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Hi I am Ambily, 6 months back I joined a web development course from one of the Software training institute.They promised real projects along with placement in a time bound manner. I didn't get both.Then I got a call from siliconindia.com. I was obviously very apprehensive about the course they were offering, and the placement assistance.As per their request I went to their office in old airport road, where they updated me about the course and showed how it works. Since I've already made up my mind to make web development my career, I decided to join their course (it was one fifth of what I've spent already).Well it was in total contrast to my previous experience, the training was excellent, tutors on call, and placement was done on evaluation of my projects and now I am with Progress Software, it's like a dream come true.

Sun, 16 Aug 2020 00:52:00 -0500 text/html https://www.siliconindia.com/online_courses/java_certification-cid-2.html
Killexams : Enterprise Software Solutions

UDRI's Enterprise Software researchers, architects, designers, and developers build robust software systems to solve any enterprise-wide challenge. We provide requirements development, technical consulting, and software development and maintenance, including modifications, optimizations, enhancements and knowledge transfer.

We are experts in developing enterprise business-grade software for daily operations. Our expertise includes cloud development, web development, current platforms, user experience and user interfaces (UX/UI) and databases. We build, test, and regularly deploy effective code; however, we also understand that live systems do not always behave as expected. In such cases, we are prepared to quickly handle any issues that arise in a production environment.

Our customers include institutes of higher education (such as the University of Dayton, Wright State University, Sinclair College and Ohio Christian University), manufacturers such as Emerson Electric and numerous small businesses.

Capabilities & Services

Our extensive experience includes the following:

  • Cloud architecture
  • Cyber security / data security
  • Database and information system development, administration, optimization and security evaluation
  • Data visualizations such as software dashboards and Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
  • Distributed processing
  • Native and web-based mobile apps
  • Online stores and payment systems
  • Reporting systems
  • Scalable cloud-based/enterprise-hosted websites on platforms such as Microsoft Azure, Angular, .NET (C#), Laravel (PHP) and more
  • Security and situational awareness systems
  • System automation
  • UX/UI design, development and implementation
  • Website development and maintenance

In addition, we can provide technical consultations, evaluations, and costing for proposed projects from other vendors.

Certified & Qualified Software Professionals

UDRI has a diverse mix of software researchers from advanced undergraduate students to PhDs. Many of our development professionals hold industry-standard certifications such as the following:

  • Certified Authorization Professional (CAP)
  • Sun Certified Java Programmer (SCJP)
  • Network+
  • Security+

We develop software in accordance with widely recognized industry standards such as ISO and ASTM and use the time-tested and proven Agile development methodology that provides transparency and accountability. We encourage our clients to remain as involved in the development process as they wish, even providing daily updates if desired. In addition, our innovative and supervised Work-to-School program reduces costs and provides better quality than offshoring.

Contact Us

Our researchers, developers, designers, engineers, and problem solvers are ready to tackle your software challenges elegantly, efficiently, and cost-effectively. Contact us today to set up your consultation.

Contact Us: 937-229-2113  |  E-Mail  |  Form

Top: Footprint™ situational awareness software in use. UDRI developed Footprint in order to enable organizations to gather and analyze crime-related data from disparate sensors.

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:10:00 -0500 en text/html https://udayton.edu/udri/capabilities/software/enterprise-software.php
Killexams : Our researchers

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Abuzayed, Ismail Hamed Ali Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering IHAAbuzayed1@sheffield.ac.uk A Amodio, Serenella Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering SAmodio1@sheffield.ac.uk A Askari, S Hamza Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering SHAskari1@sheffield.ac.uk A Ayog, Janice Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering JLAyog1@sheffield.ac.uk A

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Barr, Dr Andrew Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering a.barr@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5703 B Bhave, Pali Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering pbhave1@sheffield.ac.uk B Bradbury, Leanna Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering labradbury1@sheffield.ac.uk B

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Cai, Lingjie Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering LCai11@sheffield.ac.uk C Cao, Hoang Long Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering hlcao1@sheffield.ac.uk C Carneiro, Isabel Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering icarneirocardosodasilva1@sheffield.ac.uk C Cetinkaya, Dr Oktay Research Associate in Wireless Network Performance Department of Civil and Structural Engineering o.cetinkaya@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5418 C Chakraborty, Rohit Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering rohit.chakraborty@sheffield.ac.uk C Chakraborty, Dr Sumit Marie-Curie Fellow Department of Civil and Structural Engineering sumit.chakraborty@sheffield.ac.uk C Cho, Yun-Hang Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering yun-hang.cho@sheffield.ac.uk C Clarke, Emma Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering elclarke2@sheffield.ac.uk C Corredor Garcia, J. Leonardo Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering JLCorredorGarcia1@sheffield.ac.uk C Court, Elizabeth Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering elizabeth.court@sheffield.ac.uk C Cripps, Dr John Emeritus Staff Department of Civil and Structural Engineering j.c.cripps@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5054 C

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De-Ville, Dr Simon Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering simon.de-ville@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 4416 D Dennis, Adam Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering aadennis1@sheffield.ac.uk D Doronina, Anastasia Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering ADoronina1@sheffield.ac.uk D

E

El Khouri, Imad Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering IElKhouri1@sheffield.ac.uk E

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Fairclough, Dr Helen Research Fellow Department of Civil and Structural Engineering helen.fairclough@sheffield.ac.uk F Farooq, Muhammad Zaeem Research Associate in Building Ventilation for Health Department of Civil and Structural Engineering m.z.farooq@sheffield.ac.uk F Fathi, Farshid Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering FFathi1@sheffield.ac.uk F Fish, Dr Katherine Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering k.fish@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5732 F

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Gallet, Adrien Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering agallet1@sheffield.ac.uk G Geranmehr, Dr Mohammadali Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering m.geranmehr@sheffield.ac.uk G Gleeson, Killian Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering kgleeson1@sheffield.ac.uk G

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Hageman, Tim Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering THageman1@sheffield.ac.uk H Hajihassanpour, Mahya Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering m.hajihassanpour@sheffield.ac.uk H He, Dr Linwei Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering linwei.he@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5724 H Hosker, Tom Active Building Centre Research Data Programmer Department of Civil and Structural Engineering t.j.hosker@sheffield.ac.uk H

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Isaac, Dr Obed Samuelraj Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering o.isaac@sheffield.ac.uk I

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Jepps, Lewis Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering LJepps1@sheffield.ac.uk J John, Edward Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering edajohn1@sheffield.ac.uk J Johnson, Richard Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering R.C.Johnson@sheffield.ac.uk J

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Kazemi, Dr Ehsan Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering e.kazemi@sheffield.ac.uk K Kyritsakas, Grigorios Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering GKyritsakas1@sheffield.ac.uk K

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Lanau, Dr Maud Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering m.lanau@sheffield.ac.uk L Li, Qianqian Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering qianqian.li@sheffield.ac.uk L Li, Dr Xinyi Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Xinyi.Li@sheffield.ac.uk L Lodge, Tommy Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering pha08tl@sheffield.ac.uk L Lokk, Reinar Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering rlokk1@sheffield.ac.uk L

M

MacRorie, Matthew Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering mhmacrorie1@sheffield.ac.uk M Mallinson, Emma Research Assistant Department of Civil and Structural Engineering emma.mallinson@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5786 M Meghwar, Shanker Lal Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering shankerlal1@sheffield.ac.uk M Moavi, Mohammad Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering mmoavi1@sheffield.ac.uk M Mojtabaei, Dr Seyed Mohammad EPSRC Research Fellow Department of Civil and Structural Engineering s.mojtabaei@sheffield.ac.uk M Mounce, Dr Steve Visiting Research Fellow Department of Civil and Structural Engineering s.r.mounce@sheffield.ac.uk M Muraro, Fabio Research Student/Research Assistant in Acoustic & Hydrodynamic Measurement Department of Civil and Structural Engineering FMuraro1@sheffield.ac.uk M

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Nanayakkara, Isuru Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering kiunanayakkara1@sheffield.ac.uk N Ng, Chin Tze Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering ctng1@sheffield.ac.uk N Norbidin, Norliza Rima Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering nrnorbidin1@sheffield.ac.uk N

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Pannell, Jordan Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering JPannell1@sheffield.ac.uk P Parry, Tony Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering tparry2@sheffield.ac.uk P Peng, Dr Zhanjie Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering zhangjie.peng@sheffield.ac.uk P Pick, Dr Frances Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering f.pick@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5732 P Pickering, Dr Erik Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering e.g.pickering@sheffield.ac.uk P Pinchbeck, Joseph KTP Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering j.pinchbeck@sheffield.ac.uk P

