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Killexams : Nortel Installation, resources - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/922-072 Search results Killexams : Nortel Installation, resources - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/922-072 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Nortel Killexams : Securing the Vault

Securing the Vault

By Russ Banham

Pity the poor information technology security officer, confronted with a fusillade of cyber threats. No sooner has one chink in the armor been mended than another crack appears elsewhere. When you consider the increasing depth of expertise of organized criminals, it is a serious challenge.

The insidious combination of spyware and phishing (one of several social engineering frauds deceiving people into thinking a scam perpetrated by a hacker is a bona fide request for information) joins many other cyber risks that have been identified, such as distributed denial-of-service (DDOS) attacks, portable electronic device data leakage, desktop utility application attacks, mashup threats, radio frequency identification (RFID) attacks, mobile and wireless device endpoint attacks, application security threats, botnets and dynamic random access memory (DRAM) attacks, among a host of others, according to Gartner. Hackers deploy diverse tools in perpetrating the attacks, such as viruses, worms and Trojans, exploiting corporate security weaknesses in their firewalls, routers, servers and other systems that allow for unauthorized penetration of networks. Fortunately, an entire industry is on tap to provide services and tools to stay one step ahead of the next scourge.

Evaluating Threats

The wide range of cyber threats across the globe today requires companies to implement a holistic risk management process, in which technology security is achieved through systematic risk identification, assessment, quantification and mitigation. Threats must be evaluated for their potential likelihood and financial severity, and then prioritized for corporate resource allocation purposes. While it is impossible for any organization to fully protect itself from cyber risks — the cost would be overwhelming — companies must put their dollars where they will most benefit. As Steven Bandrowczak, chief information officer at Toronto-based communications provider Nortel, puts it, “I can make this place 100 percent bunkerproof and safe, but then we wouldn’t have money left over.”

Given the perilous risk of a security breach adversely affecting corporate reputation, technology security is a strategic concern these days. It is common now for CIOs to report on a scheduled basis to their companies’ boards of directors about technology risks and respective mitigation tactics. When a cyber threat rears, such reports are immediate, in terms of the necessary action steps. “Boards have become educated about information security because of the many rules, from Sarbanes-Oxley to Gramm-Leach- Bliley to HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) that have heightened their responsibility for security failures,” explains Pamella Easley, lead practice director in enterprise risk services at consultancy RSM McGladrey. “Directors want to be sure that any and all vulnerabilities compromising company data have been identified and the controls tested.”

“Customers trust us with their vital information, as do government agencies,” Bandrowczak says. “We have to demonstrate that we can secure this data.” Hence, the exact interest in an enterprise risk management approach to technology security. The process begins with risk identification—a basic understanding of current and emerging threats. “You have to assume that company data will be stolen,” says Avivah Litan, vice president and security analyst at Gartner, a technology risk management consultancy.

“Consequently, your job is twofold —protecting data from being stolen and then preventing stolen data from being used.”

Once inside, hackers have access not only to sensitive employee and customer data, but also proprietary corporate and competitive information, all of it now for sale in the underground market. What makes getting one’s arms around corporate information so difficult from a security standpoint is its ephemeral nature and movement. “You need to think in terms of your vital data and where it resides — not just on the computer in an office but how it flows throughout your organization,” says Vincent Weafer, vice president of Symantec Security Response, a provider of technology security tools and services. “You have to ask, ‘Is the data in transit, at rest, on a USB key or in a laptop?’ Once you understand where the data is and its importance, you can assess the risks and develop strategies to protect it.”

Identity Threats

According to SunGard Availability Services, technology risks can be broken down into three categories: natural threats like a hurricane that shut down systems or prevent access to data to continue business; accidental threats, in which an employee unintentionally obtains improper access to verboten data; and intentional threats, the wide array of illegal scans, probes and attempted accesses via malicious code. The latter is the most threatening. “We live in a digital world via the Internet, and its access channels have also evolved to where the Web is a platform for services like social networking and sophisticated information sharing. This drives a higher degree of interaction,” explains Deepak Batheja, chief technology officer and SVP-Products at SunGard Availability Services, which ensures that 10,000 customers in North America and Europe have access to their business-critical information systems. “More applications are being deployed on laptops and more silent communication is going on between applications on the laptop and data center. That, in turn, means increased opportunities for interception. So, while the majority of incidents today are accidental threats, enterprises must be vigilant against all risks and SunGard solutions can help ensure end-to-end information availability and protection.”

