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In the summer of 1950, Enrico Fermi had a lunchtime discussion at Los Alamos National Laboratory about extraterrestrial technological civilizations, during which he asked, “where is everybody?” In retrospect, this appears to be a naïve proposition for a scientist, similar to asking “where are our neighbors?” without looking out the windows or venturing to the backyard. Surely, we must first construct telescopes that engage in the search for interstellar objects from outside the Solar system before concluding anything.

We now know, based on Kepler satellite data, that a substantial fraction of all Sun-like stars hosts an Earth-size planet roughly at the same separation. Since most of these stars formed billions of years before the Sun, the dice of “intelligent life as we know it” was rolled tens of billions of times, in the Milky Way alone, long before we came to exist. There are trillions of galaxies in the observable volume of the Universe, all the way back to the cosmic dawn when the first galaxies formed. The exquisite level of uniformity of the cosmic microwave background informs us that there is no “cliff” out to 4,000 times the size of our cosmic horizon – implying there should be at least 64 billion times more galaxies beyond the trillions we can in principle see with our telescopes.

And the story of our cosmic roots: “Let there be light,” is being rewritten by new data. The first deep image from the Webb telescope revealed some of the earliest stars from 13 billion years ago. The revelation was celebrated in a dedicated White House event hosted by President Biden and vice-President Harris. The image shows numerous red arcs stretched around a cluster of galaxies, named SMACS 0723, located about 5 billion light years away. NASA administrator Nelson noted, “Mr. President, we’re looking back more than 13 billion years”, an unusual statement to be heard in the household of DC politics that make plans on a timescale of four years.

Judging by our own lack of attention to climate change, it is possible that many of the other technological civilizations in our own galaxy died several centuries after they started venturing into space. The traditional approach of the Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations (SETI), has been searching for radio or laser signals from active transmitters. It has a narrow window of opportunity, less than one part in ten million, since most of such signals escaped the Milky Way galaxy long ago and by now are faint undetectable glows billions of light years away.

However, any chemically-propelled spacecraft sent by past civilizations into interstellar space, like the five we had sent so far (Voyager 1 & 2,  Pioneer 10 & 11, and New Horizons), remained gravitationally bound to the Milky Way long after these civilizations died. Their characteristic speed of tens of kilometers per second is an order of magnitude smaller than the escape speed out of the Milky Way. These rockets would populate the Milky Way disk and move around at similar speeds to the stars in it.

This realization calls for a new research frontier of “interstellar archaeology”, in the spirit of searching our back yard of the Solar system for objects that came from the cosmic street surrounding it. The interstellar objects could potentially look different than the familiar asteroids or comets, which are natural relics or Lego pieces from the construction project of the Solar system planets. The traditional field of archaeology on Earth finds relics left behind by cultures that are not around anymore. We can do the same in space.

Given this perspective, it is evident that Fermi asked his question prematurely. An astronomical search for an interstellar treasure of technological artifacts accumulated over the past ten billion in the Milky Way galaxy, is only beginning now in earnest, seven decades after Fermi’s question.

The likelihood of success in the quest for interstellar artifacts is not described by the traditional Drake equation, which applies to fleeting electromagnetic signals. Instead, the number of physical relics we discover would simply be proportional to the survey volume and the sensitivity of our detectors to small, fast-moving objects.

Astronomers routinely search for asteroids, comets or meteors that move at a speed of tens of kilometers per second. Past surveys could have easily missed tiny spacecraft moving at a fraction of the speed of light, similar to the light sails developed by the Breakthrough Starshot Initiative, whose scientific advisory board I lead.

Our search for interstellar artifacts could unravel either functional devices or defunct space trash that aged beyond its lifetime–like New Horizons would be in a billion years, or equipment that was damaged by the impact of cosmic rays, X-rays, dust, and gas particles.

Functional devices that search for life might be focusing on trajectories aimed toward the habitable regions around stars. As a result, they could be far more abundant in the vicinity of Earth than, on average, in interstellar space. Given that the extent of the Solar system is a hundred thousand times bigger than the Earth-Sun separation, the local density enhancement of such life-seeking devices could be some fifteen orders of magnitude.

There are two primary ways to find interstellar objects. We can look for these “keys” under the lamppost of the Sun, the bright source of light that illuminates the darkness around us. This is how Solar system asteroids or comets are routinely found. The interstellar objects would be faster than Solar system objects because they are unbound to the Sun. We can also use the Earth as a fishing net and search for objects that collide with it at high speeds.  This could uncover smaller objects because they produce their own light as they burn up as a result of their friction with air and appear as meteors.

First Interstellar Visitors

Remarkably, the first three interstellar visitors were discovered only over the past decade. First was the interstellar meteor, CNEOS 2014–01–08, detected on January 8, 2014, by US Government sensors near Papua New Guinea. It was half a meter in size and exhibited material strength tougher than iron. It was an outlier both in terms of its speed outside the Solar system (representing the fastest five percent in the velocity distribution of all stars in the vicinity of the sun) and its material strength (representing less than five percent of all space rocks).

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Oumuamua, center, tracked at a distance (Credit: ESO/K. Meech et al.)

The second was the unusual interstellar object, ‘Oumuamua (1I/2017 U1), discovered by the Pan STARRS telescope in Hawaii on October 19, 2017, which was pushed away from the Sun by an excess force that declined inversely with distance squared but showed no evidence for cometary gases indicative of a rocket effect. Another object, 2020 SO, exhibiting an excess push with no cometary tail, was discovered by the same telescope in September 2020. It was later identified as a rocket booster launched by NASA in 1966, being pushed by reflecting sunlight from its thin walls. Finally, the interstellar comet, 2I/Borisov, was discovered on August 29, 2019, by the amateur astronomer Gennadiy V. Borisov. This object resembled Solar system comets and was definitely natural in origin.

It is intriguing that two out of the first three interstellar objects appear to be outliers relative to familiar asteroids or comets which are bound to the Solar system.

Unexplained Objects in Our Backyard?

What we regard as “ordinary” are things we are used to seeing. Such things include birds in the sky. But digging deeper into the nature of ordinary matters suggests that they are rather extraordinary. Humans were only able to imitate birds with the Wright brother’s first flight in 1903. Similarly, what we regard as “extraordinary claims” is often based on societal conventions.

On June 25, 2021, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a  report on 143 UAP and admitted that UAP data is rarely discussed openly because “Sociocultural stigmas and sensor limitations remain obstacles to collecting data on UAP… reputational risk may keep many observers silent, complicating scientific pursuit of the topic.” On Tuesday, May 17, 2022, the first open congressional hearing in half a century was held on the subject of UAP.

There are two possible interpretations of technological objects: either they were made by humans or they were made by extraterrestrial civilizations. In the first case, the government wishes to know which technologies are used by other nations. In the second case, scientists wish to know which technologies were developed by extraterrestrial civilizations.

Obviously, government officials are concerned with UAP as a threat to national security. Their job definition is twofold: to protect the safety of our military personnel and the security of the nation. From their perspective, reports by military staff members are of primary importance for the first task, and data from military training or patrol sites are linked to the second objective. They need to know what the vast majority of UAPs are, and for that purpose, they must attend to data of compromised quality, such as the blurry videos shared during the hearing.

However, the task for scientists is complementary to that. They do not need to explain most of the reports. Even if only one object is of extraterrestrial technological origin among the clutter of many others that are human-made, it would represent the most consequential discovery in human history. Its significance would resemble our first visit to the kindergarten when we realized that there is a smarter kid on the block. To figure this out, scientists must have access to the highest quality data, such as a high-resolution image of an object showing a label “Made on an Exo-Planet”, or a maneuver at a fraction of the speed of light or a set of buttons that demonstrate technical specifications of a futuristic “iPhone 100”.

