You will surely pass 310-560 exam with these Dumps

Our confirmation specialists says that finishing 310-560 test with just course reading is truly challenging on the grounds that, the majority of the inquiries are out of course book. You can go to killexams.com and download 100 percent free 310-560 Practice test to assess before you purchase. Register and download your full duplicate of 310-560 PDF Dumps and partake in the review.

Exam Code: 310-560 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Sun Certified Engineer for Sun One Directory Server 5.x
SUN Certified education
Killexams : SUN Certified education - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-560 Search results Killexams : SUN Certified education - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-560 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : Colby Management’s Jennifer Jahn Earns CMCA® Designation

Jennifer Jahn, CMCA®

Colby Management

SUN CITY, AZ, Aug. 08, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Colby Management, an Associa company and  leading provider of top-tier community management and financial services throughout the Sun City area, is pleased to announce that team member Jennifer Jahn has earned the Certified Manager of Community Associations (CMCA®) designation from the Community Association Managers International Certification Board (CAMICB®).

The CMCA® is the only international certification program designed exclusively for managers of homeowner and condominium associations and cooperatives. It recognizes individuals who have demonstrated the fundamental knowledge required to effectively manage community associations. Established by the Community Associations Institute (CAI®) in 1995, CAMICB® is the professional accreditation body for more than ​20,000 community association managers worldwide.

Jahn began her community management career as a receptionist before moving into a manager role. She earned her Certified Community Association Manager (CCAM®) certificate in 2013 and worked as a community manager before temporarily stepping away to raise her children. Jahn joined Colby Management in 2021 and quickly began working toward her CMCA® certification. She is also currently working to earn her AMS® designation.

“I am proud of Jennifer for earning her CMCA® certification,” said Marcy Cowan, Colby Management branch president. “This demonstrates a tremendous step forward in her long-term career growth and enhances her ability to meet the needs of our clients on a range of levels.”

About Associa

With more than 225 branch offices across North America, Associa is building the future of community for nearly five million residents worldwide. Our 11,000+ team members lead the industry with unrivaled education, expertise, and trailblazing innovation. For more than 43 years, Associa has brought positive impact and meaningful value to communities. To learn more, visit www.associaonline.com.

Stay Connected

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/associa

Subscribe to the Blog: https://hub.associaonline.com/

Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/associa

Join us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/associa

Attachment

CONTACT: Tom Womack Associa 214-272-4107 tom.womack@associaonline.com
Mon, 08 Aug 2022 04:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/colby-management-jennifer-jahn-earns-163000562.html
Killexams : Can Veterans’ Spouses Get Florida Teaching Certificates Without Degrees?

Veterans’ spouses without a bachelor’s degree can obtain a five-year teaching certificate in Florida after observing classrooms for 12 hours.

Context

A new law in Florida will allow U.S. military veterans to obtain a temporary teaching certificate without a bachelor’s degree, as long as they meet other education requirements. However, contrary to erroneous reports, military spouses are not eligible for the “Educator Certification Pathways for Veterans” program.

Fact Check

In July 2022, a new law was enacted in Florida that makes it easier for veterans to become teachers in that state. As news reports and social media posts started to circulate about this law, so did confusion about exactly what it entails. Are the spouses of veterans allowed to bypass degree requirements to become teachers? If so, what sort of training or education is required?

In short, Florida’s new law allows U.S. military veterans who do not have a bachelor’s degree to obtain a teacher’s certificate if they meet other requirements, such as passing a subject area examination demonstrating a bachelor’s level of education. However, while Florida does waive certification fees for veterans’ spouses (as well as active-duty military personnel and their spouses), only veterans themselves are eligible for the Military Veterans Certification Pathway program.

Florida Senate Bill 896

This rumor pertains to bill SB 896 which “provides an alternative pathway for veterans seeking subject area certification by removing the requirement for a baccalaureate degree for issuance of their temporary educator certificate.” In order to qualify for the program, potential teachers must have served at least four years in the military and must have completed some college education. Furthermore, people teaching under these temporary certificates must be assigned a teaching mentor.

The Florida Department of Education outlines the requirements, writing:

Minimum of 48 months of military service with an honorable/medical discharge
Minimum of 60 college credits with a 2.5 grade point average

Passing score on a Florida subject area examination for bachelor’s level subjects
Employment in a Florida school district, including charter schools

Military spouses are mentioned in SB 286, but only in the section stating that Florida will waive fees for spouses.

Why the Confusion?

Shortly after this law went into effect, several news outlets reported that both former military members and their spouses would be able to take advantage of this program and receive a temporary teacher’s certificate without a bachelor’s degree. Before issuing a correction, the Gainesville Sun reported: “Last week, the Florida Department of Education announced that military veteran[s], as well as their spouses, would receive a five-year voucher that allows them to teach in the classroom despite not receiving a degree to do so.”

A number of local news outlets also repeated this error as they republished a story from News Nation. On social media, one viral Facebook post claimed that a military spouse with no educational background had actually been awarded a teaching position after only 12 hours of classroom observation.

