There is no better option than our 310-056 Exam dumps and Practice Test

You will get the exactly same replica of 310-056 real exam questions that you are going to attempt in actual test. Killexams.com has maintained database of 310-056 Practice Test that is big questions bank highly pertinent to 310-056 and served by test takers who attempt the 310-056 exam and passed with high score.

Exam Code: 310-056 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Certified Programmer for J2SE 5.0 Upgrade
SUN Programmer study help
Killexams : SUN Programmer study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-056 Search results Killexams : SUN Programmer study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-056 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : China Successfully Deploys Massive Solar Observatory To Study The Sun 24 Hours Everyday

China has successfully deployed its space-based solar observatory to study the Sun and its characteristics. Named Advanced Space-based Solar Observatory (ASO-S), the telescope lifted off at 5:13 am IST on October 9 from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Inner Mongolia atop the Long March 2D rocket. 

According to NASA Spaceflight, the observatory has been nicknamed 'Kuafu-1' after a giant in Chinese mythology which chased the Sun and is designed to operate for four years. 

(The ASO-S observatory; Image: Chinese Academy of Sciences)

First conceived in 1976 as ASTRON-1, the idea of the ASO-S observatory was revisited in 2011 after the establishment of the space science priority program of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) and after analysing the project's feasibility, the telescope's construction was completed in August 2022. It is equipped with three main instruments that will help scientists study the Sun 24 hours every day for the next four years. 

The observatory, which weighs roughly 888 kg, is deployed at an altitude of 720 km in a Sun-synchronous orbit from where it will study the Sun's magnetic field, solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), as well as superhot plasma ejecting out of the Sun at speeds reaching millions of km per hour, Space.com reported. The data gathered during the mission will be used to predict, monitor, and research solar flares.

According to the mission description by the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), the mission aims also include "observation of different layers of the solar atmosphere in response to eruptions to uncover the conversion and transport of different forms of energies" and "observation of solar eruptions and the magnetic field evolution" for better space weather prediction. An accurate prediction of space weather can be beneficial for assets in orbit as well as the power grids because the solar flares travelling toward Earth could cause major disruptions in their operation. 

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 01:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.republicworld.com/science/space/china-successfully-deploys-massive-solar-observatory-to-study-the-sun-24-hours-everyday-articleshow.html
Killexams : The Sun-Times’ new chapter: Our digital content is now free for everyone

In recent years, Chicago has proven its reputation as an exceptional news town — one in which residents care passionately about its future and invest in its success. Our city has become known as a hub of innovation for local news. This year alone we’ve seen a number of great examples: City Bureau’s Documenters program, which trains people to document public meetings, is expanding nationally. Block Club Chicago is building an investigative reporting team. South Side Weekly and the Hyde Park Herald merged to form a South Side–focused nonprofit newsroom.

And in January, the Chicago Sun-Times became a nonprofit newsroom as part of Chicago Public Media.

The nation is watching what happens here to see whether Chicago can be a model for how to defend and rebuild local news. And it’s all thanks to you, the people of Chicago.

Because of you, our great city has a real chance to buck the alarming trend of local news shrinking nationwide. Between late 2019 and May 2022, 360 newspapers closed in the U.S., according to a June report from the Medill School of Journalism. A quarter of the country’s newspapers have closed since 2005, the study found, with two more closing every week — and Illinois has lost the most news outlets of any state during this period. The industry has seen a 70% decline in newsroom employees since 2006. The research also shows that local news really matters. When communities lose their local news coverage, they experience more corruption, pollution and poverty, and even experience a decline in voter turnout.

Providing the news for everyone

As a reader of the Chicago Sun-Times, you turn to us for the news you need to thrive. For timely, accurate and fairly reported stories on the issues that matter most. For stories that celebrate and honor the members of our community, from victories on the field to remembrances of lives well lived. Our journalists care about your community because it’s our community, too. And we strongly believe that everyone in the Chicago area should have access to the news, features and investigations we produce, regardless of their ability to pay.

So today, we are dropping our paywall and making it possible for anyone to read our website for free by providing nothing more than an email address. Instead of a paywall, we are launching a donation-based digital membership program that will allow readers to pay what they can to help us deliver the news you rely on.

It’s a bold move: Reporting the news is expensive, and the converging market forces of inflation and an anticipated (or possibly already here) recession could further endanger local newsrooms like ours. But we know it’s the right thing to do.

For the Sun-Times’ next chapter to be successful, it is essential for us to be truly open and inclusive so we can tell the stories that matter to all parts of our community. A membership program connects our revenue model more closely to how well we serve our community, holding us accountable to you, our readers. We think that’s a good thing, because if we’re not serving you, we’re not doing our jobs. So we’re taking a leap of faith and putting our trust in you.

If you love Chicago and believe everyone deserves access to information about our community, from our community, please help us tell Chicago’s stories.

You can participate in two ways: 1) Support the Sun-Times by becoming a founding member today at suntimes.com/member and 2) Submit a letter to the editor about your community based on one of the following prompts:

  • Tell us a story: Describe a moment that has made you feel especially proud of your community, or a moment that brought your community together.
  • Correct the record: What do people miss — or misunderstand — about your community?

Your letter to the editor — we’re hoping to get them from all of our city’s great neighborhoods — should be 200-400 words, sent to us at letters@suntimes.com.

Or, share your story on social media (in any medium) with the hashtag #CSTforall.

We hope you will join us as we write the Sun-Times’ next chapter together!

Nykia Wright, Chicago Sun-Times CEO

Jennifer Kho, Chicago Sun-Times executive editor

Celeste LeCompte, Chicago Public Media chief audience officer

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 06:17:00 -0500 en text/html https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/2022/10/6/23389729/paywall-sun-times-dropping-news-journalism-nykia-wright-jennifer-kho-celeste-lecompte
Killexams : Social Security boost will help millions of kids, too No result found, try new keyword!Seventy-year-old Cassandra Gentry is looking forward to a hefty cost-of-living increase in her Social Security benefits — not for herself but to pay for haircuts for her two grandchildren and put food ... Mon, 10 Oct 2022 11:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://lasvegassun.com/news/2022/oct/10/social-security-boost-will-help-millions-of-kids-t/ Killexams : 2022 Festival of Science Program

Thursday, Sept. 22

Flagstaff Star Party Field Day

3 - 5 p.m. | Buffalo Park

Astronomers from the Flagstaff Dark Skies Coalition and Coconino Astronomical Society will safely guide you on a visit to the star of our solar system, the Sun! We’ll see planets in the daytime and kids can make their own telescopes! Bring the whole family. Then join the World’s Most Accessible Star Party, the Flagstaff Star Party, at nightfall!

6 - 10 p.m. | Buffalo Park

Get lost in dark skies with constellations, nebulae and planets! Astronomers will be your telescope hosts. Enjoy Sunset Talks, Twilight Talks and the Flagstaff Dark Sky Quartet. For times and activities, go to FlagstaffDarkSkies.org.

People are also reading…

Friday, Sept. 23

Plein Air in Open Spaces!

4 - 6 p.m. | Buffalo Park Entrance

The plein air event is for artists of all ages to learn to observe nature by drawing or painting outdoors in one of Flagstaff’s beautiful natural areas. Artists demonstrate techniques, and art supplies will be available. All are encouraged to create artwork outdoors all week and submit it for exhibition at First Friday Art Walk on Nov. 4, 2022 and prizes!

6 - 10 p.m. | Buffalo Park

Get lost in dark skies with constellations, nebulae and planets! Astronomers will be your telescope hosts. Enjoy Sunset Talks, Twilight Talks and the Flagstaff Dark Sky Quartet. For times and activities, go to FlagstaffDarkSkies.org.

Pyrouettes with the NAU Community Music and Dance Academy

6:30 - 6:45 p.m. | NAU Ardrey Auditorium

A collection of dances inspired by Egyptian archaeology, the desert and ancient Egypt performed to traditional and contemporary music from the region.