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Quinn, Dr Ruth Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering R.Quinn@sheffield.ac.uk Q

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Rabab, Saba KTP Associate - Real Time Control Department of Civil and Structural Engineering s.rabab@sheffield.ac.uk R Ratcliff, Adam Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering aratcliff1@sheffield.ac.uk R Roberts, Dr Katherine Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Katherine.roberts@sheffield.ac.uk R Rogers, Jade Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering jcrogers1@sheffield.ac.uk R Roscini, Dr Francesca MCSA Research Fellow Department of Civil and Structural Engineering f.roscini@sheffield.ac.uk R Rubinato, Dr Matteo Visiting Research Fellow Department of Civil and Structural Engineering m.rubinato@sheffield.ac.uk +44 7794 995864 R

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Sailor, Gavin Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering g.sailor@sheffield.ac.uk S Saptura, Bastian Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering BSaputra1@sheffield.ac.uk S Sarfraz, Amal Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering asarfraz1@sheffield.ac.uk S Scutt, Sophie Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering sscutt1@sheffield.ac.uk S Selvaranjan, Kajanan Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering kselvaranjan1@sheffield.ac.uk S Seyoum, Dr Alemtsehay G. Research Associate in Sewer and Water Supply System Performance Department of Civil and Structural Engineering a.g.seyoum@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5416 S Sharifian, Dr Mohammad Kazem Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering m.sharifian@sheffield.ac.uk S Shelley, Dr Samuel KTP Associate – Fibre Optic Flow Sensing Department of Civil and Structural Engineering s.shelley@sheffield.ac.uk S Sheng, Yulan Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering ysheng8@sheffield.ac.uk S Shepherd, Dr Will Research Staff Department of Civil and Structural Engineering w.shepherd@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5732 S Shirvani, Mohammad Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering MShirvani1@sheffield.ac.uk S Sonnenwald, Dr Fred Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering f.sonnenwald@sheffield.ac.uk +44 114 222 5416 S Soria Penafiel, Rosa Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering RISoriaPenafiel1@sheffield.ac.uk S Stevenson, Rowena Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering rstevenson1@sheffield.ac.uk S Sun, Xitong Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering XSun44@sheffield.ac.uk S Sun, Yushu Assistant Data Scientist Department of Civil and Structural Engineering yushu.sun@sheffield.ac.uk S

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Takalloozadeh, Dr Meisam Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering m.takalloozadeh@sheffield.ac.uk T Tan, Ling Min Research Associate in Urban Decarbonisation Department of Civil and Structural Engineering lingmin.tan@sheffield.ac.uk T Trochoutsou, Niki Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering n.trochoutsou@sheffield.ac.uk T

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Vu, Vinh Quang Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering v.q.vu@sheffield.ac.uk V

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Wang, Jiaming Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering jiaming.wang@sheffield.ac.uk W Ward, Dr Wil Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering w.ward@sheffield.ac.uk W Weston, Dr Sally Research Associate Department of Civil and Structural Engineering sally.weston@sheffield.ac.uk W Williams, Gabriella Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering GBWilliams1@sheffield.ac.uk W Wood, Tom Research Associate in Policy Evidence for Extreme Climate Change Adaption Department of Civil and Structural Engineering thomas.wood1@sheffield.ac.uk W

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Yildiz, Veysel Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering vyildiz1@sheffield.ac.uk Y YU, Weijiang Research Student Department of Civil and Structural Engineering wyu18@sheffield.ac.uk Y
Wed, 21 Oct 2020 03:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/civil/people/research
Killexams : A teenager breaks free in ‘Murina’

Hello! I’m Mark Olsen. Welcome to another edition of your regular field guide to a world of Only Good Movies.

40 years of Outfest. Celebrating its 40th anniversary, Outfest — L.A.’s LGBTQ+ festival — began this week and runs through July 24. The festival opened with Billy Porter’s directorial debut, the coming-of-age romance “Anything’s Possible.” Among highlights of this year’s program will be a 20th anniversary screening of Todd Haynes’ “Far From Heaven” in 35 mm, with star Julianne Moore in attendance, and a preview of the upcoming series adaptation of “A League of Their Own.” The festival will close with the premiere of “They/Them,” a thriller that marks the directing debut of screenwriter John Logan.

Nicolas Cage Day (Unofficial). In what is apparently a complete coincidence, two venues will play top-grade Nicolas Cage films on Sunday, making the day an unofficial celebration of the actor. The New Beverly — in a double bill programmed by Cage himself — will have 35-mm screenings of Martin Scorsese’s undersung “Bringing Out the Dead,” written by Paul Schrader, and John Dahl’s crucial ’90s neo-noir “Red Rock West.” The Academy Museum screens John Woo’s ecstatic “Face/Off” in 35 mm in the big room at the David Geffen Theater with an introduction from screenwriters Mike Werb and Michael Colleary.

Rivette’s “Duelle” revisited. The Mezzanine screening series hosts the L.A. premiere of a 2K restoration of Jacques Rivette’s 1976 film “Duelle” at the 2220 Arts + Archives space on Thursday, July 21. With an introduction from critic and programmer Miriam Bale, the event will bring to local audiences another of Rivette’s uncanny metaphysical explorations, this time starring Juliet Berto and Bulle Ogier as rival goddesses making their way through Paris.

“My Old School” screening. On Wednesday, July 20, we will host an in-person Indie Focus screening series event for the new documentary “My Old School.” Following a showing of the film, director Jono McLeod will join us for a Q&A.

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‘Murina’

The directorial debut for Antoneta Alamat Kusijanović, “Murina” won the Caméra d’Or prize for best first film when it premiered at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival. Shot by celebrated cinematographer Hélène Louvart and executive produced by Martin Scorsese, the film tells the story of teenage Julija (Gracija Filipović), yearning to break free from her controlling father and life in their small Croatian coastal town. The movie is playing in limited release.

For The Times, Justin Chang wrote, “At times overpowering in its sun-drenched sense of place, ‘Murina’ reveals each corner of this private world to us with a cool, dispassionate gaze. … [Julija’s] dream of escape may well be a delusion; Javier, for all the promise he represents, is at best a knight in tarnished armor, as well as a man with burdens and anxieties of his own. But it’s a dream that Kusijanović embraces alongside her heroine, notably in a sequence of Julija swimming in open water, the camera bobbing gently in front of her for a few moments before rising to a breathtaking bird’s-eye view. It’s a bracing image of freedom in a world that, even if only for a few moments, finally feels like paradise.”

For the New York Times, Manohla Dargis wrote, “The writer-director Antoneta Alamat Kusijanović uses dialogue prudently, keeping exposition to a minimum and letting details trickle in through naturalistic conversations and in the feelings that tremble in every exchange. Why is everyone angry? Patriarchy? Teenagers? Take your pick. Kusijanović, making her feature directing debut, plots the family’s dynamic through a roundelay of gazes and with near-geometric precision. … For the most part, the director cuts loose her characters and lets them and the story’s vague ideas — about gender, sexuality, money and power — swirl and drift, leaving you to decide how and whether they all fit together, or don’t.”

For Vulture, Bilge Ebiri wrote, “The settings of ‘Murina’ are certainly lovely, but Kusijanović avoids the siren call of the picturesque. The sea is steel blue, the terrain arid and lunar; the landscape has been stripped of possibility. Even the expertly-shot underwater sequences have a strange, surreal desolation to them; only those haunted, serpentine morays seem to exist in this barren blue world. (We see almost no other fish.) The daughter’s dreams cannot be contained by this spare coastline, while the father’s dreams have curdled here into empty grandiosity. The whole place is suffocated of life. And yet, somehow, the picture itself is wonderfully alive.”

For Reverse Shot, Ela Bittencourt wrote, “Despite its essentially polemical, feminist nature, ‘Murina’ can be surprisingly understated, leaving viewers ample room to breathe. … And though Kusijanović doesn’t suggest a clear way out of Julija’s entrapment, her young heroine has already done something therapeutic. While she has lashed out to no avail, it’s true, she’s also tested the boundaries of her relationship with powerful men — the limits of her reliance on them, as well as the limits of her allegiance to womanhood as placidly set out by her mother.”

A young woman in a white one-piece bathing suit walks next to an older man in swim trunks looking at his phone.

Leon Lučev and Gracija Filipović in “Murina.”

