Free 310-303 questions and answers Questions by killexams.com

killexams.com SUN Certification Practice Test are setup by our IT professionals. It is truly challenging to assess rumored accreditation practice questions suppliers. Notwithstanding, we have simplified it to test our Sample 310-303 questions and register for full form of 310-303 actual test PDF Braindumps and Real Exam Questions with VCE practice test.

Exam Code: 310-303 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Sun Certified Security Administrator for the Solaris 10 OS
SUN Administrator test
Killexams : SUN Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-303 Search results Killexams : SUN Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-303 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : NASA's asteroid strike test successfully shifts orbit

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A spacecraft that plowed into a small, harmless asteroid millions of miles away succeeded in shifting its orbit, NASA said Tuesday in announcing the results of its save-the-world test.

The space agency attempted the first test of its kind two weeks ago to see if in the future a killer rock could be nudged out of Earth's way.

"This mission shows that NASA is trying to be ready for whatever the universe throws at us," NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said during a briefing at NASA headquarters in Washington.

In this image made from a NASA livestream and taken from the Double Asteroid Redirection Test spacecraft, asteroid Dimorphos is seen as the spacecraft flies toward it, Monday, Sept. 26, 2022. (ASI/NASA via AP)

The Dart spacecraft carved a crater into the asteroid Dimorphos on Sept. 26, hurling debris out into space and creating a cometlike trail of dust and rubble stretching several thousand miles (kilometers). It took days of telescope observations from Chile and South Africa to determine how much the impact altered the path of the 525-foot (160-meter) asteroid around its companion, a much bigger space rock.

People are also reading…

Before the impact, the moonlet took 11 hours and 55 minutes to circle its parent asteroid. Scientists had hoped to shave off 10 minutes but Nelson said the impact shortened the asteroid's orbit by about 32 minutes.

Neither asteroid posed a threat to Earth — and still don't as they continue their journey around the sun. That's why scientists picked the pair for the world's first attempt to alter the position of a celestial body.

This image made available by NOIRLab shows a plume of dust and debris blasted from the surface of the asteroid Dimorphos by NASA's DART spacecraft after it impacted on Sept. 26, 2022, captured by the U.S. National Science Foundation's NOIRLab's SOAR telescope in Chile. The expanding, comet-like tail is more than 6,000 miles (10,000 kilometers) long. (Teddy Kareta, Matthew Knight/NOIRLab via AP)

"We've been imagining this for years and to have it finally be real is really quite a thrill," said NASA program scientist Tom Statler.

Launched last year, the vending machine-size Dart — short for Double Asteroid Redirection Test — was destroyed when it slammed into the asteroid 7 million miles (11 million kilometers) away at 14,000 mph (22,500 kph).

Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland built the spacecraft and managed the $325 million mission.

"This is a very exciting and promising result for planetary defense," said the lab's Nancy Chabot.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 09:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://madison.com/news/science/nasas-asteroid-strike-test-successfully-shifts-orbit/article_d1869d4e-1c44-5754-bd6d-b78719b7be87.html
Killexams : NASA reports smashing success with asteroid redirection test © Provided by The Washington Post

NASA’s attempt to thwap an asteroid by crashing a spacecraft into it has succeeded spectacularly, changing the rock’s motion through space significantly and offering promise that this still-experimental technique could someday be applied as a practical form of planetary defense, agency officials said Tuesday.

The Double Asteroid Redirection Test was just that — a test. The targeted asteroid, named Dimorphos, posed no threat. It won’t come within 4 million miles of Earth at any point in the foreseeable future. Dimorphos orbits a larger asteroid named Didymos. Both were circling the sun about 7 million miles from Earth when the DART spacecraft took aim on the evening of Sept. 26.

DART is NASA’s first “planetary defense” mission. The goal was to test whether this technique, called a kinetic impactor, would deliver enough of a punch to a speeding space rock to knock it significantly off course.

NASA crashes spacecraft into asteroid, passing planetary defense test

It did. Before DART’s arrival, Dimorphos orbited Didymos in 11 hours and 55 minutes. Then: Blam! The newly calculated orbit: 11 hours and 23 minutes.

That 32-minute change in the orbital period was at the high end of a range of estimated outcomes, NASA’s head of planetary science, Lori Glaze, said. DART surpassed the agency’s minimum benchmark for a successful mission by more than 25 times.

“We showed the world NASA is serious as a defender of this planet,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson.

The mission “felt like a movie plot,” he said. “But this was not Hollywood.”

