessible gateway for creators to activate their ideas. "The barriers to creating a media product have dropped significantly," Denhoff said. "When we talk about creators, obviously there are folks that can produce something right from their phone and post it on social media — but we're also talking to independent writers, podcasters, and YouTubers who are building digital media products."

Parallel Partner

Like the healthcare sector's challenges, education and teachers have experienced similar confounding variables impacting talent retention. Educators in K-12, especially over the last 15 years and post-Covid-19, are finding outside interest in their skill sets, offering a pivot to current work-life balance issues.

Many accounts point to a lack of ownership of respective work-life models and preparatory activities lacking in personalization. Behind the scenes, many educators left the profession within the first five years post-certification for jobs in the technology sector serving the very same classrooms these educators left.

The intersection of teachers and healthcare providers in the creator economy has established an opportunity to share knowledge with consumers and practitioners to generate revenue more broadly.

Healthcare Entrepreneurs

Many in the healthcare industry view their position as part interventionist and part educator. As a result, some are looking to K-12 and higher education models of online delivery to stir up new and balanced professional opportunities.

As a physician, Dr. Chester Zoda faced the challenges of medical school and residency. Today he runs Digital Doctor University, an education startup company that converts physicians and health experts into content creators. Zoda, during Covid-19, was working close to 100 hours per week, and he eventually started thinking about a life through medicine that could provide balance.

“This harsh reality pushed me to seek a solution and save myself from this madness,” says Zoda.

A 2022 CHG healthcare survey found that nearly 50% of healthcare providers either left the profession altogether for out-of-sector positions, retired, or changed jobs within the industry. Respondents cited a lack of work-life balance and decreased income as key factors impacting their decisions.

Online education is a multi-billion dollar industry and growing every day. The Creator Economy has sprouted up to reveal opportunities for first-time entrepreneurs eager to monetize their respective knowledge base.

“After I started building my business and sharing my medical knowledge online, I shared my approach with a small group of health professionals who found similar success,” says Zoda.

The train-the-trainer model evolved into what is now Zoda’s Digital Doctor University. “I am leading a new generation of health experts into a brighter future like author and Doctor of Optometry and graduate of the University of California, Berkley Pam Theriot.”

The statistics of healthcare providers, like Theriot, burning out from traditional service models are growing with each headline published across the country.

Zoda points to the tech sector's impact on entertainment and commerce, noting the classic replacement artists of Amazon and Netflix replacing Walmart and Blockbuster, respectively. “The early adopters [in entertainment and commerce] are now the biggest companies in the world. The laggards (ex. Blockbuster) became bankrupt and lost everything because they were reticent to move their offerings online.”

Demographics

In the creator economy, most assume that practitioners of content monetization are Gen-Z and Millennial populations centered on entertainment. However, Zoda has found that his healthcare practitioner-customers are diverse in background and current placement. “It has been surprising, but we have seen students come to us from all levels of medical practice, from resident doctors to graduates from NASA, Cambridge, and Harvard.”

A challenge for healthcare professionals remains the choice between home and family and an occupation often linked to working for a cause or purpose. The mission, for many, is to continue delivering positive health outcomes but instead through alternative business models.

Some professionals exchange job security for schedules they control through locum tenens (temporary healthcare positions) that often provide a substantially higher income for providers.

They may not have chosen the creator economy, but many choosing this path cite creation as the key to their decision. Trevor Cabrera, MD, in looking at what he deems his “medical mortgage,” found locums created opportunities to practice medicine as an entrepreneur might in the tech sector. “I’m lucky to love my day-to-day “job” and hardly feel as if I’m working, but I’m not exempt from physical and mental exhaustion. So, I am sure to schedule in extra days for enjoyment or exploration,” says Cabrera in CompHealth.

“In New Mexico, I’ve scheduled extra days off to see the desert and climb the mountains. In Maine, I worked in an extra week to drive up the coast and eat every lobster roll I could find. I’ve even managed to make time for visiting friends and family — things I only dreamed of during residency,” he adds.

The centralized nature of medical education and practice is seen by many as a significant problem for the industry. “The sector should be looking to decentralize and democratize health care and put the power firmly in the hands of the practitioners. That's an opportunity we want to put in the hands of everyone in this industry,” says Zoda.

The mindset of healthcare content creators and the impact educational models have on professional practice are yet to field a substantial set of opportunities. Those healthcare professionals who hang a proverbial shingle are primed to be the initial explorers of the Creator Economy and the relative benefits of educating through this new and digital channel of review-generating opportunities.


Online education presents an alternative to traditional brick-and-mortar education mixed with a creator economy's explosion that appears to be accelerating a new knowledge acquisition path for professionals across sectors.

Healthcare, as an industry, has adapted to meet patient needs in a digital world. It may be time to perk up and pay attention to providers who also see the merits of online mechanisms to achieve work-life balance and monetary success.

A world of creators solely focused on fashion trends and entertainment seems to be growing as traditional occupations and providers explore new opportunities. Time will tell if healthcare providers in health and wellness fields find a reason to proctor expertise through atypical means as Zoda has.

"Online education is a game changer, and the use cases for it across industries are massive,” says Zoda.

The creator community hopes to see you through a digital device in the near future. Practitioners as educators and content creators aim to capitalize on the longstanding challenges of an industry ripe with burnout. The creator economy will continue to amass more providers and revenue while focusing on creators and their niche communities.

The welcome mat has unfurled for the next generation of practitioners. The healthcare consumer market will likely define the health outcomes of updated practices by the field. And if healthcare content creators have a say, they’ll do so from a position of power over current work and life constraints.

Interviews have been edited and condensed for clarity.

