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Killexams : SUN Certified study tips - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-152 Search results Killexams : SUN Certified study tips - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-152 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : Health & Wellness: Why get some sun? And, how much is too much?

BATON ROUGE, La. (BRPROUD) – After weeks of battling Louisiana’s summertime temperatures, the sun may seem more foe than friend. 

But some medical experts are in agreement with an ancient Hebrew proverb that states, “It is good for the eyes to see the sun.” 

According to WebMD, small amounts of sun can be good for the body. 

The surprising benefits of sunlight

Exposure to a balanced amount of sunlight can provide the following benefits:

Increase your Vitamin D Levels

The sun’s UV rays trigger the body’s ability to make Vitamin D, which is a critical component in ensuring the health of bones, blood cells, and the immune system. The important vitamin also helps with the intake and utilization of calcium and phosphorus.

Help you sleep better at night

Interestingly, some experts believe that being in the sun for a balanced amount of time during the morning can help a person sleep better at night. WebMD explains, “Your eyes need light to help set your body’s internal clock. Early morning sunlight in particular seems to help people get to sleep at night. This may be more important as you age because your eyes are less able to take in light, and you’re more likely to have problems going to sleep.”

Assist in shedding extra weight

Some scientists believe morning sunlight can help with weight control. According to a National Public Radio article, researchers at Northwestern University had 54 adults wear wrist monitors that tracked their exposure to light and sleep patterns for one week. Kathryn Reid, the research associate professor who led the study said, “We found that the earlier this light exposure occurred during the day, the lower individuals’ body mass index.”

In other words, exposure to light seems to play a role in regulating metabolism, and those who want to harness this effect of sunlight should seek morning light between 8 a.m. and noon, for about 20 to 30 minutes.

Keep you calm and positive

Leaving the house to get some fresh air and sunlight can have a great impact on our mood and overall health. 

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, “Studies also show that being outside in nature is relaxing, reducing our stress, cortisol levels, muscle tension and heart rates – all of which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease.”

Sunlight in particular can increase the brain’s release of a chemical called serotonin, which gives us more energy and helps to keep us calm, positive, and focused. WebMD says, “Doctors sometimes treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and other types of depression linked to low levels of serotonin with natural or artificial light. “

How much is too much sunlight?

While a number of health experts agree that exposure to sunlight can have positive effects on the body, how much is too much sun? 

Since everyone’s skin and health backgrounds are different, it’s best to consult with a personal doctor who knows your case history.

Healthline advises, “Some dermatologists believe that, as long as you don’t have complications with usual sun exposure, you can sunbathe without sunscreen up to 20 minutes each day. To reduce the risk of sunburn, it may be best to stick to 5 to 10 minutes.”

In addition to this, one research study recorded in the National Library of Medicine revealed that even though it’s difficult to know how strong UV light is due to the fact that we can’t see or feel it, we do know that, “the higher in the sky the sun is, the stronger the UVB radiation on Earth. This is both true in terms of the sun’s position over the course of the day – it’s highest at midday – and in terms of geographical location.”

The importance of taking precautions

The study added, “Intensive and frequent sunbathing can be too much for your skin to handle… the skin of people who are sensitive to light can’t protect itself from UV radiation for long. In very fair-skinned people, UV radiation starts becoming harmful after about 5 to 10 minutes.”

Additionally, individuals with certain autoimmune conditions like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis may find that their symptoms worsen in exposure to direct sunlight. 

This is why it’s often a good idea to consult with a personal physician before taking steps to add increased sun exposure to one’s daily activities.  

In any case, whether a person’s condition allows for getting outdoors and sitting in the shade, or enjoying a little bit of sun, either activity can provide a multitude of benefits.

Mon, 18 Jul 2022 08:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.brproud.com/news/health-wellness-why-get-some-sun-and-how-much-is-too-much/
Killexams : Dermatologists Decode What Everything Means on a Sunscreen Bottle
We all know how important sunscreen is. It's our best line of defense against sun damage, which can lead to everything from premature signs of aging to skin cancer. But, take a quick glance at the bottle and you're gonna see things you may not fully understand like "broad-spectrum" and PA+++. But, understanding these labels can help you pick the best level of protection for you. To clear up any confusion, we've tapped a few derms to decode the most common phrases on sunscreen bottles.