Reservations: scifest.org

See Keynote presentation for info

W.L. Gore and Associates Presentation:

Mummies, Monuments and Mysteries with Dr. Zahi Hawass

7 – 8:30 p.m. | NAU Ardrey Auditorium

Journey with legendary Egyptologist Dr. Zahi Hawass into the vast and mysterious kingdom of the ancient world where great pyramids dot the landscape, monuments to the gods tower to the sky and Pharaohs rule the land. Retrace his extraordinary discoveries of golden mummies, hidden tombs, immense riches, and the life and death of King Tut. Follow this fearless archaeologist through the Valley of the Kings, into the Book of the Dead and on the road to the afterlife. And learn how technology continues to unearth vast treasures, revealing more secrets buried deep in the sand for thousands of years.

Reservation required: scifest.org

In person seats and webinar stream available

7:30 - 10 p.m. | NAU Campus Observatory

1401 S. San Francisco St.

Explore the wonders of the night sky from NAU’s Campus Observatory.

Saturday, Sept. 24

8:30 - 10:30 a.m. | Bubbling Ponds Fish Hatchery

1970 N. Page Springs Rd., Cornville, AZ

Let’s tag migrating monarchs for scientific research with Southwest Monarch Study in Cornville! Nets, tags and data collection training provided. Wear long pants and sturdy shoes (no sandals).

Archaeology Day at Walnut Canyon National Monument

9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Walnut Canyon National Monument Visitor Center

Join National Park Service archaeologists on National Public Lands Day (free entrance) to learn about Walnut Canyon’s human history and try your hand at throwing at an atlatl.

Journey to Giza: Virtual Reality Tours of the Egyptian Pyramids

10 - 11:30 a.m. | NAU Cline Library

Experience the thrill of a 3-dimensional tour of the great pyramids of Egypt! Library staff will guide you through the Giza plateau using Google Earth on the Oculus VR headset. This experience is not recommended for visitors younger than 13, or individuals susceptible to motion sickness.

Reservations: scifest.org

Snook’s Science in the Park

10 a.m. - 2 p.m. | Wheeler Park

Make figurines with clay, play catch with a robot and learn about building model railroads at the 2022 Snook’s Science in the Park! Have you ever tried an augmented reality headset, where you can explore the future of spatial design? The fun is endless at our popular family science fair, where YOU are the scientist for the day!

An Intersection of Histories at Dow Spring

10 - 11:30 a.m. | Dow Spring Trailhead on Forest Road 131

Kaibab National Forest South Zone archaeologist Charlie Webber will lead a hike to a collection of archaeological sites located around Dow Spring that reveal an amazing slice of history. For the 1.25 mile, hour-long hike, please bring water, appropriate footwear for rocky terrain, sunscreen, sunglasses and a hat.

Reservations: scifest.org

Connecting to Patterns in Nature: Land Art and Natural Sculpture

10 a.m. - 1 p.m. | Coconino Center for the Arts

Tree branches, roots, lightning and even our own veins—notice a pattern? Nature-based art can be an amazing way to explore our world and our relationship to it. Students in this workshop will use natural materials to create their own outdoor art right here at the art center! No materials or experience necessary! Please dress for the weather. Ages 9+.

Reservations: scifest.org

Field Trip to the Dawn of the Dinosaurs in the Petrified Forest

2 - 4 p.m. | North Visitor Center, Petrified Forest National Park, AZ

A 2-mile round trip hike (rugged terrain, moderate difficulty) to visit historic paleontology sites. See petrified logs in remote badlands, fossil bones and teeth of Triassic animals including the oldest dinosaurs and huge crocodile-like predators. Wear suitable footwear and clothing, bring water and sunscreen. Not suitable for young children.

Reservations: scifest.org

Tynkertopia, Flagstaff’s award-winning STEAM Community Center, is open to kids, parents, teachers, artists, crafters, inventors, makers and “tynkerers.” Learn how we invite curiosity, inspire wonder, encourage playfulness and celebrate unique solutions. Learn about options for classes, parties, and field trips at our East Flagstaff facility.

6 - 10 p.m. | Buffalo Park

Get lost in dark skies with constellations, nebulae and planets! Astronomers will be your telescope hosts. Enjoy Sunset Talks, Twilight Talks and the Flagstaff Dark Sky Quartet. For all times and activities, go to FlagstaffDarkSkies.org.

Flagstaff Heritage Preservation: Archaeological & Cultural Resource Protection

7 - 8 p.m. | Riordan Mansion State Historic Park

Uncover the progression of one historic Flagstaff home by sifting through maps and physical evidence with Flagstaff’s Heritage Preservation Officer, Mark Reavis.

7:30 - 10 p.m. | NAU Campus Observatory

1401 S. San Francisco St.

Explore the wonders of the night sky from NAU’s Campus Observatory.

Sunday, Sept. 25

8:30 - 10:30 a.m. | Bubbling Ponds Fish Hatchery

1970 N. Page Springs Rd., Cornville, AZ

Let’s tag migrating monarchs for scientific research with Southwest Monarch Study in Cornville! Nets, tags and data collection training provided. Wear long pants and sturdy shoes (no sandals).

Explore, Learn, Discover: Geocaching at Tynkertopia

9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Tynkertopia

Discover geocaching – locating hidden treasure at specific latitude and longitude coordinates. Use your smart phone and Google Maps to locate geocaches hidden in Bushmaster Park. Caches contain a STEAM Challenge to complete after the geocaching experience. The last cache will contain a small prize for each family that locates all the caches.

Walk the Trail of Time at the Grand Canyon

10 - 11:30 a.m. | Yavapai Museum of Geology - Grand Canyon National Park

Walk the Grand Canyon’s Trail of Time with one of the people who helped to build it! Hear about the making of the exhibit and the geologic evolution of the canyon. Please note, the National Park entrance fee applies. Meet outside of the Yavapai Museum of Geology.

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. | Elden Pueblo

West side of Hwy 89 at Townsend-Winona Rd

Discover prehistoric life at Elden Pueblo with tours at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m., plus artifact displays, excavations and hunting games throughout the day. Bring a hat, water and your sense of adventure!

Lava River Cave Guided Hike

10 a.m. - 1 p.m. | Lava River Cave Trailhead

Join us for a guided tour of the Lava River Cave. Observe splashdown, lavasickles and much more. Proper hiking shoes, boots, clothing and lights required. No pets, please.

Reservations: scifest.org

Morning Work-Out & Downtown History Adventure Game

10 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Wheeler Park War Memorial

Learn about Flagstaff history playing a cooperative adventure game. It’s part scavenger hunt, part Dungeons and Dragons and part boot camp. It’s a great way to visit interesting sites, make new friends and get exercise. Come prepared to workout, walk around and have fun. Learn more at missionsandmadness.com.

Reservations: scifest.org

A Walk Beneath the Sierra sin Agua

1 - 2 p.m. | Coconino Center for the Arts

Virga: Beneath the Sierra sin Agua by Flagstaff artist Shawn Skabelund is an exhibition of sculptural installations exploring historical colonialism in territorial Arizona, and the lasting emotional and physical scars on the cultural and geographical western landscape. The artist will lead a gallery tour and discussion about each installation.

The State of the Climate: Updates on Climate Science and Solutions to Slow Climate Change

3 - 4:30 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Regional experts will discuss the state of the climate in northern Arizona, emerging technology and policy solutions to slow and capture fossil fuel emissions and progress on the City of Flagstaff’s carbon neutrality plan.

Ancient Civilizations through the Eyes of Shakespeare

5 - 6 p.m. | Coconino Center for the Arts

Join Flagstaff Shakespeare Festival for a free combination performance, lecture and group discussion that explore how Shakespeare portrayed classic civilizations compared to what we know today.

7:30 - 10 p.m. | NAU Campus Observatory

1401 S. San Francisco St.

Explore the wonders of the night sky from NAU’s Campus Observatory.