Mon, 13 Feb 2023 00:00:00 -0600 Rod Berger en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/rodberger/2023/02/13/creator-economy-attracts-healthcare-educators/
Killexams : How to Stop Catastrophic Thinking at Bedtime

Like our emotions, negative and irrational thoughts will also adversely affect our sleep. No doubt, once we are in bed, all sorts of thoughts will invade our mind, anything from the work that we must complete to financial issues that are a cause of concern. Because sleep is solitary process, we have a great deal of time (the entire night!) to think about our problems and work through all the scenarios by ourselves. Not only is this a daunting task, but it’s also a problematic one: At a moment when we are supposed to be relaxing, we are confronting these issues alone and in a state of irrationality, especially if we are sleep deprived.

False beliefs about sleep or other subject matters also negatively impact our sleep; it’s a common thread among a great number of my patients. In a state of hyper-arousal (as occurs with insomnia) or sleep deprivation, the mind ruminates about anything, whether this be logical or illogical (primarily the latter). The most common illogical thought that occurs as we experience insomnia is the effect it will have on us the subsequent day. We feel that we cannot function adequately at work or home, and this will affect our performance, which would ultimately lead to disastrous consequences. We may convince ourselves that we are close to termination at our jobs, or that our loved ones are annoyed with us, or that we will sustain a potentially hazardous car accident. This is called catastrophizing, and we can counter this irrationality by recalling how few instances there are when our fears have come to fruition.

Read More: The Sleep Cure: The Fountain of Youth May Be Closer Than You Ever Thought

If you experience insomnia most nights, and if you have convinced yourself that your insomnia is putting you in grave danger, the percentage of these occurrences must be high. In other words, if your insomnia was a legitimate cause of termination, a breakup, or more, then you would be experiencing these things all the time. But reality tells us this is not so: You may want to formulate evidence for these occurrences to see that the evidence does not conform to reality and try to write these down. As always, writing is helpful because if these thoughts occur again, you have already dismissed them as not worthy of further elaboration.

Evaluating your thoughts considering this new evidence, you may want to modify your initial irrational thought and rephrase it in a way that is realistic. For example, if the irrational thought is that you will get fired if you don’t sleep and perform your best, rephrase it in a way that conforms to what happened in the past in your bouts with insomnia: “I may not perform my best at work and may be irritable, but I will get through this day without being terminated.”

Consider also debunking myths that may not necessarily relate to your sleep. Recognize that you may not need eight hours of sleep, a thought that could have guided your perception of perfect sleep and the inability to attain this holy grail. A recent study conducted at Washington University School of Medicine showed that the “sweet spot” of sleep is six and a half hours, where cognitive performance is stable over time. Also, recall that going to bed early may be detrimental because your inability to fall asleep at that time may make the connection between your bed and sleep less robust.

Instead, recognize that your best option in this situation is to prolong the time that you go to bed, so that you can not only build up a greater homeostatic drive to sleep but also to sever the links between your insomnia and the bed or bedroom environment. Looking specifically at the homeostatic drive to sleep, you may see that the nights you did not sleep well actually led to better nights subsequently. This is because the drive to sleep has had time to build up and naturally put you to sleep. Adenosine is an important sleep-inducing substance that builds up naturally in our brain. Once it has reached a threshold with higher and higher concentrations, it inhibits arousal and causes sleepiness. It leads to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. In other words, adenosine is like a natural sleep medication that our brain produces to ensure that we fall asleep if we haven’t slept for a while. In essence, this compound is telling us to “let go” and let things take their course, naturally.

Another method that I have found to be increasingly helpful but more difficult to grasp when it comes to insomnia is countering the catastrophizing by pushing it to its limit. When you start worrying, introduce the mantra of “to hell with it all,” so you can find peace in your worries. Essentially, if you’re already thinking that your life has gone or will go wrong, you have nothing left to lose. This approach pushes the catastrophizing to such an extreme degree that, when it comes time to worry, you’ve already encountered the worst-case scenario and come to terms with it.

Most people have difficulty imagining their lives as “messed-up” because that is what they are trying to desperately avoid. But when you have already made this a foregone conclusion, you have already let go; use it to your advantage and reverse it. As the ancient Chinese philosopher and writer Lao Tzu once said, “When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.”

So let go, and let sleep do its thing—as it was meant to do.

More Must-Reads From TIME


Contact us at letters@time.com.

Wed, 08 Feb 2023 17:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://time.com/6253219/how-to-stop-catastrophic-thinking-sleep/
Killexams : National Capital Region’s Top Employers: 2023 Winners

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The following organizations have been chosen as National Capital Region’s Top Employers for 2023 (employee count refers to full-time staff):

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Adobe Systems Canada Inc., Ottawa. Software publishers; 342 employees. Manages a sabbatical program of up to six weeks for employees celebrating anniversary milestones in five-year increments.

Algonquin College of Applied Arts & Technology, Nepean. Post-secondary education; 1,421 employees. Provides subsidized access to on-campus fitness facilities, with personal trainers, an indoor running track, a bouldering and climbing wall, and registered massage therapist services.

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Alterna Savings and Credit Union Limited, Ottawa. Credit unions; 584 employees. Enhanced its coverage for mental health care from $500 to $2,500 per year and expanded the group of practitioners covered.

Assembly of First Nations, Ottawa. Indigenous government; 147 employees. Provides generous maternity and parental leave top-up for new mothers, to 93 per cent of salary for up to 50 weeks.

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Bank of Canada, Ottawa. Central bank; 2,035 employees. Offers the option to purchase up to five additional vacation days as part of its flexible benefits plan.