“You just want to pick up the bottle and go, but there are so many things to think about,” says Debra Jailman, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City. Here’s where to start.

UVA

Sunscreen protects us from two types of ultraviolet rays: ultravioletA (UVA) and ultavioletB (UVB). "UVA rays are the rays that penetrate deeper," says Dr. Jailman. "They're the rays that cause changes in pigment, but also the rays that cause skin cancer and cause premature aging."

UVB

"For several decades, what was largely recognized as the source of sun damage were UVB rays," says Ranella Hirsch, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Cambridge, Massachusetts. "They are the principal reason we turn red and burn, though a touch of UVA causes this too."

Broad-spectrum

"As science and the dermatologic community started to better understand the importance of UVA rays to sun damage, sunscreens were developed to include UVA protection, and the term broad-spectrum is what manufacturers used to indicate that,” Dr. Hirsch says. “At that point though, we had not yet introduced a standardized form of testing for that protection. So in 2011, the Food and Drug Administration, the regulatory body in the United States that oversees sunscreen regulations, introduced certain standards for what qualified for UVA protection ample to meet the broad-spectrum label."

So if you have a sunscreen that doesn't say broad-spectrum, you're only getting UVB protection. You'll be protected from burns but not long-term damage that can cause skin cancer and accelerate signs of aging.

SPF

This is the label we're all most familiar with. "SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor," says Lindsey Zubritsky, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Pennsylvania. "It’s a measurement of how well the sunscreen protects our skin from burning with exposure to UVB rays, as well as a measurement of how long protected skin takes to burn compared to unprotected skin."

Dermatologists recommend that you use sunscreen with a minimum of SPF 30. "SPF 30 offers sunscreen protection from 97 percent pf UVB light, an SPF 50 offers sunscreen protection of 98 percent, and an SPF 100 protects 99 percent," says Dr. Jailman. "There's a slight difference when you go from a 50 to 100. It isn't as much as you would think."

For many, wearing more than SPF over 30 isn't really necessary. Some exceptions? "Let's say you're somebody who's a redhead and you have very pale skin or you're taking medication that makes you sun sensitive, like doxycycline for Lyme disease, then maybe you'd want to go for an SPF 50," says Dr. Jailman. "It also may depend on where you live and what you do. If you live near the equator, or if you're somebody who's out teaching tennis and you have so much sun exposure in the midday sun, then you may want to choose a higher SPF because you have so much sun exposure."

A higher SPF is also helpful if you're not great at applying enough sunscreen, which is two fingers worth for the face and a shot glass for the body. That's because if you don't put on enough sunscreen, you're actually not getting the SPF on the label. So if you apply half the amount of required sunscreen using an SPF 100, you're getting half the amount of protection.

PA++++

The PA system stands for the Protection Grade of UVA. So it's like SPF but for UVA rays. It was developed in Japan in 1996, and has since been adopted by other countries. It's based on PPD, persistent pigment darkening. "PPD measures the multiple increases of UVA a person can be exposed to without experiencing skin darkening," says Dr. Hirsh.

"It's a good thing because otherwise you really don't know how much UVA protection you have," says Dr. Jailman. The plus signs next to PA denote how much UVA protection the sunscreen provides. " PA+ offers some UVA protection. PA++ offers moderate UVA protection. PA+++ offers high UVA protection. And PA++++ is extremely high UVA protection."

Chemical

Common chemical blockers include avobenzone, homosalate, octinoxate, and oxybenzone. "Chemical sunscreens get absorbed into your skin, and then it absorbs the ultraviolet rays and converts those rays to heat and inactivates them," says Dr. Jailman. Chemical sunscreens are a bit controversial. FDA research from 2020 shows that when the correct amount of chemical sunscreen is applied to the skin, it gets absorbed by the bloodstream. From there, it can remain in the body for an extended period of time. The agency is doing more research to determine if lingering sunscreen chemicals have any impact on health. But for now,  chemical blockers remain FDA-approved and are also recommended by the American Academy of Dermatologists (AAD). "Claims that sunscreen ingredients are toxic or a hazard to human health have not been proven," reads the AAD website.

Although Dr. Jailman prefers mineral sunscreens over chemical, she says chemical sunscreens are very good at providing sun protection. "The chemicals, I have to say, they work really well," she says. "If you have avobenzone, any of those, it's going to protect your skin. There's no question. That's why they use them because they do protect your skin very well." And while researchers explore the safety of chemical sunscreens there's one thing we know for sure: Sun damage can lead to skin cancer, and chemical sunscreens are great at protecting against that.