How it works: NASA hopes to hit an asteroid now in case we really need to knock one away later

Despite the enthusiasm emanating from NASA officials, there is not a fully developed system for intercepting asteroids. The key to planetary defense is finding potentially hazardous asteroids long before they cross Earth’s path. Astronomers can calculate whether they are on a trajectory to strike the planet.

“You gotta know they’re coming,” Glaze said.

The idea of a kinetic impactor is to give a hazardous asteroid a nudge many years before its anticipated impact with Earth. This is not a last-minute technique for saving the world.

“We really need to have that warning time for a technique like this to be effective,” said Nancy Chabot, DART coordination lead at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, which handled the mission under a NASA contract.

NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission just before its closest approach to the Dimorphos asteroid, on September 26, 2022. (ASI/NASA / AFP/Getty Images) NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission just before its closest approach to the Dimorphos asteroid, on September 26, 2022. (ASI/NASA / AFP/Getty Images)

Big asteroids that might menace Earth are easily spotted, and their orbits calculated many decades into the future. But many smaller asteroids in the general size range of Dimorphos, which is about 160 meters in diameter, are harder to detect.

Asteroids are not identical. Some are hard, solid bodies, while others are “rubble piles.” The composition and shape of Dimorphos were not known prior to the arrival of DART. Only in the last few minutes of the mission did the asteroid come into focus. The impact created a stunning plume of ejecta, and the dramatic motion of the asteroid came in part from the way it recoiled as boulders and fine particles spewed into space.

The mission was already in the books as an engineering triumph simply by virtue of a successful collision — indeed a bull's eye — dramatically captured by the spacecraft’s camera in the final moments before impact.

The laws of physics dictated that there had to be some effect. And images captured by a trailing cubesat, provided by the Italian Space Agency and deployed by DART 15 days before impact, showed material hurtling into space. Subsequent observations from telescopes on Earth as well as the Hubble and Webb space telescopes revealed a long trail of debris, creating a comet-like effect.

NASA spacecraft will slam into an asteroid Monday — if all goes right

Not until Tuesday, after much analysis, did NASA reveal the precise change in Dimorphos’s orbit. The analysis is continuing, and one question is whether the rock has gone wobbly.

“We should not be too eager to say one test on one asteroid tells us how every other asteroid would behave,” NASA program scientist Thomas Statler cautioned.

Even so, the bottom line is that the DART mission worked just like scientists and engineers had hoped.

“Let’s all just kind of take a moment to soak this in,” Glaze said. “For the first time ever, humanity has changed the orbit of a planetary body.”

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 10:19:02 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/nasa-reports-smashing-success-with-asteroid-redirection-test/ar-AA12QTKP Killexams : Save-the-world test: NASA asteroid strike succeeds in shifting its orbit

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A spacecraft that plowed into a small, harmless asteroid millions of miles away succeeded in shifting its orbit, NASA said Tuesday in announcing the results of its save-the-world test.

The space agency attempted the test two weeks ago to see if in the future a killer rock could be nudged out of Earth’s way.

Advertisement

“This mission shows that NASA is trying to be ready for whatever the universe throws at us,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said during a briefing at the space agency’s headquarters in Washington.

The Dart spacecraft carved a crater into the asteroid Dimorphos on Sept. 26, hurling debris out into space and creating a cometlike trail of dust and rubble stretching several thousand miles (kilometers). It took consecutive nights of telescope observations from Chile and South Africa to determine how much the impact altered the path of the 525-foot asteroid around its companion, a much bigger space rock.

Advertisement

Before the impact, the moonlet took 11 hours and 55 minutes to circle its parent asteroid. Scientists had anticipated shaving off 10 minutes, but Nelson said the impact shortened the asteroid’s orbit by 32 minutes.

“Let’s all just kind of take a moment to soak this in ... for the first time ever, humanity has changed the orbit” of a celestial body, noted Lori Glaze, NASA’s director of planetary science.

Apollo astronaut Rusty Schweickart, a co-founder of the nonprofit B612 Foundation, dedicated to protecting Earth from asteroid strikes, said he’s “clearly delighted, no question about that” by the results and the attention the mission has brought to asteroid deflection.

The team’s scientists said the amount of debris apparently played a role in the outcome. The impact may also have left Dimorphos wobbling a bit, said NASA program scientist Tom Statler. That may affect the orbit, but it will never go back to its original location, he noted.