Scientists are concerned with all possible geographical locations irrespective of whether they host military assets or national facilities. Extraterrestrial equipment might not adhere to national borders in much the same way that a biker navigating down the sidewalk does not care which of the possible pavement bricks is occupied by a small colony of ants.

UAP reports are most likely a mixed bag. Many objects may have mundane explanations. But in order to figure out whether an anomalous object exists for which human-made or natural origins can be excluded, we need to retrieve new data with the best possible instruments at our disposal today.

This was the rationale in July 2021 for establishing the Galileo Project – that I lead. Funded by private donations, the Project is assembling its first telescope system on the roof of the Harvard College Observatory. The system will monitor the sky continuously in the infrared, visible and radio bands as well as audio, magnetic  and muon signals. The data will be analyzed by state-of-the-art software that uses artificial intelligence and machine learning to identify objects in the sky and interpret their properties. Once the system will work as desired, the Project will make copies of it and distribute them in various geographical locations.

The Galileo Project has two additional branches of research. One involves the design of a space mission to rendezvous with unusual interstellar objects like ‘Oumuamua, in the spirit of NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission — which landed on the asteroid Bennu, or ESA’s plan for a future Comet Interceptor — which is limited in its maneuvering speed. The Galileo Project will develop software that will identify interstellar objects that do not resemble familiar asteroids or comets from the Solar system. This software will be applied to the pipeline of data from the Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST) of the Vera C. Rubin Observatory data pipeline. LSST will serve as the “dating app” for dating the next `Oumuamua. Since this expensive date will cost more than a billion dollars, we will “swipe to the left” most of the time.

Finally, a third branch of the Project involves a plan for an expedition to retrieve fragments from the first interstellar meteor CNEOS 2014–01–08 from the ocean floor near Papua New Guinea. It would be particularly interesting to determine the composition and structure of this unusual object and infer whether it was natural or artificial in origin. But even if it is natural, its non-solar composition could provide independent evidence that it originated in a distant planetary system.

New Clues from Webb’s Web

From its vantage point at the second Lagrange Point (L2), located a million miles away from Earth, the Webb Telescope just started to unravel new insights about the Universe. Are there exciting prospects for using data caught in the “spider web” of the 18 hexagonal segments of Webb’s primary mirror in searching for extraterrestrial technological civilizations?

There are several ways by which the Webb Telescope can detect signs of intelligent life. First, it could study interstellar objects that arrive near Earth from outside the solar system and infer their composition and motion to check if they might be extraterrestrial spacecraft. Looking at these objects from L2 and Earth would allow us to accurately determine their trajectory in three dimensions and infer any excess propulsion beyond motion that is shaped by gravity or cometary evaporation.

Second, the Webb telescope can search for city lights on the night side of habitable planets around nearby stars. Within the Solar system, one can distinguish an artificial source of light from an object reflecting sunlight by the way it dims as it changes its distance from the lamppost of the Sun. A source that produces its own light, like a light bulb, dims inversely with distance squared, whereas a distant object that reflects sunlight dims inversely with distance to the fourth power because the amount of light bouncing off of it scales inversely with distance squared.

And third, the Webb telescope could search for industrial pollution in the atmosphere of planets that transit in front of their host star. Artificial molecules, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), may survive long after the industrial civilization that produced them perished.

Final Thoughts

We invest major funds in the search for the nature of dark matter that has minimal impact on our society, but minimal funds on interstellar archaeology. As a result, the lack of “extraordinary evidence” for “everybody” in Fermi’s question is often self-inflicted ignorance.

We might resolve the nature of anomalous interstellar objects long before we understand dark matter, if only we can be brave enough to collect and analyze new data based on the scientific method.

Avi Loeb is the head of the Galileo Project, founding director of Harvard University’s – Black Hole Initiative, director of the Institute for Theory and Computation at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the former chair of the astronomy department at Harvard University (2011-2020). He chairs the advisory board for the Breakthrough Starshot project, and is a former member of the President’s Council of Advisors onScience and Technology and a former chair of the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Academies. He is the bestselling author of “Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth” and a co-author of the textbook “Life in the Cosmos”, both published in 2021.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 02:18:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://thedebrief.org/interstellar-archaeology-the-search-for-non-terrestrial-artifacts/
Killexams : New administrative director takes over at SUN Area Technical Institute

NEW BERLIN — The new administrative director of SUN Area Technical Institute in New Berlin said he wants to continue the positive legacy that already exists for the school.

David Bacher took over on July 15 as administrative director of the school at 815 Market St., New Berlin, replacing Jen Hain, the director since 2014. Bacher was approved by The SUN Area Technical Institute Joint Operating Committee in June.

“I know I have gigantic shoes to fill, but I’m up for the task,” said Bacher, who is in his 23rd year of education. “SUN Area Technical Institute has a reputation of excellence across Pennsylvania. It’s a great position to walk into. They are really embedded in the communities they serve.”

Bacher, of Bloomsburg, graduated from Hazleton Area High School in 1991 and earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Bloomsburg University in 1995. He now has a bachelor’s in secondary education and a master’s in educational leadership.

He taught English at Danville and Mount Carmel, and worked as an administrator at Columbia Montour Area Vocational Technical School, Northwest Area School Districts and Shikellamy School District. He was most recently an assistant principal at Shikellamy.

Bacher said he has experience working as a frame carpenter and in restaurants. His father was a machinist and his mother was a hair stylist.

“Our family has always recognized the value of trades,” he said.

He said he wasn’t looking to leave Shikellamy but was drawn to the position when he saw it was open because of the affinity he feels toward career and technology education. He said he likes that students have many options and opportunities when they attend schools like SUN.

Hain will step down officially on Sept. 30. In her retirement, she will be taking over and helping to expand the Central PA Career Pathways Partnership, which the Degenstein Foundation is helping to fund. The Central PA Career Pathways Partnership is an emerging collaborative effort among multiple education entities, employer-led, community-based and workforce organizations serving Snyder, Union and Northumberland counties and beyond.

Hain has worked in education for 31 years in both SUN Area and Columbia Montour Area Vocational Technical School, where she graduated after studying cosmetology. She said her biggest accomplishment was overseeing the expansion of the West Campus, which is home to the Diesel Truck Technology Program and the Culinary Arts Program.

She also initiated the future expansion of the mechatronics program. The program prepares individuals to apply basic engineering principals and technical skills in support of engineers engaged in developing and testing automated, servomechanical and other electromechanical systems.

“I am excited to see where education is headed,” said Hain.

In her retirement, Hain said she will spend time with her retired husband, Dennis Hain Sr., the former administrative director of SUN Area Technical Institute before her and a former welding instructor.

They plan to take care of his parents, traveling, fishing, hunting, camping and spending time with their grandchildren.

Bacher said he is looking forward to continuing the expansion of the mechatronics program as well as building upon what already exists at the school, including pre-apprentice programs; partnerships with Evangelical Community Hospital and its EMT program; and new clinical opportunities in health care systems like Geisinger and other providers.

Mon, 25 Jul 2022 20:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.dailyitem.com/news/new-administrative-director-takes-over-at-sun-area-technical-institute/article_686774ee-0c45-11ed-9c8c-378e0617026f.html
Killexams : Biden surveys flood damage in Kentucky, pledges more US help

LOST CREEK, Kentucky — President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden on Monday witnessed the damage from deadly and devastating storms that have resulted in the worst flooding in Kentucky’s history, as they visited the state to meet with families and first responders.

At least 37 people have died since last month’s deluge, which dropped 8 to 10 1/2 inches of rain in only 48 hours. Gov. Andy Beshear told Biden that authorities expect to add at least one other death to the total. The National Weather Service said Sunday that flooding remains a threat, warning of more thunderstorms through Thursday.