"Chemical sunscreens are also typically easier to rub in and have less chance of leaving a white cast compared to mineral sunscreens," adds Dr. Zubritsky.

Mineral

Mineral sunscreens use two physical blockers: titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. While there are 16-FDA-approved sunscreens (both mineral and chemical sunscreens) these two mineral blockers are the only ones that are well-researched enough to have GRASE (generally recognized as safe and effective) status. Dr. Zubritsky notes that "those with sensitive skin can occasionally develop allergies to chemical sunscreens, so mineral ones are best for that skin type."

It's generally accepted that what sets mineral sunscreens apart from chemical is that they reflect sunlight instead of absorbing it. However, a 2015 study shows that physical blockers also work by absorbing UV rays. "In fact, they both [chemical and mineral sunscreens] largely function by absorbing the UV and converting it into heat, though with mineral, there is a small percent (around 5 to 10 percent) that is reflected," says Dr. Hirsch.

While physical sunscreens mostly absorb UV rays, Shirley Chi, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Southern California, notes that they reflect a good amount of visible light. Visible light is quite literally the light you can see. (UV rays are invisible to the human eye.) "Modern-day, nanoparticle-sized mineral ingredients reflect up to 50 percent of visible light, which we now know is very important in preventing pigment conditions like melasma," says Dr. Chi. "That's why I still love mineral sunscreens so much, even with more and more great chemical sunscreen options."

Mineral sunscreens have historically left behind a chalky white or purple cast on the skin, especially on skin of color. However, "they now have nice ones that blend right into the skin and they look cosmetically elegant," says Dr. Jailman.

Water-resistant

If you're going to be spending time in the water, you need water-resistant sunscreen. Just know that you need to check the label to see how often you need to reapply if in water. "Some sunscreens are water-resistant for 40 minutes," says Dr. Jailman, "and some sunscreens are water-resistant for 80 minutes."

How to apply sunscreen, the right way:


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Fri, 24 Jun 2022 08:43:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wellandgood.com/how-to-read-sunscreen-bottle/
Killexams : Running in the heat – how to stay safe when running in the sun

Photo credit: Track Mafia

'I love running during a heatwave,' says Apple Fitness+ trainer and founder of Track Mafia Cory Wharton-Malcolm. 'It gives me the chance to train my body in coping with different temperatures.'

While it's true hot temperatures can affect your performance, this doesn't mean you should avoid running completely, or head for the safety of the air conditioned gym. Instead, you should be prepared and adjust your goals.

‘Running in extreme heat isn't for everyone though which is why, even though I recommend it, it comes with a warning. Every year there’s a heatwave of some kind and every year I have seen people get caught out by the heat, either due to over hydrating, not drinking enough or simply not adjusting their goals accordingly. At some of these races, I have stopped with friends to await emergency services as people have collapsed; I have stopped to help people stretch as they are cramping up or they are dehydrated so we supply them water. A lot of the times it comes from either not training in those weather conditions or not listening to your body. I know from experience that it's not fun when you get it wrong as dehydration and cramp have caught me out many times.’

Here, we've put together some tips for running safely in the heat:

1. Drink to thirst

In a 2016 study, athletes completed a 20km trail run, either drinking a set amount to replace their expected sweat loss or simply drinking to thirst – their finish times were identical. However, as a ballpark, recommendations on how much water we should consume per hour when running vary from 300-800ml.

It is also important to drink before and after running. Research suggests about 530ml of water before and after a workout of any sort will support recovery and help prevent dehydration post-exercise.

2. Don't forget salt

Running on a hot day means more sweating, and this sodium needs to be replaced. Nutritionist Renee McGregor estimates that at a temperature of 20C, the average runner loses about 1,230mg of sodium per hour, which can lead to gastrointestinal distress, dizziness and heat stress. Top up your sodium stores with salt tabs, sports drinks and real food.

3. Adjust your goals

A study into the effects of heat on marathon running, published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, found that sub-elites tended to run 20 minutes slower in temperatures between 21C and 26C.

Don't chase the same split times as you would normally hit on a day when the weather is cooler. Monitoring your average heart rate can be helpful in gauging your effort levels comparative to runs in cooler temperatures, so try training by heart rate instead of by pace. As you adjust to running in the heat, you'll be able to go faster at the same number of beats per minute.

