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Exam Code: 920-173 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Nortel Contact Center Rls. 7.0 Technical Support
Nortel Technical test
Killexams : Nortel Technical test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/920-173 Search results Killexams : Nortel Technical test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/920-173 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Nortel Killexams : Nortel Networks

(Nortel Networks Limited, Brampton, Ontario) Once a world leader in telecommunications products, Nortel filed for bankruptcy in 2009 and sold its CDMA business and LTE assets to Ericsson and its enterprise and government business to Avaya.

Nortel's products included switching, wireless and broadband systems for service providers and carriers, telephones and systems for residential and business users, computer telephony integration, multimedia and telephone network management systems.

With an international history that goes back more than a century, Nortel was a pioneer in telecom. After Alexander Graham Bell's father sold his share in his son's telephone patent to National Bell Telephone of Boston in 1880, a former sea captain, Charles Fleetford Sise, was sent to Montreal to create Bell Telephone Company of Canada. Within two years, the company began to make its own telephones. By 1895, the manufacturing branch was spun off into Northern Electric and Manufacturing, later renamed Northern Electric when it merged with the wire and cable subsidiary of Bell in 1914.

Over the next decades, Northern Electric manufactured equipment designed by Western Electric, which owned as much as 46% of the company at one time. It also made a raft of other products including radios, TVs, amplifiers, Hammond organs, sound equipment and police and fire call boxes. After the 1956 consent decree that caused AT&T to eliminate its partnerships, the company gained technical independence from Western Electric and established its own R&D labs in Ottawa.

In 1971, Northern Electric merged its research and development with Bell Canada to form BNR (Bell Northern Research). A year later, it introduced its first line of computerized PBXs, which evolved into digital PBXs and digital switches.

In 1976, Northern Electric was renamed Northern Telecom. Its DMS line of digital central office telephone switches, introduced a year later, provided explosive growth for the company, especially after the 1984 AT&T breakup. Northern Telecom became the first non-Japanese provider to Nippon Telegraph & Telephone, and the company took advantage of opportunities in Europe and China.

In 1995, it adopted a new logo and name: NORTEL. In 1998, it added Networks to its name when it merged with Bay Networks, a major manufacturer of hubs and routers. From its roots back to Alexander Graham Bell, Nortel Networks became one of the world's largest suppliers of digital network solutions.

_NORTEL.GIF image

The Creation of Northern Electric

In 1914, the merger of Northern Electric and Imperial Wire and Cable was celebrated at St. Lawrence Hall in Montreal. (Image courtesy of Nortel Networks.)

Thu, 28 Mar 2019 19:28:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/nortel-networks
Killexams : Brian Monkman

Brian Monkman is executive director of NetSecOPEN, a nonprofit, membership-driven organization with a goal of developing open standards for testing network security products. A 25-year network security veteran, he has extensive experience in technical support, sales engineering, and program management roles at technology companies including Nortel Networks, ICSA Labs, Sterling Software, and others. At NetSecOPEN, he leads an effort to significantly change network security product testing by developing open and transparent testing standards that will be used by approved test labs to test network security products in a manner that produces verifiable and repeatable results.

Tue, 05 Feb 2019 01:36:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/author/brian-monkman
Killexams : IPTV pioneer causes a ruckus

Although revenues are still a fraction of the global telecoms market, at the IPTV World Forum in London earlier this month there was plenty of optimism that just around the corner awaits a market of millions.

Triple play refers to a combination of wireless TV, internet and digital telephone services provided via broadband connections to the home using the new generation of wi-fi technology.

Western Europe currently has the largest number of IPTV subscribers of any region - 1.6 million - with France accounting for approximately half of them. Global customers are expected to double each year from 6.4m at the end of 2006 to nearly 50m by 2010, according to analysts Gartner.

Home internet and VOIP using wireless makes sense for consumers who want to move on from broadband cable and fixed line or mobile phones, but how many people are desperately waiting to get their TV piped via wireless into their bedrooms?

Well, they might do when the technology is sold as a package by your broadband carrier, and the technology provides consistent high-quality pictures and sound. In France, early adoption of IPTV by France Telecom and aggressive competition among players including Free and Neuf helped push up subscriptions.

Making the switch to IPTV happen was the challenge that inspired Selina Lo to found Ruckus Wireless, an IPTV pioneer, in 2004. At the IPTV World Forum in London last week, Ruckus Wireless was named Best Distributor of IPTV. According to Lo, the show has doubled in size since last year.

Earlier this year Lo attended the World Economic Forum in Davos and mingled with the world's top CEOs, which she says was an "amazing experience". The feeling was apparently mutual, with WEF's technology panel picking Ruckus Wireless as a "technology pioneer" for its "smart wi-fi" home networking technology.

Hong Kong-born Lo, who took her computer science degree at Berkeley, stands out in this male-dominated industry for being an Asian woman technology entrepreneur - the company website advertises her love of shoes, shopping and one-word answers. But her record for technology start-ups, industry awards and multi-billion dollar IPOs speaks for itself.

Ruckus's CEO and president has built a career and fortune by setting out to solve big problems. This time it is the following: "The problem all IPTV service providers have is the destructive customer experience when they get IPTV to the gateway. They start having to wire the set-top box to the DSL modem. Most people don't like that and there is a rejection rate of 30%," says Lo.

Then comes the pitch: "There are thousands of wi-fi players and IPTV service providers - it's a very competitive market. But we are the only one known to support video, voice and internet with a reliable signal that a consumer can set up at home without a complicated registration process. Once they take it out of the box and connect it up, it's ready to use."

Ruckus's biggest market is Europe, which is not as saturated with cable and satellite as the US. "Cable and satellite in the US are pretty well penetrated but that is not the case in Europe, so new cable is being installed with higher bandwidth. Satellite is not so popular in Europe either," Lo says

She says that Belgium's biggest telcom Belgacom took a "visionary position" in their approach to wireless at home. "They knew they had to make it [triple play wireless] a self-installing service otherwise people would not be interested. They now have 130,000 subscribers a year. You have to remember that when a provider has to install they can only do two jobs a day so it would take forever to do this number.