(Kino Lorber)

‘Mrs. Harris Goes To Paris’

Directed by Anthony Fabian from the novel by Paul Gallico, “Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris” is a whimsically delightful tale of fashion and finding oneself. The movie stars Lesley Manville as Ada Harris, a widowed housecleaner in 1950s London who decides she simply must have a couture Dior gown and goes on quite the journey to get it. The supporting cast includes Isabelle Huppert, Lambert Wilson, Alba Baptista, Lucas Bravo and Jason Isaacs. The movie is playing in theaters in general release.

Emily Zemler spoke to Manville, Fabian and Huppert about the movie. Of it’s sneaky, light tone, Manville said, "“It’s meant to make you feel good. It’s meant to make you feel that the world is all right when the world is really not all right at the moment. It’s just a heartwarming story about this little Duracell battery of a woman who has got this notion in her head that why shouldn’t she have a dress? She’s a woman. She’s feminine. She wants to feel lovely. And why can’t it be something that this cleaner can have?”

For Tribune News Service, Katie Walsh wrote, “One could say that frittering away money on an expensive dress wouldn’t be worth it, but one would be revealing themselves as not knowing the real power of real fashion; that often looking good means feeling good, and feeling good means knowing, and demanding your own worth. This is the message of ‘Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris,’ which boasts a proud pro-labor sentiment, starting with Mrs. Harris, whose adventure across the English Channel helps her to see herself as someone worth being seen, someone deserving of nice things.”

For the Washington Post, Ann Hornaday wrote, “Hovering over ‘Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris’ is a character from another movie entirely: Cyril, the martinet-like sister Manville played in 2017’s fashion-centric melodrama ‘Phantom Thread.’ … Manville in any incarnation is one of the great pleasures of screen storytelling, especially now. And even at its most patronizing, ‘Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris’ provides a generous, gentle stage for her most endearing qualities to shine through. There are moments when ‘Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris’ resembles the cinematic equivalent of nursery food: over-egged but soothing, and perhaps a much-needed respite from a world in danger of spinning off its axis.”

For Vanity Fair, Richard Lawson wrote, “Manville shrewdly draws a working class hero who is neither supernaturally good nor saintly in her humble penury. She’s just a regular lady who wishes to do an irregular thing, and so she does. … It’s lovely to see someone of Manville’s stature treat this airy lark so thoughtfully; she guides ‘Mrs. Harris’ toward a genuinely poignant conclusion, one in which the Euro fantasy fades but a more sustainable, more local contentment begins to bloom. Not so much a testament to conspicuous consumption as it is to the necessity of occasionally shaking up the routine of one’s life, ‘Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris’ is a nourishing, if fleeting, summer holiday that can be enjoyed for far less than the cost of couture.”

A woman stands in a strapless gown. A woman kneels nearby as a man in lab coat and gloves presses his hand to his brow.

Lesley Manville, center, with fellow cast members in “Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris.”

(David Lukacs / Ada Films Ltd.)

‘Don’t Make Me Go’

Directed by Hannah Marks from a script by Vera Herbert, “Don’t Make Me Go” is a father-daughter road-trip dramedy anchored by the performances of John Cho and Mia Isaac. Single father Max (Cho) takes his daughter, Wally (Isaac), on a cross-country drive to his high school reunion, though he has other motivations in mind. The film is streaming on Prime Video.

For The Times, Sarah-Tai Black wrote, “A keen student of millennial women filmmakers such as Greta Gerwig and Lena Dunham, actor and filmmaker Hannah Marks similarly imbues her movies with equal dashes of frustration, melancholy and humor; her latest feature, ‘Don’t Make Me Go,’ is no exception to this. … While every director shouldn’t be tasked with reinventing the cinematic wheel (most every movie has its place and audience), there is something about a movie like ‘Don’t Make Me Go’ that — even as it pulls on your heartstrings or makes you smile — still leaves one feeling uninspired.”

For the New York Times, Amy Nicholson wrote, “The setup is like a hazard sign practicing ‘Caution: Treacle Ahead.’ Yet the director Hannah Marks and the screenwriter Vera Herbert veer from predictability. Life is unpredictable, and the film gambles big to make that point. … Cho and Isaac’s stellar performances expose the gulf between familiarity and intimacy. The two flinty characters are more likely to expose their own vulnerable bellies to outsiders than to each other. Herbert’s droll, scrupulously realistic dialogue captures the journey of a parent and a child learning to see each other as flawed people.”

For the Hollywood Reporter, Angie Han wrote, “With Max growing more complicated while Wally does not, ‘Don’t Make Me Go’ starts to look like nothing so much as an exaggerated fantasy of parenthood. … When Max’s secrets inevitably come tumbling out, the ensuing confrontation sounds less like an emotional outburst between a teenager and her dad, and more like a parent’s fantasy of all the frustrations they’ve imagined expressing to their kid, and all the sentimentalities they wish they’d hear back in turn.”

For IndieWire, Kate Erbland wrote, “From its opening moments, Hannah Marks’ ‘Don’t Make Me Go’ tries to put its audience at ease with a surprising promise: disappointment. ‘You’re not going to like the way this story ends, but I think you’re going to like this story,’ young Wally Park (newbie Mia Isaac) tells us via voiceover. … And it will prove to be true: ‘Don’t Make Me Go’ is a sweet, charming, and eventually daring dramedy with tons of heart. Also true: Where this road trip movie ends its journey will likely engender some very strong reactions, but Vera Herbert’s smart script (a Black List entry), Marks’ assured direction, and the delight of Cho and Isaac’s well-matched performances sell it. It stings, but we knew that. Wally told us already, but it’s up to the audience to believe her.”

A view through the front windshield of a young woman driving a car and an older male passenger

John Cho and Mia Isaac in “Don’t Make Me Go.”

(Prime Video)

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 18:05:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/movies/newsletter/2022-07-15/indie-focus-murina-mrs-harris-goes-to-paris-dont-make-me-go-indie-focus
Killexams : Taiwan Defiant As China Readies Military Drills Over Pelosi Visit

Taiwan struck a defiant tone Wednesday as it hosted US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, with a furious China gearing up for military exercises dangerously close to the island's shores in retaliation for the visit.

Pelosi landed in Taiwan on Tuesday despite a series of increasingly stark threats from Beijing, which views the island as its territory and had said it would consider the visit a major provocation.

China responded swiftly, warning the US ambassador in Beijing of "extremely serious consequences" and announcing military drills in seas around Taiwan -- some of the world's busiest waterways.

"Facing deliberately heightened military threats, Taiwan will not back down. We will... continue to hold the line of defence for democracy," Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen said at an event with Pelosi in Taipei.

She also thanked Pelosi for "taking concrete actions to show your staunch support for Taiwan at this critical moment".

China tries to keep Taiwan isolated on the world stage and opposes countries having official exchanges with Taipei.

Pelosi, second in line to the presidency, is the highest-profile elected US official to visit Taiwan in 25 years.

"Today, our delegation... came to Taiwan to make unequivocally clear we will not abandon our commitment to Taiwan," she said at the event with Tsai.

Earlier, Pelosi said her group had come "in friendship to Taiwan" and "in peace to the region".

The Taiwan visit of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (C) has sent tensions soaring between Washington and Beijing AFP / Sam Yeh

The administration of President Joe Biden said in the run-up to the visit that US policy towards Taiwan remained unchanged.

This means support for its government while diplomatically recognising Beijing over Taipei, and opposing a formal independence declaration by Taiwan or a forceful takeover by China.

While the White House is understood to be opposed to Pelosi's Taiwan stop, its National Security Council spokesman John Kirby said she was entitled to go where she pleased.

After Pelosi touched down Tuesday night in a military aircraft following days of feverish speculation about her plans, the Chinese foreign ministry summoned US Ambassador Nicholas Burns.

Her visit "is extremely egregious in nature and the consequences are extremely serious", Vice Foreign Minister Xie Feng told Burns, according to state news agency Xinhua.

"China will not sit idly by."

The Chinese military said it was on "high alert" and would "launch a series of targeted military actions in response" to the visit.

The drills will include "long-range live ammunition shooting" in the Taiwan Strait, which separates the island from mainland China and straddles vital shipping lanes.

Map of Taiwan and its surrounding waters, highlighting the areas of the Chinese military drills from August 4 to 7. AFP / Laurence CHU

The zone of Chinese exercises will be within 20 kilometres (12 miles) of Taiwan's shoreline at some points, according to coordinates released by the Chinese military.

"Some of the areas of China's drills breach into... (Taiwan's) territorial waters," defence ministry spokesman Sun Li-fang said at a press conference Wednesday.

"This is an irrational move to challenge the international order."

Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council, which sets the government's China policies, accused Beijing of "vicious intimidation" that would "seriously impact the peace and prosperity of the entire East Asia".