After threats are identified, they must be assessed and measured for their potential frequency and financial impact. “Once we know a threat exists we look at its likelihood to affect us,” says Anne Wilms, executive vice president and CIO of Rohm and Haas, a Philadelphia-based manufacturer of specialty chemical materials. “Something may be highly unlikely, but the cost could be devastating. Conversely, something may be more likely, but the cost more manageable. With these in mind, we examine our vulnerabilities and current mitigation practices, and then, based on our resources, make determinations where people, processes and tools must be deployed.”

After assessing and quantifying cyber risks insofar as their likelihood and financial impact, companies must trigger corporate resources to do battle against them. With security spending rising within most corporate information technology (IT) departments, war is, indeed, being waged.

New Weapons

Among newer strategies is so-called security-as-a-service, which comprises a wide range of cyber security software that is owned, delivered and managed remotely by one or more providers. Instead of deploying all the security troops at the corporate gate to battle cyber criminals, they’re assembled outside the organization at the vendor’s site. “Enterprises have a wide range of options today when procuring and implementing information security technology, from the more traditional approach of buying, installing and managing security software to newly emerging security-as-a-service offerings,” says John Pescatore, vice president, Internet security, at technology consultancy Gartner. “In this one-to-many model, customers subscribe and pay for some or all of the services provided.”

A similar approach is cloud-based security — also provided by third-party security specialist organizations to customers as an on-demand service (as opposed to a more traditional software product). Cloud-computing security, a term that did not exist two years ago (the word “cloud” refers to the ephemeral world of the Internet), is tightly coupled to the external bandwidth services sold by Internet service providers. “Many mobile users are accessing business data and business services like SalesForce.com or various Google applications that don’t traverse the corporate network, thereby creating new cyber risks,” Pescatore explains.

Cloud-based computing security tools are essentially placed between mobile users of technology and cyber criminals, although enterprises still must maintain adequate perimeter security controls to protect risks to non-mobile assets like the data center and desktop PCs.

Optimizing Technology

Other less new twists include external hosting, in which the enterprise owns and manages the security function, but instead of it being located physically at the enterprise, it is located at an external hosting provider site; and insourcing, in which the security controls are owned and managed by the enterprise, but external service personnel are hired on a contract basis to monitor, operate and manage the security controls. Companies also are buying more cost-effective, unified threat management security products from vendors, as opposed to myriad point solutions, giving them financial recourse to deploy the remainder of their budgets toward emerging threats or those risks perceived to have the most adverse impact on the enterprise. “It frees up money and personnel to deploy against more contemporary challenges like highly targeted attacks, social engineering and identity theft, not to mention tomorrow’s threats,” says Pescatore. “The goal is to constantly optimize the technology security budget to address the biggest threats — the ones that can affect your brand reputation.”

Many companies are collapsing the number of security tools fromvendors into more single-point solutions. “The tools we use are best of breed across the board, rather than many point solutions,” says Baljit Dail, global CIO at Aon Corporation. “We’ve prioritized our risks, and have identified as among our greater concerns the stealthy, highly targeted attacks that are becoming more common, as opposed to the DDOS attacks of the past that went after thousands of computers. Consequently, we’re standardizing and centralizing our IT platform, looking at the right tools to deploy our resources more effectively. We’re also implementing global solutions and standards, whether it is data encryption services, e-mail encryption or even our hard drives. What we’re trying to do, first and foremost, is protect our reputation.”

Craig Shumard, chief information security officer at the Philadelphiabased health and employee services provider, CIGNA Corp., agrees that unified threat management and other new security products have great appeal in the cost-strapped economy. “Unified threat management, in which many products are coming together in one solution, complements other new practices like in-the-cloud security, where spam and virus filtering, for example, is provided by third parties outside the perimeter of a company’s IT infrastructure,” he says. CIGNA subscribes to services provided by Symantec for this purpose.

Other CIOs like David Vordick at USEC Inc., a Bethesda, Marylandbased provider of enriched uranium to the nuclear power industry, use tools from multiple vendors and maintain an internal infrastructure of systems and services to mitigate cyber risks.

“Occasionally we’ll engage a third party to help us do a targeted risk assessment to get an independent view of our security, but for the most part we handle things in-house, doing, for example, ongoing vulnerability assessments and system scans to determine if we need new patches or new products installed from vendors,” Vordick explains. “We’re also using more tools these days, in terms of defense and strategy, and our security budget has increased. We certainly have more people here now whose specific job title is information security.”

Dimension Data, a global IT solutions provider with $3.8 billion in 2007 revenues, takes a different tack altogether. “We leverage outside vendors on a subscription basis to provide the most accurate signatures for our e-mail and virus filtering,” explains Mark Slaga, CIO and chief technology officer of Dimension Data Americas. “For me, it’s a no-brainer — they have teams of experts to create the rules and signatures, but we do keep the equipment on our premises and manage the equipment ourselves. As for our firewalls and security policy work, they’re part of our core competency so they’re handled internally, as are data encryption and management of the hard drives.”