"Belgacom looked at our solutions - they plugged our router into their DSL gateway, and our adaptor into the set-top box. O2 telephone in the Czech Republic did the same." Ruckus are now in around 12 markets - the biggest being Italy and France. Its first customer was IPPC Hong Kong.

The market, of course, is not just about TV -internet and VOIP telephone are equally important. Fixed line and mobile phone telecom companies are losing minute usage to VOIP services, and small and medium businesses are leading the charge to VOIP. Last year around 58 percent of IP lines shipped went to medium-sized companies, while an increasing interest from small businesses saw them buy 18 percent of IP lines sold, according to IDC.

"There is a very competitive market for creating system infrastructure. Alcatel and Siemens now working on IPTV, and Nortel, Cisco and Ericsson are jumping in. We are just one player at the end of the broadband tunnel," says Lo.

But while wi-fi is becoming more popular, most consumers still haven't heard of triple play. Part of the reason for this is problems with the quality of the signal and the long lead time for the telcoms to test and market wi-fi products. Normal wi-fi antenna send a signal evenly in all directions and are susceptible to interference from other signals in the vicinity. In addition, the range of normal wi-fi is often very limited. The Ruckus technology is more like a beam with software that chooses the most efficient route to the VOIP phone, computer or TV set-top box. Lo describes it as "just like a torch compared to a lightbulb.

"Bluetooth, microwaves, cordless phones and a lot of consumer electronic household goods generate noise and interfere with signals. Most antenna in the market don't have a way of stopping the noise. We have created a smart signal that can get around obstacles in the home."

This is Lo's third start-up in the network communications field. The second, Alteon WebSystems, went public in 2000 and was sold to Nortel Systems for a cool $7.8 billion. The timing -just before the bursting of the dotcom bubble - was fortuitous. "Those were good times," says Lo wistfully.

Lo went from being Alteon's VP of marketing to become VP of Nortel Networks' content business unit following the acquisition. Her first start-up, Centillion, was sold to Bay Networks in 1994 for $150m, where she joined Bay Networks as a VP of marketing.

Lo tells the story of how, having quit Nortel Networks to "try out semi-retirement" the seed of the Ruckus idea was born when she decided to get a cable TV in her bedroom. "I had to get a guy to do it. It took six hours and they had to come back to fix it later. He had to run a wire through my ceiling." The experience was "tremendously irritating" and got her thinking. "I just started looking for telecoms companies doing wireless television. I found two guys developing the technology - William Kish and Victor Shrom - at an incubation research centre, with funding from Secoya Capital."

Secoya Capital is synonymous with the rise of Silicon Valley, having helped create most of the household names one associates with the 1990s digital boom - Yahoo, Google, Cisco, Paypal and many others. Lo met the technical founders and decided their ideas were worth funding. Major telecoms have been trialling the product, but progress is slow. "Practically every major telcom has IPTV in the lab, in home trials or in production. It takes a long time to work with the carriers. We have chosen a path that is a lot more difficult than working with retailers but hopefully the payback will be worth it."

She adds that Ruckus is talking to all the major telecom companies in the UK. The advantage of going with the carriers is that they can offer a ready-made package which removes the need to navigate through an electronics shop or online retailer and find the right package for your needs.

So far Ruckus has shipped around 100,000 units of branded technology and more than that number again as licensed technology under the Netgear brand for its routers and DSL gateway.

Lo, naturally, is optimistic. She expects company revenues to more than double in 2007 although going public "is not in our plans this year", she adds with the clear implication that it will be in future. "We are not Cisco yet, but we are on our way there."

Sat, 25 Nov 2017 21:53:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.managementtoday.co.uk/iptv-pioneer-causes-ruckus/article/643523
Killexams : Honorary degree citation - John A. Roth

By: Mohsen Anvari, November 2000

Mr. Chancellor, I have the honour to present to you John Roth, president and chief executive officer of Nortel Networks Corporation.

Born in Calgary, John Roth grew up in Lethbridge, Alberta, and came to Montreal to study at McGill University, where he earned a Bachelor of Engineering in electrical engineering and a Masters in engineering.

He began his professional career with RCA Montreal and in 1969 joined Nortel, then known as Northern Electric, as a design engineer. Over the next three decades, he held a range of management and executive positions, where his leadership had a significant impact on the development of Canada's high-technology industry.

In the mid-1980s, as President of its Bell-Northern Research subsidiary, he was in charge of the company's global network of research-and-development labs. In the early 1990s, he established Nortel Networks as one of the world's leading wireless network suppliers. He was named chief operating officer in 1995 and, in 1997, became president and CEO.

Mr. Roth's rise through the corporate ranks reflects his outstanding leadership abilities as well as his vision. Immediately on assuming the leadership of Canada's high-tech flagship, he issued a manifesto for change. He called for a "Right-Angle Turn" away from the past. He set out his vision of a new foundation for global communications and began leading sweeping changes in his company's way of doing business.

A safe and steady 100-year-old maker of telecom equipment for a handful of the world's largest telephone companies had to be transformed. It had to become an aggressive provider of networking gear for thousands of Internet-related network operators. It had to compete with aggressive and fast-moving high-tech firms in California's Silicon Valley.

Not everyone in global communications shared the vision he described in 1997. But by setting his company on a bold new course and steering it into the heart of the Internet Revolution, John Roth effectively transformed the communications industry worldwide.

By making the right decisions at the right time, he also boosted Nortel Networks sales by 44 percent between 1997 and 1999 to $32.7 billion (Canadian). As CEO, he has strengthened the company's position at the core of Canada's technology environment and ensured Nortel Networks can continue contributing to Canada's economic development.

John Roth's leadership skills have been given shape by a passionate commitment to Canada. He has been an active participant in the public policy process, addressing economic and social issues important to Canada's future. He is committed to making Canada the world's most connected nation and a leader in the new global economy.

Under his leadership, Nortel Networks traditional support for education has expanded and become the focus of its corporate citizenship activities. The company is contributing about $25 million (Canadian) this year to expand capabilities for science, math, and technology education.