The Florida DOE told us that the above rumor is “completely false” and that the Military Veteran Certification Pathway “is not available for spouses of military veterans.”

Confusion over this law appears to stem from some poor wording on the Florida DOE website. After this new law was enacted, the website contained a section entitled “Military Personnel, Veterans & Spouses” which summarized the various aspects of the new law. Here’s how the DOE website looked on July 15, 2022:

While not explicitly stated, it’s easy to see how this text may have been misinterpreted, as the title includes “spouses,” the main text includes “spouses,” and the one underlined section states “not yet earned their bachelor’s degree.”

This page has been reworked to more clearly state the impacts of this legislation. In fact, a bolded sentence has been added to the DOE website stating “Military spouses and families are not eligible for this certification pathway.” Here’s how the page looked on July 28, 2022:

The Gainesville Sun published the following correction to their story: “Correction: An earlier version of this article stated spouses of veterans could receive a five-year teaching voucher. The Florida Department of Education, however, has clarified that spouses are only eligible for fee waivers.”

Sources:

“Bills Signed by the Governor in Fort Walton Beach to Support Military Families.” Niceville.Com, 10 June 2022, https://niceville.com/bills-signed-by-the-governor-in-fort-walton-beach-to-support-military-families/.

Florida Department of Veterans’ Affairs | Connecting Veterans to Federal and State Benefits They Have Earned. https://floridavets.org/governor-desantis-signs-six-bills-to-support-floridas-military-families/. Accessed 28 July 2022.

“Florida Fills Teacher Vacancies with Vets, Spouses.” NewsNation, 26 July 2022, https://www.newsnationnow.com/us-news/education/florida-schools-to-hire-vets-spouses-without-teaching-experience/.

Governor DeSantis Announces $8.6 Million to Expand Career and Workforce Training Opportunities for Military Veterans and Spouses. https://www.flgov.com/2021/11/11/governor-desantis-announces-8-6-million-to-expand-career-and-workforce-training-opportunities-for-military-veterans-and-spouses/. Accessed 28 July 2022.

“Governor DeSantis Signs Six Bills to Support Military Families.” WTXL, 9 June 2022, https://www.wtxl.com/news/local-news/governor-desantis-signs-six-military-family-bills.

Solodev. ICYMI: Governor Ron DeSantis Signs Six Bills to Support Florida’s Mil. 17 Oct. 2020, https://www.fldoe.org/newsroom/latest-news/icymi-governor-ron-desantis-signs-six-bills-to-support-floridas-military-families.stml.

“Veterans.” NABCEP, https://www.nabcep.org/veterans-2/. Accessed 28 July 2022.

“Veterans Can Now Teach in Florida with No Degree. School Leaders Say It ‘Lowers the Bar.’” The Gainesville Sun, https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2022/07/21/florida-education-program-military-veterans-teach/10117107002/. Accessed 28 July 2022.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:57:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/veterans-spouses-teaching-certificates/
Killexams : Reclaim Idaho’s education initiative certified for November election ballot

Idaho voters will decide whether to approve or reject Reclaim Idaho’s $300-million-plus per year K-12 education funding initiative on the Nov. 8 ballot, the Idaho Secretary of State’s Office confirmed in a press release late Friday.

The initiative, known as the Quality Education Act — which will appear as Proposition 1 on the ballot — will take a simple majority of votes to be approved. If the initiative does not receive a majority of votes, the initiative will fail and education funding levels will remain at current levels, with the Idaho Legislature setting the public schools budgets every year.

Although Idaho is sitting on a record state budget surplus, some Republican legislators view that as a one-time windfall and are urging caution for spending.

The education initiative is a form of direct democracy that, if approved by voters, bypasses the Legislature to create a new, supplemental funding source specifically for public schools. An analysis performed by the state found the initiative would generate $323.5 million per year, beginning in the 2024 budget year.

“I spoke with a number of teachers over the past two years who told me that they were either leaving the profession or thinking of leaving it,” said Luke Mayville, the co-founder of Reclaim Idaho. “They would ask me a really troubling question, which was, ‘why wouldn’t I leave?’ And it was always difficult to come up with an answer. But as I thought more about it, the best answer we have is this initiative, because Proposition 1 will send a clear signal not just all across Idaho, but especially to our Legislature that even if the powers that be are not respectful of our educators, the people of Idaho do believe in public schools. The people of Idaho do appreciate what educators are doing.”

To qualify the initiative for the ballot, leaders and about 1,000 volunteers for the nonprofit organization knocked on doors and gathered signatures across the state for more than a year.

To qualify for the ballot, the Secretary of State’s Office said the group needed at least 64,945 signatures from 6% of voters statewide and 6% of voters from at least 18 different legislative districts.

The Secretary of State’s press release said the initiative exceeded that threshold in at least 19 legislative districts.

What would Reclaim Idaho’s Quality Education Act do?

Money raised from the education initiative could go toward reducing class sizes, increasing pay for teachers or other education professionals, expanding curricula, investing in educational materials, supporting programs such as drama, music, art, foreign languages, career-technical education programs or more.