Canada Post Corporation, Ottawa. Postal service; 49,624 employees. Launched its mental health strategy in the past year and maintains wellness and safety programs to foster a psychologically healthy and safe workplace.

Canada Revenue Agency / CRA, Ottawa. Federal government, general economic programs; 55,588 employees. Offers family-related leave with pay for up to 45 hours per year, which can be used to care for a sick family member, to accompany family members to appointments, or to provide temporary child care.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa. Federal government, food inspection and regulation; 6,838 employees. Facilitated discussions with BIPOC employees to better understand their experiences with systemic racism and discrimination.

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Canadian Internet Registration Authority / CIRA, Ottawa. Information technology services; 110 employees. Celebrates exceptional performance through a number of aptly themed awards, such as the Canada Goose Award for an employee who leads the gaggle.

Carleton University, Ottawa. Post-secondary education; 2,516 employees. Provides unlimited coverage for psychologist services, massage and physiotherapy as part of its benefits plan.

CBC / Radio-Canada, Ottawa. Broadcasting; 8,209 employees. Maintains a special assistance fund to help employees and their eligible dependents claim necessary medical expenses not covered by other sources, to a lifetime maximum of $12,500.

Children’s Aid Society of Ottawa / CASO, Gloucester. Children and youth support services; 402 employees. Supports lifelong learning with tuition subsidies for courses taken externally, to $2,500 per year.

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Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario / CHEO, Ottawa. Hospitals; 2,325 employees. Manages the Shining Star peer recognition program and honours award recipients at an annual evening gala.

Colleges and Institutes Canada / CICan, Ottawa. Professional organizations; 134 employees. Introduced a hybrid work policy in 2022 to provide more flexibility to work at home and in-office, in whatever combination employees choose.

Communications Security Establishment / CSE, Ottawa. Federal government, national security; 3,236 employees. Manages a unique Legacy Talks series where soon-to-be retired employees share their corporate, operational and personal knowledge, gained after long and productive careers.

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Co-operative Housing Federation of Canada, Ottawa. Co-operative housing; 30 employees. Moves employees to four weeks of annual vacation allowance after only four years on the job.

CPCS Transcom Limited, Ottawa. Transportation consulting services; 79 employees. Cultivates an ownership culture through share purchase and profit-sharing plans, available to all employees.

Dairy Farmers of Canada / Les Producteurs laitiers du Canada, Ottawa. Business associations; 76 employees. Encourages employee volunteerism with paid time off to volunteer, up to three days annually.

Department of Finance Canada, Ottawa. Federal government, general economic programs; 796 employees. Organizes FIN Ideas Hub, informal sessions that bring employees together from various branches to broaden thinking on prominent policy questions, encourage collaboration and share ideas.

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Department of Justice Canada, Ottawa. Federal government, legal system administration; 4,896 employees. Fosters connection through regular social events and activities, including weekly coffee breaks, with work excluded from conversations, and virtual “5 à 7” events.

Egg Farmers of Canada, Ottawa. Business associations; 60 employees. Manages the annual Get Cracking Award to honour employees for their volunteerism, also making a donation to a charity of the recipient’s choice.

Employment and Social Development Canada, Gatineau. Federal government, social development, employment insurance, passport services; 37,334 employees. Helps employees plan for the future with pre-retirement workshops on Topics including financial planning, health and nutrition, and psychological aspects of retirement.

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Engineers Canada, Ottawa. Professional organizations; 50 employees. Encourages staff to engage in healthy habits at home and at work through a variety of initiatives, including step challenges and healthy eating lunch and learns.

Evolugen, Gatineau. Renewable energy generation and services; 238 employees. Maintains a charitable focus on initiatives related to health and safety, environmental initiatives, education and research, community services, and Indigenous communities.

Export Development Canada, Ottawa. International trade financing and support services; 2,019 employees. Employees may allocate their flexible benefits credits to RRSP, TFSA or RESP accounts, or distribute credits as a donation to the United Way.

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Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard, Ottawa. Federal government, administration of conservation programs; 13,705 employees. Extends health benefits to retirees, with no age limit and up to 69 per cent of premium coverage.

Health Canada / Santé Canada, Ottawa. Federal government, administration of public health programs; 9,987 employees. Maintains a longstanding mental health and wellness strategy to build a healthy, respectful and inclusive workplace and offers coverage for mental health services, to $2,000 per year.

Health Standards Organization / HSO, Gloucester. Professional organizations; 219 employees. Encourages employees to take the time they need to rest and recharge with up to 15 paid sick days annually.

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Hydro Ottawa, Gloucester. Electric power distribution; 687 employees. Supports employees who want to start a family with subsidies for fertility treatments and fertility drugs if needed, to a lifetime maximum of $15,000.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada / IRCC, Ottawa. Federal government, immigration services; 10,347 employees. Hosted a virtual mental health and wellness fair featuring a TED Talk Series, yoga, guest speakers and presentations.

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Ottawa. Federal government, industry and economic development programs; 6,160 employees. Provides long-term peace of mind with contributions to a defined benefit pension plan and retirement planning assistance.

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Invest Ottawa, Ottawa. Administration of general economic programs; 102 employees. Helps employees balance work and their personal lives with flexible work hours, eight days of “life leave” and has introduced hybrid work options.

Kinaxis Inc., Kanata. Software developers; 670 employees. Has continued the pandemic-era policy of offering employees the last Friday of every month off, providing a shared mental break along with an additional long weekend.

La Cité, Ottawa. Post-secondary education; 541 employees. Introduced a formal hybrid work program to supplement its existing flex work options and adapted onsite physical workspaces to accommodate a return to work.