He has served on the Prime Minister's Advisory Board on Science and Technology and is chair of the Premier of Ontario's industry advisory board for the Access to Opportunities Program. He is also a member of the Premier of Alberta's external advisory committee on information and communications issues and a member of the policy committee of the Business Council on National Issues.

Through his participation in public and industry forums and organizations, he has worked to keep high-tech jobs in this country so that Canada can offer its young people opportunities at the forefront of global technology and business. Most recently, he co-chaired the Canadian E­Business Opportunities Roundtable, a joint public and private sector initiative examining what Canada has to do to prosper in the new Internet economy.

Since becoming CEO, John Roth has received many awards and other forms of recognition from public and industry organizations around the world. These have recognized his business accomplishments, his industry leadership, his support for education, and his contributions to Canada and the world.

He received the Emerging Markets CEO of the Year Award in 1998. In 1999, he was presented with the New York Hall of Science Distinguished Leadership Award for the Application of Technology to Telecommunications and Education. Earlier this year, he was awarded an honorary doctorate from Queen's University and received the IWAY Award for public leadership for his contributions to the advancement of Canada's information society and the development of its high-­tech industry.

For his success in transforming Nortel Networks into a 21st century powerhouse, he was recently named Outstanding CEO of the Year 2000 by a panel of business peers and academics.

Mr. Chancellor, on behalf of Senate and the Board of Governors, it is my privilege and an honour to present to you John Roth, so that you may confer upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa.

Sat, 18 Mar 2017 21:21:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.concordia.ca/offices/archives/honorary-degree-recipients/2000/11/john-roth.html
Killexams : NTS to Build World’s Highest Capability LOCA Chamber in Partnership with NuScale to Bring Carbon-Free Nuclear Technology to Market

The advanced chamber will be used to qualify components of NuScales ground-breaking small modular reactor technology.

ANAHEIM, Calif., July 28, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--National Technical Systems, Inc. ("NTS"), the leading independent provider of qualification testing, inspection, and certification solutions in North America, is excited to announce a business collaboration agreement with NuScale Power Corporation ("NuScale") to build a LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) chamber to bring carbon-free nuclear technology to market safely and efficiently. The chamber will be designed to test at a temperature of 700°F and a pressure of 1400 PSI. When completed, it will be the world’s first LOCA chamber capable of testing at this pressure.

NuScale, an innovative nuclear energy provider, manufactures small modular reactor (SMR) technology to bring scalable energy solutions to market in regions with physical limitations. By partnering with NTS, NuScale will be able to qualify components of its technology to ensure regulatory compliance. The agreement allows NTS to begin development of an Equipment Qualification (EQ) Test Chamber, which will allow NuScale to mimic the range of environmental conditions under which equipment is required to function in order to meet Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s and plant-specific requirements.

As part of the agreement, NTS will design, fabricate, and commission the EQ Chamber at its nuclear testing facility in Huntsville, AL. The chamber will support critical testing for equipment used in NuScale’s small modular reactor (SMR) under a schedule in order to enable the timely delivery of NuScale Power Modules to customers by 2027.

"This collaboration agreement marks yet another milestone in our company’s progress towards global deployment of our leading SMR technology," said Scott Bailey, Vice President, Supply Chain. "With NTS’s expertise in nuclear-related testing and engineering along with NuScale’s innovative design, the two companies will demonstrate compliance with all industry requirements during equipment qualification."

"NTS is honored that NuScale chose us in partnership to shape the future of the nuclear energy industry. We look forward to strengthening the industry alongside NuScale as we push the bounds of technology together," said Brad Ferguson, NTS’s Director of Strategic Development, Nuclear Division. With the development of the new LOCA chamber, NTS is in position to test and qualify other technologies in the future.

About National Technical Systems

National Technical Systems, Inc. (NTS) is the leading provider of qualification testing, inspection, and certification services in North America, serving a broad range of industries, including the civil aviation, space, defense, nuclear, telecommunications, industrial, electronics, medical, and automotive end markets. Since 1961, NTS has built the broadest geographic presence in the United States, offering more than 70 distinct environmental simulation and materials testing categories, including climatic, structural, dynamics, fluid flow, EMI/EMC, lightning, product safety, acoustics, failure analysis, chemical, and other industry-specific tests.

With 28 technologically advanced testing laboratories, this geographically diverse footprint puts NTS facilities in close proximity to its more than 8,000 clients, allowing NTS to serve the nation’s most innovative companies with industry-leading accessibility and responsiveness. NTS is accredited by numerous national and international organizations and operates its inspection division under the Unitek brand, providing a wide range of supply chain management services. NTS’s certification division, which operates under the NQA brand, is one of the largest and most respected global ISO registrars, with active certifications in more than 75 countries. For additional information about NTS, visit our website at www.nts.com or call 800-270-2516.

About NuScale Power

NuScale Power (NYSE: SMR) is poised to meet the diverse energy needs of customers across the world. It has developed small modular reactor (SMR) nuclear technology to supply energy for electrical generation, district heating, desalination, commercial-scale hydrogen production and other process heat applications. The groundbreaking NuScale Power Module™ (NPM), a small, safe pressurized water reactor, can generate 77 megawatts of electricity (MWe) and can be scaled to meet customer needs. NuScale’s 12-module VOYGR™-12 power plant is capable of generating 924 MWe, and NuScale also offers four-module VOYGR-4 (308 MWe) and six-module VOYGR-6 (462 MWe) power plants, as well as other configurations based on customer needs.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220728005346/en/

Contacts

Jade Bunke, Vice President of Marketing
jade.bunke@nts.com

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 04:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/nts-build-world-highest-capability-160100572.html
Killexams : Market Focus: Workhorse products

One of the product categories that can be considered to make up the industrial market is those infrastructure products that support the booming electronic and telecommunications industry. This year's SPI Structural Plastics Conference and Design Competition focused on some of these interesting applications.

An eye-catching example from the industrial telecommunications perspective was the award-winning Alcoa Fujikura splice box, molded and submitted by Mack Molding (see opposite page). The part represents a metal-replacement trend in this market that's been under way for several years and is now reaching critical mass.