Monday, Sept. 26

8:30 - 10:30 a.m. | Bubbling Ponds Fish Hatchery

1970 N. Page Springs Rd., Cornville, AZ

Let’s tag migrating monarchs for scientific research with Southwest Monarch Study in Cornville! Nets, tags and data collection training provided. Wear long pants and sturdy shoes (no sandals). This special program is for adults only.

Hart Prairie Preserve Nature Walk

10 - 11:30 a.m. | Hart Prairie Preserve

Learn about birds, wildflowers, forest ecology, the globally rare Bebb’s Willow forest and efforts to restore the mountain meadow on this 90-minute walk. No dogs, please. Hikers must be able to walk on uneven ground.

Reservations: scifest.org

Science in Anime: Dueling in the Pyramids

3:30 - 4:30 p.m. | East Flagstaff Library Community Room

There is science in anime? Learn how there is Egyptology in anime and the connections to science! Ages 12-17. All materials provided.

Literary Legos: Ancient Egypt Edition

3:45 - 4:45 p.m. | Downtown Flagstaff Library Community Room

Find some great Egypt books and participate in a Lego building challenge. Recommended for ages 5 and up.

Bones, Skins and Teeth, Oh My!

4 - 5:30 p.m. | Buffalo Park Ramada

Have you ever seen a javelina skull, touched a bear paw or looked at a piece of baleen? Come join Scientists in the Classroom for a hands-on demonstration from the inside out, a look into the diversity of animal bones, skins and so much more. This is an hour and a half program with prizes for participation.

Monarch Butterfly Migration in Arizona

4 - 5 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Every year monarch butterflies fly through Arizona on their fall migration. Gail Morris shares the existing findings of the Southwest Monarch Study tagging and monitoring, a Citizen Science program.

4 - 5 p.m. | Coconino Community College Fourth St. Campus

Explore the mysterious microscopic world! Everyday objects look completely different when seen up close through a microscope. Can you figure out what you are viewing? Participants aged 10 - 18 only.

Reservations: scifest.org

Introduction to Microcontrollers and Sensors

4:30 - 5:30 p.m. | NACET Accelerator Building - Conference Room

Control your robot! How? Join NAU’s ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Club for a workshop on using microcontrollers and sensors to control electromechanical devices.

Reservations: scifest.org

The Hidden Diversity of the Triassic Period at Petrified Forest National Park

5 - 6 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Most biodiversity of modern vertebrate communities is made up of small animals. Join Adam Marsh as he opens a window into the hidden biodiversity of the Triassic, revealing the early evolution of living animal groups like amphibians, mammals, lizards, crocodilians, birds and their closest extinct ancestors.

Art-ology: Using the Arts to Better Understand Science

5:30 - 7 p.m. | Coconino Center for the Arts

In this interactive workshop led by scientist and artist Lindsay Hansen, we will explore how we can use the arts, including painting, drawing, music, theater, poetry and other art forms to effectively and creatively share scientific discoveries with a broad range of people, making science more understandable, accessible, and fun to learn about for all ages.

Reservations: scifest.org

Fires, Floods & Flagstaff

Wildfires dramatically change the landscape, and as we’ve seen here in Flagstaff, they make flash floods much more likely. Brian Klimowski,Meteorologist in Charge at NWS, will present on the recent flooding that has occurred as a result of our local fires, and the meteorology and new technologies behind forecasting these events.Register: scifest.org

Available starting at 7 p.m. | scifest.org

Recordings of local authors memorizing their children’s books with science themes! In these recorded segments, bring the whole family to enjoy a bedtime story! Sponsored by Brightside Bookshop in Flagstaff.

Tuesday, Sept. 27

Putting the Right Seed in the Right Place at the Right Time

9 - 10 a.m., 12 - 1 p.m. | USGS Flagstaff Science Campus Research Garden

USGS scientists host a guided tour of the new research garden facility on the Flagstaff Science Campus! Learn about restoring dryland ecosystems with limited water availability and the changing climate. Bring a water bottle, mask and questions about dryland landscapes of the American Southwest.

Reservations: scifest.org

1 - 4 p.m. | NAU DuBois Center

STEM students and STEM professionals interact and share scientific research with the community. NAU parking regulations apply.

2:30 - 3 p.m. | Museum of Northern Arizona Discovery Village

(Matthews Building, Research Campus)

We know that the San Francisco Peaks are a big volcano that once blew its top! See a model erupt and learn how lava forms different kinds of rocks, from sharp, hard obsidian used for tools to lightweight pumice.

Crafty Corner: Science Festival Edition

3:30 - 4 p.m. | East Flagstaff Library Community Room

Join us for fun science-themed crafts at the East Flagstaff Community Library! Ages 3+ welcome to attend. All materials are provided.

Recycle & Create: Build-A-Bot Workshop

3:30 - 5:30 p.m. | Tynkertopia

Come to Flagstaff’s STEAM Community Center to engage in the Engineering Design Process (Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, Improve). Create a Bot using a wide variety of recycled materials. Ages 2–102! Designing your OWN Bot is fun, creative, purposeful and mindful at the same time!

Thermoregulation: The Secret Weapon to Your Next PR

4 - 5 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Cross country coach Xavier Rodriguez dives into the importance of temperature regulation in competitive running. Xavier discusses the body’s ability to regulate temperature and how to properly cool and heat your body for peak performance.

McMillan Mesa Interpretive Walk

4 - 6 p.m. | Buffalo Park Entrance

Join Willow Bend, in partnership with City of Flagstaff’s Open Space Program, for an interpretive walk on McMillan Mesa. Learn about McMillan Mesa’s urban forestry, open space, wildlife and more! This program is targeted for adults (we do have a family-focused McMillan Mesa program on September 29th).

4 - 5 p.m. | Museum of Northern Arizona Discovery Village

(Matthews Building, Research Campus)

Make a model eruption within view of our favorite volcano – the San Francisco Peaks! Learn how much of our landscape was formed by volcanic activity, and how the same materials form different kinds of stone depending on how they cool.

Are We Alone? Does Technologically Advanced Life Exist Elsewhere in the Galaxy?

5 - 6 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Perhaps the most fundamental question of science is whether we’re alone in the universe. Long a matter of speculation, it is now possible to make reasonable assumptions based on science. Biologist Klaus Brasch and astronomy writer and retired psychiatrist William Sheehan present two sides of the issue, and the audience will vote for the most persuasive argument.

Race Robots with the CocoNuts!

5 - 6:30 p.m. | NACET Accelerator Building - Conference Room

Build and race a robot of your own design with help from the CocoNuts FIRST Robotics Team! No prior robotics experience necessary, just bring your friends and be ready to have a good time.

Science and Engineering of Brewing

5 - 6 p.m. | Wanderlust Brewing Co.

Join Nathan Friedman from Wanderlust Brewing to learn about the beer making process, including how the ingredients are combined, how the manufacturing process is controlled, and how the beers get their distinctive flavors. For those 21 and over, the Wanderlust lineup of beers will be available for sampling and purchase in the tap room.

Science Book Club: The Writing of the Gods

6 - 7:30 p.m. | Downtown Flagstaff Library Community Room

In honor of the Festival of Science theme “Pyramids to the Peaks,” we will discuss The Writing of the Gods: The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone by Edward Dolnick. Copies are available at the Downtown Library information desk; please read the book prior to the discussion.

Kitchen Chemistry: Homemade, Sustainable, Money-saving Products for Your Home

6 - 7:30 p.m. | NAU Cline Library MakerLab

Several recipes will be presented for making your own household and garden products that are better for our planet, safe around kids and pets, and will save you some money. Join Rebecca Harner to talk about the basic chemistry of the ingredients (don’t worry - it’s easy). And you will take home some sample recipes you can make yourselves.

Reservations: scifest.org

Discover Science Writing Workshop: Top 10 Things to Know

6 - 7:30 p.m. | NACET Accelerator Building - Policy Room

Do you love science, technology, engineering and/or math–and writing? You just may be a science writer! In this workshop for middle school, high school and college students, we’ll take a look at how science writers do their work, where they publish their writing and some of the career opportunities out there.