To pay for the increase in education funding, the initiative would increase the corporate income tax from 6% to 8% and create a new tax bracket at 10.925% for individuals making more than $250,000 per year and families making more than $500,000. The initiative would not affect sales tax or property tax rates.

Today, Idaho has a slightly lower corporate income tax rate than neighboring states of Oregon (6.6% and 7.6%, depending on the bracket) and Montana (6.75%), according to the nonprofit Tax Foundation. If voters approve the initiative, Idaho’s corporate income tax rate would be slightly higher at 8% than Oregon and Montana’s rates. Of the neighboring states that charge a corporate income tax, Utah’s rate is the lowest at 4.85%. Washington and Nevada don’t have a corporate income tax but have a different tax called a gross receipts tax. Wyoming does not have a corporate income tax.

Reclaim Idaho is the same organization that led the successful 2018 Medicaid expansion ballot initiative, which was approved by 60.6% of voters and expanded Medicaid eligibility to more Idahoans.

“For me personally, it’s a special moment because we started Reclaim Idaho back in 2017 with a focus not only on health care, but also on strengthening our public schools and giving our great teachers and staff the resources they need to succeed,” Mayville said. “And now with the certification of this initiative, we finally have a chance to follow through on a mission that we’ve had all along.”

In terms of next steps, the language “for” and “against” the initiative that will appear on Idahoans’ ballots was due Wednesday. State officials will review the submitted language and forward it to the opposing sides for a rebuttal, which is due Aug. 1, Chief Deputy Secretary of State Chad Houck told the Idaho Capital Sun on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, Reclaim Idaho organizers and volunteers will spend the fall launching a get-out-the-vote campaign designed to get Idahoans to the polls in November and raise awareness of the initiative.

Some Idaho Republicans have come out in opposition to the initiative while Democrats support it

Voters have yet to weigh in, but reaction from legislators has broken along partisan lines.

The two Republican chairmen of the Idaho Legislature’s education committees came out against the initiative last year, even before it was clear the initiative would qualify for the ballot.

“My reaction is that it’s a huge tax increase,” House Education Committee Chairman Lance Clow, R-Twin Falls, told the Idaho Capital Sun last year.

Mayville disagrees.

“This is a modest and reasonable tax proposal,” he said. “It simply restores corporate income tax rates to what they used to be in Idaho, and adds no new income taxes to anyone making under $250,000 a year. All the initiative does — beyond restoring the corporate income tax rate — is it adds an individual income tax on the amount earned over a quarter-million dollars a year. So less than 1% of Idahoans will pay any new taxes under this initiative.”

Senate Education Committee Chairman Steven Thayn, R-Emmett, also doesn’t support the proposal.

“First of all, I think it’s based on a false assumption that money will Excellerate education, and that is not necessarily the case,” Thayn told the Sun.

Thayn will be leaving the Legislature at the end of this year after losing his re-election bid in the May 17 Republican primary.

Meanwhile, Idaho Democrats passed a resolution during the June convention endorsing the education funding initiative.

“There is an unequal access to learning opportunities for Idaho children across the state because where an Idaho student lives and goes to school determines the resources and educational opportunities available to them, which are largely due to whether their community can pass a supplemental levy,” the Democratic resolution states, in part.

For more information:

A summary of the initiative can be found on the Idaho Secretary of State website by visiting https://sos.idaho.gov/elections/initiatives/2022/Quality_Education_Act.pdf.

For more information about how an initiative qualifies for the ballot in Idaho, visit https://sos.idaho.gov/elections-division/ballot-initiatives/.

photo

Sun, 24 Jul 2022 20:07:00 -0500 en text/html https://cdapress.com/news/2022/jul/25/reclaim-idahos-education-initiative-certified-nove/
Killexams : Certified Farm Succession Coordinator Training now offered virtually

The Certified Farm Succession Coordinator Training originally set as an in-person training has switched to a virtual format Aug. 29-30 and Sept. 13.

The training provides the opportunity for individuals to become a certified farm succession coordinator. It is hosted by the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Dairy Profitability, in collaboration with the International Farm Transition Network (IFTN) and North Dakota State University Extension.

The virtual training will take place from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Participants must attend all three days to be eligible for certification. Registration is required by Aug. 18.

Attorneys, accountants, lenders, Extension educators, financial advisers, farm/ranch mediators and any individuals who want to specialize in farm succession planning are welcome to participate. This training is approved for 14.75 ND CLE credits plus 2.0 ND Ethics credit for a total of 16.75 ND CLE credits through the North Dakota Commission for Continuing Legal Education.

“The economic future of our nation’s agriculture depends on the next generation’s ability to access land and business assets,” says Carrie Johnson, NDSU Extension assistant director for family and community wellness. “Many farm and ranch operators are realizing the importance of creating a succession plan. Agriculture service professionals who work with these farms and ranches are recognizing that it takes more than a business structure or an estate plan to get those assets transferred to the next generation of managers. Succession planning also includes management transfer, inheritance issues and (surprise!) humans with emotions.”