People Are Key

While hardware and software tools can be wielded to combat many cyber threats, the most uncertain element in the chain of management is people. Employees have been known to leave laptops on airplanes and trains. Laid-off workers have taken vital corporate data with them out the door. Others have sold sensitive data for personal gain. Education and training are the best line of defense in these cases, provided either by third-party certified or internally by the chief security officer and staff. “We’re trying to create a risk-aware culture here, which is not the easiest thing when you have tens of thousands of employees,” acknowledges Aon’s Dail. “We’re constantly sending out communication from our executive team about security and the need to protect confidential information. We have instituted an Awareness Program that provides security training online, and have made taking this training compulsory in the U.S. We will soon require it elsewhere in the enterprise.”

Security training and education also are de rigueur at TCS, a provider of information technology services and outsourcing solutions. “We offer a range of online education courses, including a 20-question quiz that every employee must complete on security awareness,” says Ananth Krishnan, the firm’s chief technology officer. Vordick says USEC is doing the same — “raising awareness in our end user community about what they are permitted to do and not do, and when to let us know when something doesn’t look right.” CIGNA, notes Shumard, “focuses a lot of energy around training and education. We have several people on staff right now directly focused on training, education and information protection.”

All these efforts are making cyber crimes more difficult to perpetrate. But, as Shumard concedes, “At the end of the day there will always be a percentage of security risks, as much as 20 percent, that not only our company but no company has a solution for,” he says. “That’s why training and awareness are so important.”

Mon, 03 Jan 2022 19:37:00 -0600 text/html https://www.wsj.com/ad/article/zurich_securing_vault.html
Killexams : EDF Gets waiver to keep nuclear plants online in hot weather

The French nuclear regulator granted a temporary waiver for five nuclear plants to discharge hot water into rivers that may breach environmental standards as the nation struggles with an energy crisis.

ASN approved a request to keep the Bugey, Saint Alban, Tricastin, Blayais and Golfech plants in operation, even if the water they emit may exceed the authorized limit, according to a filing on grid operator RTE's website. The exception brings some relief to the strained European power market, where prices are near record levels as extended heatwaves have caused disruption to rivers and waterways used to carry fuel and cool power plants.

Under the rules, Electricite de France SA must reduce or even halt output when river temperatures reach certain thresholds to ensure that the water used to cool the plants won't harm the environment when put back into the waterways. Sizzling temperatures are expected to hit France, the UK and Germany this week, according to Maxar Technologies LLC. Water levels of the Rhine, Europe's most important river for commodity trading, are so low the river will soon effectively close.

Given their locations and cooling systems, the Golfech, Blayais, Bugey, Tricastin and Saint-Alban atomic power stations are the most prone to being affected by environmental limits. The Chooz nuclear plant, not given a waiver, also has to be halted when the flow of the Meuse river falls below a certain threshold.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 09:02:00 -0500 en text/html https://energycentral.com/news/edf-gets-waiver-keep-nuclear-plants-online-hot-weather
Killexams : Network and Telecommunications

The Network Operations Unit, part of the User Support Services IT Department, is responsible for all low voltage data and telecommunications systems on campus, including Ethernet, WiFi, telephony (contact center/voicemail/dial tone/fax lines/E911), Emergency/Blue Light and elevator phones, door access hardware, burglar/panic button alarms, security camera hardware, and Internet access. 

Beginning in Spring 2020, a multi-year in-place migration of the college's telephone system began.  The existing Nortel CS1000E PBX will be upgraded to a new Avaya Communications Manager Version 8 infrastructure, providing a number of technologies that Excellerate reliability and better serve the college's evolving business needs.  Due to the complexity and breadth of the telephony systems this project is expected to be completed by fall 2022. 

Other long-term initiatives include physical route separation and diversification for all building fiber optic uplinks, upgrading and consolidating building alarm and door access systems, establishing a secondary Internet point-of-presence, and improving surveillance camera coverage and reliability across campus. 

Sat, 26 Feb 2022 03:09:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.ric.edu/department-directory/network-and-telecommunications
Killexams : Shabodi Set To Address National Security Challenges With 5G Innovation As Part Of The 2022 NSIN Propel Cohort'

(MENAFN- PR Newswire)

TORONTO, July 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Shabodi, the next-gen 5G application enabler, has announced that they have been selected as part of the 2022 cohort of companies participating in the NSIN Propel program. This four-month accelerator program, a culmination of the partnership between Newlab, Decisive Point, National Security Innovation Network (NSIN), and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), provides mentorship and resources to early-stage companies looking to make headway and scale their technologies in the federal sector.