Reservations: scifest.org

Climate Change Data from the Building to the Planet

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. | Webinar

Join NAU Professor Kevin Gurney, PhD, as he examines how new data, artificial intelligence and satellites are beginning to connect local action greenhouse gas reductions with global climate change targets, allowing for better decisions and the ability to track progress.

Wednesday, Sept. 28

Cloud Walk with NWS Meteorologist Brian Klimowski

10 - 11 a.m., 12 - 1 p.m., 3 - 4:30 p.m. | Buffalo Park Entrance

Join Brian Klimowski, Meteorologist in Charge at the National Weather Service, for a 45-minute walk at Buffalo Park. The talk will cover the science behind the local weather, how our mountains impact the rain and snow and look into the science of clouds and cloud formation through time-lapse photography!

Reservations: scifest.org

1 - 2 p.m. | Meeting location provided after reservation is made

Explore Downtown’s unique geology with geologist Daniel Foley. Learn about architectural styles, discuss changing preferences for certain rock types and discover exciting historic events etched in stone.

Archaeology at Bushmaster Park

3 - 5 p.m. | Bushmaster Park - East Side Ramadas

Join archaeologists from Flagstaff Area National Monuments for a fun-filled afternoon to learn more about the human history of northern Arizona. Activities will include creating split-twig figurines and pictographs.

Recycle & Create: Build-A-Bot Workshop

3:30 - 5:30 p.m. | Tynkertopia

Come to Flagstaff’s STEAM Community Center to engage in the Engineering Design Process (Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, Improve). Create a Bot using a wide variety of recycled materials. Ages 2–102! Designing your OWN Bot is fun, creative, purposeful and mindful at the same time!

3:45 - 4:45 p.m. | Downtown Flagstaff Library Community Room

Join library staff for Ancient Egyptian-themed storytime and crafts. Ages 3 and up.

Entering a New Era: Expansion and Growth of Augmented Reality

4 - 5 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Augmented reality is a combination of digital graphics being overlaid over the real world. This technology has endless applications in personal life, education and workplace environments. This lecture will have hands-on demonstrations of augmented reality utilizing the Microsoft Hololens 2 and do a deep dive into what the future will look like with augmented reality and how it will change our lives.

4 - 6 p.m. | Willow Bend Environmental Education Center

Learn to use a nature journal as a tool for deepening observations, finding beauty, and creating lasting memories and to grow kids’ curiosity. Make and decorate your own nature journal, then we’ll get outside and start using it!

Reservations: scifest.org

4 - 6 p.m. | BASIS Flagstaff Gymnasium

Learn from planetary scientists about Mars’ landforms as you walk across a giant, gym-sized landscape map of Mars. Explorers of all ages are welcome!

4 - 5:30 p.m. | TGen North

3051 W. Shamrell Blvd. #106

Visit TGen North to learn more about the cool science that we do! After a tour of the lab spaces, we’ll learn about DNA and microbes (germs) through craft activities. Open to 2nd to 4th graders.

Reservations: scifest.org

Updates from the Mars Rovers

5 - 6 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Hear local Martians Alicia Vaughan and Ryan Anderson talk about the most recent scientific investigations and discoveries from the Curiosity and Perseverance Rovers.

Lowell Observatory Open House

5 - 10 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Experience astronomical history and wonder at Lowell Observatory! Don’t miss your chance to walk through Lowell’s beautiful historic grounds, see the 126-year-old Clark Telescope and stargaze at the Giovale Open Deck Observatory through six advanced telescopes under Flagstaff’s beautiful dark skies.

Out in STEM: LGBT+ Folks Making an Impact

5:30 - 6:30 p.m. | East Flagstaff Library Community Room

3000 N. Fourth St. Ste. 5

Join us at the East Flagstaff Community Library for a discussion on the impact made by LGBT+ folks in the STEM workforce! Ages 12+.

How a Warming Arctic Affects the Climate and You

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. | Webinar

The Arctic is warming two and a half times faster than the global average. This is having a profound effect on ecosystems and people in the region. But what happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay there. NAU Regents’ Professor Ted Schuur, PhD, will discuss how changes there influence the entire climate system and, as a result, global society everywhere.

Kombucha: What Is It and How Do You Make It?

6:30 - 8 p.m. | NACET Accelerator Building - Policy Room

A workshop and lecture focused on the science of Kombucha and how you can make it at home. You’ll learn general information on the science of fermentation, acidity and carbonation, plus see live demonstrations of the process and equipment needed as well as taste samples!

Available starting at 7 p.m. | scifest.org

Recordings of local authors memorizing their children’s books with science themes! In these recorded segments, bring the whole family to enjoy a bedtime story! Sponsored by Brightside Bookshop in Flagstaff.

Thursday, Sept. 29

Recycle & Create: Build-A-Bot Workshop

3:30 - 5:30 p.m. | Tynkertopia

Come to Flagstaff’s STEAM Community Center to engage in the Engineering Design Process (Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, Improve). Create a Bot using a wide variety of recycled materials. Ages 2–102! Designing your OWN Bot is fun, creative, purposeful and mindful at the same time!

Silent No More! What Teens Are Telling Us about Their Mental Health Needs

4 - 5 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Join NAU Assistant Professor Katie Mommaerts, LCSW, to discover what adolescents are saying about mental health. We will discuss factors that impact adolescent mental health, the importance of involving youth in research and ways to support adolescent development.

McMillan Mesa Family Guided Program

4 - 5:30 p.m. | Buffalo Park Entrance

Join Willow Bend, in partnership with City of Flagstaff’s Open Space Program, for a guided family-focused tour of McMillan Mesa, including a short walk and fun hands-on activities for the whole family. Learn about urban forestry, open space, wildlife and more! Wear comfortable shoes, bring sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water. Feel free to bring a picnic lunch and hang out after the program.

Exploring Amphibians of Arizona

4:30 - 5:30 p.m. | Buffalo Park Entrance

Join Kathryn Cooney for an inspiring talk focused on the identification, life cycles and conservation threats of amphibians in Arizona followed by a guided tour of amphibian habitat.

The Evolving Link Between Music and Science

5 - 6 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Pythagorean philosophers in ancient Greece believed the cosmos was governed by a harmonious “music of the spheres.” Join astronomer David Koerner in exploring “data sonification” and the “musical” nature of natural phenomena with acoustic renderings that allow us to “hear” pulsars, black holes, gravitational waves, and other phenomena.

Video Game Development: Exploration into the Digital Universe

5 - 7 p.m. | NAU Advanced Media Lab, Room 112 Building 16, School of Communication

In this introduction to video game development, we will go over how to create an interactive 3D environment by sculpting landscapes, importing and placing 3D digital files on the landscape, and adjusting lighting and elemental effects.

Reservations: scifest.org

Women in STEAM Networking Event

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. | The Toasted Owl

A night to celebrate and discuss the unique experiences shared by Women in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics). The evening will be an opportunity to expand your circle and create a network of artists and scientists you can tap into for collaboration, advice and experience sharing.

The Science of Food & Sensory Analysis

6 - 7 p.m. | NAU Hotel & Restaurant Management, Building 33

Visit NAU’s Chef Mark Molinaro for a tour of the test kitchens and a cooking workshop focused on sensory analysis, one of the five key fields of food science. Learn about sensory evaluation techniques, which are used to measure such food characteristics as taste, texture, smell and appearance.

Reservations: scifest.org

Bacterial Hitchhikers: How Global Migration Spreads Infectious Diseases Through Livestock

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. | Webinar

Since ancient times, humans have moved around the world, bringing livestock, and their diseases, as well. From anthrax to brucellosis, NAU Associate Professor Jeff Foster, PhD, will show how these dangerous pathogens have been spread and how they affect human and animal health.

Honoring Sovereignty and Care: A Cultural Property Panel Discussion

6:30 - 8 p.m. | East Flagstaff Library Community Room

Join us for a panel discussion on cultural property, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials from experts in archives, cultural property and anthropology.