Library of Parliament, Ottawa. Federal government, library; 413 employees. Starts new employees with four weeks of paid vacation and considers previous work when setting vacation entitlements for more experienced new candidates.

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Lumentum Ottawa Inc., Nepean. Specialty manufacturing; 345 employees. Lets new parents extend their leave into an unpaid leave of absence as well as offering phased-in work options when they are ready to return to work.

National Capital Commission, Ottawa. Federal government, land and building management; 523 employees. Introduced new hybrid work arrangements to accompany existing flex options, offering ergonomic assessments for employees’ home offices.

Nelligan O’Brien Payne LLP, Ottawa. Law firms; 110 employees. Encourages its employees to take the time to support local charitable initiatives with one paid day off to volunteer.

Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions of Canada, Ottawa. Federal government, regulation of financial institutions; 948 employees. Supports ongoing employee development with tuition subsidies for courses related and not directly related to their current position.

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Ottawa, City of, Ottawa. Municipal governments; 12,899 employees. Helps employees plan for a secure future with retirement planning assistance services and contributions to a defined benefit pension plan.

Ottawa Community Housing Corporation, Ottawa. Administration of housing programs; 409 employees. Supports its new moms, dads and adoptive parents with maternity and parental leave top-up payments, up to 95 per cent of salary for 25 weeks.

Parliamentary Protective Service, Ottawa. Police service. Starts its new employees with four weeks of paid vacation and considers previous work when setting vacation entitlements for experienced candidates.

Perley-Robertson, Hill & McDougall LLP / s.r.l., Ottawa. Law firms; 110 employees. Encourages employee wellness through seminars on a range of relevant topics, from nutrition to sleep therapy to mindful meditation and yoga.

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Public Services and Procurement Canada, Gatineau. Federal government, procurement services; 17,710 employees. Along with in-house training programs and tuition subsidies, employees can apply for an educational leave of absence, ranging up to 16 weeks in duration.

Pythian Services Inc., Ottawa. Computer systems design and support services; 123 employees. Encourages ongoing employee development through generous tuition subsidies for courses and related and not directly related to their current position, to $5,000 annually.

QlikTech Corporation, Kanata. Computer software; 186 employees. Offers an unlimited vacation policy for all of its employees.

Ross Video Ltd., Nepean. Audio and video communications technology; 825 employees. Lets employees design a suitable work schedule with their managers and select from one of four work style options.

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Royal Canadian Mint, The, Ottawa. Minting and coin distribution; 1,188 employees. Offers generous coverage for mental health practitioner services through its health benefits plan, up to $2,000 annually.

Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Ottawa. Specialty hospitals; 937 employees. Supports its new moms, dads and adoptive parents with maternity and parental leave top-up payments, along with the option to extend their leave into an unpaid leave of absence.

Shopify Inc., Ottawa. Multi-channel commerce platform; 7,538 employees. Manages the unique Hack Days program that offers three full days annually for employees to “step out of their day jobs and tackle a new problem”.

Statistics Canada / Statistique Canada, Ottawa. Federal government, statistical agency; 6,506 employees. Established a workplace wellness committee that is managed by employee volunteers who manage programs and initiatives in support of their colleagues.

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Tehama Inc., Ottawa. Computer software; 65 employees. Offers all employees a flexible paid vacation program that features a 30-day flexible “bucket of time” that is available for employees to use as they need during the year.

Tomlinson Group, Nepean. Construction services; 1,408 employees. Encourages employees to become recruiters for the firm with generous new employee referral bonuses, from $500 to $1,000 depending on the position.

Universities Canada / Universités Canada, Ottawa. Professional organizations; 84 employees. Introduced a formal hybrid work program that includes generous home office allowances and new flex work stations that employees can book online when coming to the office.

University of Ottawa, Ottawa. Post-secondary education; 5,210 employees. Offers a generous mental health practitioner benefit as part of their health benefits plan, to $3,000 annually.

-Richard Yerema & Kristina Leung

This story was produced by Mediacorp in partnership with Postmedia, on behalf of Alberta’s Top Employers.

Mon, 06 Feb 2023 06:43:00 -0600 en-CA text/html https://ottawacitizen.com/sponsored/top-employers/national-capital-regions-top-employers-2023-winners
Killexams : Doctors Are Disappearing From Emergency Rooms as Hospitals Look to Cut Costs

Pregnant and scared, Natasha Valle went to a Tennova Healthcare hospital in Clarksville, Tennessee, in January 2021 because she was bleeding. She didn't know much about miscarriage, but this seemed like one.

In the emergency room, she was examined then sent home, she said. She went back when her cramping became excruciating. Then home again. It ultimately took three trips to the ER on three consecutive days, generating three separate bills, before she saw a doctor who looked at her bloodwork and confirmed her fears.

"At the time I wasn't thinking, 'Oh, I need to see a doctor,' " Valle recalled. "But when you think about it, it's like, 'Well — dang — why didn't I see a doctor?' " It's unclear whether the repeat visits were due to delays in seeing a physician, but the experience worried her. And she's still paying the bills.

The hospital declined to discuss Valle's care, citing patient privacy. But 17 months before her three-day ordeal, Tennova had outsourced its emergency rooms to American Physician Partners, a medical staffing company owned by private equity investors. APP employs fewer doctors in its ERs as one of its cost-saving initiatives to increase earnings, according to a confidential company document obtained by KHN and NPR.

This staffing strategy has permeated hospitals, and particularly emergency rooms, that seek to reduce their top expense: physician labor. While diagnosing and treating patients was once their domain, doctors are increasingly being replaced by nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively known as "midlevel practitioners," who can perform many of the same duties and generate much of the same revenue for less than half of the pay.