4. Add sunscreen

Some runners claim that sunscreen clogs up sweat pores and makes you overheat, but a study commissioned by the US military found that using sunscreen did not adversely affect heat-regulation variables such as skin temperature. That said, not all sunscreen is created equal. Go for at least factor 30 and apply liberally (most of us use about half the required amount). Make sure it's broad spectrum, offering protection from UVA and UVB rays. We've summed up the best sunscreens for runners here.

5. Head to the trail

Roads retain heat and radiate it back onto your body, making your run harder, so head to the grass and shade of some nearby trails. Carry water and a mobile phone with you.

6. Mix things up

'Use the nice weather as an opportunity to try other sports along with running, maybe a duathlon or triathlon. Run to a pool or reservoir or run out and bike back,' Cory advises.

7. Dress for the heat

'Wear loose, breathable clothing, a cap to protect you from the sun or sweat bands to stop the sweat from dripping in your eyes,' Cory says. Opt for a lightweight vest to keep you cool – and a pair of sunglasses, to keep the glaring sun out of your eyes.

8. Instead of avoiding running in the heat, adapt to it

A study in the European Journal of Sport Science found that even two, two-hour runs in hot temperatures stimulated marked improvements, such as decreases in core temperature and an increase in blood plasma, which helps maintain optimum temperature.

Cory says, 'I like to wait until the hottest part of the day at 12 and run along the canal or through the woods away from built-up polluted areas. I try and be a smart runner and just slow down and enjoy the heat... I feel like that’s one thing that helped me when I ran the Speed Project with friends through death valley in California... the fact that I'd always tried to run when it was hot in London and not waited for it to be cool.’

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Mon, 11 Jul 2022 02:17:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.style.yahoo.com/running-heat-stay-safe-running-141700486.html
Killexams : Migraine sufferers have treatment options beyond just pain medication

For some, too much medication might make migraine worse. peterschreiber.media/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Migraine headaches currently affect more than one billion people across the globe and are the second-leading cause of disability worldwide. Nearly one-quarter of U.S. households have at least one member who suffers from migraines. An estimated 85.6 million workdays are lost as a result of migraine headaches each year.

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Yet many who suffer with migraine dismiss their pain as simply a bad headache. Rather than seeking medical care, the condition often goes undiagnosed, even when other incapacitating symptoms occur alongside the pain, including light and sound sensitivity, nausea, vomiting and dizziness.

Researchers have discovered that genetics and environmental factors play a role in the condition of migraine. They happen when changes in your brainstem activate the trigeminal nerve, which is a major nerve in the pain pathway. This cues your body to release inflammatory substances such as CGRP, short for calcitonin gene-related peptide. This molecule, and others, can cause blood vessels to swell, producing pain and inflammation.

For some, medication has its limits

A migraine can be debilitating. Those who are experiencing one are often curled up in a dark room accompanied by only their pain. Attacks can last for days; life is put on hold. The sensitivity to light and sound, coupled with the unpredictability of the disease, causes many to forego work, school, social gatherings and time with family.

Numerous prescription medications are available for both the prevention and treatment of migraine. But for many people, conventional treatment has its limitations. Some people with migraine have a poor tolerance for certain medications. Many can’t afford the high cost of the medicines or endure the side effects. Others are pregnant or breastfeeding and can’t take the medications.

However, as a board-certified neurologist who specializes in headache medicine, I’m always amazed at how open-minded and enthusiastic patients become when I discuss alternative options.

Your brain sends you warning signals, such as fatigue and mood changes, to let you know a migraine may be on the way.

These approaches, collectively, are called complementary and alternative medicine. It might be surprising that a traditionally trained Western doctor like me would recommend things like yoga, acupuncture or meditation for people with migraine. Yet in my practice, I value these nontraditional treatments.

Research shows that alternative therapies are associated with improved sleep, feeling better emotionally and an enhanced sense of control. Some patients can avoid prescription medications altogether with one or more complementary treatments. For others, the nontraditional treatments can be used along with prescription medication.

These options can be used one at a time or in combination, depending on how severe the headache and the cause behind it. If neck tension is a contributor to the pain, then physical therapy or massage may be most beneficial. If stress is a trigger, perhaps meditation would be an appropriate place to start. It is worth talking to your provider to explore which options may work best for you.