Friday, Sept. 30

Egyptian Cats in Science & Paint

4:30 - 6 p.m. | Downtown Flagstaff Library Community Room

A discussion and painting session to explore the cultural and scientific significance of Egyptian cats! The discussion will be based on the chapter “Egypt” from Classical Cats: The Rise and Fall of the Sacred Cat by Donald W. Engels. Painting supplies will be provided by the library.

Reservations: scifest.org

Recycle & Create: Build-A-Bot Workshop

3:30 - 5:30 p.m. | Tynkertopia

Come to Flagstaff’s STEAM Community Center to engage in the Engineering Design Process (Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, Improve). Create a Bot using a wide variety of recycled materials. Ages 2–102! Designing your OWN Bot is fun, creative, purposeful and mindful at the same time!

3:45 - 4:45 p.m. | Downtown Flagstaff Library Community Room

Learn all about the world of mummies with library staff and then do a mummy craft. Ages 8 and up.

Sensory Illusions & the Science Behind Them

4 - 5 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Sensory illusions fool our senses (e.g., vision, taste, etc.) meaning we may experience our world differently than it actually is. Join Nicole Bies-Hernandez to learn more about sensory illusions in this session by participating in illusion activities and then learning about the science behind the illusions.

Dissections with a Scientist in the Classroom

4 - 5 p.m. | Buffalo Park Ramada

If you are curious about how different species evolved to adapt to their environments, come use dissecting tools and take a look at the anatomy of crayfish, frogs and owl pellets!

How Do Golden Eagles in Arizona Choose Their Nest Sites?

5 - 6 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

Learn about the ‘must-haves’ for Golden Eagles in Arizona when shopping for real estate to raise a family. Presented by Dr. Losee, discover the complexities of a multi-scale habitat suitability model that tells us what is important to our eagles. Live raptor during the Q & A session.

CCC Science Night Celebration

5:30 - 7:30 p.m. | CCC Lone Tree Campus

Launch water rockets, view the stars, look through microscopes at amazing creatures, perform chemistry experiments, tour the medicinal garden and more! Complete a junior science passport and earn a prize. Indoor and outdoor events and lots of free parking.

Available starting at 7 p.m. | scifest.org

Recordings of local authors memorizing their children’s books with science themes! In these recorded segments, bring the whole family to enjoy a bedtime story! Sponsored by Brightside Bookshop in Flagstaff.

7:30 - 10 p.m. | NAU Campus Observatory

Explore the wonders of the night sky from NAU’s Campus Observatory.

Um, Actually: Science Edition

Fun science trivia game show to warm up for SCI Talks.

Optimum Presents: SCI Talks

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. | Coconino Center for the Arts

Four Tedx style talks from local artists, scientists and educators.

Understanding the Largest Earthquakes on Earth with Underwater Imaging

Dr. Donna Shillington, NAU School of Earth and Sustainability

Many of the most important geological processes occur below the seas, including the generation of earthquakes. However, scientists have only mapped a fraction of Earth’s seafloor and the geology below. Marine voyages are enabling new research on why the biggest earthquakes occur where they do.

Finding the Humane in Digital Fabrication through Self-Portraits

David Van-Ness, NAU School of Art

In 2020, David had anxiety attacks unlike any he had before. These attacks paralyzed him for a few weeks, but with time and a new diagnosis of OCD David had a new perspective. Now he creates art that combines art and science while talking about mental health. This is the story of how David went from chasing what was cool to knowing who he is and making cool things.

Accelerating Carbon Dioxide Removal: Safely, Equitably and Economically

Dr. Jennifer Wade, NAU Mechanical Engineering

Jennifer will discuss the notion of an emissions budget and the diversity of solutions needed to meet that budget, including carbon dioxide removal through both natural and engineered systems, their scale and what this may look like with the resources and climate in our region.

Get Out! Or, Effectively Experiencing the Outdoors with Kids

Moran Henn, Executive Director at Willow Bend Environmental Education Center

Moran will share ideas, tips and anecdotes from over 10 years of experience delivering outdoor STEM and environmental education programs and leading field trips. Why it’s important to get kids outside, how to make outdoor experiences positive, the best ways to prepare, where to go and other useful, fun and funny tips and stories.

Saturday, Oct. 1

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. | Tynkertopia

Learn about Tynkertopia, Flagstaff’s award-winning STEAM Community Center, that’s open to kids, parents, teachers, artists, crafters, inventors, makers and “tynkerers.” Explore how we invite curiosity, inspire wonder, encourage playfulness and celebrate unique solutions.

Camp Colton on the Prairie

9 - 11 a.m. | Camp Colton

Travel north on Hwy 180 until you pass mile marker 225. Turn right onto dirt road; FS 151. Drive 3.8 miles. Look for sign on right.

Explore Camp Colton and experience a little bit of what Camp offers with a focus on environmental education, games, outdoor activities and fun. All are welcome!

Hike to the Crater Field Where Astronauts Trained

9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Landfill Road Trailhead

North on Hwy 89 past Flagstaff Mall 5 miles, turn right on Landfill Rd. for 1.5 miles. Trailhead on left.

A 3.5-mile hike across uneven terrain to the crater field where Apollo Astronauts trained. Bring sturdy shoes, water, hat, jacket, sunscreen and snacks. Not suitable for young kids or dogs. Please view this short video about how the Crater Field was made: astrogeology.usgs.gov/rpif/videos/making-craters

Reservations: scifest.org

Willow Bend Science Saturday: Sustainable Homes

9:30 - 11:30 a.m. | Willow Bend Environmental Education Center

Participate in a fun kids event with hands-on activities all about sustainable building, in partnership with the County Sustainable Building Program! Learn about sustainable building materials, make your own sustainable home model and explore renewable energy and waste reduction activities.

10 a.m. - 12 p.m. | NAU Cline Library Maker Lab

Join the Cline Library MakerLab team to learn all about 3D printing and how this growing movement is continuing to shape the fields of manufacturing, construction, healthcare, art and design. Attendees will also learn how to design a custom 3D-printed keychain using TinkerCAD!

Reservations: scifest.org

10 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Willow Bend Environmental Education Center

This tour showcases homes that model sustainable methods and technologies including rainwater harvesting, solar design and PV. Learn from the homeowners’ building stories. Pick up a self-guided tour packet at Willow Bend on the day of the tour or get at coconino.az.gov/sustainablebuilding.

Falconry 101: Introduction to Falconry and What it Takes to Become a Falconer

10 a.m. - 12 p.m. | East Flagstaff Library Community Room

This workshop will cover a brief history of falconry, federal and state falconry regulations as well as an introduction to basic steps on how to get started and training raptors for falconry. Live raptors will be used for demonstrations.

Reservations: scifest.org

Plein Air in Open Spaces!

10 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Picture Canyon Natural and Cultural Preserve

3920 N El Paso Flagstaff Rd.

The Plein Air event is for artists of all ages to learn to observe nature by drawing or painting outdoors in one of Flagstaff’s beautiful natural areas. Artists will be on hand to demonstrate different techniques, and art supplies will be available to use.

An Intersection of Histories at Dow Spring

10 - 11:30 a.m. | Dow Spring Trailhead on Forest Road 131

Kaibab National Forest South Zone archaeologist Charlie Webber will lead a hike to a collection of archaeological sites located around Dow Spring that reveal an amazing slice of history. For the 1.25 mile, hour long hike attendees should bring water, appropriate footwear for rocky terrain, sunscreen, sunglasses and a hat.

Reservations: scifest.org

National Weather Service Open House

11 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. | National Weather Service

49 Hughes Ave., Bellemont, AZ

Come to the National Weather Service office in Bellemont and talk to the Meteorologists about how we forecast flash floods, tornadoes and severe thunderstorms. Watch a balloon launch (12 p.m. and 4 p.m.) and learn all about the weather around us!