"APP has numerous cost saving initiatives underway as part of the Company's continual focus on cost optimization," the document says, including a "shift of staffing" between doctors and midlevel practitioners.

In a lab at Lipscomb University, nurse practitioners join doctors in practicing how to place a chest tube to fix a collapsed lung by snaking a rubber hose through a rack of pork ribs. The NPs will have to perform the procedure under a doctor’s supervision before being allowed to do it on their own.

In a statement to KHN, American Physician Partners said this strategy is a way to ensure all ERs remain fully staffed, calling it a "blended model" that allows doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants "to provide care to their fullest potential."

Critics of this strategy say the quest to save money results in treatment meted out by someone with far less training than a physician, leaving patients vulnerable to misdiagnoses, higher medical bills, and inadequate care. And these fears are bolstered by evidence that suggests dropping doctors from ERs may not be good for patients.

working paper, published in October by the National Bureau of Economic Research, analyzed roughly 1.1 million visits to 44 ERs throughout the Veterans Health Administration, where nurse practitioners can treat patients without oversight from doctors.

Researchers found that treatment by a nurse practitioner resulted on average in a 7% increase in cost of care and an 11% increase in length of stay, extending patients' time in the ER by minutes for minor visits and hours for longer ones. These gaps widened among patients with more severe diagnoses, the study said, but could be somewhat mitigated by nurse practitioners with more experience.

The study also found that ER patients treated by a nurse practitioner were 20% more likely to be readmitted to the hospital for a preventable reason within 30 days, although the overall risk of readmission remained very small.

Yiqun Chen, who is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Illinois-Chicago and co-authored the study, said these findings are not an indictment of nurse practitioners in the ER. Instead, she said, she hopes the study will guide how to best deploy nurse practitioners: in treatment of simpler patients or circumstances when no doctor is available.

"It's not just a simple question of if we can substitute physicians with nurse practitioners or not," Chen said. "It depends on how we use them. If we just use them as independent providers, especially…for relatively complicated patients, it doesn't seem to be a very good use."

Chen's research echoes smaller studies, like one from The Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute that found nonphysician practitioners in ERs were associated with a 5.3% increase in imaging, which could unnecessarily increase bills for patients. Separately, a study at the Hattiesburg Clinic in Mississippi found that midlevel practitioners in primary care — not in the emergency department — increased the out-of-pocket costs to patients while also leading to worse performance on nine of 10 quality-of-care metrics, including cancer screenings and vaccination rates.

But definitive evidence remains elusive that replacing ER doctors with nonphysicians has a negative impact on patients, said Dr. Cameron Gettel, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Yale. Private equity investment and the use of midlevel practitioners rose in lockstep in the ER, Gettel said, and in the absence of game-changing research, the pattern will likely continue.

"Worse patient outcomes haven't really been shown across the board," he said. "And I think until that is shown, then they will continue to play an increasing role."

For Private Equity, Dropping ER Docs Is a "Simple Equation"

Private equity companies pool money from wealthy investors to buy their way into various industries, often slashing spending and seeking to flip businesses in three to seven years. While this business model is a proven moneymaker on Wall Street, it raises concerns in health care, where critics worry the pressure to turn big profits will influence life-or-death decisions that were once left solely to medical professionals.

Nearly $1 trillion in private equity funds have gone into almost 8,000 health care transactions over the past decade, according to industry tracker PitchBook, including buying into medical staffing companies that many hospitals hire to manage their emergency departments.

At a two-day company training put on by American Physician Partners, chief medical officer Dr Tony Briningstool teaches doctors and nurse practitioners how to safely use sedation in the emergency department. As a money-saving strategy, emergency rooms are employing fewer doctors and relying instead on midlevel practitioners.

Two firms dominate the ER staffing industry: TeamHealth, bought by private equity firm Blackstone in 2016, and Envision Healthcare, bought by KKR in 2018. Trying to undercut these staffing giants is American Physician Partners, a rapidly expanding company that runs ERs in at least 17 states and is 50% owned by private equity firm BBH Capital Partners.

These staffing companies have been among the most aggressive in replacing doctors to cut costs, said Dr. Robert McNamara, a founder of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine and chair of emergency medicine at Temple University.

"It's a relatively simple equation," McNamara said. "Their No. 1 expense is the board-certified emergency physician. So they are going to want to keep that expense as low as possible."

Not everyone sees the trend of private equity in ER staffing in a negative light. Jennifer Orozco, president of the American Academy of Physician Associates, which represents physician assistants, said even if the change — to use more nonphysician providers — is driven by the staffing firms' desire to make more money, patients are still well served by a team approach that includes nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

"Though I see that shift, it's not about profits at the end of the day," Orozco said. "It's about the patient."

The "shift" is nearly invisible to patients because hospitals rarely promote branding from their ER staffing firms and there is little public documentation of private equity investments.

Dr. Arthur Smolensky, a Tennessee emergency medicine specialist attempting to measure private equity's intrusion into ERs, said his review of hospital job postings and employment contracts in 14 major metropolitan areas found that 43% of ER patients were seen in ERs staffed by companies with nonphysician owners, nearly all of whom are private equity investors.

Smolensky hopes to publish his full study, expanding to 55 metro areas, later this year. But this research will merely quantify what many doctors already know: The ER has changed. Demoralized by an increased focus on profit, and wary of a looming surplus of emergency medicine residents because there are fewer jobs to fill, many experienced doctors are leaving the ER on their own, he said.

"Most of us didn't go into medicine to supervise an army of people that are not as well trained as we are," Smolensky said. "We want to take care of patients."