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The Bidens were greeted warmly by Beshear and his wife, Britainy, when they arrived in eastern Kentucky. They immediately drove to see devastation from the storms in Breathitt County, stopping at the site of where a school bus, carried by floodwaters, was crashed into a partially collapsed building.

Beshear said the flooding was “unlike anything we’ve ever seen” in the state and credited Biden with swiftly approving federal assistance.

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He praised responders who “have moved heaven and earth to get where we are what about nine days from when this hit,” he said.

Attending a briefing on the flooding’s impact with first responders and recovery specialists at Marie Roberts Elementary School in Lost Creek, Biden pledged the continued support of the federal government.

“We’re not leaving, as long as it takes, we’re going to be here,” he said.

Biden emphasized that politics have no place in disaster response, noting his frequent political battles with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. “We battle all the times on issues,” Biden said, but in helping Kentuckians rebuild, “we’re all one team.”

The Bidens were later scheduled to tour another hard-hit community in the state and meet directly with those affected.

Monday’s visit is Biden’s second to the state since taking office last year. He previously visited in December after tornadoes whipped through Kentucky, killing 77 people and leaving a trail of destruction.

“I wish I could tell you why we keep getting hit here in Kentucky,” Beshear said recently. “I wish I could tell you why areas where people may not have much continue to get hit and lose everything. I can’t deliver you the why, but I know what we do in response to it. And the answer is everything we can. These are our people. Let’s make sure we help them out.”

Biden has expanded federal disaster assistance to Kentucky, ensuring the federal government will cover the full cost of debris removal and other emergency measures.

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Jean-Pierre said the Federal Emergency Management Agency has provided more than $3.1 million in relief funds, and hundreds of rescue personnel have been deployed to help.

“The floods in Kentucky and extreme weather all around the country are yet another reminder of the intensifying and accelerating impacts of climate change and the urgent need to invest in making our communities more resilient to it,” she said.

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The flooding came just one month after Beshear visited Mayfield to celebrate the completion of the first houses to be fully constructed since a tornado nearly wiped out the town. Three families were handed keys to their new homes that day, and the governor in his remarks hearkened back to a visit he had made in the immediate aftermath.

“I pledged on that day that while we had been knocked down, we were not knocked out,” Beshear said. “That we would get back up again and we would move forward. And six months to the day, we’re not just up, we’re not just standing on our feet, we are moving forward.”

Now more disasters are testing the state. Beshear has been to eastern Kentucky as many times as weather permitted since the flooding began. He’s had daily news conferences stretching an hour to provide details including a full range of assistance for victims. Much like after the tornadoes, Beshear opened relief funds going directly to people in the beleaguered regions.

A Democrat, Beshear narrowly defeated a Republican incumbent in 2019, and he’s seeking a second term in 2023.

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Polling has consistently shown him with strong approval ratings from Kentuckians. But several prominent Republicans have entered the governor’s race, taking turns pounding the governor for his aggressive pandemic response and trying to tie him to Biden and rising inflation.

Beshear comments frequently about the toll surging inflation is taking in eating at Kentuckians’ budgets. He avoids blaming Biden, instead pointing to the Russian invasion of Ukraine and supply chain bottlenecks as contributors to rising consumer costs.

Schreiner reported from Frankfort, Kentucky and Megerian reported from Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 08:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/nation-world/ct-aud-nw-biden-kentucky-flooding-20220808-wpvz3qlkbncotjbu45lwxg2bdq-story.html
Killexams : Astronomers eagerly await first images from the James Webb Space Telescope

President Biden will unveil the first color image from the James Webb Space Telescope at the White House on Monday, heralding the end of tests and checkout and the beginning of science operations by the world's most powerful space observatory.

"We're going to deliver humanity a new view of the cosmos, and it's a view that we've never seen before," NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, who will join Biden at the White House, told reporters in a preview briefing.

"One of those images ... is the deepest image of our universe that has ever been taken," he said. "And we're only beginning to understand what Webb can and will do."

webb-labled.jpg
An artist's impression of the James Webb Space Telescope. NASA

NASA plans to release additional "first light" images Tuesday, photos designed to show off Webb's ability to capture light from the first generation of stars and galaxies; to chart the details of stellar evolution, from starbirth to death by supernova; and to study the chemical composition of exoplanet atmospheres.

For the past 30 years, the Hubble Space Telescope has become one of the most iconic instruments in astronomical history, helping astronomers pin down the age of the universe, confirming the presence of supermassive black holes, capturing the deepest views of the cosmos ever collected and providing fly-by class images of planets in Earth's solar system.

But Webb, operating at just a few degrees above absolute zero behind a tennis-court size sunshade, promises to push the boundaries of human knowledge even deeper with a 21.3-foot-wide segmented primary mirror capable of detecting the faint, stretched-out infrared light from the era when stars began "turning on" in the wake of the Big Bang.

Launched on Christmas Day, Webb is stationed in a gravitationally stable orbit nearly 1 million miles from Earth. For the past six months, engineers and scientists have been working through a complex series of deployments, activations and checkouts, fine tuning the telescope's focus and optimizing the performance of its four science instruments.

The initial images released Monday and Tuesday, selected by an international team of astronomers, will "demonstrate to the world that Webb is, in fact, ready for science, and that it produces excellent and spectacular results," said Klaus Pontoppidan, Webb project scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

"And it's also to highlight the breadth, the sheer breadth of science that can be done with Webb and to highlight all of the four science instruments," he added. "And last but not least, to celebrate the beginning of normal science operations."

The targets for Webb's first public images include:

  • The Carina Nebula: A vast star-forming region in the constellation Carina some 7,600 light years from Earth that's four times as large as the Orion Nebula. The Carina Nebula is the home of the most luminous known star in the Milky Way as well as the Eta Carinae binary system, which includes a massive sun expected to explode in a supernova blast in the near future (astronomically speaking).
070822-carina1.jpg
The Carina Nebula, a vast stellar nursery featuring massive young stars in multiple clusters and the debris of supernova blasts, as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. Webb's infrared view is expected to peer into the dusty clouds to reveal infant suns in the process of being born. Maicon Germiniani
  • Southern Ring Nebula: An expanding cloud of gas a half light year across that was ejected from a dying star. Relatively low-mass stars like Earth's sun will end their lives by blowing off their outer layers, forming so-called "planetary nebulas" while their cores shrink and slowly cool.
  • Stephen's Quintet: A collection of five galaxies in the constellation Pegasus 290 million light years from Earth that was discovered in 1877, the first such compact grouping of galaxies to be detected. Four of the five galaxies are gravitationally interacting in a slow-motion merger.
070822-quintet2.jpg
A Hubble image of Stephen's Quintet, a group of five large galaxies in the constellation Pegasus. Four of the galaxies are gravitationally interacting while the fifth, at lower left, is not involved. NASA, ESA, Hubble Legacy Archive
  • WASP-96b: An unusual cloudless exoplanet 1,150 light years away that's about half the size of Jupiter, orbiting its sun every 3.4 days. By spectroscopically analyzing light from the parent star as it passes through the exoplanet's atmosphere on the way to Earth, astronomers can tease out details about its chemical composition.
  • SMACS J0723.3-7327: The combined gravity of countless stars in huge galaxy clusters like this one can act as a powerful lens if the alignment is just right, magnifying the light from more distant objects in the far background to provide a deeper look back across space and time than would otherwise be possible.

"The first images will include observations that span the range of Webb science themes," said Pontoppidan. "From the early universe, the deepest infrared view of the cosmos to date. We will also see an example of how galaxies interact and grow, and how these cataclysmic collisions between galaxies drive the process of star formation.