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. | Museum of Northern Arizona

Enjoy a smorgasbord of science activities throughout the museum and learn how the Colorado Plateau has been important in key moments of science. In the afternoon, MNA researchers and associates will deliver short talks covering a wide variety of topics, from the importance of pottery to burial traditions.

The Neuroscience of Physical Therapy

3 - 4:30 p.m. | Summit Health and Fitness

The goal of this session is to explore the current neuroscience underlying physical therapy treatments. Jay McCallum from Banner Physical Therapy will lead participants through recent research, case studies and movement and bodily perception experiments. Also, recommendations for using exercise and activity to optimize health and minimize the risk of injury or decline in function will be discussed.

Wildfire Risk Reduction Challenges & Solutions for the Greater Flagstaff Area: Panel Discussion

3 - 5 p.m. | Lowell Observatory

What are the biggest challenges to mitigating wildfire risk in our community? Neil Chapman of the Flagstaff Fire Department leads a panel of experts from the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Salt River Project and NAU’s School of Forestry and Ecological Restoration Institute in a discussion of the science behind the fires and how these fire management partners can work together to develop solutions.

Naval Observatory Open House

7 - 10 p.m. | US Naval Observatory

10391 W Naval Observatory Rd.

Tour the Observatory and meet the staff! Learn about the history of the Naval Observatory and mission in Northern Arizona. This event features astronomical viewing – weather permitting.

7:30 - 10 p.m. | NAU Campus Observatory

Explore the wonders of the night sky from NAU’s Campus Observatory.

Sunday, Oct. 2

Explore, Learn, Discover: Geocaching at Tynkertopia

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. | Tynkertopia

The whole family can experience geocaching – locating hidden treasures at specific latitude and longitude coordinates. Use your smartphone and Google Maps to locate geocaches hidden in Bushmaster Park. Each cache contains a STEAM Challenge to complete after the experience. A small prize awaits each family that locates all the caches. Please bring a smartphone!

Off-Road Adventure to the Apollo Training Ground

9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Cinder Lakes Off Highway Vehicle Area

Junction of FR 776 and Highway 89

Bring your 4x4 and drive through the crater field used to train the Apollo astronauts, then take a short hike to discuss the Apollo missions and the training that takes place in and around Flagstaff as well as future plans to return humans to the Moon.

Reservations: scifest.org

Arboretum’s Fall Open House

9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | The Arboretum at Flagstaff

4001 S. Woody Mountain Rd.

Join The Arboretum at Flagstaff for a free day of fun nature activities for kids of all ages! Learn about native plants and their wild adaptations, our very own Willow Pond and the aquatic macroinvertebrates that call it home and the relationship between the Ponderosa pines and our friend the Abert’s squirrel.

Harrenburg Wash Enhancement Project Guided Tour

9 - 11 a.m. | Pumphouse Wash Trailhead

Near Intersection of Oraibi Ovl and Ancient Trail in Kachina Village

Tour a project Coconino County Parks and Recreation and Natural Channel Design are conducting to enhance the riparian habitat in the Harrenburg Wash area. The wash and associated wetland habitat have been impacted by several factors that are now causing downstream channel erosion due to high water velocity, channel head cuts and the invasion of non-native weed species.

Reservations: scifest.org

Morning Work-Out & Downtown History Adventure Game

10 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Wheeler Park War Memorial

Learn about Flagstaff history playing a cooperative adventure game. It’s part scavenger hunt, part Dungeons and Dragons and part boot camp. It’s a great way to visit interesting sites, make new friends and get exercise. Come prepared to workout, walk around and have fun. Learn more atmissionsandmadness.com.

Reservations: scifest.org

10 - 11 a.m. | Downtown Flagstaff Library Community Room

Science fiction is full of exciting ideas, but how realistic are they? And if they aren’t realistic, does it matter? Hear from USGS scientist and science fiction fan, Ryan Anderson, about how science is portrayed in various fictional stories.

A Human History of Plants

1 - 2 p.m. | Museum of Northern Arizona - Easton Collections Center

People have always drawn upon plants to provide food, shelter, clothing, medicine and more. Come meet some of the most important plants of our area, both native and cultivated, which grow on the campus of the Museum of Northern Arizona.

Reservations: scifest.org

Playing the Game of Life as an American Kestrel

1 - 2 p.m. | East Flagstaff Library Community Room

The life of a raptor is hard and some play the game better than others. The American Kestrel is one species that is losing the game. Come play the game of life as a raptor and find out if you win. Learn about American Kestrel conservation issues, how you can help and meet a live American Kestrel.

2 - 4 p.m. | Meeting Location Provided After Reservation Made

Join retired Kaibab National Forest archaeologist Neil Weintraub for a 1.5 mile round trip hike to the Keyhole Sink petroglyphs. Learn about the forest’s rich natural and cultural history and the importance of ongoing forest restoration treatments. Meeting location provided upon reservation.

Panel Discussion: The Ethics of Archaeology

3 - 4:30 p.m. | scifest.org

Exploring our shared history requires striking a delicate balance between respecting cultural traditions and the desire to learn and share information. Join local archaeology experts in a panel discussion on practical ethics in archaeology, moderated by NAU Professor Jaime Awe, PhD.

Clouds, Storms and Cameras!

5:30 - 6:30 p.m. | scifest.org

Join the Flagstaff Cloud Appreciators Group on an exciting photo tour of the wild clouds and storms we’ve seen in Arizona over the past couple years! Learn to identify and recognize the dramatic Arizona clouds, and how to take pictures of these atmospheric interlopers!

7:30 - 10 p.m. | NAU Campus Observatory

Explore the wonders of the night sky from NAU’s Campus Observatory.

Sun, 18 Sep 2022 00:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://azdailysun.com/2022-festival-of-science-program/article_958a52e6-2e07-11ed-a05e-d7abc11064a0.html
Killexams : Looking for a new job? This California program will pay women to work in construction No result found, try new keyword!Fresno Bee State and local officials are doubling down on efforts to support women in California’s central San Joaquin Valley that want to pursue careers in the construction trades. On Wednesday, ... Wed, 12 Oct 2022 23:30:00 -0500 text/html https://www.mercedsunstar.com/news/california/article267231772.html Killexams : New study identifies regular cannabis use as a potential risk factor for overactive bladder

Previous research has shown cannabis can help relieve low urinary tract symptoms

Article content

Chinese researchers suggest that regular cannabis users may be at increased risk of developing overactive bladder (OAB) and more severe related symptoms.

Advertisement 2

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

“Marijuana exposure may be an independent risk factor for overactive bladder,” note authors of the study, a pre-proof of which was published this month in the American Journal of Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication.

Article content

Investigators sought to assess the association between regular pot use and the onset and severity of OAB as part of low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

  1. Just a handful, six per cent, of responding HCPs reported having received MC training in professional school. /

    Over half of Canadian healthcare practitioners ‘uncomfortable’ about their cannabis knowledge

  2. Investigators received input from 181 patients aged18 and older who were enrolled in the Pennsylvania MM program and were using cannabis for one of the state’s qualified conditions. /

    More study needed to determine affect quality of life in those who use weed for pain relief

  3. The initial hypothesis was that preinjury THC use in trauma patients with TBI would be associated with fewer thromboembolic events and adverse outcomes. /

    THC linked to lower hemorrhagic stroke risk in people with traumatic brain injury

To do so, they analyzed 13 years of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a program of studies to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the U.S., and used the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score — which measures symptoms like urgency, urinary frequency and urgency incontinence — to define the presence of overactive bladder in each study participant.

Advertisement 3

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

Study authors write that regular cannabis exposure was associated with the severity of OAB. “All frequencies of regular use showed almost consistent effects on the onset and severity of overactive bladder,” the study abstract states.

What is overactive bladder?

OAB “causes a frequent and sudden urge to urinate that may be difficult to control,” according to the Mayo Clinic. A person “may feel like you need to pass urine many times during the day and night, and may also experience unintentional loss of urine (urgency incontinence).”