Continue Reading



Shabodi announces the selection in the NSIN Propel 2022

Speaking on their selection, Vikram Chopra, CEO & Cofounder of Shabodi, stated, 'This is an exciting time for Shabodi. We believe that 5G innovation holds immense potential for the public sector, specifically national security. But to make the most of the technology, enterprises in the sector will need to address the complexity of their underlying networks. Interestingly, that is the exact premise on which we have built Shabodi.'

Shabodi is building the industry's first-ever commercial Application Enablement Platform (AEP) to enable enterprises to build 5G-aware applications.

Ryan Benitez, Partner at Decisive Point, said, 'The NSIN Propel program has established a robust network of founders, technologists, and government stakeholders committed to strengthening innovation in the space of national security. The 2022 cohort further raises the bar for innovation, and we can't wait to see what Shabodi, and its peers achieve at the end of the four-month accelerator program.'

'We are thrilled to be part of this year's NSIN Propel. By the end of the program, we believe our team will be equipped to leverage the powerful combination of our technology leadership and Propel's network and DoD-specific insights to create meaningful 5G innovation opportunities in the federal market,' Rubal Sabharwal, Head of Strategy & Operations, Shabodi concluded.

About Shabodi:

Shabodi's foundational platform enables enterprises, system integrators, and telcos to build next-generation applications in a multi-vendor environment, irrespective of the underlying network, enabling them to tap into the exponentially more powerful 5G network. Using a revolutionary Application Enablement Platform (AEP), Shabodi delivers the maximum value out of enterprise 5G deployments. Shabodi's team includes former industry executives from Cisco, Juniper Networks, and Nortel. For more information, visit or follow Shabodi on LinkedIn.

Press Contact:

Rubal SabharwalHead - Strategy & Operations[email protected] 724-209-4685

SOURCE Shabodi

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Fri, 22 Jul 2022 00:40:00 -0500 Date text/html https://menafn.com/1104575293/Shabodi-Set-To-Address-National-Security-Challenges-With-5G-Innovation-As-Part-Of-The-2022-NSIN-Propel-Cohort
Killexams : IEEE Annual Election: Division III Candidates

Below are the candidates for IEEE Division III Delegate-Elect/Director-Elect, 2023; Delegate/Director, 2024-2025

Division III: Communications Society

The sequence of candidates was determined by lottery and indicates no preference.

  • Stefano Bregni (Nominated by IEEE Division III)
  • Vincent W. S. Chan (Nominated by IEEE Petition)
  • Wahab Almuhtadi ((Nominated by IEEE Division III)

View position description

Tue, 09 Sep 2014 01:43:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.ieee.org/about/corporate/election/division3.html
Killexams : Howard Roddy Named To Tennessee Board Of Regents

Nashville — Governor Phil Bredesen today named three Tennesseans, including Chattanooga's Howard Roddy, to fill vacancies on the Tennessee Board of Regents, which governs the state’s university and community college system, as well as technology centers.

By state law, today’s appointments to the Board of Regents must include one citizen representing East Tennessee At-Large, one citizen representing the Fourth Congressional District and one citizen representing the Seventh Congressional District. Student and faculty member positions on the Board will be announced later this month.

“The Tennessee Board of Regents plays a valuable role in our state, and I’m pleased to announce these three Tennesseans to fill open positions effective immediately,” Bredesen said. “In finding the right persons to fill the open positions on the Board, not only was it important to find people with the right knowledge and experience for the job, but to find members who reflect the great diversity of our state.”

“I appreciate all the recommendations and feedback I have received from citizens and community groups the last few months about these appointments,” Bredesen added. “I’m confident these appointees will each bring great leadership and expertise to contribute to the Board, and I thank them for their service to the State of Tennessee.”

Today’s appointments include:

Agenia Clark, Seventh District Citizen Representative. Clark is the president and CEO of The Girl Scout Council of Cumberland Valley, representing 25,000 girls and more than 8,000 volunteers. Previously, she worked as the vice president of human resources for the Tennessee Education Lottery Corporation, in addition to having worked in human resources capacities at Vanderbilt University and Nortel Networks. Her community involvement includes work with The Women’s Fund of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, and she formerly served on the board of HCA’s Tri-Star Health System. Clark holds a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s degree in business administration from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She is appointed to a six-year term.