Mindfulness, meditation and more

Because stress is a major trigger for migraines, one of the most effective alternative therapies is mindfulness meditation, which is the act of focusing your attention on the present moment in a nonjudgmental mindset. Studies show that mindfulness meditation can reduce headache frequency and pain severity.

Another useful tool is biofeedback, which enables a person to see their vital signs in real time and then learn how to stabilize them.

For example, if you are stressed, you may notice muscle tightness, perspiration and a fast heart rate. With biofeedback, these changes appear on a monitor, and a therapist teaches you exercises to help manage them. There is strong evidence that biofeedback can lessen the frequency and severity of migraine headaches and reduce headache-related disability.

Yoga derives from traditional Indian philosophy and combines physical postures, meditation and breathing exercises with a goal of uniting the mind, body and spirit. Practicing yoga consistently can be helpful in reducing stress and treating migraine.

Meditation is an alternative therapy that could help with your migraine.

Manipulation-based therapy

Physical therapy uses manual techniques such as myofascial and trigger-point release, passive stretching and cervical traction, which is a light pulling on the head by a skilled hand or with a medical device. Studies show that physical therapy with medication was superior in reducing migraine frequency, pain intensity and pain perception over medications alone.

By lowering stress levels and promoting relaxation, massage can decrease migraine frequency and improve sleep. It may also reduce stress in the days following the massage, which adds further protection from migraine attacks.

Some patients are helped by acupuncture, a form of traditional Chinese medicine. In this practice, fine needles are placed in specific locations on the skin to promote healing. A large 2016 meta-analysis paper found acupuncture reduced the duration and frequency of migraines regardless of how often they occur. Acupuncture benefits are sustained after 20 weeks of treatment.

What’s also fascinating is that acupuncture can change the metabolic activity in the thalamus, the region of the brain critical to pain perception. This change correlated with a decrease in the headache intensity score following acupuncture treatment.

Vitamins, supplements and nutraceuticals

Herbal supplements and nutraceuticals, which are food-derived products that may have therapeutic benefit, can also be used to prevent migraine. And there is evidence to suggest vitamins work reasonably well compared to traditional prescription medication. They also have fewer side effects. Here are some examples:

Devices can be beneficial

The Food and Drug Administration has approved several neurostimulation devices for migraine treatment. These devices work by neutralizing the pain signals sent from the brain.

One is the Nerivio device, which is worn on the upper arm and sends signals to the brainstem pain center during an attack. Two-thirds of people report pain relief after two hours, and side effects are rare.

Another device that shows promise is the Cefaly. It delivers a mild electrical current to the trigeminal nerve on the forehead, which can lessen the frequency and intensity of migraine attacks. After one hour of treatment, patients experienced a nearly 60% reduction in pain intensity, and the relief lasted up to 24 hours. Side effects are uncommon and include sleepiness or skin irritation.

These alternative therapies help treat the person as a whole. In just my practice, many success stories come to mind: the college student who once had chronic migraine but now has rare occurrences after a regimen of vitamins; the pregnant woman who avoided medication through acupuncture and physical therapy; or the patient, already on numerous prescription medications, who uses a neurostimulation device for migraine instead of adding another prescription.

Granted, alternative approaches are not necessarily miracle therapies, but their potential to relieve pain and suffering is notable. As a physician, it is truly gratifying to see some of my patients respond to these treatments.

Danielle Wilhour does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.

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Sat, 16 Jul 2022 11:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://azdailysun.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/migraine-sufferers-have-treatment-options-beyond-just-pain-medication/article_e86cce54-a0ab-51d2-8f9b-b6349f22b6bb.html
Killexams : I’m a dog expert – here are signs your dog is smart & pays attention to you

PET experts have revealed the tell-tale signs that your dog is smart and pays attention to you.

Researchers at the Institutional Committee of Eötvös Loránd University believe there is a connection between a pooch’s head movement and its ability to understand.

Dogs tilt their head when they're listening to their owners, a new study claims

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Dogs tilt their head when they're listening to their owners, a new study claimsCredit: Getty

According to lead author Andrea Sommese, a dog‘s head tilt shows an increase in attention to what their owner is saying.

During a study, Mr Sommese and a team of five others analysed the movements of 40 dogs during object-label knowledge tests as the canines received instructions to fetch a toy.