It added that democratic countries should "unite and take a solemn stand to punish and deter" Beijing.

Japan, a key US ally in the region, said Wednesday it had expressed concern to China over the exercises, while South Korea called for dialogue to maintain regional peace and stability.

Both countries are on Pelosi's Asia itinerary, following stops in Singapore, Malaysia and Taiwan.

China on Wednesday announced curbs on the import of fruit and fish from Taiwan -- citing the detection of pesticide residue and the coronavirus. It also halted shipments of sand to the island.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi vowed Thursday to punish those who offend Beijing.

"This is a complete farce. The United States is violating China's sovereignty under the guise of so-called 'democracy'... those who offend China will be punished," he said.

Outside the Taiwanese parliament, 31-year-old computer programmer Frank Chen shrugged off the Chinese warnings against Pelosi's visit.

"I'm not too panic about China's intimidation," he told AFP.

"I think China will take more threatening actions and ban more Taiwanese products, but we shouldn't be too worried."

There was a small group of pro-China demonstrators outside parliament as well.

"The United States uses Taiwan as a pawn in its confrontation with China, to try to drag China down so (it) can dominate the world," Lee Kai-dee, a 71-year-old retired researcher, told AFP.

China has vowed to annex self-ruled, democratic Taiwan one day, by force if necessary.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February heightened fears in Taiwan that China may similarly follow through on its threats to annex the island.

MEET IBT NEWS FROM BELOW CHANNELS

© Copyright AFP 2022. All rights reserved.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 13:43:00 -0500 Amber WANG en text/html https://www.ibtimes.com/we-come-friendship-taiwan-peace-region-pelosi-3595113
Killexams : 27 China Jets Enter Taiwan's Air Defence Zone After Nancy Pelosi's Visit

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen said the island of 23 million would not be cowed.

Twenty-seven Chinese warplanes flew into Taiwan's air defence zone on Wednesday, Taipei said, as US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi made her controversial visit to the self-ruled island that Beijing considers its territory.

"27 PLA aircraft... entered the surrounding area of (Republic of China) on August 3, 2022," the defence ministry said in a tweet.

Taiwan maintained a defiant tone as it hosted Pelosi, with a furious China gearing up for military exercises dangerously close to the island's shores in retaliation for the visit.

Pelosi landed in Taiwan on Tuesday despite a series of increasingly stark threats from Beijing, which views the island as its territory and had said it would consider the visit a major provocation.

China responded swiftly, announcing what it said were "necessary and just" military drills in the seas just off Taiwan's coast -- some of the world's busiest waterways.

"In the current struggle surrounding Pelosi's Taiwan visit, the United States are the provocateurs, China is the victim," Beijing's foreign ministry said.

But Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen said the island of 23 million would not be cowed.

"Facing deliberately heightened military threats, Taiwan will not back down. We will... continue to hold the line of defence for democracy," Tsai said at an event with Pelosi in Taipei.

She also thanked the 82-year-old US lawmaker for "taking concrete actions to show your staunch support for Taiwan at this critical moment".

China tries to keep Taiwan isolated on the world stage and opposes countries having official exchanges with Taipei.

Pelosi, second in line to the presidency, is the highest-profile elected US official to visit Taiwan in 25 years.

"Today, our delegation... came to Taiwan to make unequivocally clear we will not abandon our commitment to Taiwan," she said at the event with Tsai.

She added her group had come "in friendship to Taiwan" and "in peace to the region".

Before leaving Taiwan, Pelosi also met with several dissidents who have previously been in the crosshairs of China's wrath -- including Tiananmen protest student leader Wu'er Kaixi.

"We are in high agreement that Taiwan is in the frontline (of democracy)," Wu'er said.

"Both the United States and Taiwan governments need to... conduct more in defending human rights."

Pelosi's delegation left Taiwan on Wednesday evening headed to South Korea, her next stop in an Asia tour. She will head to Japan after.

- 'High alert' -

The administration of President Joe Biden said in the run-up to the visit that US policy towards Taiwan remained unchanged.

This means support for its government while diplomatically recognising Beijing over Taipei, and opposing a formal independence declaration by Taiwan or a forceful takeover by China.

While the White House is understood to be opposed to Pelosi's Taiwan stop, its National Security Council spokesman John Kirby said she was entitled to go where she pleased.

Beijing summoned US Ambassador Nicholas Burns over Pelosi's visit, while the Chinese military declared it was on "high alert" and would "launch a series of targeted military actions in response" to the visit.

The drills will include "long-range live ammunition shooting" in the Taiwan Strait, which separates the island from mainland China and straddles vital shipping lanes.

The zone of Chinese exercises will be within 20 kilometres (12 miles) of Taiwan's shoreline at some points, according to coordinates released by the Chinese military.

"Some of the areas of China's drills breach into... (Taiwan's) territorial waters," defence ministry spokesman Sun Li-fang said at a press conference Wednesday.

"This is an irrational move to challenge the international order."

Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council, which sets the government's China policies, accused Beijing of "vicious intimidation" that would "seriously impact the peace and prosperity of the entire East Asia".

It added that democratic countries should "unite and take a solemn stand to punish and deter" Beijing.

Japan, a key US ally in the region, said Wednesday it had expressed concern to China over the exercises, while South Korea called for dialogue to maintain regional peace.

- 'We shouldn't be too panic -
Beijing has long used diplomatic, military and economic pressure on Taiwan.

On Wednesday China announced curbs on the import of fruit and fish from Taiwan -- citing the detection of pesticide residue and the coronavirus. It also halted shipments of sand to the island.

"Those who offend China will be punished," Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told reporters Thursday while on a trip to Cambodia.

Outside the Taiwanese parliament, 31-year-old computer programmer Frank Chen shrugged off the Chinese warnings against Pelosi's visit.

"I'm not too panic about China's intimidation," he told AFP.

"I think China will take more threatening actions and ban more Taiwanese products, but we shouldn't be too worried."

There was a small group of pro-China demonstrators outside parliament as well.

"The United States uses Taiwan as a pawn in its confrontation with China, to try to drag China down so (it) can dominate the world," Lee Kai-dee, a 71-year-old retired researcher, told AFP.

"If the United States continues to act this way, Taiwan will end up like Ukraine."

China has vowed to annex self-ruled, democratic Taiwan one day, by force if necessary.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February heightened fears in Taiwan that China may similarly follow through on its threats to annex the island.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:17:00 -0500 text/html https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/27-china-jets-enter-taiwans-air-defence-zone-after-nancy-pelosi-visit-3221621
Killexams : Horoscope Today, August 1, 2022 No result found, try new keyword!Want to know how the stars have aligned to send a message to you as per your zodiac sign for August 1, 2022? Gemini, Leo, Aquarius, Aries, and Virgos, what advice should you follow? Check your ... Sun, 31 Jul 2022 14:15:03 -0500 en-in text/html https://www.msn.com/en-in/lifestyle/other/horoscope-today-august-1-2022/ar-AA10aaOI Killexams : The made-in-Toronto cult classic “Class of 1984” turns 40

In 1981 an unlikely dream team of CBC reporter Arthur Kent, a pre-“Family Ties” Michael J. Fox, actor Timothy Van Patten (way before he started directing “The Sopranos”) and the auteur behind “Roller Boogie” descended on Central Tech to shoot a movie.

“Battlezone: Adams High,” which became “Guerrilla High,” which became “Class of 1984” stars Perry King as an idealistic high-school music teacher who exacts brutal revenge after a psychopathic student (Van Patten) and his degenerate crew wreak havoc on the student body and ultimately assault his wife. The film co-stars Emmy-winning Roddy McDowall as a colleague who’s pushed to the brink and Ontario’s own Lisa Langlois as a gleefully evil gang member. Hamilton punk-rock legends Teenage Head even show up to get things slamming.

Cannes went wild, Roger Ebert gave it a thumbs up, and the film, with its lurid and unflinching depiction of a high school rife with crime and violence, became a hit. To mark the 40th anniversary of its release, filmmakers, cast members and a couple of superfans look back on one of the most delirious B movies ever made in Toronto.

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Cinema Canada magazine (September 1981): Arthur Kent, best known to most Canadians as a CBC news reporter and brother of ex-National anchorman Peter Kent, has moved into a new field, feature production. Kent’s first theatrical feature, “Battlezone: Adams High,” goes before the cameras at Toronto’s Central Tech High School on August 17 (1981). … Novice producer Kent has no doubts about the marketability of his story, which he described as a cross between “To Sir, with Love” and “Dirty Harry.”