Fran Marcum, Fourth District Citizen Representative. Marcum is a managing partner at Marcum Capital, a Tullahoma-based company that nurtures business start-ups and expansions in Tennessee. Her previous experience includes serving as chairman and CEO of Micro Craft, Inc. for 28 years, and working as an elementary teacher in the Nashville and Chattanooga school systems. Marcum currently serves on the University of Tennessee Foundation Board, is a former commissioner of the Southern Association of Schools and Colleges and has served as a trustee and former chairman of the Motlow State Community College Foundation. She is a founding member of the Tullahoma Education Foundation and Partners For Healing, a free medical clinic for the working uninsured of Coffee County. Marcum holds a bachelor’s degree in education from the Peabody College at Vanderbilt University. She is appointed to a six-year term.

Howard Roddy, East Tennessee At-Large Citizen Representative. Roddy is vice president of Advocacy & Healthy Community for Memorial Health Care System. He previously worked as an administrator in the Health Services Division for Hamilton County Government. His community involvement includes volunteer work for the East Tennessee State University Foundation, the Hamilton County Regional Health Council, the Metro Chattanooga YMCA Board, and the University of Chattanooga Foundation, Inc. He received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Austin Peay State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Health Administration from East Tennessee State University. He is appointed to a six-year term.

The composition and powers of the board are set forth in Tennessee Code Annotated 49-8-201 through 49-8-203. The board consists of 18 members: 12 lay citizens appointed for six-year terms by the Governor from each of the state's nine congressional districts and three grand divisions; one faculty member appointed by the Governor for a one-year term; one student from among the system institutions appointed for a one-year term by the Governor; and four ex-officio members -- the Governor of Tennessee, the Commissioner of Education, the Commissioner of Agriculture, and the Executive Director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, who is a non-voting member.

Board of Regents institutions include six state universities and 13 community colleges across the state serving nearly 152,000 students, and 26 technology centers serving more than 32,000 students. For more information, visit the Board’s Web site at www.tbr.state.tn.us.

Sat, 16 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.chattanoogan.com/2004/7/23/53221/Howard-Roddy-Named-To-Tennessee-Board.aspx
Killexams : SaaS DR/BC: If You Think Cloud Data is Forever, Think Again

Key Takeaways

  • SaaS is quickly becoming the default tool for how we build and scale businesses. It’s cheaper and faster than ever before. However, this reliance on SaaS comes with one glaring risk that’s rarely discussed.
  • The “Shared Responsibility Model” doesn’t just govern your relationship with AWS, it actually impacts all of cloud computing. Even for SaaS, users are on the hook for protecting their own data.
  • Human error, cyber threats and integrations that have gone wrong are the main causes of data loss in SaaS. And it’s not uncommon, in one study, about 40% of users have said they have lost data in SaaS applications.
  • It’s possible to create your own in-house solution to help automate some of the manual work around backing-up SaaS data. However, there are limitations to this approach and none of them will help you restore data back to its original state.
  • A data continuity strategy is essential in SaaS, otherwise you may be scambling to restore all information you rely on each and every day. 
     

The Cloud is Not Forever and Neither is Your Data 

When I began my career in technical operations (mostly what we call DevOps today) the world was dramatically different. This was before the dawn of the new millennium. When the world’s biggest and most well-known SaaS company, Salesforce, was operating out of an apartment in San Francisco. 

Back then, on-premise ruled the roost. Rows of towers filled countless rooms. These systems were expensive to set up and maintain, from both a labour and parts perspective. Building a business using only SaaS applications was technically possible back then but logistically a nightmare. On-prem would continue to be the default way for running software for years to come. 

But technology always progresses at lightspeed. So just three years after Salesforce began preaching the “end of software”, Amazon Web Services came online and changed the game completely.

Today a new SaaS tool can be built and deployed across the world in mere days. Businesses are now embracing SaaS solutions at a record pace. The average small to medium-sized business can easily have over 100 SaaS applications in their technology stack. Twenty years ago, having this many applications to run a business was unthinkable and would have cost millions of dollars in operational resources. However, at Rewind, where I oversee technical operations, I looked after our software needs with a modem and a laptop. 

SaaS has created a completely different reality for modern businesses. We can build and grow businesses cheaper and faster than ever before. Like most “too good to be true” things, there’s a catch. All this convenience comes with one inherent risk. It’s a risk that people rarely discussed in my early days as a DevOps and is still rarely talked about. Yet this risk is important to understand, otherwise, all the vital SaaS data you rely on each and every day could disappear in the blink of an eye.

And it could be gone for good. 

The Shared Responsibility of SaaS

This likely goes without saying but you rent SaaS applications, you don’t own them. Those giant on-prem server rooms companies housed years ago, now rest with the SaaS provider. You simply access their servers (and your data) through an operating system or API. Now you are probably thinking, “Dave, I know all this. So what?” 