"We'll see a couple of examples from the life cycle of stars, starting from the birth of stars, where Webb can reveal new, young stars emerging from their natal cloud of gas and dust, to the death of stars, like a dying star seeding the galaxy with new elements and new dust that may one day become part of new planetary systems."

Last but not least, he said, the team will show off the first chemical fingerprints from the atmosphere of an exoplanet.

One of the Hubble Space Telescope's most astonishing images was its initial "deep field" look at a tiny patch of seemingly empty sky over a 10-day period in 1995. To the amazement of professionals and the public alike, that long-exposure image revealed more than 3,000 galaxies of every shape, size and age, some of them the oldest, most distant ever seen.

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The original Hubble Deep Field revealed more than 3,000 galaxies in a small, seemingly empty region of space. The James Webb Space Telescope is expected to push well beyond Hubble in search of the first stars and galaxies to form after the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago. NASA

Subsequent Hubble deep fields pushed even farther back in time, detecting the faint light of galaxies that were shining within about 500 million years of the Big Bang. How stars formed and got organized so quickly into galactic structures is still a mystery, as is the development of the supermassive black holes at their cores.

Webb's four instruments are expected to push the boundaries still closer to the beginning of galaxy formation. A test image from the telescope's Canadian-built Fine Guidance Sensor, an image that wasn't optimized for the detection of extremely faint objects, nonetheless revealed thousands of galaxies.

Webb's look at SMACS 0723 is expected to demonstrate the enormous reach of the observatory.

"This is really only the beginning, we're only scratching the surface," Pontoppidan said. "We have in the first images, a few days worth of observations. Looking forward, we have many years of observation, so we can only imagine what that will be."

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 03:13:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/james-webb-space-telescope-first-images-white-house/
Killexams : Bloomfield-based painter to exhibit ‘27 Kisses From The Sun’ in Middletown

MIDDLETOWN — Bloomfield-based painter and mural artist Alex Ranniello will be showing off his artwork in an upcoming exhibit, “27 Kisses From The Sun,” at The Buttonwood Tree, 605 Main St.

His pieces will be on view during September, with a reception from Sept. 24 from 6 to 8 p.m. There is no admission for this event, but donations are encouraged.

Outside Ranniello’s role as a studio artist, he’s had both multifaceted and widespread community involvement in the arts across, according to a press release. Since 2016, he has been an arts program administrator, gallery assistant manager, workshop assistant, curator, guest speaker, visiting artist, event team manager, juror, and advocate for the arts.

His academic education includes a bachelor’s degree in painting and drawing, including dual minors in ceramics and art history, the news release said. He achieved his master’s in marketing and communications from The University of Hartford.

In 2017, Ranniello became a workshop assistant at Wethersfield Academy for the Arts. In 2018, he completed his Single Artist Residency at A.I.R. Studio in Paducah, Ky., and co-founded GoingPlaces Art Collective, a Connecticut-based arts advocacy group founded to support and unite local artists with businesses and organizations through sustainable opportunities, the Buttonwood said.

From 2018 to 2021, he was assistant gallery manager at Stockman Gallery in New Britain, and in 2020 he served as an arts program administrator for Connecticut’s State Office of the Arts. Additionally, Ranniello has served as a painting juror for the Regional Scholastic Arts & Writing Awards in Connecticut, and was a visiting artist at Manchester’s Community College Arts program.

In five years, Ranniello has showcased five solo exhibitions, including over 30 group exhibits in addition to his litany of festivals, fairs, and pop-up community events, the venue said. At West Hartford Art League, he was the second-place winner of The CT+6 Regional juried exhibition (2018), and third-place winner in the 30th Annual National Arts Program’s Exhibit in Connecticut.

Over the years, Ranniello has produced over 15 murals and public works across Connecticut, most notably The Hartford Paints The City Project, The 5 x 5 Mural Downtown Hartford Initiative, Meriden Humane Society Mural, the SoDo project, Constitution Plaza Barbershop’s mural, the JB Hunt mural, Hartford Has It mural, Faces of Connecticut mural, The Manchester Mahoney Recreation Center mural, and New Canaan High School mural, the news release said.

Through partnership with local businesses, he has collaborated as a freelance marketing consultant for Glaze Innovative Salon (Hamden) and Agonist Gallery (Broad Brook), interior designer with Bee’s Artistry (Hartford), and as a Workshop Instructor with Le Petit Studios (Farmington) and RiseUP Community Group (Hartford).

Ranniello spent a few years with Stack Influence Agency as a social media micro-influencer on a host of product marketing campaigns. Today, he remains a regular contributor on the Sports & Culture Podcast Productive Conversations.

In the near future, Ranniello plans on continuing to expand his Alexander Califournia Brand to both collaborate with other artists and design new products and merchandise, the venue said. He’s expanding into blogging and podcasting, while remaining true to his studio practice and mural work, the Buttonwood said.

See buttonwood.org for show details or call 860-347-4957 or email TheButtonwoodTree@gmail.com.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.middletownpress.com/middletown/article/Bloomfield-based-painter-to-exhibit-27-Kisses-17345278.php
Killexams : First image from NASA's $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope revealed

Our view of the universe just expanded: The first image from NASA’s new space telescope unveiled Monday is brimming with galaxies and offers the deepest look of the cosmos ever captured.The first image from the $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope is the farthest humanity has ever seen in both time and distance, closer to the dawn of time and the edge of the universe. That image will be followed Tuesday by the release of four more galactic beauty shots from the telescope’s initial outward gazes.The “deep field" image released at a White House event is filled with lots of stars, with massive galaxies in the foreground and faint and extremely distant galaxies peeking through here and there. Part of the image is light from not too long after the Big Bang, which was 13.8 billion years ago.Seconds before he unveiled it, President Joe Biden marveled at the image he said showed “the oldest documented light in the history of the universe from over 13 billion — let me say that again — 13 billion years ago. It’s hard to fathom.”The busy image with hundreds of specks, streaks, spirals and swirls of white, yellow, orange and red is only “one little speck of the universe,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said.The pictures on tap for Tuesday include a view of a giant gaseous planet outside our solar system, two images of a nebula where stars are born and die in spectacular beauty and an update of a classic image of five tightly clustered galaxies that dance around each other.The world’s biggest and most powerful space telescope rocketed away last December from French Guiana in South America. It reached its lookout point 1 million miles from Earth in January. Then the lengthy process began to align the mirrors, get the infrared detectors cold enough to operate and calibrate the science instruments, all protected by a sunshade the size of a tennis court that keeps the telescope cool.The plan is to use the telescope to peer back so far that scientists will get a glimpse of the early days of the universe about 13.7 billion years ago and zoom in on closer cosmic objects, even our own solar system, with sharper focus.Webb is considered the successor to the highly successful, but aging Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble has stared as far back as 13.4 billion years. It found the light wave signature of an extremely bright galaxy in 2016. Astronomers measure how far back they look in light-years with one light-year being 5.8 trillion miles (9.3 trillion kilometers).“Webb can see backwards in time to just after the Big Bang by looking for galaxies that are so far away that the light has taken many billions of years to get from those galaxies to our telescopes,” said Jonathan Gardner, Webb’s deputy project scientist said during the media briefing.How far back did that first image look? Over the next few days, astronomers will do intricate calculations to figure out just how old those galaxies are, project scientist Klaus Pontoppidan said last month.“The image is spectacularly deeper (than a similar one taken by Hubble), but it’s unclear how far back we’re looking,″ Richard Ellis, professor of astrophysics at University College London, said by email. ”More info is needed.”The deepest view of the cosmos “is not a record that will stand for very long,” Pontoppidan said, since scientists are expected to use the Webb telescope to go even deeper.Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA’s science mission chief said when he saw the images he got emotional and so did his colleagues: “It’s really hard to not look at the universe in new light and not just have a moment that is deeply personal.”At 21 feet, Webb’s gold-plated, flower-shaped mirror is the biggest and most sensitive ever sent into space. It’s comprised of 18 segments, one of which was smacked by a bigger than anticipated micrometeoroid in May. Four previous micrometeoroid strikes to the mirror were smaller. Despite the impacts, the telescope has continued to exceed mission requirements, with barely any data loss, according to NASA.NASA is collaborating on Webb with the European and Canadian space agencies.“I’m now really excited as this dramatic progress augurs well for reaching the ultimate prize for many astronomers like myself: pinpointing “Cosmic Dawn” — the moment when the universe was first bathed in starlight,” Ellis said.___AP Aerospace Writer Marcia Dunn contributed.___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Our view of the universe just expanded: The first image from NASA’s new space telescope unveiled Monday is brimming with galaxies and offers the deepest look of the cosmos ever captured.