This training will offer:

  • Insight on the barriers to farm succession.
  • Strategies on working with families as they navigate farm succession.
  • Facilitation tools to guide the process.
  • Opportunities to consider real-life examples of farm succession case studies.

Instructors for this training are Kiley Fleming, executive director of the Iowa Mediation Service, and Joy Kirkpatrick, a farm succession specialist with the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Dairy Profitability. Fleming and Kirkpatrick have been instructors for this training since its inception in 2012. They offer over 35 years of combined succession planning experience to the training.
Registration fees are $950 per person. A discount of $50 per person is available for organizations registering three or more individuals in the same purchase. The fee includes a 2022-2023 International Farm Transition Network membership. For more information or to register, visit ndsu.ag/farm-succession .

For more information, contact Kirkpatrick at joy.kirkpatrick@wisc.edu or 608-263-3485.

Sat, 06 Aug 2022 00:55:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.jamestownsun.com/business/certified-farm-succession-coordinator-training-now-offered-virtually
Killexams : Lack of interest kills alternative teacher licensing program in Clark County

Why do I have to complete a CAPTCHA?

Completing the CAPTCHA proves you are a human and gives you temporary access to the web property.

What can I do to prevent this in the future?

If you are on a personal connection, like at home, you can run an anti-virus scan on your device to make sure it is not infected with malware.

If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices.

Another way to prevent getting this page in the future is to use Privacy Pass. Check out the browser extension in the Chrome Web Store.

Sun, 31 Jul 2022 21:28:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://lasvegassun.com/news/2022/aug/01/lack-of-interest-kills-alternative-teacher-licensi/
Killexams : Visalia one step closer to becoming Certified Autism Destination

The CAD designation is awarded to destinations where key community areas like hotels, museums, attractions, entertainment venues and other tourism organizations are trained and certified to serve autistic individuals and those with other sensory disorders. Even without being a CAD, the addition of five more businesses allows Visalia visitors with autism to have a broader selection of businesses and hotels to choose from.

“We are so excited for travelers to have the ability to choose just the right hotel and attractions for their family from our growing list of Certified Autism Centers,” John Onteo, interim executive director of Visit Visalia, said. “What started as a grassroots program to have one or two of our local hotels become CACs, has grown into a citywide initiative embraced by our community of tourism-based businesses.”

The five new Certified Autism Centers that were added to Visalia’s list are the Wyndham Visalia Hotel, Lamp Liter Inn, Visalia Adventure Park, ImagineU Children’s Museum and Arts Visalia.

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 08:15:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://thesungazette.com/article/visalia/2022/07/29/visalia-one-step-closer-to-becoming-certified-autism-destination/
Killexams : Severe Maryland teacher shortage highlights difficult working conditions at K-12 schools No result found, try new keyword!As the beginning of the school year approaches, the Baltimore region is facing a high number of teacher vacancies. Wed, 03 Aug 2022 18:47:51 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/severe-maryland-teacher-shortage-highlights-difficult-working-conditions-at-k-12-schools/ar-AA10dus4 Killexams : Skin Cancer Is a Risk No Matter the Skin Tone. But It May Be Overlooked in People With Dark Skin.

Brykyta Shelton found herself standing in a checkout line of a big-box retailer, uncomfortably aware as a woman ahead of her stared at her sandaled feet.

Shelton had been taking medication for months for what her doctor said was toenail fungus, but one nail still looked gross.

After Shelton completed her purchase, the woman pulled her aside and said that, while she wasn’t a doctor, she thought Shelton was dealing with something more serious than fungus.

“She’s like: ‘I know I’m just a random stranger, but please, go get it checked out by someone else,’” said Shelton, who lives in a Maryland suburb of  Washington, D.C.

Shelton, now 42, took the advice.

The initial lab work didn’t provide a clear diagnosis, but her new doctor said he was confident she had acral lentiginous melanoma, a form of skin cancer. Additional testing proved him right. While rare, it is the most common subtype of melanoma in Black people, like Shelton. It is the disease that killed reggae star Bob Marley at age 36, and is most often found on skin less frequently exposed to the sun, such as the hands, the soles of the feet, and under nails. Researchers do not understand what causes acral lentiginous melanoma, and they don’t know how to prevent it. It is often overlooked in skin checks or misdiagnosed.

Skin cancer, in general, is often missed or misdiagnosed in Black patients.

Historically, Black people and those with dark skin have been left out of efforts to combat skin cancer. Long neglected by sunscreen manufacturers and a medical community lagging in diversity and cultural competency — the acknowledgment of a patient’s heritage, beliefs, and values — many have not been informed about sun safety or how to check their skin for signs of damage or cancer.

To be sure, skin cancer rates are lower for people with dark skin tones. Melanoma is more than 20 times as common in white people as in African Americans, with an overall lifetime risk of 1 in 38 for white people compared with 1 in 1,000 for Black people. Melanin does provide some protection against sun damage, so those with more of it — those with darker skin — are better protected than those with fairer skin.