Well, this is where the conundrum lies. 

If you look at the terms of service for SaaS companies, they do their best to ensure their applications are up and running at all times. It doesn’t matter if servers are compromised by fire, meteor strike, or just human error, SaaS companies strive to ensure that every time a user logs in, the software is available. The bad news is this is where their responsibility ends. 

You, the user, are on the hook for backing up and restoring whatever data you’ve entered and stored in their services. Hence the term “Shared Responsibility Model”. This term is most associated with AWS but this model actually governs all of cloud computing.

The above chart breaks down the various scenarios for protecting elements of the cloud computing relationship. You can see that with the SaaS model, the largest onus is on the software provider. Yet there are still things a user is responsible for; User Access and Data.  

I’ve talked to other folks in DevOps, site reliability, or IT roles in exact years and I can tell you that the level of skepticism is high. They often don’t believe their data isn’t backed up by the SaaS provider in real time. I empathize with them, though, because I was once in their shoes. So when I meet this resistance, I  just point people to the various terms of service laid out by each SaaS provider. Here is GitHub’s, here is Shopify’s and the one for Office 365. It’s all there in black and white.

The reason the Shared Responsibility Model exists in the first place essentially comes down to the architecture of each application. A SaaS provider has built its software to maximize the use of its operating system, not continually snapshot and store the millions or billions of data points created by users. Now, this is not a “one-size fits all scenario”. Some SaaS providers may be able to restore lost data. However, if they do, in my experience, it’s often an old snapshot, it’s incomplete, and the process to get everything back can take days, if not weeks. 

Again, it’s simply because SaaS providers are lumping all user data together, in a way that makes sense for the provider. Trying to find it again, once it’s deleted or compromised, is like looking for a needle in a haystack, within a field of haystacks.    

How Data Loss Happens in SaaS

The likelihood of losing data from a SaaS tool is the next question that inevitably comes up. One study conducted by Oracle and KPMG found that 49% of SaaS users have previously lost data. Our own research found that 40% of users have previously lost data. There are really three ways that this happens; risks that you may already be very aware of. They are human error, cyberthreats, and 3rd party app integrations. 

Humans and technology have always had co-dependent challenges. Let’s face it, it’s one of the main reasons my career exists! So it stands to reason that human inference, whether deliberate or not, is a common reason for losing information. This can be as innocuous as uploading a CSV file that corrupts data sets, accidentally deleting product listings, or overwriting code repositories with a forced push.

There’s also intentional human interference. This means someone who has authorized access, nuking a bunch of stuff. It may sound far-fetched but we have seen terminated employees or third-party contractors cause major issues. It’s not very common, but it happens.       

Cyberthreats are next on the list, which are all issues that most technical operations teams are used to. Most of my peers are aware that the level of attacks increased during the global pandemic, but the rate of attacks had already been increasing prior to COVID-19. Ransomware, phishing, DDoS, and more are all being used to target and disrupt business operations. If this happens, data can be compromised or completely wiped out. 

Finally, 3rd party app integrations can be a source of frustration when it comes to data loss. Go back and read the terms of service for apps connected to your favourite SaaS tool. They may save a ton of time but they may have a lot of control over all the data you create and store in these tools. We’ve seen apps override and permanently delete reams of data. By the time teams catch it, the damage is already done.

There are some other ways data can be lost but these are the most common. The good news is that you can take steps to mitigate downtime. I’ll outline a common one, which is writing your own backup script for a Git.

One approach to writing a GitHub backup script

There are a lot of ways to approach this. Simply Google “git backup script” and lots of options pop up. All of them have their quirks and limitations. Here is a quick rundown of some of them.

Creating a local backup in Cron Scripts

Essentially you are writing a script to clone a repo, at various intervals, using cron jobs. (Note the cron job tool you used will depend on the OS you use). This method essentially takes snapshots over time. To restore a lost repo, you just pick the snapshot you want to bring back.  For a complete copy use git clone --mirror to mirror your repositories. This ensures all remote and local branches, tags, and refs get included. 

The pros of using this method are a lack of reliance on external tools for backups and the only cost is your time. 

The cons are a few. You actually won’t have a full backup. This clone won’t have hooks, reflogs, configuration, description files, and other metadata. It’s also a lot of manual work and becomes more complex if trying to add error monitoring, logging, and error notification. And finally, as the snapshots pile up, you’ll need to consider accounts for cleanups and archiving.