Affecting millions of people in the U.S., a 2016 review noted related symptoms can range from being bothersome to resulting in “significant detrimental effects on many aspects of individuals’ lives, representing a particularly impactful health burden to quality of life and productivity.”

Advertisement 4

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

A Canadian review released in 2020 showed that 43.7 per cent of respondents with urinary incontinence (UI) felt the condition was a “serious problem that could easily ruin quality of life.”

Of 23.7 per cent of people with UI, 61.2 per cent experienced leakage a few times a month or more frequently and 23.7 per cent had had UI for more than 11 years.

Cannabis has been used to relieve LUT symptoms

Authors of the new study point out that previous research has shown cannabis can help relieve LUTS.

Research from back in 2011 gathered input from patients with Multiple Sclerosis, who often develop “troublesome LUTS.” The study found that smoking weed was associated with a 64 per cent improvement in urinary urgency symptoms, a 55 per cent improvement in urgency incontinence and a 59 per cent improvement in hesitancy in initiating urination.

Advertisement 5

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

In 2017, a study published in Urology involved collecting urine samples from healthy control subjects and cannabis users to identify any differences in the number and quantity of urine proteins.

Researchers’ observations “potentially indicate activation (or inhibition) of specific signalling pathways in the lower urinary tract during chronic exposure to exogenous cannabinoids,” which includes THC and are defined as “cannabinoids that produce biological effects through their interactions with cannabinoid receptors.”

Study authors concluded more investigation was needed on the “potential role of exocannabinoids in developing therapies to treat LUT disorders.”

Also in Urology, a review of 48 studies from 2020 indicated “cannabinoids appear well-tolerated in the short-term, but their efficacy and long-term impact is unproven and unknown in urologic discomfort.” As such, randomized controlled trials were needed to assess cannabinoids for urologic symptoms.

All that said, authors of the latest study conclude their “data do not support the evidence for the use of cannabinoids in the medical treatment of patients with overactive bladder, especially given the thorny health problems caused by marijuana.”

Subscribe to Weekend Dispensary, a weekly newsletter from The GrowthOp.

    Advertisement 1

    This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

Thu, 29 Sep 2022 06:38:00 -0500 en-CA text/html https://winnipegsun.com/cannabis-news/regular-cannabis-use-increases-risk-of-developing-overactive-bladder-study
Killexams : 3 strategies to help reduce food expenses without sacrificing nutrition

Inflation and rising food costs have families scrambling to find ways to keep up. According to Consumer Price Index figures, the cost of food has risen more than 11 percent over the past year. There’s no doubt that higher food costs are causing many Californians to face food insecurity, increasing reliance on state and local food assistance programs. Those who are trying to stay afloat financially are forced to cut back to make ends meet.

How much must nutrition suffer when food costs rise?

Food insecurity in California has been increasing steadily this year with over 20 percent of Californians experiencing hunger. The CalFresh program (formerly referred to as food stamps) helps low-income households stretch their food-buying power to meet their nutrition needs. CalFresh benefits can be used at grocery stores and participating farmers’ markets.

Those who are struggling financially, especially single-parent households, people with disabilities and senior citizens, but are not eligible for food assistance programs are uniquely at risk. Many are tightening their food spending in order to afford other necessities.

The good news is that it’s still possible to eat healthfully on a budget. Timeless ways to save money on groceries such as shopping sales, clipping coupons and comparing prices are a good place to start. Many grocery stores offer digital coupons through their web-based app as well as rewards and loyalty programs for easy savings. However, there are additional ways to maximize your food dollar that can help you save even more on nutritious foods. These three simple strategies can help cut spending on food without sacrificing health and nutrition.

Pack Your Lunch

The food with the largest price markup is typically pre-prepared foods including restaurant food. Cutting back on the frequency of meals out can be a quick fix to reduce your monthly food expenses. Plus, food prepared at home is typically lower in calories, fat and sodium, while restaurant meals are often lacking in whole grains, fruit and vegetables. Packing a sandwich or leftovers for lunch is more cost-effective and usually healthier than eating out and can also help reduce food waste.

Eat More Plant-Based Meals

The cost of some animal products like eggs and dairy have increased more than others over the past year. While beef and seafood have not significantly risen in price this year, these foods are already higher in cost. A study published earlier this year in The Lancet Planetary Health found that vegan and vegetarian diets can cut food costs by up to one-third.

Meals that contain more plant foods like beans, lentils, tofu and whole grains can help with cutting back on big-ticket items like cheese, meat and fish. Plus, some of these plant-based foods are great pantry items that are even cheaper when purchased in bulk. Even those who don’t want to go vegan or vegetarian can save money by enjoying plant-based meals more often.

Reconsider Convenience Items

While convenience foods can save time, they often cost more money with less nutritional value than other foods. Take an inventory of the typical convenience items on your grocery list. Foods like granola bars, tortilla chips, salad dressing, cookies and soda may be taking up a significant portion of your food bill without supporting your health goals. Consider if any of these items could be made at home or swapped out for a lower-cost, healthier alternative. While making bread from scratch may be too time-consuming, homemade salad dressing is relatively easy to make, tastes great and can promote health while cutting costs.

LeeAnn Weintraub, MPH, RD is a registered dietitian, providing nutrition counseling and consulting to individuals, families and organizations. She can be reached by email at RD@halfacup.com.

Author

LeeAnn Weintraub, a registered dietitian, provides nutrition counseling and consulting to individuals, families and businesses. Email RD@halfacup.com.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 02:17:00 -0500 LeeAnn Weintraub en-US text/html https://www.sbsun.com/2022/10/06/3-strategies-to-help-reduce-food-expenses-without-sacrificing-nutrition/
Killexams : With cash infusion, after-school program is serving more ‘all-stars’ No result found, try new keyword!The program pays teachers ... School All-Stars for academic help from their regular teachers, who know exactly what they need, Zepher said. After they study, they can enjoy cheerleading, crafts ... Tue, 27 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://lasvegassun.com/news/2022/sep/30/with-cash-infusion-after-school-program-is-serving/ Killexams : Proposition FF: Slashing tax breaks for the wealthy would fund program giving all Colorado public school students free meals

Proposition FF is a measure on the November ballot that aims to ensure free school meals for all Colorado public school students, regardless of their household income.

It comes after the end of a federal initiative that provided free meals to all kids through the first two years of the pandemic. 

In the current school year, free lunches in Colorado are limited to students who qualify for free or reduced-price meals, a federal indicator of poverty. 

The measure, if approved by voters, would create a new school meals program funded by increasing taxes for households that earn more than $300,000 in federal adjusted gross income by reducing the amount they can claim in state income tax deductions. The measure would also require school meal providers to tap into federal funding programs and recoup as much in federal reimbursements as possible so fewer state funds are needed to feed students.

Proposition FF was referred to the ballot by Democrats in the Colorado legislature this year through the passage of House Bill 1414. It requires a simple majority vote to pass. 

Here’s what you need to know about Proposition FF:

What it would do

The measure would establish the Healthy School Meals for All program to reimburse school meal providers for making free breakfasts and lunches available to all kids. Any school meal provider could benefit from the program, whether they serve one or more school districts or charter schools. 

The program would be funded by restricting the amount of money that households earning at least $300,000 could deduct from their Colorado taxable income starting in tax year 2023. Those taxpayers would be able to deduct no more than $12,000 for single filers and no more than $16,000 for joint filers.

Currently, taxpayers who earn more than $400,000 can claim a maximum of $60,000 in state income tax deductions for a joint filer and a maximum of $30,000 for a single filer, caps that were passed under House Bill 1311. Taxpayers whose income is between $300,000 and $400,000 are not limited in how much they can deduct from their state taxable income.

The provision would impact an estimated 113,988 tax returns, or 5% of all Colorado returns.

The restriction would affect a taxpayer’s standard deduction or itemized deductions, which include charitable contributions, state and local taxes, and mortgage interest.

The proposition would mandate that the state education department complete a report every two years beginning in 2024 for the state legislature assessing the new program. The department would also be required to work with an independent auditor to produce a financial and performance audit of the program.