The two bodies originally were already less than a mile apart. Now they’re tens of yards closer.

Neither asteroid posed a threat to Earth — and still don’t as they continue their journey around the sun. That’s why scientists picked the pair for this all-important dress rehearsal.

In this image made from a NASA livestream and taken from the Double Asteroid Redirection Test spacecraft, asteroid Dimorphos is seen as the spacecraft flies toward it, Monday, Sept. 26, 2022.

Planetary defense experts prefer nudging a threatening asteroid or comet out of the way, given years or even decades of lead time, rather than blowing it up and creating multiple pieces that could rain down on Earth.

“We really need to also have that warning time for a technique like this to be effective,” said mission leader Nancy Chabot of Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory, which built the spacecraft and managed the $325 million mission.

Advertisement

“You’ve got to know they’re coming,” added Glaze.

As it happens

Get updates on developing stories as they happen with our free breaking news email alerts.

Launched last year, the vending machine-size Dart — short for Double Asteroid Redirection Test — was destroyed when it slammed into the asteroid 7 million miles away at 14,000 mph.

“This is huge feat, not only in achieving the first step in possibly being able to protect ourselves from future asteroid impacts,” but also for the amount of images and data collected internationally, Daniel Brown, an astronomer at Nottingham Trent University in England, said via email.

Brown also said that it’s “particularly exciting” that the debris tail can be seen by amateur skygazers with medium-size telescopes.

Team scientists cautioned more work is needed to not only identify more of the countless space rocks out there, but to ascertain their makeup — some are solid, while others are rubble piles. Scouting missions might be needed, for instance, before launching impactors to deflect the orbits.

“We should not be too eager to say one test on one asteroid tells us exactly how every other asteroid would behave in a similar situation,” Statler said.

Advertisement

Nonetheless, he and others are rejoicing over this first effort.

“We’ve been imagining this for years and to have it finally be real is really quite a thrill,” he said.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 08:51:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/nationworld/ct-aud-nw-asteroid-strike-20221011-rei3upl6w5a4fgjgdvl7z6i3ri-story.html
Killexams : Sun Pharma Gets CDSCO Panel Nod To Study Elagolix tablet

However, this approval is subjected to a condition that the firm should include both a T-score and a Z-score for monitoring bone marrow density (BMD).

This came after the firm presented the revised Phase III clinical trial protocol of Elagolix (150 and 200 mg) before the committee, in light of an earlier SEC recommendation dated July 28, 2012.

Elagolix is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonist used to treat moderate to severe pain in endometriosis.

Endometriosis develops when tissue that is similar to the kind that is normally located in the uterus starts to grow outside of the uterus. Such growth leads to various symptoms like pain during periods, pelvic pain between periods, and pain during sexual intercourse. The growths themselves are referred to as lesions and frequently develop on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and other areas around the uterus, including the bowels or bladder. The growth of these lesions is dependent on the estrogen hormone.

Elagolix is an orally administered nonpeptide small molecule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist that inhibits endogenous GnRH signalling by binding competitively to GnRH receptors in the pituitary gland. Administration of elagolix results in dose-dependent suppression of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), leading to decreased blood concentrations of the ovarian sex hormones, estradiol and progesteron.

Earlier, the Medical Dialogues Team had reported that, in response to pharma major Sun Pharma's proposal to manufacture and market the drug Elagolix in 150 mg and 200 mg tablets by conducting a Phase-III clinical trial in the country, the Central Drug Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) panel had recommended to conduct a Phase III clinical trial of Elagolix 150 mg tablets for test arm 1 by monitoring bone marrow density for six months and with the follow-up of serum oestrogen levels of the subjects.

Furthermore, regarding the Phase III study of Elagolix 200mg Tablets with Test Arm 2, the committee raised safety concerns with subjects at higher doses and did not consider the request to conduct a Phase III study with Test Arm 2 (Elagolix 200mg Tablets).

In light of this, during the earlier SEC meeting for Reproductive and Urology, the committee recommended that the company submit the revised protocol for additional review.

Now, in continuation, at the exact SEC meeting for Reproductive and Urology held on September 28th, 2022, the expert panel extensively reviewed the revised Phase III clinical trial protocol of Elagolix Tablets 150 mg and 200 mg presented by drug major Sun Pharma.

After detailed deliberation, the committee recommended the grant of permission to conduct the study as per the presented protocol, subject to the condition that the firm should include both T-score and Z-score for monitoring of bone marrow density (BMD).