"I Guess We're the First Guinea Pigs for Our ER"

Joshua Allen, a nurse practitioner at a small Kentucky hospital, snaked a rubber hose through a rack of pork ribs to practice inserting a chest tube to fix a collapsed lung.

It was 2020, and American Physician Partners was restructuring the ER where Allen worked, reducing shifts from two doctors to one. Once Allen had placed 10 tubes under a doctor's supervision, he would be allowed to do it on his own.

"I guess we're the first guinea pigs for our ER," he said. "If we do have a major trauma and multiple victims come in, there's only one doctor there. … We need to be prepared."

Allen is one of many midlevel practitioners finding work in emergency departments. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants are among the fastest-growing occupations in the nation, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Generally, they have master's degrees and receive several years of specialized schooling but have significantly less training than doctors. Many are permitted to diagnose patients and prescribe medication with little or no supervision from a doctor, although limitations vary by state.

The Neiman Institute found that the share of ER visits in which a midlevel practitioner was the main clinician increased by more than 172% between 2005 and 2020. Another study, in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, reported that if trends continue there may be equal numbers of midlevel practitioners and doctors in ERs by 2030.

There is little mystery as to why. Federal data shows emergency medicine doctors are paid about $310,000 a year on average, while nurse practitioners and physician assistants earn less than $120,000. Generally, hospitals can bill for care by a midlevel practitioner at 85% the rate of a doctor while paying them less than half as much.

Private equity can make millions in the gap.

For example, Envision once encouraged ERs to employ "the least expensive resource" and treat up to 35% of patients with midlevel practitioners, according to a 2017 PowerPoint presentation. The presentation drew scorn on social media and disappeared from Envision's website.

Envision declined a request for a phone interview. In a written statement to KHN, spokesperson Aliese Polk said the company does not direct its physician leaders on how to care for patients and called the presentation a "concept guide" that does not represent current views.

American Physician Partners touted roughly the same staffing strategy in 2021 in response to the No Surprises Act, which threatened the company's profits by outlawing surprise medical bills. In its confidential pitch to lenders, the company estimated it could cut almost $6 million by shifting more staffing from physicians to midlevel practitioners.

Sun, 12 Feb 2023 10:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/988196
Killexams : Column: Nurse practitioners are valued professionals. But they aren't doctors.

southbendtribune.com cannot provide a good user experience to your browser. To use this site and continue to benefit from our journalism and site features, please upgrade to the latest version of Chrome, Edge, Firefox or Safari.

Mon, 13 Feb 2023 01:09:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.southbendtribune.com/story/opinion/columns/2023/02/13/indiana-nurse-practitioners-are-seeking-independent-practice/69893164007/
Killexams : Ed Sheeran’s Lawyers Want ‘Misleading’ Concert Footage Banned From ‘Thinking Out Loud’ Trial

In an upcoming courtroom showdown, is a YouTube video of Ed Sheeran switching between his “Thinking Out Loud” and Marvin Gaye‘s “Let’s Get It On” a smoking gun? Or just smoke and mirrors?

Facing a trial in April over whether his smash hit infringed Gaye‘s iconic song, Sheeran’s lawyers asked a federal judge Tuesday (Feb. 7) to block his accusers from citing that clip, which captures the star at a 2014 concert entertaining the crowd by seamlessly toggling between the two songs.

The problem? Sheeran’s lawyers say the mash-up video is falsely incriminating. It could look to jurors like damning evidence that Sheeran copied “Let’s Get It On,” they say, but only actually shows that both songs contain a common chord progression — one that isn’t covered by copyrights and was “freely available to all songwriters.”

“There are dozens if not hundreds of songs that predate and postdate LGO utilizing the same or similar chord progression,” Sheeran’s lawyers wrote. “These medleys are irrelevant to any issue in the case and would be misleading [and] confuse the jury.”

The case against Sheeran was filed way back in 2017 by heirs of Ed Townsend, who co-wrote “Let’s Get It On.” Gaye’s heirs, who once famously sued Robin Thicke over accusations that his “Blurred Lines” was stolen from the legendary singer, are not involved in the case.

Sheeran’s lawyers have long argued that the star did nothing wrong, since “Thinking Out Loud” and “Let’s Get It On” share only “unprotectable and commonplace elements” that are not covered by copyright law. But Judge Louis D. Stanton has repeatedly refused to decide the case in their favor, ruling that the dispute is close enough that it must be decided by a jury.

In the lead-up to the trial, attorneys for the Townsend heirs filed a formal notice that they planned to play the YouTube clip for jurors. In the video — a 6-minute snippet of a November 2014 concert in Zurich that’s been viewed nearly 300,000 times — Sheeran abruptly switches from “Thinking” to “Lets” and back again, drawing huge cheers from the crowd.

It’s not surprising that Sheeran’s accusers want to use the medley video. In a 2019 ruling in which he sent the case to trial, Judge Stanton specifically highlighted the clip as potential evidence that might resonate with jurors, saying they “may be impressed by footage of a Sheeran performance which shows him seamlessly transitioning between LGO and TOL.”

But in Tuesday’s objections, Sheeran’s lawyers argued that the jury would be impressed for all the wrong reasons.

“The admission of this evidence will mislead the jury and cause unjustified prejudice – suggesting to the jury, inaccurately, that segueing from singing the lyrics of TOL over the TOL chord progression to singing a snippet of the lyrics of LGO over the TOL chord progression is ‘evidence’ that Sheeran copied LGO,” they wrote.

Sheeran’s lawyers also argued that letting such evidence play a key role in the upcoming trial would have a broader “chilling effect” on the music industry and on medleys, which they called an “important, enduring aspect of live concerts.”