The team incorporated six "gifted word learners" (GWL) among the batch of trialists to see whether they would show "more significant head tilts" when responding to their owner's commands.

According to Sommese, the study found that upon hearing the owners’ request for a familiar toy, the GWL dogs tilted their heads significantly more than typical dogs.

Noting that all dogs had undergone three months of training for the tests, he said: “We suggest that the difference in the dogs’ behaviour might be related to hearing meaningful words (for the GWL dogs) and could be a sign of increased attention.

"Possibly, head-tilts could also be related to making a cross-modal match in the dogs’ memory (e.g. name to a visual image) upon hearing the toy’s name."

The expert believes the head tilt movement can help owners identify their dog’s level of intuition.

He believes it can be utilised when training them as it shows that their dog is able to understand instructions and retain information.

Mr Sommese added: "Our results indicate that only dogs that had learned the name of the objects tilted their heads frequently.

"Besides, the side of the tilt was stable across several months and tests. Thus, we suggest a relationship between head-tilting and processing relevant, meaningful stimuli."

In other pet news, a dog expert has given their top tips for owners trying to keep their pets cool during the heatwave.

Plus,  the tell-tale signals to look out for when it comes to understanding how your pet is feeling have been revealed.

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 06:09:00 -0500 Jacob Bentley-York en-gb text/html https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/fabulous/9166279/dog-expert-signs-dog-smart-pays-attention/
Killexams : Best exercises to do in the heat to 'burn more calories' - 'can be beneficial'

Many like to take to the outdoors when the sun is shining but it's not always enjoyable to run in when it's scorchingly hot. Even in a gym, the air-con system might not be able to keep a person as cool as they might like.

Instead, a personal trainer has provided advice and suggested some alternatives for working out in the heat.

She noted that for some activities, the heat can be advantageous.

Activities such as hot yoga can be useful for boosting weight loss and improving overall fitness.

And according to a 2014 study, just one session of yoga in the heat is enough to get the heart pumping at the same rate as a brisk walk.

The extra heat element for both yoga and pilates has been found to also challenge people's focus and mental strength.

"This can be beneficial as it helps to elevate your heart rate," Lesley explained.

READ MORE: Diet: Expert warns against common mistake

She also pointed out that people should focus on the number of days they workout rather than the time it takes them to complete a session.

"If you usually workout an hour, cutting it down to 30 minutes will still have positive benefits," Lesley said.

"Rather than focusing on the time you spend in the gym or how long you run for, remember what matters the most is the number of days you exercise.

"And for those of you who have time, you can also split your sessions to twice a day in order to allow the body to rest," she added.

READ MORE: Michael Mosley weight loss: Remove three foods to stay slim

While people push themselves to the limit to try and beat their personal bests and get the very most out of their workout, in the heat this can be dangerous.

Lesley warned people to be wary of exercise-related heat exhaustion, caused by the body's temperature rising above normal.

This can happen both outside and in the gym.

To avoid this, she suggested when training outside to avoid the hottest parts of the day, as studies have proven that in some cases people "won't work as hard" in hot weather because their bodies are already working overtime to keep cool.

Exercising in the early hours of the day has many other advantages as it can also help boost metabolism.

"If you're working out outside, try and find a shaded area that will not only protect you from the sun but take the edge off the heat too," she said.

"Try interval training or circuits instead of one long continuous session.

"This type of training gives the body time to rest and cool down.

"And don't forget to drink water to avoid dehydration."

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 15:02:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/diets/1640770/weight-loss-burn-calories-exercise-plan-yoga-pilates-heatwave-exclusive
Killexams : Your Skin Is a Superhero: How to Support Your Body’s Biggest Organ © 2005-2022 Healthline Media a Red Ventures Company. All rights reserved. Our website services, content, and products are for informational purposes only. Healthline Media does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. See additional information. Sun, 19 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.healthline.com/health/beauty-skin-care/your-skin-is-a-superhero-how-to-support-your-bodys-biggest-organ Killexams : Millions of Brits say they’re too busy & tired to achieve their health goals this summer

PROCRASTINATING Brits struggle to meet their own health and fitness goals, a new study has shown.

A survey found 83 per cent of Brits are not confident that they will meet the targets they set themselves this summer, with procrastination and low energy being the main culprits.