Outdoors
Unless you've been in a coma for the last five years, you know that the digital revolution is well underway. Baby Bells, AT&T, MCI Worldcom, Sprint, British Telecom, and a host of other mega-companies are positioning themselves to build and cash in on new and improved telephone, cable, and mobile communications networks. These networks have an infrastructure being built by the likes of Lucent, Nortel, and Motorola.

Joel Fouquart, technical manager at GE Plastics, says the Alcoa/Mack splice box is the best example of the trend occurring in the outdoor infrastructure arena. The Alcoa box replaces a diecast aluminum predecessor that weighed 65 lb and was a beast to install. But with a switch to GE's Valox PBT and structural foam molding, Alcoa suddenly had a lighter, equally durable, less expensive box that could be produced in volumes. That, says Fouquart, is the key-producing in high volumes to accommodate the new and improved networks under construction.

Indoors
Indoors, Fouquart says the central office is the scene of the most changes. Not happy producing simple computer and electronics cabinets and housings, many manufacturers are looking to plastics and injection molding to create a more striking identity, similar to the job Silicon Graphics has done with its standout colors and contours. Fouquart says many OEMs struggle to determine the break-even point between plastic and metal.

The economic advantages of plastics increase with part complexity. Plastics allow designers to incorporate unique features that are often difficult to impossible to produce in sheet metal. GE and Fouquart conducted a study using a standard 6-ft cabinet panel with moderate contours and complexity, and compared the cost of producing it via structural foam vs. metal. The sheet metal, he says, has an initial tooling cost ranging from $10,000 to $90,000, where an injection mold ranges from $100,000 to $275,000.

However, downstream welding and shaping of the metal ballooned the per part cost to $550 for metal compared to $350 for plastic. Not only that, but the break-even volume for the plastic part is 1000 units annually.

For Example
The Best Paper winner at the Structural Plastics Conference was written and presented by Michael Caropreso, who, with Hewlett-Packard, devised a system for molding plastic panels to replace a large metal door on a peripheral computer rack system. The metal door H-P was looking to replace cost $40 to make and $150 to ship because of its size, and was often damaged in transit.

The series of smaller plastic panels would prove less expensive to make, and ship, and easier to use for service personnel who need to access cabinets. But what made the project particularly interesting was the rare combination of gas-assist molding and sequential gating.

The panels are 35 inches long and 16 inches wide, with a nominal wall thickness of .140 inch, unpainted and with no visible sink marks or weld lines allowed. Two gates were used in the mold, both fed by a hot manifold system with hydraulic valves.

To establish production parameters, the mold was filled through one gate in a series of short shots that were used to determine the ram position at which the flow front reached the second gate. This position was used to trigger the second valve, which finished filling the part. This overlap in flow fronts rendered weld lines invisible.

Gas filling begins after both gates close. A series of carefully guided gas bubbles help pack out different sections of the panel, provide strength, and eliminate sinks. The entire cycle runs in just over a minute, with no secondary operations. The molder produces the parts at facilities in California and Dublin, Ireland.

Metal-to-plastic conversion takes the weigh off

Replacing its eight-part diecast aluminum predecessor, this structural foam molded splice box weighs less than half as much and greatly reduced the total part count. The splice box, manufactured for Alcoa Fujikura Ltd. by Mack Molding (Arlington, VT), is mounted on utility poles and buildings and is used to house and protect spliced fiber optic connections.

"An excellent metal replacement application, this splice box previously weighed 65 lb," says Brian Sumpter, new business development director at Mack's southern division. "We've reduced that to 29 lb, which is a tremendous relief to field service personnel who are hoisting these units up telephone poles to install them." The 10-by-30-inch box consists of two primary parts: one is a drawer in which lines are spliced; the other is the enclosure into which the drawer slides (see photo). The drawer accommodates up to 360 fiber splices and up to six individual cables of various types and sizes. The gasketed drawer can be easily opened for periodic maintenance.

Called the Opti-Guard splice box, it's high-pressure structural foam molded of Valox PBT from GE Plastics at Mack Molding's Inman, SC facility. The material was chosen to meet requirements of UV exposure, ballistic resistance, impact resistance of 100 ft-lb or more at -40F, and temperature resistance ranging from -40F to 176F. Also, Alcoa's internal tieoff system resists more than 100 lb of tension per cable.

The part was an award winner at the Structural Plastics '99 Conference and Design Competition, an annual event hosted by the Society of the Plastics Industry.

For more information:
GE Plastics, Pittsfield, MA
Phone: (800) 845-0600; Fax: (800) 433-2925
Web: www.geplastics.com

Rare-earth compound, plastic unite for speedometer part

All the plastic parts you see in this Bitorque speedometer, designed for some models of Harley Davidson motorcycles, are molded by Thomas G. Faria Corp. But the two parts below the speedometer required a special material. Called bobbins, the parts hold a pin that connects to a magnetic source on the back side of the speedometer. That magnetic source emits a varying electrical charge based on how fast the engine is running. The bobbin, connected to the pin and a meter, rotates according to that charge, thus telling the driver the vehicle's speed.

Faria needed a moldable, highly filled, high-temperature polymer that could be insert molded and then magnetized as part of the inner electrical workings of the speedometer. It hired custom compounder Foster Corp. (Dayville, CT), which developed a compound from a nylon and a rare-earth material called ferrite (an iron-based material). Specifics of the material were not released, but according to the molder, the plastic version is equal in quality to the chrome-plated, hand-finished instrument made for other Harley motorcycles.

Faria runs 40 or so injection molding machines ranging from 15 to 200 tons at its Uncasville, CT plant.

For more information:
Foster Corp., Dayville, CT
Phone: (860) 848-9271
Fax: (860) 848-2704
Web: www.fostercomp.com

Regenerative pump housing benefits from PPS

Designed to house regenerative pumps for use in soft drink dispensing systems in the U.S. and the U.K., this part is required to withstand up to 30 bar of pressure and must operate in temperatures ranging from -4F to 212F. Chemical resistance is required to withstand periodic purging with cleaners. Good surface hardness and dimensional stability are also required. Chosen to mold the part: 40 percent glass-filled Fortron PPS from Ticona.