Using Syncthing

Syncthing is a GUI/CLI application that allows for file syncing across many devices. All the devices need to have Syncthing installed on them and be configured to connect with one another. Keep in mind that syncing and backing up are different, as you are not creating a copy, but rather ensuring a file is identical across multiple devices.  

The pros are that it is free and one of the more intuitive methods for a DIY “backup” since it provides a GUI.  Cons: Syncthing only works between individual devices, so you can’t directly back up your repository from a code hosting provider. Manual fixes are needed when errors occur. Also, syncing a git repo could lead to corruption and conflicts of a repository, especially if people work on different branches. Syncthing also sucks up a lot of resources with its continuous scanning, hashing, and encryption. Lastly, it only maintains one version, not multiple snapshots. 

Using SCM Backup

SCM Backup creates an offline clone of a GitHub or BitBucket repository. It makes a significant difference if you are trying to back up many repos at once. After the initial configuration, it grabs a list of all the repositories through an API. You can also exclude certain repos if need be. 

SCM lets you specify backup folder location, authentication credentials, email settings, and more. 

Here’s the drawback though, the copied repositories do not contain hooks, reflogs, or configuration files, or metadata such as issues, pull requests, or releases.  And configuration settings can change across different code hosting providers. Finally, in order to run it, you need to have .NET Core installed on your machine.

Now that’s just three ways to backup a git repository. As I mentioned before, just type a few words into Google and a litany of options comes up. But before you get the dev team to build a homegrown solution, keep these two things in mind.

First, any DIY solution will still require a significant amount of manual work because they only clone and/or backup; they can’t restore data. In fact, that’s actually the case with most SaaS tools, not just in-house backup solutions. So although you may have some snapshots or cloned files, it will likely be in a format that needs to be reuploaded into a SaaS tool. One way around this is to build a backup as a service program, but that will likely eat up a ton of developer time. 

That brings us to the second thing to keep in mind, the constantly changing states of APIs. Let’s say you build a rigorous in-house tool: you’ll need a team to be constantly checking for API updates, and then making the necessary changes to this in-house tool so it’s always working. I can only speak for myself, but I’m constantly trying to help dev teams avoid repetitive menial tasks. So although creating a DIY backup script can work, you need to decide where you want development teams to spend their time.

Data Continuity Strategies for SaaS

So what’s the way forward in all of this? There are a few things to consider. And these steps won’t be uncommon to most technical operations teams. First, figure out whether you want to DIY or outsource your backup needs. We already covered the in-house options and the challenges it presents. So if you decide to look for a backup and recovery service, just remember to do your homework. There are a lot of choices, so as you go through due diligence, look at reviews, talk to peers, read technical documentation and honestly, figure out if company X seems trustworthy. They will have access to your data after all.  

Next, audit all your third-party applications. I won’t sugarcoat it, this can be a lot of work. But remember the “terms of service” agreements? There are always a few surprises to be found. And you may not like what you see. I recommend you do this about once a year and make a pro/cons list. Is the value you get from this app worth the trade-off of access the app has? If it’s not, you may want to look for another tool. Fun fact: Compliance standards like SOC2 require a “vendor assessment” for a reason. External vendors or apps are a common culprit when it comes to accidental data loss.

And finally, limit who has access to each and every SaaS application. Most people acknowledge the benefits of using the least privileged approach, but it isn’t always put into practice. So make sure the right people have the right access, ensure all users have unique login credentials (use a password manager to manage the multiple login hellscape) and get MFA installed.

It’s not a laundry list of things nor is it incredibly complex. I truly believe that SaaS is the best way to build and run organizations. But I hope now it’s glaringly obvious to any DevOps, SRE or IT professional that you need to safeguard all the information that you are entrusting to these tools. There is an old saying I learned in those early days of my career, “There are two types of people in this world – those who have lost data and those who are about to lose data”. 

You don’t want to be the person who has to inform your CIO that you are now one of those people. Of course, if that happens, feel free to send them my way. I’m certain I’ll be explaining the Shared Responsibility Model of SaaS until my career is over!  

About the Author

Dave North has been a versatile member of the Ottawa technology sector for more than 25 years. Dave is currently working at Rewind leading 3 teams (devops, trust, IT) as the director of technical operations. Prior to Rewind, Dave was a long time member of Signiant, holding many roles in the organization including sales engineer, pro services, technical support manager, product owner and devops director. A proven leader and innovator, Dave holds 5 US patents and helped drive Signiant’s move to a cloud SAAS business model with the award winning Media Shuttle product. Prior to Signiant, Dave held several roles at Nortel, Bay Networks and ISOTRO Network Management working on the NetID product suite. Dave is fanatical about cloud computing, automation, gadgets and Formula 1 racing.