Arthur Kent (producer): I was 27 in 1980. I had been a reporter with CBC News, the national correspondent for Alberta. But I left to go overseas because I wanted to do international news. I was in Israel when the Soviets invaded Afghanistan at the start of 1980. At that time, it was either do the hostage-taking in Tehran, which everybody was covering, or the war in Afghanistan, which people were having a hard time covering because the Soviets had thrown all the journalists out. I chose the latter. The way I did that was to come back to Calgary, my hometown, and propose a certified Canadian production – that is, a documentary certified by Canadian authorities to gain tax write-offs for investors. I financed it with a group of stockbrokers, and it was a success. After it aired in the summer of 1980, this group approached me and said, “How would you feel about producing a much bigger production?” And I said, “Well, sure.” The leader of that group, John Toffan, said, “I’ve got a friend in Los Angeles who’s a young director.” So, he put me together with Mark Lester. And that’s how the project came into being in late autumn 1980.

Mark L. Lester (director, co-executive producer, co-screenwriter): The premise is powerful: a pacifist teacher becomes this vicious vigilante killer. And the audience is cheering him on.

Kent: Our production was fairly ambitiously budgeted at $4.3 million.

Students and teacher watch in horror as a wasted teen climbs up a flagpole. (Mark L. Lester)

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Lester: I was influenced heavily by (the 1955 inner-city school drama) “Blackboard Jungle.” My film was an amped-up version of all my nightmares growing up and going to high school. It just came out of this madness, in an era where you could still make whatever you wanted, and people weren’t questioning that. There was no need to be politically correct. Today, you could never even film some of the scenes that are in this movie.

Click to expand

Perry King (actor): It got much more violent in the shooting than it was on paper. That was around the time I was starting to develop a strong distaste for violence in films. I was trying to tame it down while we were shooting.

Lester: At the time we were shooting, Perry says, “I can’t saw someone’s arm off!” I go, “Well, you boiled someone in a pot in ‘Mandingo.’” “Oh, you’re right. OK!”

Lisa Langlois (actor): When I got cast, I remember everybody saying, “We love her, but she’s got this Canadian accent.” This top (dialect coach) called Bob Easton broke my accent in three hours.

King: I was fascinated by my character. He’s being forced to fight back, and yet that’s anathema to him. The guy has a tremendous arc. That’s what actors always look for in a role.

Kent: You can see on the screen: nobody is mailing in their performance.

King: We were all just working actors who committed to the job at hand. It was quite clear to us the style that was being asked for was taking it very seriously – no sense of humour about any of it, making it life and death for all those characters.

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Tom Scharpling (fan): A juicy part is a juicy part, and you can sleepwalk through it at your own peril. Why would you do that? It’s chum for an actor to get to be in high drama like this, even if it’s kind of dumb and trashy.

The filmmakers chose to shoot in Toronto to take advantage of tax breaks and more accommodating crews.

Lester: I love Toronto because it’s like Anytown, America: Detroit, Chicago, New York.

King: I’ve spent many years of my life in Toronto pretending it’s New York or Boston, all kinds of places. It’s never been Toronto. When I’ve been there, it’s always been somewhere else.

Kent: The Toronto of that era had in several neighbourhoods, buildings and street scenes that could sell an American setting. There were parts of Toronto that were distressed.

Lester: We used this high school, Central Tech, in downtown Toronto. We shot in the summertime when the school was closed. The art director painted all this graffiti throughout the school. I heard it caused a bit of an issue because when the kids came back, the school was still filled with all this crazy graffiti.

Langlois: Oh, that is so sad. I hate when people don’t leave things in the same condition or better. I didn’t know about that.

Lester: For the scene in the punk club with Teenage Head, we advertised in a local Toronto paper to get all these punk rockers in – like, 500 showed up to be extras. They had a thing at the time called slam dancing, and they would just bang into each other. So, they gave the actors a run for their money. It was a crazy scene.

Legendary Hamilton punk band Teenage Head, featuring Gord Lewis (far right), played during the club scene. (Shin Sugino)

Langlois: I had a few punk rock women say to me, “You’re not a real punk rocker, the way you’re dressed. We’re going to get you when you’re on your own.” If you watch the film, you don’t see me in that dance scene. I made sure that I was very scarce because I thought, “If they’re going to get me, that’s where they’re going to get me – when they’re slam dancing.” It was one of the few times I’ve been afraid on a set.

Gord Lewis (guitarist, Teenage Head): I recall 200 disgruntled punks and a disconnect because they were real Toronto, early-’80s punks that didn’t love the success the band was gaining at that time. We finally won the punks over by the end of the very long shoot and we became friends.

Langlois: There was a lot of danger because it was the wild, wild west in Canada. There was this one scene with Roddy McDowall driving a car recklessly, as it’s described in the script, as he tried to run us down. It was on Elm Street and they didn’t have a stunt driver. It was Roddy McDowall driving the car. I ran for my life for real.

Kent: I think what Lisa’s probably referring to is that we had a fairly informal, open and fluid atmosphere on the shoot. It’s true, Roddy was eager to drive the car through an approach. But as I remember, it was either a three-point turn or a simple 90-degree turn, drive by the camera and then stop.

Lester: And we flipped a car in the middle of downtown Toronto.

Timothy Van Patten (center) and his gang do battle with fellow students. (Mark L. Lester)

Kent: (Stunt coordinator) Terry Leonard came to me and (first assistant director) Tony Lucibello and said, “We’ve got an old car functioning very well, but it’s a stunt car. It’s got to hit a particular speed. It’s going to go up an iron ramp, which is partially concealed, and flip over. And (we’re) gonna set off explosives in the car. So, I do not want any stuntman driving that car. I want a hell driver.” We found a hell driver in Montreal working in an arena show. We flew him to Toronto and he drove the stunt with the flipping, exploding car. It went off in one take exactly as it was designed by Terry.

I personally visited all the businesses on Elm Street to prepare them, to let them know this is what’s going to take place. There were a minimum of complaints. It was held very late at night. It was safe. Nothing went wrong. I would say we were pushing everything we did. But we had in key positions, as department heads, among the most experienced people in film.

Langlois: In Los Angeles, it’s been generations of filmmaking. So, there are rules and regulations that get established from things happening. Those things hadn’t happened up here yet, so there weren’t rules and regulations in place.

Kent: I think Mark found Toronto more restrictive than L.A., but I kept telling him, “I hear what you’re saying.” We’re having to plan everything in advance and get approvals and permissions – even shooting in homes, renting homes or apartments as locations. It seemed to him onerous. I said, “Take it from me, as someone who has grown up in this country, went to university in Ottawa, has worked in Toronto news, they’re bending over backwards for us.”

King: It was a scrappy low-budget production. I’ve done so many of those in my career, and they’re always exciting because of it – and fun. But you’re always scrambling to make things work.

Erin Noble and Michael J. Fox flee the gang down an alley off of Yonge and Elm. (Mark L. Lester)

Kent: Producing a motion picture is like setting up a tent in a windstorm. It’s never going to be all four corners in place. You have to thrive on the air of crisis and instant decision-making and the clock constantly moving, the schedule, the board, the date, the calendar flipping by.

Lester: The premiere was at the Cannes Film Festival and the reception was insane. That’s when Roger Ebert wrote the first review of it.

Kent: It was a very important review. It was wonderful to be able to thank him in person when I ran into him at the Telluride Film Festival in 1983.

Roger Ebert (Chicago Sun-Times, Jan. 1, 1982, rogerebert.com): “Class of 1984” is not a great movie but it works with quiet, strong efficiency to achieve more or less what we expect from a movie with such a title. It is violent, funny, scary, contains boldly outlined characters, and gets us involved. … You may or may not think it’s any good, but you’ll have to admit that it works. … “Class of 1984” is raw, offensive, vulgar, and violent, but it contains the sparks of talent and wit, and it is acted and directed by people who cared to make it special.

Kent: Newsweek called it “‘Blackboard Jungle’ with herpes.” My mother wasn’t very impressed when she saw that.

Neil Clifford gets checked for weapons as Perry King (far left) and Roddy McDowell (right) look on. (Shin Sugino)

Jack Kroll (Newsweek critic, Aug. 30, 1982): One of the nastiest movies of our time, it pretends to be horrified by endemic violence in our schools while actually exploiting violence with a coldblooded cynicism that’s worse than the violence itself.

Scharpling: I saw it opening weekend in a packed theatre on my birthday. Everybody was just screaming and cheering – full on up on their feet. The kids were losing their minds. It was such a moving communal experience that I’ve never gotten over it – I guess because I was 12 when I saw it.