Currently, 183 school meal providers feed students throughout Colorado and cover the costs of providing free and reduced-price lunches by tapping into state and federal funds and charging families whose income exceeds federal poverty levels. Students might qualify for free or reduced-price meals, depending on their household income, but Colorado students who can receive reduced-price meals get free meals instead because the state pays for their portion of the meal cost.

Without the federal universal free school meals initiative during the past two school years, when all students could secure free meals, 40% of Colorado K-12 students would have qualified for free school meals based on their family’s income — about 355,000 students.

The arguments for

Advocates of Proposition FF say that meeting kids’ basic needs, including making sure they are fed, is critical for their success in school and will help more families at a time many are struggling with the state’s rising cost of living. With food insecurity on the rise during the pandemic and inflation now affecting the cost of food, Proposition FF is designed to make sure all public school students across the state — including kids in early childhood education — can access food just like they had been able to for the first few years of the pandemic.

A Centennial Elementary School staff member wheels lunches through the cafeteria Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021, at the Harrison School District 2 school in Colorado Springs. (Mark Reis, Special to The Colorado Sun)

The current school meal program that subsidizes breakfasts and lunches for students doesn’t reach all the kids who qualify, said Rep. Serena Gonzales-Gutierrez, a Denver Democrat and prime sponsor of House Bill 1414. That’s because some families may be too embarrassed to fill out the necessary paperwork while immigrant families may hesitate to provide identification information on school forms for fear of deportation. And while some families may not qualify for free or reduced-price school meals because their income level exceeds program thresholds, they may still struggle to feed their kids without help.

Gonzales-Gutierrez wants to remove the stigma kids often face when they can’t pay for meals at school by opening up free meals to everyone.

“If that means we’re going to feed a kid who comes from a family that can afford food for them, I don’t see any issue with that,” Gonzales-Gutierrez said. “They’re all kids, and at any moment at this time in this world we live in, most people are one paycheck away from not having those means to meet those basic needs.”

She doesn’t view the restrictions placed on state income tax deductions as a tax increase and said the measure still allows taxpayers the ability to claim deductions.

“We’re not completely taking that away, and we’re investing in our kids,” Gonzales-Gutierrez said. 

She prioritizes kids’ well-being above all else.

“It’s going to benefit our schools,” Gonzales-Gutierrez said. “It’s going to benefit our students and their education, and so I think it is a great investment no matter how you look at it.”

The arguments against

Opponents of Proposition FF argue that revenue from a tax increase shouldn’t be spent on students whose families don’t need financial assistance and that the dollars would have more of an impact if districts could decide how to spend the extra money based on their specific students’ needs.

Conservative fiscal activist Michael Fields would rather spend a tax increase on other pressing education issues, such as teacher pay.

“I’m not going to say that it’s a waste to provide lunches for students,” Fields said. “I just think the money might be able to be better spent somewhere else.”

Those against the measure are also quick to point out that a jump in taxes will make it harder for families to save or invest, particularly at a time inflation and a high cost of living is already straining households. Fields also has concerns that the funding projections related to the ballot measure could be off, particularly with food being a significant driver of inflation right now, and the potential for restrictions on state income tax deductions to discourage people from donating to charities. Fields wants to see a study conducted looking at the potential impact of the ballot measure on charitable giving.

It’s a “trade-off” Fields worries could hurt philanthropic organizations throughout the state.

Democratic Gov. Jared Polis also isn’t a big fan of the measure. He told Colorado Public Radio that he’s not sure he will vote for it. “I don’t have an objection to the funding mechanism but at the same time I sort of ask myself, if we had this would it be better just to be able to pay teachers better, reduce class size? Or is the best use of it lunches for upper- middle-income families?” he said to CPR.

One big thing you should know

Proposition FF would increase income tax revenue to Colorado by an estimated $100.7 million during the first full year of the tax change, fiscal year 2023-24, which begins on July 1, 2023. The funds wouldn’t be subject to the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights camp on government growth and spending.

The new program that would be created by the measure would also be supported by federal dollars. The proposition would require Colorado to take part in a federal initiative that ensures students enrolled in Medicaid automatically qualify for free school meals subsidized by the federal government.

Additionally, school meal providers would be obligated to participate in the federal Community Eligibility Provision program, if they qualified. That program provides extra federal reimbursements to schools with a high population of students whose household income makes them eligible for free and reduced-price meals. Schools with a high concentration of kids living in poverty are able to offer free meals to all students.

The players and the money

Healthy School Meals for All Colorado Students is the issue committee pushing for passage of Proposition FF.

Nonprofit Hunger Free Colorado is the top donor to the committee, giving half of the $1 million the group has raised. The Community First Foundation donated $250,000, while Gary Advocacy gave $100,000. 

Much of Healthy School Meals for All Colorado Students’ spending thus far has gone to consultants, but the group was slated to start airing TV ads Oct. 11.

There isn’t organized, well-funded opposition to the measure.

Colorado Sun correspondent Sandra Fish contributed to this report.

The Latest

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 02:11:00 -0500 Trish Zornio en-US text/html https://coloradosun.com/2022/10/12/colorado-proposition-ff-school-meals-tax-deductions/
Killexams : Gov. Mills launches program to deliver grants up to $2,000 to family caregivers

The Mills administration is launching a $5.1 million pilot program that would provide grants of up to $2,000 to people caring for a family member with a disability.

The program, called Respite for ME, begins Monday. The one-time grants aim to help people who are caring for family members who have Alzheimer’s, dementia or other disabilities.

Funding for the two-year pilot comes from the federal American Rescue Plan. The Mills administration could not estimate how many people would be eligible, but there are an estimated 29,000 people ages 65 and older in Maine living with Alzheimer’s. Some are in memory care facilities, but others get care at home.

The money can be used for respite care, which provides help with daily tasks such as feeding, dressing and bathing to deliver family caretakers a break from those chores. It can also be used to cover other costs, such as assistive technology – anything from hearing aids to wheelchairs to devices that help patients retain memory.

“Families across Maine are doing their best to care for the people they love in the comfort of their own homes, but it isn’t always easy,” said Gov. Janet Mills in a statement. “Respite for ME will deliver families access to important services so they can better support themselves and their loved ones.”

Bridget Quinn, AARP Maine advocacy and outreach director, said in an interview with the Press Herald on Wednesday that the need is great, with more than 181,000 unpaid caregivers in the state taking care of a family member.

“This is absolutely a step in the right direction,” Quinn said. “We don’t have quite the systems in place to support our caregivers. They are giving their time, resources, and often spend thousands out-of-pocket. If you install a ramp at the home, for instance, that’s coming straight out-of-pocket.”

Quinn said these at-home caregivers help family members age in place, but they need a better support system.

The news comes on the same day as Japanese pharmaceutical company Eisai announced that its experimental medication for Alzheimer’s slowed cognitive decline in patients in the early stages of the disease. The drug reduced cognitive decline by 27 percent over 18 months compared to a placebo in a study of about 1,800 patients.

But in Maine, which has the highest median age in the country, the number of people needing in-home support and care is only going to increase.

Brenda Gallant, executive director of the Maine Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program, said in a statement that family caregivers “face the enormous challenge of providing care and support that is often needed 24 hours a day. The demands of caregiving can take a toll emotionally, physically, and financially and may lead to caregiver burnout. Respite for ME will provide critically needed respite services for family caregivers, strengthening their ability to be a caregiver.”

To be eligible, the caregiver must be an adult who is not otherwise getting paid for the care provided. The pilot program will be used to evaluate “what services are most effective in supporting families going forward,” according to the news release.

Those looking for more information about the program should call (877) 353-3771.


Use the form below to reset your password. When you've submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code.

Thu, 29 Sep 2022 08:52:00 -0500 text/html https://www.sunjournal.com/2022/09/28/mills-launches-program-to-give-grants-up-to-2000-to-family-caregivers/
310-056 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List