The first image from the $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope is the farthest humanity has ever seen in both time and distance, closer to the dawn of time and the edge of the universe. That image will be followed Tuesday by the release of four more galactic beauty shots from the telescope’s initial outward gazes.

The “deep field" image released at a White House event is filled with lots of stars, with massive galaxies in the foreground and faint and extremely distant galaxies peeking through here and there. Part of the image is light from not too long after the Big Bang, which was 13.8 billion years ago.

Seconds before he unveiled it, President Joe Biden marveled at the image he said showed “the oldest documented light in the history of the universe from over 13 billion — let me say that again — 13 billion years ago. It’s hard to fathom.”

The busy image with hundreds of specks, streaks, spirals and swirls of white, yellow, orange and red is only “one little speck of the universe,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said.

NASA

This image provided by NASA on Monday, July 11, 2022, shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope.

The pictures on tap for Tuesday include a view of a giant gaseous planet outside our solar system, two images of a nebula where stars are born and die in spectacular beauty and an update of a classic image of five tightly clustered galaxies that dance around each other.

The world’s biggest and most powerful space telescope rocketed away last December from French Guiana in South America. It reached its lookout point 1 million miles from Earth in January. Then the lengthy process began to align the mirrors, get the infrared detectors cold enough to operate and calibrate the science instruments, all protected by a sunshade the size of a tennis court that keeps the telescope cool.

The plan is to use the telescope to peer back so far that scientists will get a glimpse of the early days of the universe about 13.7 billion years ago and zoom in on closer cosmic objects, even our own solar system, with sharper focus.

Webb is considered the successor to the highly successful, but aging Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble has stared as far back as 13.4 billion years. It found the light wave signature of an extremely bright galaxy in 2016. Astronomers measure how far back they look in light-years with one light-year being 5.8 trillion miles (9.3 trillion kilometers).

“Webb can see backwards in time to just after the Big Bang by looking for galaxies that are so far away that the light has taken many billions of years to get from those galaxies to our telescopes,” said Jonathan Gardner, Webb’s deputy project scientist said during the media briefing.

Laura Betz/NASA via AP, File

In this April 13, 2017, photo provided by NASA, technicians lift the mirror of the James Webb Space Telescope using a crane at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

How far back did that first image look? Over the next few days, astronomers will do intricate calculations to figure out just how old those galaxies are, project scientist Klaus Pontoppidan said last month.

“The image is spectacularly deeper (than a similar one taken by Hubble), but it’s unclear how far back we’re looking,″ Richard Ellis, professor of astrophysics at University College London, said by email. ”More info is needed.”

The deepest view of the cosmos “is not a record that will stand for very long,” Pontoppidan said, since scientists are expected to use the Webb telescope to go even deeper.

Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA’s science mission chief said when he saw the images he got emotional and so did his colleagues: “It’s really hard to not look at the universe in new light and not just have a moment that is deeply personal.”

At 21 feet, Webb’s gold-plated, flower-shaped mirror is the biggest and most sensitive ever sent into space. It’s comprised of 18 segments, one of which was smacked by a bigger than anticipated micrometeoroid in May. Four previous micrometeoroid strikes to the mirror were smaller. Despite the impacts, the telescope has continued to exceed mission requirements, with barely any data loss, according to NASA.

NASA is collaborating on Webb with the European and Canadian space agencies.

“I’m now really excited as this dramatic progress augurs well for reaching the ultimate prize for many astronomers like myself: pinpointing “Cosmic Dawn” — the moment when the universe was first bathed in starlight,” Ellis said.

___

AP Aerospace Writer Marcia Dunn contributed.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


Mon, 11 Jul 2022 07:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wcvb.com/article/nasa-james-webb-space-telescope-first-image/40576746
Killexams : First batch of James Webb Space Telescope images and data released by NASA

Two side-by-side deep field images from the MIRI and NIRCam instruments of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, a revolutionary apparatus designed to peer through the cosmos to the dawn of the universe, show composites made from images at Mid-Infrared (L) & Near-Infrared (R) and released July 12, 2022. 

Nasa | Reuters

A new era of astronomy has begun.

NASA on Tuesday released a full batch of images and data from the James Webb Space Telescope, providing a tantalizing first look at the cosmic mysteries that could be untangled in the years ahead by humanity's largest and most powerful space observatory.

Among the newly released images are breathtaking views of a distant galaxy group called Stephan's Quintet that was discovered in 1877, a stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula that plays host to many stars that are several times larger than the sun, and the Southern Ring Nebula, a huge expanding shell of gas around a dying star.

Stephan’s Quintet, a collection of five galaxies, as seen by MIRI from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, a revolutionary apparatus designed to peer through the cosmos to the dawn of the universe and released July 12, 2022. 

Nasa | Reuters

"Every image is a new discovery and each will deliver humanity a view of the universe that we've never seen before," NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said during an event held at the Goddard Space Flight Center to introduce the images.

The long-awaited release of the Webb telescope's first images comes after NASA and the White House gave the public a sneak peek a day early, unveiling a stunning view captured of a patch of sky overflowing with bright galaxies.

The so-called "deep field view" showed massive clusters of galaxies in the foreground that are magnifying and distorting light from fainter and much more distant celestial objects behind them.

Two side-by-side images show observations of the Southern Ring Nebula in near-infrared light, at left, and mid-infrared light, at right, from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, a revolutionary apparatus designed to peer through the cosmos to the dawn of the universe and released July 12, 2022. I

NASA | Reuters

That image, along with the full series released Tuesday by the space agency, hint at the sheer power and unparalleled capabilities of the $10 billion-Webb telescope. Scientists have said the observatory, which will be able to see deeper into space and in greater detail than any telescope that has come before it, could revolutionize human understanding of the universe.

This week's release included the Webb telescope's first spectrum of an exoplanet, showing light emitted at different wavelengths from WASP-96b, a planet outside our solar system that was discovered in 2014. WASP-96b, located more than 1,000 light-years away from Earth, has roughly half the mass of Jupiter and is primarily made up of gas, according to NASA.

The "Cosmic Cliffs" of the Carina Nebula is seen in an image divided horizontally by an undulating line between a cloudscape forming a nebula along the bottom portion and a comparatively clear upper portion, with data from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, a revolutionary apparatus designed to peer through the cosmos to the dawn of the universe and released July 12, 2022. Speckled across both portions is a starfield, showing innumerable stars of many sizes.

NASA | Reuters

While WASP-96b is too hot and located too close to its parent star to be considered habitable, Webb's spectrum revealed the presence of water vapor in the planet's atmosphere.