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 00:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicaldialogues.in/news/industry/pharma/sun-pharma-gets-cdsco-panel-nod-to-study-elagolix-tablet-100685
Killexams : Here's how to make sense of confusing COVID-19 rapid test results, according to 3 testing experts

As fall temperatures set in, cold and flu season gets into full swing and holiday travel picks up, people will undoubtedly have questions about COVID-19 testing. Is this the year people can finally return to large gatherings for traditional celebrations? What role does testing play when deciding whether to go out or stay home?

Adding to the confusion are personal accounts of people who are experiencing confusing or seemingly contradictory test results.

People are also reading…

Our insights from both the cutting edge of rapid testing research as well as our clinical perspectives from working directly with patients can help people figure out how to make the best use of rapid tests.

Technique matters when it comes to getting a sufficient amount of virus for a rapid test. Images By Tang Ming Tung/Digital Vision via Getty Images

Multiple negative tests, then a positive - why?

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, takes time to build up in the body, like many other viruses and bacteria that cause respiratory illness. Typically it takes two to three days to test positive after exposure. Our research group has demonstrated this, as have others.

Rapid tests detect parts of the virus that are present in the trial collected from your nose or mouth. If the virus has not replicated to a high enough level in that part of your body, a test will be negative. Only when the amount of virus is high enough will a person’s test become positive. For most omicron variants in circulation today, this is one to three days, depending on the initial amount of virus you get exposed to.

A newscaster rapid tests for COVID-19 on live TV.

Why do some people test positive for extended periods of time?

It’s important to clarify which type of test we’re talking about in this situation. Studies have shown that some people can test positive for a month or more with a PCR test. The reason for this is twofold: PCR tests are capable of detecting extremely small amounts of genetic material, and fragments of the virus can remain in the respiratory system for a long time before being cleared.

When it comes to rapid tests, there are reports that some people test positive for an extended period of time with the current strains of the omicron variant compared with earlier variants. Several studies show that most people no longer test positive after five to seven days from their first positive test, but between 10% to 20% of people continue to test positive for 10 to 14 days.

But why it takes longer for some people to clear the virus than others is still unknown. Possible explanations include a person’s vaccination status or the ability of one’s immune system to clear the virus.

In addition, a small number of people who have been treated with the oral antiviral drug Paxlovid have tested negative on rapid antigen tests, with no symptoms, only to “rebound” seven to 14 days after their initial positive test. In these cases, people sometimes experience recurring or even occasionally worse symptoms than they had before, along with positive rapid test results. People who experience this should isolate again, as it has been shown that people with rebound cases can transmit the virus to others.

Why do I have COVID-19 symptoms but still test negative?

There are several possible explanations for why you might get negative rapid tests even when you have COVID-like symptoms. The most likely is that you have an infection of something other than SARS-CoV-2.

Many different viruses and bacteria can make us sick. Since mask mandates have been lifted in most settings, many viruses that didn’t circulate widely during the pandemic, like influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, are becoming common once again and making people sick.

Second, a mild COVID-19 infection in a person that’s been vaccinated and boosted may result in a viral level that’s high enough to cause symptoms but too low to result in a positive rapid test.

Finally, the use of poor technique when sampling your nose or mouth may result in too little virus to yield a positive test. Many tests with nasal swabbing require you to swab for at least 15 seconds in each nostril. A failure to swab according to package instructions could result in a negative test.

Our previous studies show that if you are symptomatic and do two rapid antigen tests 48 hours apart rather than just one, you are more highly likely to test positive if you are infected with SARS-CoV-2.

Self-swabbing: It sounds kind of cringy, but it’s really not so bad.

Do rapid tests work against the current strains of SARS-CoV-2?

Multiple studies have examined the performance of rapid tests against the omicron variant.

Fortunately, these studies show that all the rapid tests that have been authorized for emergency use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration detect the current omicron variants just as well as previous variants such as alpha and delta. If a symptomatic person tests positive on a rapid test, they likely have COVID-19. If you are exposed to someone who has COVID-19, or have symptoms but receive a negative test, you should take another test in 48 hours. If you then test positive or if your symptoms get worse, contact your health care provider.

What’s the best way to use and interpret rapid tests before gatherings?

Testing remains an important tool to identify infected people and limit the spread of the virus. It’s still a good idea to take a rapid test before visiting people, especially older people and those with weakened immune systems.