The critical component in the housing design is the back plate. Stress analysis conducted during the design phase indicated that unacceptably high stress levels in key areas around the connecting points could cause the part to fail. A new design was submitted in which the overall wall section was increased, ensuring greater strength and dimensional stability, with cored-out sections to minimize material use.

Tests on the new design showed a reduction in strain levels around the connecting points by a factor of three. Tests also predicted that the design would be able to meet the stress requirements as well as maintain the .05 mm flatness required for the pump's impeller. The housings are made in the U.K. by Electromag-Neil, which insert molds the stainless steel threads for connecting pipes.

For more information:
Ticona, Summit, NJ
Phone: (800) 235-2637
Fax: (908) 598-4165
Web: www.ticona.com

Polypropylene wheel unit endures heavy weight

This four-caster wheel unit, called the Universal Gondola Skate, is designed to facilitate safe and easy movement of heavy, fully loaded shelves during renovation of retail stores. The wheels are placed under the shelves so that during a store's off hours, the shelves can be moved out of the way to make room for renovation and construction. Then, they can be easily rolled back to their place during regular store hours. They are designed to hold up to 2000 lb and reportedly cost up to 50 percent less than comparable products.

The idea was co-developed by Cozza Harris Design (San Diego) and Co-Mack Technology (Vista, CA). Co-Mack molds the part in a structural foam molding process on a 385-ton Battenfeld. Up to 700 wheel units can be produced in a day on the single-cavity mold. The part is made from a 10 percent glass-filled polypropylene from RheTech Inc. that doesn't have to meet tight tolerances, but must offer strength. The casters are purchased out of house and assembled at Co-Mack.

For more information:
RheTech Inc.
Whitmore Lake, MI
Phone: (734) 769-0585
Fax: (734) 769-3565

Tension knob gets lubed with switch to acetal

The knob on the Ovation 2 thermal transfer printer is used to adjust ribbon tension each time a different width label is used. The printer produces labels up to 4 inches wide and is used to make bar codes, tags, and other products. The tension knob is used intermittently, but not continuously. For Orlando-based manufacturer Datamax, this was a problem with the material used previously, which tended to bind up if the knob was not frequently used.

"The binding," says Ken Colonel, director of mechanical engineering at Datamax, "was due to the fact that the knob is a part that is not in constant operation. The lubricated material we previously used would have worked fine had this been the case. Frequent use would have brought the internal lubricants to the surface and allowed for better performance."

For help, Datamax switched to Fulton 441D, a silicone lubricated acetal composite produced by LNP Engineering Plastics. Because of the silicone's limited compatibility with the base acetal material, it migrates to the surface of the tension adjustment knob. The result is a continuous generation of silicone film, which serves as a boundary or lubricant.

For more information:
LNP Engineering Plastics
Exton, PA
Phone: (610) 363-4500;
Fax: (610) 363-4749
Web: www.lnp.com

Encapsulated solenoids endure with PET

Solenoids manufactured by Caterpillar Inc. are designed to operate hydraulic valves on heavy-duty equipment used in construction, mining, and agriculture. The key to the solenoid's durability is the encapsulation, which blocks moisture and insulates the unit from sudden temperature changes.

Previously overmolded with a thermoset or other thermoplastic, the solenoid is now encapsulated with 30 percent glass-filled Rynite PET from DuPont. More durable than previous designs, the encapsulated product meets Caterpillar's standards for resistance to heat, thermal shock, vibration, moisture penetration, fuel, and lubricants. The company rates solenoids for service at ambient temperatures from -40F to 250F. The PET is also used to mold a coil bobbin that is part of the assembly.

John Hoffman, an engineer for Caterpillar, says the new design and the switch to Rynite PET makes the new units less expensive to produce than the ones they replace. Also, the addition of an integrated electrical receptacle into the encapsulation shell saves the cost of an additional part. The solenoids are installed on bulldozers, wheel loaders, motor graders, agricultural tractors, and off-highway mining trucks.

For more information:
DuPont Engineering Polymers
Wilmington, DE
Phone: (800) 441-0575
Fax: (302) 999-2311
Web: www.dupont.com/enggpolymers

TPE rubber used in electrica plugs, connectors

Electrical products maker Leviton Mfg. in Little Neck, NY makes this watertight locking plug and connector assembly for indoor and outdoor industrial electrical applications. Called the Wetguard, the unit is used to connect two flexible cords in order to supply power to electrical appliances, tools, and machines in a safe and simple installation procedure. The guard shields the connection from threatening environmental elements, providing protection from moisture and dust.

Leviton molds the Wetguard with a Capron nylon 6 from AlliedSignal Plastics and overmolds it with a Santoprene thermoplastic elastomer from Advanced Elastomer Systems. Santoprene not only gives a tactile feel, it also provides resistance to harsh environments, insulation, and good part uniformity and sealability. Levitron specified nylon-bondable grades of Santoprene because they chemically bond well with Capron, thus eliminating any possibility for leakage in the area where the two parts meet. The combination also reportedly resists crushing, impact, and abrasion.

The plugs and connectors, which are available in 15A, 20A, and 30A Nema ratings, feature a tongue-and-groove design, meaning when the male and female parts of the plug and connector are put together, it seals itself. It also has a locking indicator that gives the user visual confirmation that a seal has been obtained.

The Wetguard enclosure consists of two parts that are insert injection molded on a 150-ton press in a two-cavity mold. Previously, enclosures for the 15A devices were designed as a two-part assembly, which, according to Leviton, was a slow operation that often provided an unsatisfactory seal.

For more information:
Advanced Elastomer Systems
Akron, OH
Phone: (330) 849-5000
Fax: (330) 849-5599
Web: www.aestpe.com

AlliedSignal Plastics
Morristown, NJ
Phone: (201) 455-5010
Fax: (201) 455-3506
Web: www.asresin.com

Multimeter features one-shot overmolding of TPU resin

Tektronix Inc. wanted to Boost the durability of its TX-DMM family of true RMS digital multimeters, and ease the manufacturing process at the same time. Handheld DMMs are the most common of all electrical and electronic test instruments. Tektronix used film insert molding to Boost the bezel and display window of the DMM but the back cover presented some design molding challenges.