Webb's observations of exoplanets, including with instruments sensitive enough to study the chemical fingerprints of their atmospheres, could help guide the search for potential life beyond Earth.

The Webb telescope, a collaboration among NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency, launched into space Dec. 25, 2021. After spending more than six months testing and configuring the spacecraft's various instruments, NASA officials said the observatory's science operations are now ready to begin in earnest.

The spacecraft, which is the size of a tennis court, is equipped with infrared "eyes" that can pierce through dust and gas that might otherwise make some stars, galaxies and celestial targets undetectable. As such, the telescope is expected to provide first-of-its-kind infrared views of the universe, and capture some never-before-seen cosmic objects.

A group of five galaxies that appear close to each other in the sky: two in the middle, one toward the top, one to the upper left, and one toward the bottom are seen in a mosaic or composite of near and mid-infrared data from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, a revolutionary apparatus designed to peer through the cosmos to the dawn of the universe and released July 12, 2022. 

Nasa | Via Reuters

Telescopes like Webb can essentially peer back into the universe's history because it takes time for light to travel through space. This means that light detected by Webb from the most distant galaxies in the cosmos provides insight into the universe as it was billions of years ago.

Billed as the successor to the prolific Hubble Space Telescope, the Webb observatory is designed to study the earliest stars and galaxies in the universe. Researchers have said that Webb could unlock mysteries from as far back as 100 million years after the Big Bang — observations that could help astronomers understand how the modern universe came to be.

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 13:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/12/first-batch-of-james-webb-space-telescope-images-and-data-released-by-nasa.html
Killexams : The first five images from the James Webb Space Telescope, explained

It was a giddy Tuesday morning at NASA'S Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. At one point NASA Administrator Bill Nelson even joked that the mood was more akin to a pep rally than a stuffy scientific press conference.

Yet the joy was not misplaced. Long-awaited images produced by the groundbreaking James Webb Space Telescope were finally going to be revealed to the public. The five images ran the astronomical gamut: one was an image of some of the oldest and most distant objects in the universe; another was not a literal image, but observational data revealing the composition of the atmosphere of a planet in an alien solar system around 1000 light-years away. 

Nelson commented that President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris had asked to see the pictures in advance, and met in secrecy in the White House to do so.

They were "like kids," Nelson recalled. Another host commented that they "geeked out."

With characteristic optimism, Nelson ended the rally by promising that visits to the Moon and Mars were next on NASA's itinerary. It is unclear if the agency can back up that bravado; the history of American space exploration has contained many unfulfilled promises and disappointments.

Yet at least on Tuesday — with the revelation that the James Webb Space Telescope had abundantly succeeded in its mission — NASA could at least say, on this occasion: Mission accomplished.


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These are the five images that were revealed, and what each one means for humanity. 

1. SMACS 0723

SMACS 0723NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has produced the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date. Known as Webb's First Deep Field, this image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 is overflowing with detail. (NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI)This is not only the first full-color image to be produced by the James Webb Space Telescope; it is also, to date, the most clear and full infrared image of the distant universe ever produced.

"This image covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm's length. It's just a tiny sliver of the vast universe," Nelson explained in a statement. Another host commented that the telescope was so powerful, the scientists could not find a single spot where there was mere blank sky: "It's teeming with galaxies!"

One of the selling points of the James Webb Space Telescope is that it can detect infrared light — historically, the most difficult part of the electromagnetic spectrum for astronomers to observe. Indeed, from Earth's surface, infrared astronomy is virtually impossible because of all the infrared light generated on Earth from heat, and which is scattered in the atmosphere. Only in the darkness of space can a telescope like James Webb detect infrared light. That incredible ability allows for the space telescope to take images like this one, which would be impossible with even the largest ground-based telescope.

If you look carefully at the image, you will see white galaxies that were formed roughly around the time that the Earth and Sun were also being formed. Some galaxies look stretched and pulled because they've been distorted by gravity from black holes or supermassive galaxies with black holes at their center, as Einstein famously predicted.

2. The Southern Ring Nebula

Southern Ring NebulaTwo cameras aboard Webb captured the latest image of this planetary nebula, cataloged as NGC 3132, and known informally as the Southern Ring Nebula. It is approximately 2,500 light-years away. (NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI)It might look like a jellyfish without any tentacles, but it's actually the Southern Ring Nebula, approximately 2,500 light years away from Earth, and officially dubbed NGC 3132. A planetary nebula is created when a dying star expels large amounts of mass over a period of successive waves; in these pictures, we can see those waves. There is also a "bubbly, almost foamy" orange material around the edges (blue in the mid-infrared version) that exists because molecular hydrogen expands and lights up the gas and dust.

The image is false-color, and depending on whether you're looking at it with near-infrared light versus mid-infrared light, the image has been colored to appear more blue or red respectively.

The hosts also noted an "eager egg," a narrow filament near the top of the nebula that is radially aligned and appears to be blue in the near-infrared image. One astronomer had initially insisted it was nothing remarkable; others speculated that it could be an edge-on galaxy, or a disk galaxy that appears at high angles to the line of sight. The doubting astronomer lost the bet; it was, indeed, an edge-on galaxy.

3. Stephan's quintet

Stephan's QuintetIn an enormous new image, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope reveals never-before-seen details of galaxy group "Stephan's Quintet" (NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI)This awe-inspiring feature is 290 million light years away from Earth. Situation in the constellation Pegasus — named after the winged horse from Greek mythology — it stunned astronomers when it was first discovered in 1877: They had never seen such a compact group of galaxies. Locked in a sort of cosmic dance, two of the galaxies are currently in the process of merging within each other. This new image is considered to be especially significant because it shows the type of interaction that drives the evolution of galaxies and can be the mechanisms for galaxies' growth. It provides scientists with new insights into how galactic interactions lead to star formation, as well as reveals more detail about a black hole in that region.

"The image also shows outflows driven by a black hole in Stephan's Quintet in a level of detail never seen before," NASA officials said. 

4. Carina Nebula

Carina NebulaThis landscape of "mountains" and "valleys" speckled with glittering stars is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by NASA's new James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals for the first time previously invisible areas of star birth. (NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI)It almost looks like a rough horsehair blanket, deep red and beige, with a classic and sharp blue night sky peeking up from behind it. One could imagine a camper in a sleeping bag gazing up at the stars while snuggled in warmly and receiving a view along these lines.

Except this is no ordinary view. Only 7,500 light years away from Earth, and located in our own Milky Way galaxy, the Carina Nebula has beguiled scientists for generations. This new image reveals, with unprecedented clarity, individual stars and emerging stellar nurseries that had not previously been seen. 

"These observations of NGC 3324 will shed light on the process of star formation. Star birth propagates over time, triggered by the expansion of the eroding cavity," NASA writes. "As the bright, ionized rim moves into the nebula, it slowly pushes into the gas and dust. If the rim encounters any unstable material, the increased pressure will trigger the material to collapse and form new stars."

5. WASP-96 b (spectrum)

WASP 96 bNASA's James Webb Space Telescope has captured the distinct signature of water, along with evidence for clouds and haze, in the atmosphere surrounding a hot, puffy gas giant planet orbiting a distant Sun-like star. The observation, which reveals the presence of specific gas molecules based on tiny decreases in the brightness of precise colors of light, is the most detailed of its kind to date, demonstrating Webb's unprecedented ability to analyze atmospheres hundreds of light-years away. (NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI)Picture a gas giant with less than half the mass of Jupiter, but is also 1.2 times greater in diameter. You'd have WASP-96 b, which NASA describes as "a hot, puffy gas giant planet orbiting a distant Sun-like star." Discovered in 2014, the unusual planet was noted for such quirky traits as orbiting its own star every 3.4 days, giving it a temperature of over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Using sophisticated scientific instruments, the telescope actually took measurements of the atmosphere by analyzing the spectrums of light that passed through it.