“Such ‘mash-ups’ underscore the fact … that music has been, and always will be, built on commonplace and unprotectable musical building blocks freely available to all composers to use,” Sheeran’s lawyers wrote, but allowing it to serve as evidence would deter artists “for fear of creating a suggestion of infringement and encouraging unfounded claims.”

In a statement to Billboard, the Townsend heirs’ attorney Patrick R. Frank disagreed with Sheeran’s arguments, pointing directly to Judge Stanton’s previous ruling about the medley clip’s potential value to jurors.

“The passage of time has not diminished the acknowledged evidentiary significance of the medley,” Frank said. “I suspect that if there was, in fact, a legally-cognizable basis for [Sheeran’s motion], we would have seen the motion quite some time ago, as opposed to on the proverbial ‘eve’ an imminent trial.”

Frank will file his own formal response to Sheeran’s motion in court in the coming weeks.

Tue, 07 Feb 2023 10:51:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.billboard.com/pro/ed-sheeran-lawyers-concert-video-banned-thinking-out-loud-case/
Killexams : Thinking of Buying an Electric Vehicle? WSJ Readers Weigh the Decision

Journal Reports: Energy

Methanol Takes Lead in Shipping’s Quest for Green Fuel

By Costas Paris

February 6, 2023 at 3:00 PM ET

A successful shift to methanol, however, will require billions of dollars of investments in new ships and fueling infrastructure, as well as lower prices for methanol.

Mon, 06 Feb 2023 09:23:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.wsj.com/articles/thinking-buying-electric-vehicle-ev-readers-11675454028
Killexams : Nurse practitioner tops list of next decade’s fastest growing jobs

Sun, 05 Feb 2023 15:08:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.unionleader.com/news/business/nurse-practitioner-tops-list-of-next-decade-s-fastest-growing-jobs/article_c2e0080f-c3d3-5de3-b470-509bbfbba44d.html Killexams : Fewer doctors can be found in ERs as hospitals look to cut costs

Pregnant and scared, Natasha Valle went to a Tennova Healthcare hospital in Clarksville, Tennessee, in January 2021 because she was bleeding. She didn’t know much about miscarriage, but this seemed like one.

In the emergency room, she was examined then sent home, she said. She went back when her cramping became excruciating. Then home again. It ultimately took three trips to the ER on three consecutive days, generating three separate bills, before she saw a doctor who looked at her bloodwork and confirmed her fears.

Related: ER doctors call private equity staffing practices illegal and seek to ban them

“At the time I wasn’t thinking, ‘Oh, I need to see a doctor,'” Valle recalled. “But when you think about it, it’s like, ‘Well — dang — why didn’t I see a doctor?’” It’s unclear whether the repeat visits were due to delays in seeing a physician, but the experience worried her. And she’s still paying the bills.

The hospital declined to discuss Valle’s care, citing patient privacy. But 17 months before her three-day ordeal, Tennova had outsourced its emergency rooms to American Physician Partners, a medical staffing company owned by private equity investors. APP employs fewer doctors in its ERs as one of its cost-saving initiatives to increase earnings, according to a confidential company document obtained by KHN and NPR.

This staffing strategy has permeated hospitals, and particularly emergency rooms, that seek to reduce their top expense: physician labor. While diagnosing and treating patients was once their domain, doctors are increasingly being replaced by nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively known as “midlevel practitioners,” who can perform many of the same duties and generate much of the same revenue for less than half of the pay.

“APP has numerous cost-saving initiatives underway as part of the Company’s continual focus on cost optimization,” the document says, including a “shift of staffing” between doctors and midlevel practitioners.

In a statement to KHN, American Physician Partners said this strategy is a way to ensure all ERs remain fully staffed, calling it a “blended model” that allows doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants “to provide care to their fullest potential.”

Critics of this strategy say the quest to save money results in treatment meted out by someone with far less training than a physician, leaving patients vulnerable to misdiagnoses, higher medical bills, and inadequate care. And these fears are bolstered by evidence that suggests dropping doctors from ERs may not be good for patients.

A working paper, published in October by the National Bureau of Economic Research, analyzed roughly 1.1 million visits to 44 ERs throughout the Veterans Health Administration, where nurse practitioners can treat patients without oversight from doctors.

Researchers found that treatment by a nurse practitioner resulted on average in a 7% increase in cost of care and an 11% increase in length of stay, extending patients’ time in the ER by minutes for minor visits and hours for longer ones. These gaps widened among patients with more severe diagnoses, the study said, but could be somewhat mitigated by nurse practitioners with more experience.

The study also found that ER patients treated by a nurse practitioner were 20% more likely to be readmitted to the hospital for a preventable reason within 30 days, although the overall risk of readmission remained very small.

Yiqun Chen, who is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Illinois-Chicago and co-authored the study, said these findings are not an indictment of nurse practitioners in the ER. Instead, she said, she hopes the study will guide how to best deploy nurse practitioners: in treatment of simpler patients or circumstances when no doctor is available.

“It’s not just a simple question of if we can substitute physicians with nurse practitioners or not,” Chen said. “It depends on how we use them. If we just use them as independent providers, especially … for relatively complicated patients, it doesn’t seem to be a very good use.”

Chen’s research echoes smaller studies, like one from The Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute that found nonphysician practitioners in ERs were associated with a 5.3% increase in imaging, which could unnecessarily increase bills for patients. Separately, a study at the Hattiesburg Clinic in Mississippi found that midlevel practitioners in primary care — not in the emergency department — increased the out-of-pocket costs to patients while also leading to worse performance on nine of 10 quality-of-care metrics, including cancer screenings and vaccination rates.