If you believe you may be infected, the FDA recently updated their testing guidance largely based on data our lab collected. The testing regimen most likely to identify if you’re infected is to take two tests 48 hours apart if you have symptoms. If you don’t have symptoms, take three tests, one every 48 hours.

Does a positive test mean you can spread COVID to others?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that if you test positive for COVID-19, you should stay home for at least five days from the date of your positive test and isolate from others. People are likely to be most infectious during these first five days. After you end isolation and feel better, consider taking a rapid test again.

If you have two negative tests 48 hours apart, you are most likely no longer infectious. If your rapid tests are positive, you may still be infectious, even if you are past day 10 after your positive test. If possible, you should wear a mask. Multiple studies have shown a correlation between the time an individual tests positive on a rapid test and when live virus can be collected from a person, which is a common way to determine if someone is infectious.

Testing is still an important tool to keep people safe from COVID-19 and to avoid spreading it to others. Knowing your status and deciding to test is a decision that individuals make based on their own tolerance for risk around contracting COVID-19.

People who are older or at higher risk of severe disease may want to test frequently after an exposure or if they have symptoms. Some people may also be thinking about having COVID-19 and transmitting it to others who may be at higher risk for hospitalization. When combined with other measures such as vaccination and staying home when you’re sick, testing can reduce the impact of COVID-19 on all of our lives in the coming months.

Nathaniel Hafer receives funding from NIH grants UL1TR001453 and U54HL143541.

Apurv Soni receives funding from NIH grants UL1TR001453 and U54HL143541.

Yukari Manabe receives funding from the NIH. She has received research grant support to Johns Hopkins University from Hologic, Cepheid, Roche, ChemBio, Becton Dickinson, miDiagnostics, and has provided consultative support to Abbott.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 02:32:00 -0500 en text/html https://azdailysun.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/heres-how-to-make-sense-of-confusing-covid-19-rapid-test-results-according-to-3/article_b0cb279e-b80d-5700-b962-8b59c633c5bf.html Killexams : Test your knowledge of the world known to Columbus No result found, try new keyword!Here’s a quiz to test your knowledge. 1. The New World got the name “America” from …? A. The Latin word for “Amazing Land” B. A tribute to Queen Amelia of the Netherlands C. Sun, 09 Oct 2022 20:08:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://lasvegassun.com/news/2022/oct/10/test-your-knowledge-of-the-world-known-to-columbus/ Killexams : My administration’ll prioritise security, infrastructure, power –Oyebanji

From Priscilla Ediare, Ado-Ekiti

As the Ekiti State Governor-elect, Biodun Oyebanji, takes over the mantle of leadership from Governor Kayode Fayemi, he has revealed the key areas his administration will pay attention to.

Identifying security, infrastructure development and providing solution to the perennial epileptic power supply as areas of concentration, the incoming governor said focusing on the three particular areas would help to increase investment drives that would create wealth, and ignite human capital development, through job provision and revenue earnings.

Oyebanji said his administration will recruit “competent, committed, courageous, transparent, and God-fearing people” to make him successful as governor.

The governor-elect, who spoke in Ado Ekiti, yesterday, during an interactive session with newsmen announcing his swearing in, coming up October 16, acknowledged that though Ekiti is confronted with paucity of funds, still he doesn’t see the situation as affecting good leadership as his government is ready to sustain the strong partnerships the state has built with local and international development partners.

Oyebanji added that he has a template and roadmap he would deploy to increase the internally generated revenue (IGR) through effective and affordable tax regime that won’t put pressure or burden on the citizens.

He said he will always rub minds with all the strata of Ekiti to usher in development.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 13:28:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.sunnewsonline.com/my-administrationll-prioritise-security-infrastructure-power-oyebanji/
Killexams : University Continues COVID-19 Self-Test Policy as Fall Break Ends

Cornell has decided to continue its COVID-19 testing policies from the beginning of fall semester as fall break comes to a close, asking students to self-test with antigen test kits before returning to classes on Wednesday, according to an email sent to students. 

The University’s response to COVID-19 has changed from previous years during the fall 2022 semester, doing away with mandatory PCR surveillance testing and masking and replacing those rules with optional but encouraged antigen tests, which are available at sites across the Ithaca campus. 

As students return from fall break, many of them returning from travel outside Ithaca, the University is asking students to take a few precautions. In an email from the Cornell Campus Public Health Support Team, students were asked to test before leaving for Ithaca and again before beginning campus activities — ideally upon return to Ithaca and then again 3-5 days after arrival — and to report any positive test results through the Daily Check website.