Thu, 09 Dec 2021 14:12:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.infoq.com/articles/saas-drbc-data-backup/
Killexams : Teck Resources profit surges; CEO Lindsay to step down after 17 years

By Arunima Kumar and Ruhi Soni

(Reuters) -Teck Resources Ltd Chief Executive Officer Don Lindsay will step down after 17 years at the helm, the Canadian miner said on Tuesday, as it posted a quarterly profit that beat estimates on upbeat prices for steelmaking coal.

Lindsay, who will step down by end-September, will be replaced by Jonathan Price as CEO, while Harry Conger has been appointed president and chief operating officer.

The Vancouver-based miner needs a leader who will be around and accountable long-term as it shifts its focus to copper from carbon, Lindsay said, on his 71st and final post-earnings call on Wednesday.

"And I clearly wasn't going to be the one to be around," said the 63-year old top boss.

Teck also posted a second-quarter adjusted profit of C$3.25, highest on record, above analysts' expectation of C$3.20 a share, as per Refinitiv data.

Steel production and demand for steelmaking coal was strong through most of the second quarter before market conditions began to weaken last month, Teck said.

Average price of steelmaking coal in the reported quarter jumped 215% to $453 per tonne from year-ago levels, before exiting the quarter at $300 per tonne, the miner added.

Still, the company added that global steelmaking coal prices are affected by reduced downstream steel demand as weakening auto production and global inflationary pressures weigh on market sentiment.

Teck flagged labor issues as its 'single-biggest challenge' with its massive QB2 copper project in Chile seeing absenteeism of 10% during the quarter.

Teck cut its annual steelmaking coal production outlook to between 23.5 million and 24 million tonnes, below previous forecast of 24.5 million to 25.5 million tonnes, citing workforce challenges experienced in the first half of the year.

Inflationary woes increased Teck's quarterly operating costs by 14% year-on-year, of which about half relates to a 75% increase in diesel costs.

($1 = 1.2868 Canadian dollars)

(Reporting by Akriti Sharma, Arunima Kumar and Ruhi Soni in Bengaluru; Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 22:28:00 -0500 en-CA text/html https://ca.news.yahoo.com/canadian-miner-teck-ceo-don-024937519.html
Killexams : Shabodi Set to Address National Security Challenges with 5G Innovation as Part of the 2022 NSIN Propel Cohort

TORONTO, July 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Shabodi, the next-gen 5G application enabler, has announced that they have been selected as part of the 2022 cohort of companies participating in the NSIN Propel program. This four-month accelerator program, a culmination of the partnership between Newlab, Decisive Point, National Security Innovation Network (NSIN), and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), provides mentorship and resources to early-stage companies looking to make headway and scale their technologies in the federal sector.

Speaking on their selection, Vikram Chopra, CEO & Cofounder of Shabodi, stated, "This is an exciting time for Shabodi. We believe that 5G innovation holds immense potential for the public sector, specifically national security. But to make the most of the technology, enterprises in the sector will need to address the complexity of their underlying networks.  Interestingly, that is the exact premise on which we have built Shabodi."

Shabodi is building the industry's first-ever commercial Application Enablement Platform (AEP) to enable enterprises to build 5G-aware applications.

Ryan Benitez, Partner at Decisive Point, said, "The NSIN Propel program has established a robust network of founders, technologists, and government stakeholders committed to strengthening innovation in the space of national security. The 2022 cohort further raises the bar for innovation, and we can't wait to see what Shabodi, and its peers achieve at the end of the four-month accelerator program."

"We are thrilled to be part of this year's NSIN Propel. By the end of the program, we believe our team will be equipped to leverage the powerful combination of our technology leadership and Propel's network and DoD-specific insights to create meaningful 5G innovation opportunities in the federal market," Rubal Sabharwal, Head of Strategy & Operations, Shabodi concluded.

About Shabodi:

Shabodi's foundational platform enables enterprises, system integrators, and telcos to build next-generation applications in a multi-vendor environment, irrespective of the underlying network, enabling them to tap into the exponentially more powerful 5G network. Using a revolutionary Application Enablement Platform (AEP), Shabodi delivers the maximum value out of enterprise 5G deployments. Shabodi's team includes former industry executives from Cisco, Juniper Networks, and Nortel. For more information, visit www.shabodi.com or follow Shabodi on LinkedIn.

Press Contact:

Rubal Sabharwal
Head - Strategy & Operations
341016@email4pr.com 
724-209-4685

Cision

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SOURCE Shabodi

Thu, 21 Jul 2022 23:53:00 -0500 en-CA text/html https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/shabodi-set-address-national-security-115000667.html
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