"Researchers will be able to use the spectrum to measure the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere, constrain the abundance of various elements like carbon and oxygen, and estimate the temperature of the atmosphere with depth," NASA writes. "They can then use this information to make inferences about the overall make-up of the planet, as well as how, when, and where it formed."

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 08:35:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.salon.com/2022/07/12/jwst-images-explained/
Killexams : More APC leaders resign over Muslim-Muslim ticket

From Romanus Ugwu, Abuja, Tony John, Port Harcourt

The ire sparked by the ruling All Progressives Congress (APC) following the decision to field a Muslim-Muslim presidential ticket has continued with the resignation of more party members.

Asiwaju Bola Tinubu, presidential candidate of the APC, on July 10, announced Kashim Shettima, former governor of Borno State, as running mate, as development that has elicited mixed reactions.

Barely 24 hours after David Bwala, legal aide to Ovie Omo-Agege, deputy senate president, and others resigned from party over the issue, close associate of former transport minister, Rotimi Amaechi, Tonye Princewill and veteran Nollywood actor, Kenneth Okonkwo, former military administrator and national caucus member in Delta State, Air Vice Marshal Frank Ajobena (retd) have withdrawn their membership of the party.

However, former deputy national publicity secretary of the party, Yekini Nabena, argued that Nigerians should be more worried that Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) killed fairness and conventional power rotation between the North and South than the Muslim-Muslim ticket of the ruling party.

Regardless, Ajobena described Tinubu’s decision to float a Muslim-Muslim ticket as the highest level of insensitivity to the Christian faith in the country.

“A man must stand for something, else will fall for anything, hence, I am quitting,” the first military administrator of Abia State said in a statement issued in Warri, Delta State. He expressed disappointment that Tinubu who he respected so much could take such an inhuman decision.

Defending his decision to quit the party, Ajobena said: “Tinubu is not my enemy, I am not against him. But let’s call a spade a spade. It is not my character to be a double agent, I am not pretending; even though I like the APC, the right thing should be done. The decision could be described as one that portrays arrogance and total disrespect to us, Christians, in the APC. “The latest development portrays us as a people who can easily be bought over with money. Such an action is a minus to our democratic system. In what capacity will I be serving in his campaign train? As a slave?

Princewill, in his resignation letter to the chairman of his ward, said he cannot argue for equity in his state and defend inequity in his country. 

“While I appreciate my leader, Rotimi Amaechi and all his efforts, I cannot defend the decision of my party in fielding a Muslim-Muslim ticket, especially at a time like this, against all protestations from well-meaning Nigerians, across religious and political divides. It sets a very wrong precedent. It is totally insensitive and even if you win, will prove bad for good governance.  Under these dire circumstances, I find no justification to still remain, in good conscience, a member of a political party that subordinates electoral victory, over the safety of lives and the peace of mind of its citizens.

“The men and women of our party here in Rivers are the most loyal and faithful supporters I have met. They know right and they know wrong. And they know me. I enjoyed working with them and I’m so sad to leave. But, an APC party that totally disregards the basics of the same equity we preach, is alien to me. Buhari resisted the same temptation and chose a little known Osinbajo and won. By doing this, Tinubu is saying that a Northern Christian has no electoral value. My staying means I agree.

“I wish you well. And I remain grateful to our leader Amaechi; but, I cannot defend the indefensible. And to be totally honest, neither should you.”

In a related development, veteran actor, Okonkwo, wrote on his official Instagram page that APC’s Muslim-Muslim ticket would permanently destroy the political viability of Christians in the north if allowed to stand. He added that he resigned his membership also in the interest of equity, justice, fairness and peaceful co-existence among Nigerians.

The statement read: “I just resigned my membership of the All Progressives Congress in the interest of equity, justice, fairness and peaceful co-existence among Nigerians.

“May God deliver Nigeria from the hands of power grabbers, who elevate the quest for power above the quest for purpose.

“God bless you and Barka da Sallah to our Muslim brothers”, he stated.

The statement also read in part: “If Muslims could voluntarily vote for southern presidents, it is then a fallacy to insinuate that they cannot accept a northern Christian vice president.

“This will permanently destroy the political viability of Northern Christians in Nigeria, if allowed to stand. This is in addition to the failure to protect lives and properties of Nigerians which should be their primary responsibility. The country is also in shatters.”

Nabena speaks

But Nabena insisted that Nigerians should be more worried that the opposition party killed fairness and conventional power rotation between the North and South, than the Muslim-Muslim ticket of the ruling party.

Nabena, pleaded with Nigerians to ignore the unnecessary cry from the opposition parties, emphasising that there are Muslims in the North, as well as all part of the South, hence Muslim-Muslim ticket of the APC is harmless.

Addressing newsmen in Abuja, the APC chieftain gave example of South-south geopolitical zone where most of the states have Christian-Christian governor and deputy, the states are yet to develop despit their huge oil revenues and huge oil revenues.

The former APC spokesman also argued that a single faith ticket was not new in Nigeria according to history, listing Buhari/Idiagbon Muslim-Muslim ticket, Gowon/Adewale Christian-Christian ticket in the past.

“Heaven did not fall. In 2011, when Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN) fielded Nuhu Ribadu and Fola Adeola, both Muslims, there was no cry by the opposition because the ticket stood no chance of winning.

“None of those agitating against the Muslim-Muslim ticket on the basis of fairness have considered the African traditional worshippers. How fair is it that we are agitating for fairness and equity to share power between Christians and Muslims while completely ignoring and alienating our African traditional worshippers, where is the justice?

“Nigeria should worry more about the zoning arrangement which the PDP has just killed for their selfish interest and desperation of its presidential candidate, Atiku Abubakar, because of his last chance which will become one-chance by 2023,” Nabena said.

More stalwarts resign enmasse in Rivers

Another party stalwart and Senator Magnus Abe’s loyalist, Chidi Wihioka, had resigned from the party on Monday.

The  former member representing Ikwerre/Emohua Federal Constituency cited the high-handedness of leader of APC in Rivers State for his resignation. Another state lawmaker, Sam Eligwe,  from Ahoada West LGA, who also tendered his resignation alleged injustice in the administration of the party in the state.

“Since 2015, I have watched the party being run as a fiefdom where one individual has complete control over all decisions regarding party positions, employment opportunities and contracts. This is definitely not democracy being practiced.Therefore, due to the above stated reasons, I hereby wish to resign forthwith, my membership of the All Progressives Congress (APC),” he said.

Those resigning relief to party – Spokesman

State Publicity Secretary  of the party,  Chris Finebone, in his response claimed some of those that left added no value throughout their stay and wanted to kill the party.

“There have been some movements, though I cannot term it exodus because that is relative. What is important is that such a movement should be carefully appraised. The first individuals are those whom I can say added no value to APC business while they were here, to them, we wish them well.

“However, there is also the few that have left much to our relief. These are persons leaving after a tortuous effort to kill APC without success.  They even caused us non-appearance on the ballot in 2019. We say good riddance because they caused the party much more harm than good.  Happily, some of them are having a second thought and taking advantage of the ongoing reconciliation efforts in our party to retrace their steps.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 01:35:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.sunnewsonline.com/more-apc-leaders-resign-over-muslim-muslim-ticket/
Killexams : Carl Tamulevich, legendary Naval Academy athlete and administrator, dies at age 79

A few months ago, Rear Adm. John Wade was given 24 hours notice to report to the Pentagon from his posting in Honolulu for important meetings.

It was a tight schedule with Wade required to return quickly to his duties as director for operations of the United States Indo-Pacific Command.