Mark Wright says almonds can make a great energy-boosting snack

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Mark Wright says almonds can make a great energy-boosting snackCredit: Mark Wright

The study, commissioned by California Almonds, revealed that people in the UK spend 10 hours a month procrastinating on average.

Nearly half of those surveyed said that procrastination stopped them from achieving their goals, with a further 34 per cent blaming too much telly.

Social media also gets in the way of achieving health goals such as exercising more, with almost a third of Brits saying that scrolling social media has gotten in the way of their goals.

Tiredness was also a key barrier to fitness success, as over half of those asked said that low energy levels were a significant problem

TV personality and fitness fanatic, Mark Wright, said: "There is nothing worse than having a list of things to do and then an energy slump means you get completely derailed.

"At the end of the day, we all procrastinate," said Mark, "especially if it's a difficult task. I do it all the time with working out but, as soon as it's done, I feel amazing for it.

“The reason I work out is all about how it makes me feel so I love setting myself training goals to tick off each week and in order to do this I have to fuel myself properly.”

Proper diet, schedule, and motivation are absolutely key for those wanting to get healthy before the summer.

For those of us still struggling to help meet our goals, Mark Wright has given us his four top tips to stay on top of a busy schedule.

Make Ahead Meals: "It’s so easy to grab a ready meal or takeaway when you can’t be bothered or don’t have time to cook. Prepping healthy meals means you always have something to hand even when you’re rushing out."

Snack [W]right: "Mindless snacking is a common procrastination technique, but it doesn’t have to be all bad. Choosing snacks which can provide slow-release energy could stop you in your procrastination tracks."

One Step at a Time: "I get wanting to progress quickly but taking on too much can be overwhelming and cause procrastination. Instead, take small, manageable steps towards your goal."

The Crucial Countdown: "We’re all guilty of a sneaky scroll on social when we should be doing something else. Whenever I’m avoiding starting something I supply myself three seconds"

Mon, 04 Jul 2022 21:45:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/19093392/brits-too-busy-to-make-summer-health-goals/
Killexams : Are common multivitamins worth the money? New study explores the benefits, harms.

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Thu, 30 Jun 2022 01:28:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/health-wellness/2022/06/30/new-study-says-evidence-insufficient-recommend-common-vitamins/7763252001/
Killexams : I’m a dog expert – here are signs your dog is smart & pays attention to you

PET experts have revealed the tell-tale signs that your dog is smart and pays attention to you.

Researchers at the Institutional Committee of Eötvös Loránd University believe there is a connection between a pooch’s head movement and its ability to understand.

Dogs tilt their head when they're listening to their owners, a new study claims

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Dogs tilt their head when they're listening to their owners, a new study claimsCredit: Getty

According to lead author Andrea Sommese, a dog‘s head tilt shows an increase in attention to what their owner is saying.

During a study, Mr Sommese and a team of five others analysed the movements of 40 dogs during object-label knowledge tests as the canines received instructions to fetch a toy.

The team incorporated six "gifted word learners" (GWL) among the batch of trialists to see whether they would show "more significant head tilts" when responding to their owner's commands.

According to Sommese, the study found that upon hearing the owners’ request for a familiar toy, the GWL dogs tilted their heads significantly more than typical dogs.

Noting that all dogs had undergone three months of training for the tests, he said: “We suggest that the difference in the dogs’ behaviour might be related to hearing meaningful words (for the GWL dogs) and could be a sign of increased attention.

"Possibly, head-tilts could also be related to making a cross-modal match in the dogs’ memory (e.g. name to a visual image) upon hearing the toy’s name."

The expert believes the head tilt movement can help owners identify their dog’s level of intuition.

He believes it can be utilised when training them as it shows that their dog is able to understand instructions and retain information.

Mr Sommese added: "Our results indicate that only dogs that had learned the name of the objects tilted their heads frequently.

"Besides, the side of the tilt was stable across several months and tests. Thus, we suggest a relationship between head-tilting and processing relevant, meaningful stimuli."

In other pet news, a dog expert has given their top tips for owners trying to keep their pets cool during the heatwave.

Plus,  the tell-tale signals to look out for when it comes to understanding how your pet is feeling have been revealed.

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 08:09:00 -0500 Jacob Bentley-York en-gb text/html https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/19217267/dog-expert-signs-dog-smart-pays-attention/
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