Kent: By virtue of the earnings of the finished motion picture, we wound up with “Class of 1984” being in the top 10 per cent of Canadian productions in terms of return on investment to investors. And at that early stage in our film industry, that was no small feat. That was quite an accomplishment.

With its successful theatrical run and multiple iterations on home video, the film has gained a rabid worldwide following.

Lester: I’ve been invited all over the world with this movie. At the Stiges Film Festival (in Spain in 2012) people came dressed up as the characters. It still has resonance.

Langlois: It’s such a cult movie that people even want to go to the locations where it was shot.

The filmmakers shot for weeks at Central Technical School during summer break. (Shin Sugino)

Keir-La Janisse (fan): I lived in Toronto twice for like a year each. I worked at Suspect Video and would walk past Central Tech all the time on my way to work, which was my favourite part of living in Toronto. All the people who went to school there had no idea that they were going in and out of this iconic building every day that had this other life they didn’t know about.

In 2014, I was trying to pitch an art teacher there on the idea of letting me do a screening and we could raise money for a fledgling arts program at the school. But I think there was a reluctance to be associated with the film because the school already had a reputation for being a bit rough.

(Toronto film programmer) Peter Kuplowsky had also been looking into doing a screening at the school, and we found out about each other’s efforts. In 2018, we ended up putting on a screening at the Royal Theatre. I had arranged a chartered bus tour, which would start at Central Tech.

Langlois: I didn’t get into any costume or anything, but I drove around (with them).

Janisse: We went to like 30 different locations. We ended at the Royal, and all the people who were on the bus had tickets for the screening, so Peter and I put on two different things, but we joined them.

Lester: It’s my favourite movie I’ve made because it’s the one where I conceived the whole idea. It was my auteur movie. It was just a world that I created.

Lisa Langlois, who played Patsy, was one of many Canadians in the cast, which included Al Waxman as a detective. (Mark L. Lester)

Kent: It’s not exactly the storyline that many of us might want to show on the top our CVs. On the other hand, how can you not be proud of it when actors and filmmakers of such ability really, really put out?

Scharpling: If I made “Class of 1984,” I would be so proud of it because it’s just perfect. It’s everything it promises it’s going to be. It’s the ultimate version of that kind of movie.

King: There must be more to the film than I can see because I can’t see much more than an unnecessarily violent, simple revenge movie. It sure ain’t my performance. I don’t know what it is.

Janisse: I don’t know how much it resonates for people outside of Toronto, but there are a lot of locations, like record stores, that are not there anymore. So, the film stands as a time (capsule) of a lot that isn’t there anymore. Yet this school stands like this iconic thing. It is the thing that survives.

ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY DOUG BROD

Sun, 10 Jul 2022 11:16:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thestar.com/amp/life/together/snapshot/2022/07/10/the-made-in-toronto-cult-classic-class-of-1984-turns-40.html
Killexams : “We Try Not to Think”: Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor on De Humani Corporis Fabrica

It was only a matter of time before Sensory Ethnography Lab explorers Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor went inside—deep inside. Shot at eight different French hospitals, De Humani Corporis Fabrica intermingles imagery from within and without the human body, observing patients and listening in on surgeons during operations with special cameras and medical equipment. Immersive in different ways from their masterpiece Leviathan, and even more hypnotic than Caniba in aligning the screen’s surface with the textures of tissue, Paravel and Castaing-Taylor’s latest film takes its title from Vesalius’s groundbreaking 16th-century anatomy text, de- and re-familiarizing us with the interiors and exteriors of our flesh, and the systems used to navigate and contain them. Put another way, you could do a lot worse than a recent, unrelated tweet by filmmaker Zia Anger:

De Humani Corporis Fabrica inaugurated the second week of Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine) and screened on the same day as David Cronenberg’s Competition title Crimes of the Future, another film that thrives, as Paravel said of De Humani, in “the space between beauty and horror” and features opening credits against a vermilion tissue-like background nearly identical to laparoscopic shots from De Humani. I interviewed Paravel and Castaing-Taylor, who teach at Harvard University (with programmer and scholar Abby Sun as teaching assistant), at the Cannes Film Festival, and as ever, conversation was especially stimulating as the film remains a living thing to them, open to inquiry and lovely consideration, at once spontaneous and architectonic. We spoke over the din at the Plage de la Quinzaine about how they shot the body/bodies, disorientation as reorientation, and finding a Dionysian ending.

Filmmaker: What cameras are you using in the film, aside from the medical imagery?

Castaing-Taylor: The medical imagery is the most important. But we used “lipstick cameras.” They’re very specialized and kind of an anachronistic technology. They were used in Formula One cars, with a transmitter so people could watch live in the car, but the principal use is industrial—not surveillance of people but of machinery, like in mills, hard-to-access places. They’ll install them permanently, and it’ll just be a permanent bead on this one cog to see whether it’s worn down. Our camera broke down the whole time.

Paravel: The camera was not working by itself, so we had to create a system where we could see what we were filming. So, we asked Patrick Lindenmaier, our colorist and tech genius, to create a system where we would have a harness, with a monitor here [at chest level]. The camera evolved through the film, because we started with a different camera but were not really happy with the image. So, we were using this lipstick camera and sending it back to Zurich, and he would create another system to help us synch with the sound. The way we recorded was very archaic, because we would download the medical imagery of the surgery, and at the same time we were recording outside of the body and doing sound separately. At the end we would synch everything, so everything would align in a single timeline, then we could go from the inside of the body to the outside. 

Sometimes we also had the ceiling [“scialytic”] camera that the doctors used. They would often use this imagery to record and teach their surgery, when it’s an interesting surgery and they want to show a colleague, or to watch their own gestures, or to share with medical students. So, we would have the camera from the ceiling, the laparoscopic camera, our own camera, plus the sound, and everything was aligned so we could go from one camera to another.

Castaing-Taylor: Ultrasound, X-rays, MRIs—that was the hardest to synch up.

Filmmaker: When you’re filming with the lipstick camera, are you right there next to the surgeon?

Paravel: Yes.

Filmmaker: At times it felt like you weren’t physically there, as if the camera was remote. 

Paravel: Really?

Castaing-Taylor: It was always moving, wasn’t it. Oh my god, the amount of hours we were training to make those moves! I was watching yesterday, and I thought, these moves are so awkward and unsmooth.

Paravel: Me too.

Castaing-Taylor: Atrocious!

Filmmaker: But it must be a challenge with such a small camera! Every little movement is significant.

Castaing-Taylor: Have you seen Hale County This Morning, This Evening? Remember the locker-room scene in the gymnasium? Was he filming or was he absent? Did he put the camera down and leave it, or was he there? I don’t know if he was there or not. Richard Brody hypothesized that he was not there. 

Paravel: In our case, we were always there. But also it was adapted to the operating room, the sterile environment, where you cannot be too close to the doctor physically. 

Castaing-Taylor: Plus it burned! The camera got so hot we had to cover it with towels or gloves or anything we could find in the operating theater so that we wouldn’t burn ourselves. Sometimes we would come away with blisters and burnt fingers from holding it.

Filmmaker: From the electronics overheating?

Paravel: Because it was not perfected. It got perfected over time.

Castaing-Taylor: [Each camera] was like $300. We went through a few. 

Filmmaker: How was it to work out the lighting for these cameras?

Castaing-Taylor: I don’t know if you remember the urology scene? 

Filmmaker: It’s hard to forget.

Castaing-Taylor: When the probe is being removed from the penis and you can see all the scrubs around it, there’s a conversation between the doctor and one paramedic in particular about the block, and how officially organized it is, and whether they need more personnel and how many people are unemployed in France… In the middle of that shot, we don’t do anything but the camera cuts out and it goes basically white—completely overexposes. It would suddenly go—without any rhyme or reason, without any deliberation on our part, for reasons unknown to it and us—from underexposed to overexposed, or black-and-white to color, or the color temperature would change. All of the manual settings would just be overridden willy-nilly.

Filmmaker: Those are tough conditions to work under.

Castaing-Taylor: If you remember the morgue, one shot is almost black and white. The color grader did Pedro Costa’s first films like In Vanda’s Room and so on—he’s technically extraordinary. Amazingly, he was able to find data in the files that no other collaborator in the world could find, because of how they mark the files. He was able to decode the files, find this hidden [visual] information in there and convert it into something usable. 

Filmmaker: In using the imagery from the medical equipment, did you manipulate the colors at all?

Paravel: [In the gastrointestinal sequence] at some point it becomes red and green. They do that themselves, to see the little things inside and make sure they are not missing any polyps. This is not our manipulation.