But definitive evidence remains elusive that replacing ER doctors with nonphysicians has a negative impact on patients, said Dr. Cameron Gettel, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Yale. Private equity investment and the use of midlevel practitioners rose in lockstep in the ER, Gettel said, and in the absence of game-changing research, the pattern will likely continue.

“Worse patient outcomes haven’t really been shown across the board,” he said. “And I think until that is shown, then they will continue to play an increasing role.”

Not a Modern Healthcare subscriber? Sign up today.

For private equity, dropping ER docs is a ‘simple equation’

Private equity companies pool money from wealthy investors to buy their way into various industries, often slashing spending and seeking to flip businesses in three to seven years. While this business model is a proven moneymaker on Wall Street, it raises concerns in health care, where critics worry the pressure to turn big profits will influence life-or-death decisions that were once left solely to medical professionals.

Nearly $1 trillion in private equity funds have gone into almost 8,000 healthcare transactions over the past decade, according to industry tracker PitchBook, including buying into medical staffing companies that many hospitals hire to manage their emergency departments.

Two firms dominate the ER staffing industry: TeamHealth, bought by private equity firm Blackstone in 2016, and Envision Healthcare, bought by KKR in 2018. Trying to undercut these staffing giants is American Physician Partners, a rapidly expanding company that runs ERs in at least 17 states and is 50% owned by private equity firm BBH Capital Partners.

These staffing companies have been among the most aggressive in replacing doctors to cut costs, said Dr. Robert McNamara, a founder of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine and chair of emergency medicine at Temple University.

“It’s a relatively simple equation,” McNamara said. “Their No. 1 expense is the board-certified emergency physician. So they are going to want to keep that expense as low as possible.”

Not everyone sees the trend of private equity in ER staffing in a negative light. Jennifer Orozco, president of the American Academy of Physician Associates, which represents physician assistants, said even if the change — to use more nonphysician providers — is driven by the staffing firms’ desire to make more money, patients are still well served by a team approach that includes nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

“Though I see that shift, it’s not about profits at the end of the day,” Orozco said. “It’s about the patient.”

The “shift” is nearly invisible to patients because hospitals rarely promote branding from their ER staffing firms and there is little public documentation of private equity investments.

Dr. Arthur Smolensky, a Tennessee emergency medicine specialist attempting to measure private equity’s intrusion into ERs, said his review of hospital job postings and employment contracts in 14 major metropolitan areas found that 43% of ER patients were seen in ERs staffed by companies with nonphysician owners, nearly all of whom are private equity investors.

Smolensky hopes to publish his full study, expanding to 55 metro areas, later this year. But this research will merely quantify what many doctors already know: The ER has changed. Demoralized by an increased focus on profit, and wary of a looming surplus of emergency medicine residents because there are fewer jobs to fill, many experienced doctors are leaving the ER on their own, he said.

“Most of us didn’t go into medicine to supervise an army of people that are not as well trained as we are,” Smolensky said. “We want to take care of patients.”

Download Modern Healthcare’s app to stay informed when industry news breaks.


‘I guess we’re the first guinea pigs for our ER’

Joshua Allen, a nurse practitioner at a small Kentucky hospital, snaked a rubber hose through a rack of pork ribs to practice inserting a chest tube to fix a collapsed lung.

It was 2020, and American Physician Partners was restructuring the ER where Allen worked, reducing shifts from two doctors to one. Once Allen had placed 10 tubes under a doctor’s supervision, he would be allowed to do it on his own.

“I guess we’re the first guinea pigs for our ER,” he said. “If we do have a major trauma and multiple victims come in, there’s only one doctor there. … We need to be prepared.”

Allen is one of many midlevel practitioners finding work in emergency departments. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants are among the fastest-growing occupations in the nation, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Generally, they have master’s degrees and receive several years of specialized schooling but have significantly less training than doctors. Many are permitted to diagnose patients and prescribe medication with little or no supervision from a doctor, although limitations vary by state.

The Neiman Institute found that the share of ER visits in which a midlevel practitioner was the main clinician increased by more than 172% between 2005 and 2020. Another study, in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, reported that if trends continue there may be equal numbers of midlevel practitioners and doctors in ERs by 2030.

There is little mystery as to why. Federal data shows emergency medicine doctors are paid about $310,000 a year on average, while nurse practitioners and physician assistants earn less than $120,000. Generally, hospitals can bill for care by a midlevel practitioner at 85% the rate of a doctor while paying them less than half as much.

Private equity can make millions in the gap.

For example, Envision once encouraged ERs to employ “the least expensive resource” and treat up to 35% of patients with midlevel practitioners, according to a 2017 PowerPoint presentation. The presentation drew scorn on social media and disappeared from Envision’s website.

Envision declined a request for a phone interview. In a written statement to KHN, spokesperson Aliese Polk said the company does not direct its physician leaders on how to care for patients and called the presentation a “concept guide” that does not represent current views.

American Physician Partners touted roughly the same staffing strategy in 2021 in response to the No Surprises Act, which threatened the company’s profits by outlawing surprise medical bills. In its confidential pitch to lenders, the company estimated it could cut almost $6 million by shifting more staffing from physicians to midlevel practitioners.

Kaiser Health News is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation which is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

Mon, 13 Feb 2023 03:41:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.modernhealthcare.com/providers/hospitals-physicians-emergency-rooms-costs-nurse-practitioners-private-equity-teamhealth-envision
Killexams : Best Adobe After Effects alternatives 2023: free and paid VFX software

The best Adobe After Effects alternatives offer powerful visual effects software - whatever your experience and budget. 

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