But overall, Black patients are more likely to be diagnosed with various forms of skin cancer at more advanced stages and have a higher mortality rate, said Dr. Janiene Luke, with the Skin of Color Society, a nonprofit that works to educate doctors and the public on skin health.

The five-year melanoma survival rate among non-Hispanic Black people is 66%, compared with 90% for non-Hispanic white people, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And 1 in 3 Black men or women diagnosed with melanoma in the U.S. die of the disease, compared with at least 1 in 7 for non-Hispanic white people, says the American Cancer Society.

Given the known disparities in outcomes, Dr. Valerie Harvey, president of the Skin of Color Society, said two areas of research are needed: studying educational initiatives to see if awareness might lead to earlier diagnosis and improved survival; and determining risk factors in patients with dark skin, especially factors leading to the occurrence of melanoma in places less exposed to the sun.

Improving cultural competency and diversity within dermatology is just one step toward improving diagnosis and outcomes. According to the most exact data, fewer than 3% of dermatologists nationwide are Black. Orthopedics is the only medical specialty with a smaller share.

Dermatology has traditionally been one of the most competitive specialties in medicine, said Dr. Michelle Henry, a clinical instructor of dermatology at Weill Cornell Medicine. In addition to stiff academic requirements, admission to dermatology programs also depends on connecting with mentors and extensive networking, which can be expensive. And that, Henry said, has traditionally created barriers for Black medical students who want to pursue dermatology.

“There are so many hurdles that make it difficult for a lot of students of color to do the things that they need to do in such an uber-exclusive and small space,” she said.

Recent initiatives to help students overcome those barriers are beginning to work, said Dr. Susan Taylor, vice chair for diversity, equity, and inclusion in the dermatology department at the University of Pennsylvania and founder of the Skin of Color Society. Initiatives from the American Academy of Dermatology include holistic reviews of residency applications, mentorships, and programs to increase interest among and prepare high school students for college and medical school.

Medical app company VisualDX is working to reduce disparities in medicine through Project Impact by creating a catalog of images reflecting various diseases in different skin colors. Skin cancers may appear different on fairer skin than on darker skin, and because doctors may have been trained only with fair-skin depictions, the chance for misdiagnosis in people with dark skin increases.

Change has also come to the sunscreen industry.

Jorge Martínez-Bonilla, senior vice president and partner with Chicago market research company C + R Research, said failures within the medical community to provide adequate skin care for people with dark skin mirror the lack of availability of sunscreens to meet patients’ needs, especially for Black people.

“What that has done is that it has pushed Black entrepreneurs, from one day to the next, to come up with their own solutions and their own products,” Martínez-Bonilla said. “Not only from the lack of availability, but because these are the people who know their needs best.”

Katonya Breaux is one of those entrepreneurs. She wasn’t thrilled when, in her 30s and 40s, she noticed she was getting moles on her face and neck similar to those she’d seen on older family members while she was growing up. She assumed it was just part of aging. But her dermatologist said it was sun damage.

“I was, literally, shocked. I was like: ‘But I’m Black,’” she said, adding that she had no experience with sunscreen growing up. “It was so foreign to me. I believed we just didn’t need it.”

After struggling to find a sunscreen that didn’t leave a residue or feel like it was burning her skin, she worked with a chemist who helped her create a tinted mineral-based sunscreen. At first, she intended it just for her personal use, but she ultimately launched Unsun Cosmetics. The Los Angeles-based company educates about skin care and sells products designed for consumers with dark skin.

Shontay Lundy also struggled to find a sunscreen that didn’t “leave a blue, purple, or other-colored hue on my skin.” Until, she said, “I realized it didn’t exist.”

So, in 2016, she developed products that left no residue, ultimately launching Black Girl Sunscreen.

Education is fundamental to her company’s advertising, Lundy said. “Our mission is to equip people of all ages and skin tones with the right sunscreen products to take their skin health seriously and protect themselves from sun damage.”

Shelton, whose chance encounter in a store’s checkout line led to her cancer diagnosis, said she has become an evangelist for skin self-checks and sunscreen, and is now known at her local pool as “the sunblock lady.” The kind of skin cancer she had may not have stemmed from sun exposure, but it increased her awareness about skin damage and other types of skin cancers.

She has been cancer-free since the doctor successfully removed the tumor on her toe and she underwent chemotherapy and radiation. But the experience was traumatic.

“It’s life-altering,” she said.

Still, she said, she’s resumed an active and full life. She said she will forever be grateful to the stranger who pulled her aside that day, as well as the doctor who disbelieved the first set of labs that came back, opting instead to trust his instincts to immediately begin treatment.

Tips for Avoiding Skin Cancer for All Skin Tones

• Avoid direct sun, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Keep babies out of the sun entirely.

• Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day. Reapply every two hours or after swimming or activity/sweating.

• Don’t leave sunscreen in the car, because temperature fluctuations can cause it to break down and become less effective.

• Wear clothing that covers arms and legs.