The back cover, which is injection molded with Bayer's Bayblend FR110 PC/ABS resin, requires three additional parts molded with an elastomer resin: a water-resistant gasket that seals the DMM's electronics from moisture, dust and other elements; a mechanical connection that holds a metal electromagnetic interference shield inside the back cover; and four no-skid pads on the outside of the back cover. Poly-Cast (Tigard, OR), which molds the front and back covers, wanted the three parts to be molded from the same material in just one shot. It chose Bayer's Desmopan KU2-8651 TPU resin, with a 75 Shore A hardness, because it offers good flexibility, resilience, and compression-set properties.

After the Bayblend PC/ABS back covers are molded, Poly-Cast inserts them and an EMI shield into the press. The Desmopan resin is shot onto the back cover through two gates. The resin flows around the lip of the back cover to form a watertight gasket. It then continues through an opening on each side of the part's interior and flows into separate lines over the EMI shield. Finally, the resin flows through openings in the EMI shield and back cover to form four capsule-shaped feet on the outside diameter of the DMM's back cover.

According to Steve Lyford, mechanical engineer for Tektronix, it was less expensive to overmold the parts using this process than to perform a secondary operation by hand. Tektronix had previously used a custom-made gasket, but preferred the overmolding operation even though the mold was tougher to build because the resin has to run a long flow path. The complex mold was built by Bestco of Hillsboro, OR.

For more information:
Bayer Corp., Polymers Div.
Pittsburgh, PA
Phone: (800) 622-6004
Fax: (412) 777-5585
Web: www.bayer.com/polymers-usa

Wed, 06 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.plasticstoday.com/market-focus-workhorse-products
Killexams : NuScale Power Signs Business Collaboration Agreement with National Technical Systems (NTS) to Establish Equipment Qualification Test Chamber

NuScale Power Corporation (NuScale) and National Technical Systems (NTS) signed a Business Collaboration Agreement (BCA) to begin development of an Equipment Qualification (EQ) Test Chamber. This technology, built by NTS, will allow NuScale to mimic the range of environmental conditions under which NuScale equipment is required to function in order to meet U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and plant-specific requirements.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220728005273/en/

NTS is a leading test, inspection, and certification company with more than four decades of experience working in the nuclear sector, including in the areas of safety relief valve testing, repair services, and fuels and fluid testing. Operating for 61 years, NTS was instrumental in supporting the success of historical projects such as Apollo 11, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Artemis program, and the ITER fusion reactor in France.

As part of the agreement, NTS will design, fabricate, and commission the EQ Chamber at its facility in Huntsville, AL, that will ultimately support critical testing for equipment used in NuScale's small modular reactor (SMR) under a schedule to enable the timely delivery of NuScale Power Modules™ to customers by 2027.

"This collaboration agreement marks yet another milestone in our company's progress towards global deployment of our leading SMR technology," said Scott Bailey, Vice President, Supply Chain. "With NTS's expertise in nuclear-related testing and engineering along with NuScale's innovative design, the two companies will demonstrate compliance with all industry requirements during equipment qualification."

"NTS is honored that NuScale chose NTS in partnership to shape the future of the nuclear energy industry. We look forward to strengthening the industry alongside NuScale as we push the bounds of technology together," said Brad Ferguson, NTS's Director of Strategic Development, Nuclear Division.

About NuScale Power

NuScale Power (NYSE: SMR) is poised to meet the diverse energy needs of customers across the world. It has developed small modular reactor (SMR) nuclear technology to supply energy for electrical generation, district heating, desalination, commercial-scale hydrogen production and other process heat applications. The groundbreaking NuScale Power Module™ (NPM), a small, safe pressurized water reactor, can generate 77 megawatts of electricity (MWe) and can be scaled to meet customer needs. NuScale's 12-module VOYGR™-12 power plant is capable of generating 924 MWe, and NuScale also offers four-module VOYGR-4 (308 MWe) and six-module VOYGR-6 (462 MWe) power plants, as well as other configurations based on customer needs.

Founded in 2007, NuScale is headquartered in Portland, Ore., and has offices in Corvallis, Or.; Rockville, Md.; Charlotte, N.C.; Richland, Wash.; and London, UK. To learn more, visit NuScale Power's website or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

About National Technical Systems

National Technical Systems, Inc. (NTS) is the leading provider of qualification testing, inspection, and certification services in North America, serving a broad range of industries, including the civil aviation, space, defense, nuclear, telecommunications, industrial, electronics, medical, and automotive end markets. Since 1961, NTS has built the broadest geographic presence in the United States, offering more than 70 distinct environmental simulation and materials testing categories, including climatic, structural, dynamics, fluid flow, EMI/EMC, lightning, product safety, acoustics, failure analysis, chemical, and other industry-specific tests.

With 28 technologically advanced testing laboratories, this geographically diverse footprint puts NTS facilities in close proximity to its more than 8,000 clients, allowing NTS to serve the nation's most innovative companies with industry-leading accessibility and responsiveness. NTS is accredited by numerous national and international organizations and operates its inspection division under the Unitek brand, providing a wide range of supply chain management services. NTS' certification division, which operates under the NQA brand, is one of the largest and most respected global ISO registrars, with active certifications in more than 75 countries. For additional information about NTS, visit our website at www.nts.com or call 800-270-2516.

Forward Looking Statements

This release may contain "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the "safe harbor" provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of words such as "estimate," "plan," "project," "forecast," "intend," "will," "expect," "anticipate," "believe," "seek," "target" or other similar expressions that predict or indicate future events or trends or that are not statements of historical facts. These forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions. genuine results may differ materially as a result of a number of factors. Caution must be exercised in relying on these and other forward-looking statements. Due to known and unknown risks, NuScale's results may differ materially from its expectations and projections. While NuScale may elect to update these forward-looking statements at some point in the future NuScale specifically disclaims any obligation to do so. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing NuScale's assessments of any date subsequent to the date of this release. Accordingly, undue reliance should not be placed upon the forward-looking statements.