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However, Wade made sure to rent a car and travel to Annapolis to visit with Carl Tamulevich. There was no way Wade would be an hour away and not take time to catch up with the man who was a significant influence on his life.

“Carl became a father figure and mentor for me from the day I first met him as a plebe at the Naval Academy,” Wade told The Capital on Tuesday.

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Navy athletics lost a legendary figure Sunday night when Tamulevich died at the age of 79. The longtime Annapolis resident died at Anne Arundel Medical Center from complications related to cancer.

Tamulevich was a two-sport standout at the Naval Academy, a bruising fullback in football and tenacious defenseman in lacrosse. He recently retired after serving 26 years in the Navy and another 30 with the Naval Academy Athletic Association.

“We are heartbroken to lose our cherished friend and distinguished alum,” Navy Athletic Director Chet Gladchuk said in a statement. “Carl touched the lives of so many in such meaningful and influential ways throughout his life as a mentor and role model to all.

“Our fond memories of Carl — his laugh, humor, personality, professionalism and kindness — will always be ingrained in the lives of those who were fortunate enough to know him.”

Tamulevich is one of the most legendary athletes in the history of Nashua High in the New Hampshire town of the same name. He was an All-State selection in football, basketball and baseball while helping Nashua capture five state championships in those sports.

“Carl was a local hero in Nashua, New Hampshire,” said Lori Tamulevich, who met her future husband while in high school.

Carl Tamulevich initially followed in the footsteps of his father, who was also a star athlete at Nashua, by attending Holy Cross. He lasted just one semester due to poor grades, a setback that would prove a blessing in disguise.

Tamulevich had been recruited for football and baseball by the Naval Academy and was told the opportunity was still open provided he spent a year at prep school. He reported to the Naval Training Center Bainbridge in Port Deposit, and thus began a lifelong association with the service.

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Tamulevich spent two seasons with the Navy varsity football team and enjoyed many great moments as one of two primary fullbacks. The former Lori Herrick said the first date with her future husband took place after the 1966 Army-Navy game in Philadelphia. They got engaged exactly one year later at the 1967 edition of the classic rivalry.

“It was an honor and a privilege to be Carl Tamulevich’s wife,” Lori said. “Loving him was easy because he was so kind, compassionate and giving.”

Although Tamulevich had planned to play baseball for coach Joe Duff at Navy, he wound up becoming a star in a different spring sport. Hall of Fame coach Willis Bilderback put forth a full-court press to recruit Tamulevich to play lacrosse.

“Coach Bilderback wrote me three letters during plebe year saying he hoped I would come out for lacrosse,” Tamulevich recalled in March after his retirement. “I figured if the man wanted me to play that badly, I should deliver it a try.”

Tamulevich developed into one of the greatest defensemen in college lacrosse history, a two-time first-team All-American always assigned to cover the opponent’s top attackman. He earned the Schmeisser Award as the top defenseman in Division I as a senior and was inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1989.

Navy compiled a 27-6-1 record and captured two United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association national championships during Tamulevich’s three seasons on varsity. He shut out Maryland star Jack Heim when he was the nation’s leading scorer and had to cover another future Hall of Famer in Joe Cowan of Johns Hopkins.

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Tamulevich graduated from the academy in 1968 with a management degree after initially declaring as an aerospace engineering major. He went to flight school at Air Station Pensacola and then underwent multi-engine training at Air Station Corpus Christi.

Tamulevich spent 20 years flying the Lockheed P-3 Orion, an anti-submarine and maritime surveillance aircraft. He was stationed twice in Bermuda, an important P-3 base assigned to track Russian nuclear ballistic submarines operating off the East Coast. He was also stationed at air bases in Iceland (Keflavik), Spain (Rota), Italy (Sicily) and Greece (Souda Bay).

Former athletic director John “Bo” Coppedge was responsible for bringing Tamulevich back to the academy to serve as executive officer of the physical education department. After two years in that role, Tamulevich transitioned to deputy director of athletics under Coppedge.

When Jack Lengyel replaced Coppedge and became the first civilian athletic director at Navy, he hired Tamulevich as an assistant athletic director in charge of scheduling and team support.

Tamulevich was promoted to senior associate athletic director, and remained in that role after retiring from the Navy in 1992 with the rank of commander.

Tamulevich served as the sports administrator for men’s lacrosse throughout most of his tenure with the Naval Academy Athletic Association, working with four coaches over three decades.

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Richie Meade, who served as Navy lacrosse coach from 1995 to 2011, said Tamulevich was a mentor and confidant.

“Carl was like my big brother, and it meant a lot to have him in my corner,” Meade said recently. “He was a very important part of my experience at the Naval Academy. Through good times and bad times, Carl was always there to provide support.”

Current coach Joe Amplo quickly developed a close relationship with Tamulevich and credits the Navy legend for making his transition to the academy smoother than it could have been.

“Carl was the fabric of Navy lacrosse for generations. He’s been the heartbeat, the example, the icon,” Amplo said. “Carl Tamulevich is everything that Navy lacrosse is all about and to lose him is a tough blow.

“He has been the support system for every coach and player who has ever represented this program,” added Amplo, who played golf with Tamulevich a month ago.

Tamulevich also served as the sports administrator for women’s soccer for most of the 30-year tenure of coach Carin Gabarra and they developed an extremely close relationship.

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“Carl was always an incredible advocate, not only for women’s soccer, but every sport at Navy. He was true blue and gold through and through,” Gabarra said. “Carl’s passion for the Naval Academy Athletic Association and the midshipmen who played varsity sports was off the charts. He just cared so much and loved deeply everything about Navy athletics.”

Lori Tamulevich considered Gabarra her favorite varsity coach and always pushed her husband to deliver the women’s soccer program whatever it needed. “I’d ask for certain things and Carl would initially say no, but I’d eventually get him to say yes,” Gabarra said with a laugh.

Tamulevich had been recovering well from cancer treatments and was playing golf quite often in retirement. However, his health took a turn for the worse in recent weeks and Gabarra made several trips to the hospital to lift the spirits of her former boss.

“The last time I saw Carl I brought him a big ice cream sundae and we spent a few hours talking. Those are moments I will now cherish forever,” Gabarra said. “In my opinion, Carl Tamulevich epitomizes what the Naval Academy is all about. He was a special human being who cared deeply about this institution and what it stands for.”

Wade lost his father at a young age and was in need of direction and guidance after arriving at the Naval Academy as a recruited lacrosse player in 1986. Meade, who was defensive coordinator under coach Bryan Mathews at the time, asked Tamulevich to serve as the plebe’s sponsor.

Wade spent many hours at the Tamulevich home off West Street and said he learned many key leadership lessons from the man he would grow to admire so much. Hard work and commitment were obvious lessons, but Carl Tamulevich also stressed maintaining a positive attitude, smiling — even during the tough times — because it’s contagious, and taking good care of those you are charged to lead.

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Wade always remembered Tamulevich telling him to maintain a proper balance between work and life, that relationships with family and friends deliver a person energy and purpose.

“All those early leadership lessons I learned from Carl shaped me into the husband, father and Naval officer I am today,” Wade said.

In addition to his wife of 54 years, Tamulevich is survived by his son Jeff and daughter-in-law Amanda, the widow of his late son CJ. He is also survived by seven grandchildren – Drew, Madison, Genevieve, Alex, Lauren, Tabitha and Lily Bell.

Tamulevich was preceded in death by his parents, Bolic and Gladys, along with his brother Michael.

Funeral services are still to be determined and will be announced at a later date.

“I can’t imagine there is anyone who has ever met my dad and does not hold him in the highest regard,” Jeff Tamulevich said.

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