• Wear a broad-brimmed hat to protect the face, ears, and neck.

• Wear UV-blocking sunglasses.

• Avoid indoor tanning beds.

• Examine skin from head to toe every month. Look for dark spots or patches, or growths that are growing, bleeding, or changing; sores that are slow to heal, or heal and return; patches of skin that feel rough and dry; and dark lines underneath or around fingernails or toenails. Be diligent in checking nail beds, palms, soles of the feet, the head, lower legs, the groin, and other places that get little sun. Contact a doctor if you have any concerns.

• See a board-certified dermatologist at least once a year for a full-body examination.

Sources: Skin Cancer Foundation, American Academy of Dermatology, Dr. Janiene Luke, Dr. Michelle Henry, Katonya Breaux

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 21:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://khn.org/news/article/skin-cancer-risk-overlooked-in-dark-skin/
Killexams : Higher Education Reforms to Tackle 4th Industrial Revolution Needs

Education is the single most crucial factor when it comes to contributing to a country's overall growth and prosperity. Higher education institutions not only shape citizens into productive members of society but also develop the leaders of tomorrow. That's why the education system must be prioritized for the sake of the country's progress. In the past half-century, the education system in Bangladesh has been the subject of intense debate. Several times during her address, the Hon'ble Prime Minister stressed the significance of this sector. She has established several avenues for securing financial support for scientific investigation for universities. Indeed, institutions were unable to get enough funding for research. But, educators are not willing to do research even if they are paid more. Therefore, we need to direct our attention to higher educational institutions.

Under the leadership of the Hon'ble Minister of Education of the Government of Bangladesh, various reforms have been undertaken in this sector. Multiple reform initiatives focused on the primary, secondary, and higher secondary levels have begun rolling out. The curriculum has undergone extensive revisions to Excellerate it and better prepare today's students for the future. Changes to the curricula have begun in pilot programs. In this regard, the Hon'ble Minister and the State Minister of Education deserve much credit. The Ministry of Education has also placed more importance on modernizing universities.

Like the Honourable Minister of Education, the Honourable Prime Minister has consistently emphasized the importance of research at universities. However, despite a supportive government, Bangladesh's academic institutions are yet to reach the research brilliance that is hoped for. Every time a global university rating is released, universities in Bangladesh receive harsh criticism for their low placement. Even though rankings aren't always crucial, they have taken on increased significance in today's highly competitive world. However, it doesn't appear very comforting to the country when vice-chancellors from different universities make unrealistic statements regarding this ranking.

Multiple stakeholders in the education field have long advocated for a more significant share of the government's resources to be dedicated to education. The annual budget increase is one of the most consistent features of the government's support for the field of education. Although we have not observed the expected increases, this year's funding is more than last year's. But this is an encouraging development. To guarantee quality education, however, I do not believe that just raising the money would suffice. In addition to monetary constraints, this industry has several additional challenges preventing it from reaching its full potential. Public institutions in Bangladesh, for instance, do not foster a climate conducive to research. A few faculties at every public institution are engaged in scholarly investigation. Their findings are being taken into account by national governments and have received acknowledgement on a global scale. However, it is also true that most educators are against research. Several factors contribute to people's unwillingness to engage in research. Institutions of higher education now lack a mechanism for recognizing outstanding academic scholars. It's also worth asking why professors would bother with research if it has no bearing on their job security at the university level.                                         

The university teachers, in Bangabandhu's eyes, represented the national consciousness. Inspired by this thought, in 1973, he enacted a law giving university teachers their autonomy. He didn't want the law to bind educators, who he saw as the nation's moral compass. The academic system has distorted Bangabandhu's generosity over time. In 1973, for instance, a teacher needed to publish more than one research paper before being considered for a higher position. Since then, we have continued with the same clause. Why would a university professor spend time researching if it would get him promoted to a higher position just by publishing more than one paper? Attention has to be paid to this matter now.

Obtaining a PhD is often a prerequisite for teaching at the university level in developed nations. Graduates with a Master's degree and a PhD are expected to have research experience. However, in the case of Bangladesh, a lack of research skills is the outcome of making a student a university teacher after obtaining a Master's degree. Furthermore, there is no opportunity for educating newly hired university teachers; thus, they lack the knowledge required for teaching. Since it is becoming more difficult for someone like him to teach as planned, he is also losing intentions of Preparing for research. It is also true that several academics have been attempting to broaden their knowledge of higher education by studying in universities abroad. However, many academics have been shown to attempt to take advantage of legal loopholes after a university has hired them to further their careers or get vital administrative roles.

While the University Grants Commission has developed a standard guideline for hiring faculty, it has not yet been implemented nationwide. Institutions of higher education established according to the 1973 Act make faculty appointments following institutional policy. It is reassuring, however, that some public universities have tried adapting their recruitment policies for faculty members to the new realities. The person at the university's helm is the primary factor in determining the institution's direction. Any vice chancellor may successfully administer the institution if that is his goal. However, if the vice chancellor decides to implement significant changes to how the institution is administered, he or she would undoubtedly encounter resistance.