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Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:19:00 -0500 text/html https://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2022/07/28/9646558.htm
Killexams : SaaS DR/BC: If You Think Cloud Data is Forever, Think Again

Key Takeaways

  • SaaS is quickly becoming the default tool for how we build and scale businesses. It’s cheaper and faster than ever before. However, this reliance on SaaS comes with one glaring risk that’s rarely discussed.
  • The “Shared Responsibility Model” doesn’t just govern your relationship with AWS, it actually impacts all of cloud computing. Even for SaaS, users are on the hook for protecting their own data.
  • Human error, cyber threats and integrations that have gone wrong are the main causes of data loss in SaaS. And it’s not uncommon, in one study, about 40% of users have said they have lost data in SaaS applications.
  • It’s possible to create your own in-house solution to help automate some of the manual work around backing-up SaaS data. However, there are limitations to this approach and none of them will help you restore data back to its original state.
  • A data continuity strategy is essential in SaaS, otherwise you may be scambling to restore all information you rely on each and every day. 
     

The Cloud is Not Forever and Neither is Your Data 

When I began my career in technical operations (mostly what we call DevOps today) the world was dramatically different. This was before the dawn of the new millennium. When the world’s biggest and most well-known SaaS company, Salesforce, was operating out of an apartment in San Francisco. 

Back then, on-premise ruled the roost. Rows of towers filled countless rooms. These systems were expensive to set up and maintain, from both a labour and parts perspective. Building a business using only SaaS applications was technically possible back then but logistically a nightmare. On-prem would continue to be the default way for running software for years to come. 

But technology always progresses at lightspeed. So just three years after Salesforce began preaching the “end of software”, Amazon Web Services came online and changed the game completely.

Today a new SaaS tool can be built and deployed across the world in mere days. Businesses are now embracing SaaS solutions at a record pace. The average small to medium-sized business can easily have over 100 SaaS applications in their technology stack. Twenty years ago, having this many applications to run a business was unthinkable and would have cost millions of dollars in operational resources. However, at Rewind, where I oversee technical operations, I looked after our software needs with a modem and a laptop. 

SaaS has created a completely different reality for modern businesses. We can build and grow businesses cheaper and faster than ever before. Like most “too good to be true” things, there’s a catch. All this convenience comes with one inherent risk. It’s a risk that people rarely discussed in my early days as a DevOps and is still rarely talked about. Yet this risk is important to understand, otherwise, all the vital SaaS data you rely on each and every day could disappear in the blink of an eye.

And it could be gone for good. 

The Shared Responsibility of SaaS

This likely goes without saying but you rent SaaS applications, you don’t own them. Those giant on-prem server rooms companies housed years ago, now rest with the SaaS provider. You simply access their servers (and your data) through an operating system or API. Now you are probably thinking, “Dave, I know all this. So what?” 

Well, this is where the conundrum lies. 

If you look at the terms of service for SaaS companies, they do their best to ensure their applications are up and running at all times. It doesn’t matter if servers are compromised by fire, meteor strike, or just human error, SaaS companies strive to ensure that every time a user logs in, the software is available. The bad news is this is where their responsibility ends. 

You, the user, are on the hook for backing up and restoring whatever data you’ve entered and stored in their services. Hence the term “Shared Responsibility Model”. This term is most associated with AWS but this model actually governs all of cloud computing.

The above chart breaks down the various scenarios for protecting elements of the cloud computing relationship. You can see that with the SaaS model, the largest onus is on the software provider. Yet there are still things a user is responsible for; User Access and Data.  

I’ve talked to other folks in DevOps, site reliability, or IT roles in recent years and I can tell you that the level of skepticism is high. They often don’t believe their data isn’t backed up by the SaaS provider in real time. I empathize with them, though, because I was once in their shoes. So when I meet this resistance, I  just point people to the various terms of service laid out by each SaaS provider. Here is GitHub’s, here is Shopify’s and the one for Office 365. It’s all there in black and white.

The reason the Shared Responsibility Model exists in the first place essentially comes down to the architecture of each application. A SaaS provider has built its software to maximize the use of its operating system, not continually snapshot and store the millions or billions of data points created by users. Now, this is not a “one-size fits all scenario”. Some SaaS providers may be able to restore lost data. However, if they do, in my experience, it’s often an old snapshot, it’s incomplete, and the process to get everything back can take days, if not weeks. 

Again, it’s simply because SaaS providers are lumping all user data together, in a way that makes sense for the provider. Trying to find it again, once it’s deleted or compromised, is like looking for a needle in a haystack, within a field of haystacks.    

How Data Loss Happens in SaaS

The likelihood of losing data from a SaaS tool is the next question that inevitably comes up. One study conducted by Oracle and KPMG found that 49% of SaaS users have previously lost data. Our own research found that 40% of users have previously lost data. There are really three ways that this happens; risks that you may already be very aware of. They are human error, cyberthreats, and 3rd party app integrations. 

Humans and technology have always had co-dependent challenges. Let’s face it, it’s one of the main reasons my career exists! So it stands to reason that human inference, whether deliberate or not, is a common reason for losing information. This can be as innocuous as uploading a CSV file that corrupts data sets, accidentally deleting product listings, or overwriting code repositories with a forced push.

There’s also intentional human interference. This means someone who has authorized access, nuking a bunch of stuff. It may sound far-fetched but we have seen terminated employees or third-party contractors cause major issues. It’s not very common, but it happens.       

Cyberthreats are next on the list, which are all issues that most technical operations teams are used to. Most of my peers are aware that the level of attacks increased during the global pandemic, but the rate of attacks had already been increasing prior to COVID-19. Ransomware, phishing, DDoS, and more are all being used to target and disrupt business operations. If this happens, data can be compromised or completely wiped out. 

Finally, 3rd party app integrations can be a source of frustration when it comes to data loss. Go back and read the terms of service for apps connected to your favourite SaaS tool. They may save a ton of time but they may have a lot of control over all the data you create and store in these tools. We’ve seen apps override and permanently delete reams of data. By the time teams catch it, the damage is already done.