Castaing-Taylor: There’s a film from a decade ago by Yuri Ancarani, using a Da Vinci [surgical] robot [Da Vinci, 2012]. He used dyes. A doctor cousin of mine thought it was a fake advertisement for Da Vinci. 

Filmmaker: I’m curious what sort of aesthetic criteria you brought to the medical imagery. Are you thinking of film grammar in the same way when working with that sort of continuous imagery?

Castaing-Taylor: We don’t think. We do think—we try not to think. We fail to think. But we are mostly interested in what happens when we half-succeed. I suppose there were three different layers. One is our intentions, which change from hour to hour, from person to person, from day to day. The next morning, we ruminate, change positions and go back. Our conscious intentions mutate in ways we can’t anticipate. And then most of the thought is unconscious, because it’s deeper and we can’t access it usually—whether it’s our images, where we control it a bit more, or in the downloaded images, where we selected which camera to use, which operation, when to start and stop. 

Regardless of which kind of imagery it is, what’s interesting to us is the surfeit of aesthetics or of meaning or of presence. This residue of presence, one senses, isn’t about even our unconscious inclinations or conscious thoughts. That “excess of being” is there latent in every image, whether we nominally have more agency in recording it or not. So, I don’t think it’s radically different [between kinds of imagery]. Obviously there’s a grade of remove to medical imagery, even though we’re less passive than it might appear. Sometimes there were different kinds of medical cameras that go inside the body, so we would shoot one and not the other. So, we would literally be controlling that point of view, but obviously with that kind of imagery we have less agency than we do with our own. And this third level of meaning or whatever the word is—aesthetic resonance—is more present, easier to glean, more intriguing, more divorced from our intentions. But the relationship we came to by hook and by crook is something that we did not verbalize. It was the hardest film ever to edit. Excruciating.

Filmmaker: It’s all a visceral experience, literally. It can also feel vertiginous or even disorienting, even when we’re not inside a body, but outside, as in the sequence walking with two elderly women through the senior citizens ward.

Castaing-Taylor: You mean [disorienting] psychically or spatially?

Filmmaker: Psychically and to a certain extent spatially. Were you trying to play with our orientation in terms of unsettling the viewer with shifts in centeredness?

Paravel: I think yes.

Castaing-Taylor: I think no.

Paravel: Yes and no. I think we unconsciously re-created that, because this is the way it works in hospital. You have all this circulation: people are moved from one ward to another, patients are moved to their rooms and to their operating rooms, organs are moved from one body to another, fluids are being transported from one lab to another. So, there is always this movement and circulation. The flux of the hospital resembles the blood circulation inside the body. I think that came naturally, because this is the way you navigate a hospital. 

But for me the purpose was not to create a sense of disorientation. We were not interested in disorienting the viewer but in trying to install you in some places and reveal later where you were. I don’t know if you knew you were in an urethra before the camera pulls you out of it. So, sometimes we play with this to show you an interior space or territory, where you can get your bearings but don’t know exactly what it is. We allow you to see things you’re not usually used to see, then suddenly the disorientation doesn’t come from being inside, it comes from when you get out. You know where you were—in a head, a urethra, an abdominal cavity. 

Castaing-Taylor: When we had our friend design the camera system, his idea was that we ourselves would film with a laparoscopic camera outside the body. Then we determined that the medical cameras were all between $800,000 and $1.5 million, and they all turn out to be attached and weigh a ton when plugged in. We couldn’t have the mobility that we wanted, and their main focus is half a centimeter from the lens. So, we decided not to film with one of those. We had Patrick make this camera so that the optics would generate an aesthetic sensibility akin to that generated by laparoscopic cameras. They had very long depth of field, very wide angle vision, and it could focus extremely macro up close. 

So, the idea then was to generate reciprocities between interiors and exteriors which could make us rethink the singularity of these supposedly discrete bodies and between interior and exterior. We could call that destabilizing or disorienting, or we could also call it orienting or reorienting. When we’re filming in the senior citizens’ ward, the geriatric hospital, we weren’t either using the camera equipment in intentionally misleading ways or disorienting people, but on the contrary using a camera that would somehow generate imagery that would be of a piece with different corporeal interiors. 

I don’t think either of us is interested in disorientation in some shock sense, or like some horror film, or for suspense in and of itself. But it is true that we go through most of our filmmaking lives being oriented, and it does seem to me that despite our desire to be oriented, we’re often disoriented and uncomprehending, and there are ways in which our brains and imaginaries are activated when we’re not under the illusion that we understand everything. Those ways are often more generative, especially with documentary that’s so compositional and informational and didactic. 

The first cut of the film was ten hours and one minute, longer than Shoah. It was riddled with testimony by the doctors. Most of the hospitals that we filmed in are university teaching hospitals. So, there’s a lot of verbal exegesis explaining to the residents what was going on. That gave spectators the sense that they understood the point of the surgery, what the diagnosis was, sometimes what the prognosis was, etc. But that ends up anesthetizing us to a different way of engaging with the body in all of its potentiality. You’re directed toward a specific kind of narrative, an explicative kind. Cutting it down from 10 hours to two hours, we spent a lot of the time trying to retain snippets of dialogue that would be interesting but wouldn’t be interpretively too revealing. 

Filmmaker: I think the reason I was thinking about disorientation is that biological footage can deliver an illusion of mastery. And this film is trying not to deliver that feeling of mastery.

Castaing-Taylor: I feel that’s what we tried to do unwittingly in Leviathan, which is to use GoPros not to show this heroic surfer or snowboarder doing some macho, probably male heroics, but to diminish and relativize the viewer in this larger cosmos. It sounds like we engaged unwittingly in a similar endeavor here.

Filmmaker: It’s just one part of it for me! I’m still working through it.

Castaing-Taylor: We haven’t begun to work through it.

Filmmaker: About the final sequence—

Castaing-Taylor: Too long.

Filmmaker: You think it’s too long?

Paravel: No, it’s good!

Filmmaker: How did you envision this scene? [The final sequence takes place in a large recreation room for doctors with outlandish murals and low party lighting.] It felt like a combination of the infernal, and like being in a cave where I’m looking at the walls with a torch. It’s also a Dionysian end to the film.

Paravel: Interesting, I hadn’t thought of the cave. For me it was more like a religious fresco, how you would film the Sistine Chapel or something. It’s almost the apotheosis of the film, where spirituality, sex, death collide. But now I like to see it like an archaic painting in a cave. [For the doctors] it’s basically the last place where they can let go of all the violence they have been witnessing all day—because the doctors have to be God most of the time, and they have this great responsibility. They spend their day transgressing the body, violating the body, perforating it, penetrating it, cutting it. And they witness death every day. And you know what place this room is? Every single French public hospital, not private, has a cafeteria that’s called the Salle de garde where only the doctors and students can enter.

Castaing-Taylor: But not the nurses.

Paravel: This is where they eat. They are covered with pornographic frescoes. This is also where they have parties sometimes. What you see on the painting are the faces of real doctors who are operating.

Castaing-Taylor: Still operating or retired or in some cases died.

Paravel: And I don’t think it’s too long. For me it does the same job for the viewer as for the doctors. It’s the space and the condition for them to be able to exorcise [things].

Castaing-Taylor: Basically it’s their way to de-sublimate. They need to put a distance between themselves and their patients. They need to objectify and instrumentalize them to some degree, superficially at least, in order to be able perform all these perverse transgression on their bodies, even if it’s with a view to repairing them, healing them. But obviously that is an extraordinarily perverse and powerful and overwhelming position to be in, and their transgressions also exact a toll on themselves. So I think they need moments of liminal, carnivalesque, anti-structural, cathartic communitas like this to allow everything they repress, in order to carry on with their day jobs, to surge to the fore and then be sublimated again, and then carry on. It was relatively tame as a party [on screen]. They do completely orgiastic things in these spaces that we did not put into the film.

Fri, 03 Jun 2022 04:08:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://filmmakermagazine.com/114907-cannes-interview-verena-paravel-lucien-castaing-taylor-de-humani-corporis-fabrica/
Killexams : Is The Satanic Temple a protector of life, liberty, pursuit of happiness?

Let’s get this cleared up immediately: Members of The Satanic Temple do not worship Satan.

They don’t even believe in Satan. At least, not the way Christianity serves him up.

“We don’t believe in any gods, demons, devils, whatsoever,” said René Grigori, the pseudonym used by the SoCal temple minister and mild-mannered computer programmer in the Inland Empire.

“We may use that as part of our aesthetic, but we don’t believe they actually exist. We don’t believe in a literal Satan, but in Satan as a fictional character who represents our values, in much the same way that Uncle Sam is a fictional character who represents American values.”