The present government placed considerable emphasis on ensuring that the educational system is future-ready by adjusting to the demands of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The most pressing need of the 4IR is for industries to interact more closely with academic institutions. Higher education institutions in the developed world can attract massive sums of money from the corporate sector. University faculty may utilize this money to do primary research, which has dual benefits: it raises the profile of both the individual researcher and his or her institution, which in turn informs public policy. The management of our institutions has been strongly encouraged to do so by our Honourable Minister of Education.

The current government has made it one of its top priorities to revitalize the educational system so that it can meet future demands. However, it is also true that raising substantial sums of the fund by connecting universities with industry is not feasible in the practical context of Bangladesh. Our country's industrial sector cannot match the generous funding of its counterparts in other developed nations; therefore, universities here get much less than their fair share. However, as our Honourable Prime Minister has shown through the building of the Padma Bridge, it is not a particularly difficult undertaking to raise finances provided the person in charge of the government has the right motives. No one in Bangladesh expected the country to be able to construct the Padma Bridge after the World Bank reversed its decision to finance the bridge due to allegations of corruption in 2012. The Padma Bridge, however, has been built with internal funds, as shown by the Hon'ble Prime Minister. Using her inspiration, our university administration should strengthen relations with industry and institute wide-ranging institutional changes.

In a free market economy, the survival of the fittest matters most. Thus, only the strongest will participate in any given competition; the weak will inevitably perish. Certification of students who have graduated from our universities may become an issue if we fail to create institutions of a worldwide level in the age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and if our universities fail to enter the global rankings. I do not doubt that the Minister of Education is an incredibly talented politician with a long list of impressive credentials. We anticipate that the universities of Bangladesh, under her direction, will be led by qualified professors and will be able to compete successfully in the international arena by enacting the kind of reforms essential to meet the challenges posed by the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The author is a Professor in the Department of Public Administration at the University of Rajshahi University

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 22:41:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.daily-sun.com/post/635770/Higher-Education-Reforms-to-Tackle-4th-Industrial-Revolution-Needs
Killexams : Skin cancer is a risk for all skin tones, but may be overlooked in people with dark skin

Brykyta Shelton found herself standing in a checkout line of a big-box retailer, uncomfortably aware as a woman ahead of her stared at her sandaled feet.

Shelton had been taking medication for months for what her doctor said was toenail fungus, but one nail still looked gross.

After Shelton completed her purchase, the woman pulled her aside and said that, while she wasn’t a doctor, she thought Shelton was dealing with something more serious than fungus.

“She’s like: ‘I know I’m just a random stranger, but please, go get it checked out by someone else,’” said Shelton, who lives in a Maryland suburb of  Washington, D.C.

Shelton, now 42, took the advice.

The initial lab work didn’t provide a clear diagnosis, but her new doctor said he was confident she had acral lentiginous melanoma, a form of skin cancer. Additional testing proved him right. While rare, it is the most common subtype of melanoma in Black people, like Shelton. It is the disease that killed reggae star Bob Marley at age 36, and is most often found on skin less frequently exposed to the sun, such as the hands, the soles of the feet, and under nails. Researchers do not understand what causes acral lentiginous melanoma, and they don’t know how to prevent it. It is often overlooked in skin checks or misdiagnosed.

Skin cancer, in general, is often missed or misdiagnosed in Black patients.

Black people skin cancer sunscreen theGrio.com
Photo: Getty Images

Historically, Black people and those with dark skin have been left out of efforts to combat skin cancer. Long neglected by sunscreen manufacturers and a medical community lagging in diversity and cultural competency — the acknowledgment of a patient’s heritage, beliefs, and values — many have not been informed about sun safety or how to check their skin for signs of damage or cancer.

To be sure, skin cancer rates are lower for people with dark skin tones. Melanoma is more than 20 times as common in white people as in African Americans, with an overall lifetime risk of 1 in 38 for white people compared with 1 in 1,000 for Black people. Melanin does provide some protection against sun damage, so those with more of it — those with darker skin — are better protected than those with fairer skin.

But overall, Black patients are more likely to be diagnosed with various forms of skin cancer at more advanced stages and have a higher mortality rate, said Dr. Janiene Luke, with the Skin of Color Society, a nonprofit that works to educate doctors and the public on skin health.

The five-year melanoma survival rate among non-Hispanic Black people is 66%, compared with 90% for non-Hispanic white people, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And 1 in 3 Black men or women diagnosed with melanoma in the U.S. die of the disease, compared with at least 1 in 7 for non-Hispanic white people, says the American Cancer Society.

Given the known disparities in outcomes, Dr. Valerie Harvey, president of the Skin of Color Society, said two areas of research are needed: studying educational initiatives to see if awareness might lead to earlier diagnosis and improved survival; and determining risk factors in patients with dark skin, especially factors leading to the occurrence of melanoma in places less exposed to the sun.

Improving cultural competency and diversity within dermatology is just one step toward improving diagnosis and outcomes. According to the most exact data, fewer than 3% of dermatologists nationwide are Black. Orthopedics is the only medical specialty with a smaller share.