There are some other ways data can be lost but these are the most common. The good news is that you can take steps to mitigate downtime. I’ll outline a common one, which is writing your own backup script for a Git.

One approach to writing a GitHub backup script

There are a lot of ways to approach this. Simply Google “git backup script” and lots of options pop up. All of them have their quirks and limitations. Here is a quick rundown of some of them.

Creating a local backup in Cron Scripts

Essentially you are writing a script to clone a repo, at various intervals, using cron jobs. (Note the cron job tool you used will depend on the OS you use). This method essentially takes snapshots over time. To restore a lost repo, you just pick the snapshot you want to bring back.  For a complete copy use git clone --mirror to mirror your repositories. This ensures all remote and local branches, tags, and refs get included. 

The pros of using this method are a lack of reliance on external tools for backups and the only cost is your time. 

The cons are a few. You actually won’t have a full backup. This clone won’t have hooks, reflogs, configuration, description files, and other metadata. It’s also a lot of manual work and becomes more complex if trying to add error monitoring, logging, and error notification. And finally, as the snapshots pile up, you’ll need to consider accounts for cleanups and archiving.

Using Syncthing

Syncthing is a GUI/CLI application that allows for file syncing across many devices. All the devices need to have Syncthing installed on them and be configured to connect with one another. Keep in mind that syncing and backing up are different, as you are not creating a copy, but rather ensuring a file is identical across multiple devices.  

The pros are that it is free and one of the more intuitive methods for a DIY “backup” since it provides a GUI.  Cons: Syncthing only works between individual devices, so you can’t directly back up your repository from a code hosting provider. Manual fixes are needed when errors occur. Also, syncing a git repo could lead to corruption and conflicts of a repository, especially if people work on different branches. Syncthing also sucks up a lot of resources with its continuous scanning, hashing, and encryption. Lastly, it only maintains one version, not multiple snapshots. 

Using SCM Backup

SCM Backup creates an offline clone of a GitHub or BitBucket repository. It makes a significant difference if you are trying to back up many repos at once. After the initial configuration, it grabs a list of all the repositories through an API. You can also exclude certain repos if need be. 

SCM lets you specify backup folder location, authentication credentials, email settings, and more. 

Here’s the drawback though, the copied repositories do not contain hooks, reflogs, or configuration files, or metadata such as issues, pull requests, or releases.  And configuration settings can change across different code hosting providers. Finally, in order to run it, you need to have .NET Core installed on your machine.

Now that’s just three ways to backup a git repository. As I mentioned before, just type a few words into Google and a litany of options comes up. But before you get the dev team to build a homegrown solution, keep these two things in mind.

First, any DIY solution will still require a significant amount of manual work because they only clone and/or backup; they can’t restore data. In fact, that’s actually the case with most SaaS tools, not just in-house backup solutions. So although you may have some snapshots or cloned files, it will likely be in a format that needs to be reuploaded into a SaaS tool. One way around this is to build a backup as a service program, but that will likely eat up a ton of developer time. 

That brings us to the second thing to keep in mind, the constantly changing states of APIs. Let’s say you build a rigorous in-house tool: you’ll need a team to be constantly checking for API updates, and then making the necessary changes to this in-house tool so it’s always working. I can only speak for myself, but I’m constantly trying to help dev teams avoid repetitive menial tasks. So although creating a DIY backup script can work, you need to decide where you want development teams to spend their time.

Data Continuity Strategies for SaaS

So what’s the way forward in all of this? There are a few things to consider. And these steps won’t be uncommon to most technical operations teams. First, figure out whether you want to DIY or outsource your backup needs. We already covered the in-house options and the challenges it presents. So if you decide to look for a backup and recovery service, just remember to do your homework. There are a lot of choices, so as you go through due diligence, look at reviews, talk to peers, read technical documentation and honestly, figure out if company X seems trustworthy. They will have access to your data after all.  

Next, audit all your third-party applications. I won’t sugarcoat it, this can be a lot of work. But remember the “terms of service” agreements? There are always a few surprises to be found. And you may not like what you see. I recommend you do this about once a year and make a pro/cons list. Is the value you get from this app worth the trade-off of access the app has? If it’s not, you may want to look for another tool. Fun fact: Compliance standards like SOC2 require a “vendor assessment” for a reason. External vendors or apps are a common culprit when it comes to accidental data loss.

And finally, limit who has access to each and every SaaS application. Most people acknowledge the benefits of using the least privileged approach, but it isn’t always put into practice. So make sure the right people have the right access, ensure all users have unique login credentials (use a password manager to manage the multiple login hellscape) and get MFA installed.

It’s not a laundry list of things nor is it incredibly complex. I truly believe that SaaS is the best way to build and run organizations. But I hope now it’s glaringly obvious to any DevOps, SRE or IT professional that you need to safeguard all the information that you are entrusting to these tools. There is an old saying I learned in those early days of my career, “There are two types of people in this world – those who have lost data and those who are about to lose data”. 

You don’t want to be the person who has to inform your CIO that you are now one of those people. Of course, if that happens, feel free to send them my way. I’m certain I’ll be explaining the Shared Responsibility Model of SaaS until my career is over!  

About the Author

Dave North has been a versatile member of the Ottawa technology sector for more than 25 years. Dave is currently working at Rewind leading 3 teams (devops, trust, IT) as the director of technical operations. Prior to Rewind, Dave was a long time member of Signiant, holding many roles in the organization including sales engineer, pro services, technical support manager, product owner and devops director. A proven leader and innovator, Dave holds 5 US patents and helped drive Signiant’s move to a cloud SAAS business model with the award winning Media Shuttle product. Prior to Signiant, Dave held several roles at Nortel, Bay Networks and ISOTRO Network Management working on the NetID product suite. Dave is fanatical about cloud computing, automation, gadgets and Formula 1 racing.

Thu, 09 Dec 2021 14:12:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.infoq.com/articles/saas-drbc-data-backup/
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