The name was chosen nearly a decade ago by droll atheists in Massachusetts as a kind of goof — or middle finger, perhaps? — as religion crept ever further into public life. And while it clearly aspires to get the goat of the God-fearing and garner fantastic headlines, The Satanic Temple has adopted a stretch of Pacific Coast Highway between Bolsa Chica and Dog Beach in Huntington Beach, has raised money for food drives with a San Bernardino church and is now a bona fide church recognized by the Internal Revenue Service, prompting a re-examination of what the word “religion” really means.

It has 500 or so adherents in Los Angles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura and San Diego counties,  hundreds more in Northern California, and some 700,000 worldwide. For these folks — who reject “tyrannical authority” and believe their ritual surrounding a pregnancy’s termination might protect abortion rights in states that have outlawed the procedure — the separation of church and state is paramount, and Satan is far more James Dean and Mae West than biblical fallen angel.

Rebels

Candles are seen for sale at the Satanic Temple where a "Hell House" is being held in Salem, Massachusett on October 8, 2019. - The Hell House was a parody on a Christian Conversion centre meant to scare atheist and other Satanic Church members. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)
Candles are seen for sale at the Satanic Temple in Salem, Massachusetts in 2019.  (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

“Satan is a symbol of the Eternal Rebel in opposition to arbitrary authority, forever defending personal sovereignty even in the face of insurmountable odds. Satan is an icon for the unbowed will of the unsilenced inquirer – the heretic who questions sacred laws and rejects all tyrannical impositions,” the religion’s founders explain in their literature.

“Our metaphoric representation is the literary Satan best exemplified by Milton and the Romantic Satanists from Blake to Shelley to Anatole France.”

Erudite, indeed.

Adherents don’t worship anything, but if they did, it would be reason, empathy and the pursuit of knowledge.

Their bedrock beliefs include fighting injustice, protecting individual freedom and doing good works. “Beliefs should conform to one’s best scientific understanding of the world,” the church’s tenets state. “One should take care never to distort scientific facts to fit one’s beliefs.”

The rejection of traditional religion is a religious choice. And IRS-recognized churches get great tax breaks from the government, including exemptions from income, sales, property and other taxes – perks that were worth at least $71 billion a year, a conservative study found in 2015.

“Are we supposed to believe that those who pledge submission to an ethereal supernatural deity hold to their values more deeply than we?” the SoCal Group asks on its website. “Are we supposed to concede that only the superstitious are rightful recipients of religious exemption and privilege?”

The IRS found it hard to argue with that logic, and The Satanic Temple was deemed a church in 2019. One of its bedrock beliefs is that “One’s body is inviolable, subject to one’s own will alone.” And that’s where the abortion debate and its secular ritual comes in. But first –

What is religion?

A view of the Satanic Temple logo where a "Hell House" was being held is seen in Salem, Massachusett on October 8, 2019. - The Hell House was a paradoy on a Christian Conversion center meant to scare atheist and other Satanic Church members. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)
The Satanic Temple logo in Salem, Massachusetts.  (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

It’s a fascinating and age-old debate, wrote religious studies scholar Joseph P. Laycock of Texas State University, who wrote a book on The Satanic Temple titled “Speak of the Devil.”

In 1961, the Supreme Court concluded that there are many religions “that are just not interested in God,” such as Buddhism, Confucianism and some forms of Judaism, Laycock wrote. The court didn’t define religion, but it said that religion is not synonymous with theism (the belief in a god or gods as creator(s) of the universe).

In “America: Religions and Religion,” scholar Catherine Albanese argued that religions are systems with their own creeds, or a set of beliefs; code, or set of rules; cultus, or set of rituals; and community.

“The word religion lends itself to such creative legal uses precisely because it has no set definition. As religion scholar Russell McCutcheon says, religion’s ‘utility is linked to its inability to be defined,’ ” Laycock wrote.

“The Satanic Temple is significant because it renders this sort of verbal slipperiness less tenable. If this group can no longer be dismissed as a ‘hoax,’ people might be forced to think a bit more about what religion is.”

About 8% of Americans are atheists or agnostics, with another 16% saying “nothing in particular,” according to a exact Pew study. There are more atheists in the Los Angeles metro region than in the nation as a whole, making SoCal fertile ground for The Satanic Temple.

Taking action

There are gleeful pokes of Satanic fingers in establishment eyeballs. To wit:

The Satanic Temple insisted that Oklahoma erect their statue of Baphomet, a winged-goat-like version of Satan, beside the monument of the Ten Commandments installed at the State Capitol in 2012. The Oklahoma Supreme Court ordered that the Ten Commandments monument be removed.

It filed suit against the city of Scottsdale, Arizona, in 2020 after it was uninvited from giving the invocation at a city council meeting (“Let us stand now, unbowed and unfettered by arcane doctrines born of fearful minds in darkened times. Let us embrace the Luciferian impulse to eat of the Tree of Knowledge and dissipate our blissful and comforting delusions of old….”).

It has helped folks form “After School Satan” programs to teach rational thinking in schools that host Christian “Good News” clubs. It has an advocacy arm trying to protect mental health patients from what it calls “dangerous pseudoscience and discredited therapies.”

It has fought with companies in several states after its billboards showing a bowl of batter on one side and an egg and sperm on the other (“Not a cake…Not a baby”) were rejected. And it has sued Texas over its abortion prohibitions and is ready with a novel recipe to protect members who live in states where the procedure is illegal.

The abortion ritual

A man stands on a later outside the Satanic Temple where a "Hell House" was being held in Salem, Massachusett on October 8, 2019. - The Hell House was a paradoy on a Christian Conversion center meant to scare atheist and other Satanic Church members. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)
A man stands on a ladder outside the Satanic Temple in Salem, Massachusetts in 2019. (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

As the courts pointed out, religions have rituals. And so does The Satanic Temple.

Not at all mystical and admittedly often boring, this one includes the medical or surgical abortion itself and “serves to cast off notions of guilt, shame, and mental discomfort that a patient may experience when choosing to have a medically safe abortion,” the ritual primer says.

“This ritual is designed to alleviate these stressors and empower the patient to be guided by an appreciation of their bodily autonomy and knowledge of best scientific information about the process.”

To perform this ritual, a member needs only a quiet space, a mirror and a copy of The Satanic Temple’s Third and Fifth Tenets: “One’s body is inviolable, subject to one’s own will alone,” and “Beliefs should conform to one’s best scientific understanding of the world.”

There’s the taking the medication or performance of the procedure, followed by the personal affirmation, “By my body, my blood, By my will, it is done.”

Will that be enough to convince a doctor in Oklahoma that he/she and the patient are protected from legal fallout? Well, it’s certainly an interesting philosophic exercise. The Satanic Temple is poised to bring lawsuits to protect this slice of religious freedom, and it wants the FDA to grant it unrestricted access to Mifepristone and Misoprostol for use under medical supervision as part of its religious abortion ritual.

Good works

Minister Grigori, for his part, was raised Catholic and went to Catholic schools, where he had a lot of time to question and doubt the doctrine. He eventually concluded there was no God, became active in Riverside Atheists and Free Thinkers, but still wasn’t satisfied.

The Satanic Temple resents being confused with the Church of Satan, the latter of which adheres to Ayn Rand-style individualism. (Courtesy The Satanic Temple)
The Satanic Temple resents being confused with the Church of Satan, which champions Ayn Rand-style individualism. (Courtesy The Satanic Temple)

Atheists knew what they didn’t believe in. But what did they believe in?

Soon he heard about The Satanic Temple, its core tenets and its headline-grabbing antics. There has been no looking back.

It’s a community of like-minded people. There are weekly meetings online and occasional in-person events. They’re more like educational seminars than religious services. There are campaigns and causes and good works, like adopting that stretch of Pacific Coast Highway between Bolsa Chica and Dog Beach in Orange County (folks can be spied every couple of weeks there picking up trash), marching in local Pride parades (let people be who the heck they are so long as they’re not harming anyone else), and raising thousands of dollars to help an Episcopal Church in San Bernardino provide food to the needy during the height of COVID.

“We don’t hate Christians, though there are Christians who hate us,”  he said. “We’re willing to work with anyone who values, and practices, compassion.”

The temple sees itself as a bastion for liberty, justice and the American way. And who couldn’t do with a little more compassion?.

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 02:52:00 -0500 Teri Sforza en-US text/html https://www.sbsun.com/2022/07/14/is-the-satanic-temple-a-protector-of-life-liberty-pursuit-of-happiness/
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