Dermatology has traditionally been one of the most competitive specialties in medicine, said Dr. Michelle Henry, a clinical instructor of dermatology at Weill Cornell Medicine. In addition to stiff academic requirements, admission to dermatology programs also depends on connecting with mentors and extensive networking, which can be expensive. And that, Henry said, has traditionally created barriers for Black medical students who want to pursue dermatology.

“There are so many hurdles that make it difficult for a lot of students of color to do the things that they need to do in such an uber-exclusive and small space,” she said.

Recent initiatives to help students overcome those barriers are beginning to work, said Dr. Susan Taylor, vice chair for diversity, equity, and inclusion in the dermatology department at the University of Pennsylvania and founder of the Skin of Color Society. Initiatives from the American Academy of Dermatology include holistic reviews of residency applications, mentorships, and programs to increase interest among and prepare high school students for college and medical school.

Medical app company VisualDX is working to reduce disparities in medicine through Project Impact by creating a catalog of images reflecting various diseases in different skin colors. Skin cancers may appear different on fairer skin than on darker skin, and because doctors may have been trained only with fair-skin depictions, the chance for misdiagnosis in people with dark skin increases.

Change has also come to the sunscreen industry.

Jorge Martínez-Bonilla, senior vice president and partner with Chicago market research company C + R Research, said failures within the medical community to provide adequate skin care for people with dark skin mirror the lack of availability of sunscreens to meet patients’ needs, especially for Black people.

“What that has done is that it has pushed Black entrepreneurs, from one day to the next, to come up with their own solutions and their own products,” Martínez-Bonilla said. “Not only from the lack of availability, but because these are the people who know their needs best.”

Katonya Breaux is one of those entrepreneurs. She wasn’t thrilled when, in her 30s and 40s, she noticed she was getting moles on her face and neck similar to those she’d seen on older family members while she was growing up. She assumed it was just part of aging. But her dermatologist said it was sun damage.

“I was, literally, shocked. I was like: ‘But I’m Black,’” she said, adding that she had no experience with sunscreen growing up. “It was so foreign to me. I believed we just didn’t need it.”

After struggling to find a sunscreen that didn’t leave a residue or feel like it was burning her skin, she worked with a chemist who helped her create a tinted mineral-based sunscreen. At first, she intended it just for her personal use, but she ultimately launched Unsun Cosmetics. The Los Angeles-based company educates about skin care and sells products designed for consumers with dark skin.

Shontay Lundy also struggled to find a sunscreen that didn’t “leave a blue, purple, or other-colored hue on my skin.” Until, she said, “I realized it didn’t exist.”

So, in 2016, she developed products that left no residue, ultimately launching Black Girl Sunscreen.

Education is fundamental to her company’s advertising, Lundy said. “Our mission is to equip people of all ages and skin tones with the right sunscreen products to take their skin health seriously and protect themselves from sun damage.”

Shelton, whose chance encounter in a store’s checkout line led to her cancer diagnosis, said she has become an evangelist for skin self-checks and sunscreen, and is now known at her local pool as “the sunblock lady.” The kind of skin cancer she had may not have stemmed from sun exposure, but it increased her awareness about skin damage and other types of skin cancers.

She has been cancer-free since the doctor successfully removed the tumor on her toe and she underwent chemotherapy and radiation. But the experience was traumatic.

“It’s life-altering,” she said.

Still, she said, she’s resumed an active and full life. She said she will forever be grateful to the stranger who pulled her aside that day, as well as the doctor who disbelieved the first set of labs that came back, opting instead to trust his instincts to immediately begin treatment.

Tips for Avoiding Skin Cancer for All Skin Tones

• Avoid direct sun, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Keep babies out of the sun entirely.

• Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day. Reapply every two hours or after swimming or activity/sweating.

• Don’t leave sunscreen in the car, because temperature fluctuations can cause it to break down and become less effective.

• Wear clothing that covers arms and legs.

• Wear a broad-brimmed hat to protect the face, ears, and neck.

• Wear UV-blocking sunglasses.

• Avoid indoor tanning beds.

• Examine skin from head to toe every month. Look for dark spots or patches, or growths that are growing, bleeding or changing; sores that are slow to heal, or heal and return; patches of skin that feel rough and dry; and dark lines underneath or around fingernails or toenails. Be diligent in checking nail beds, palms, soles of the feet, the head, lower legs, the groin, and other places that get little sun. Contact a doctor if you have any concerns.

• See a board-certified dermatologist at least once a year for a full-body examination.


KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operating programs at KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.


TheGrio is FREE on your TV via Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku, and Android TV. TheGrio’s Black Podcast Network is free too. Download theGrio mobile apps today! Listen to ‘Dear Culture’ with Panama Jackson.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 23:42:00 -0500 Sandy West for KHN en-US text/html https://thegrio.com/2022/08/03/skin-cancer-risk-for-all-skin-tones-but-overlooked-in-people-with-dark-skin/
310-560 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List