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Exam Code: 200-301 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
200-301 Cisco Certified Network Associate - CCNA 2022

200-301 CCNA
Certification: CCNA
Duration: 120 minutes

This exam tests your knowledge and skills related to:

- Network fundamentals
- Network access
- IP connectivity
- IP services
- Security fundamentals
- Automation and programmability

The Cisco Certified Network Associate v1.0 (CCNA 200-301) exam is a 120-minute exam associated with the CCNA certification. This exam tests a candidate's knowledge and skills related to network fundamentals, network access, IP connectivity, IP services, security fundamentals, and automation and programmability. The course, Implementing and Administering Cisco Solutions (CCNA), helps candidates prepare for this exam.

20% 1.0 Network Fundamentals
1.1 Explain the role and function of network components
1.1.a Routers
1.1.b L2 and L3 switches
1.1.c Next-generation firewalls and IPS
1.1.d Access points
1.1.e Controllers (Cisco DNA Center and WLC)
1.1.f Endpoints
1.1.g Servers
1.2 Describe characteristics of network topology architectures
1.2.a 2 tier
1.2.b 3 tier
1.2.c Spine-leaf
1.2.d WAN
1.2.e Small office/home office (SOHO)
1.2.f On-premises and cloud
1.3 Compare physical interface and cabling types
1.3.a Single-mode fiber, multimode fiber, copper
1.3.b Connections (Ethernet shared media and point-to-point)
1.3.c Concepts of PoE
1.4 Identify interface and cable issues (collisions, errors, mismatch duplex, and/or speed)
1.5 Compare TCP to UDP
1.6 Configure and verify IPv4 addressing and subnetting
1.7 Describe the need for private IPv4 addressing
1.8 Configure and verify IPv6 addressing and prefix
1.9 Compare IPv6 address types
1.9.a Global unicast
1.9.b Unique local
1.9.c Link local
1.9.d Anycast
1.9.e Multicast
1.9.f Modified EUI 64
1.10 Verify IP parameters for Client OS (Windows, Mac OS, Linux)
1.11 Describe wireless principles 1.11.a Nonoverlapping Wi-Fi channels 1.11.b SSID 1.11.c RF 1.11.d Encryption
1.12 Explain virtualization fundamentals (virtual machines)
1.13 Describe switching concepts
1.13.a MAC learning and aging
1.13.b Frame switching
1.13.c Frame flooding
1.13.d MAC address table
20% 2.0 Network Access
2.1 Configure and verify VLANs (normal range) spanning multiple switches
2.1.a Access ports (data and voice)
2.1.b Default VLAN
2.1.c Connectivity
2.2 Configure and verify interswitch connectivity
2.2.a Trunk ports
2.2.b 802.1Q
2.2.c Native VLAN
2.3 Configure and verify Layer 2 discovery protocols (Cisco Discovery Protocol and LLDP)
2.4 Configure and verify (Layer 2/Layer 3) EtherChannel (LACP)
2.5 Describe the need for and basic operations of Rapid PVST+ Spanning Tree Protocol and identify basic operations
2.5.a Root port, root bridge (primary/secondary), and other port names
2.5.b Port states (forwarding/blocking)
2.5.c PortFast benefits
2.6 Compare Cisco Wireless Architectures and AP modes
2.7 Describe physical infrastructure connections of WLAN components (AP, WLC, access/trunk ports, and LAG)
2.8 Describe AP and WLC management access connections (Telnet, SSH, HTTP, HTTPS, console, and TACACS+/RADIUS)
2.9 Configure the components of a wireless LAN access for client connectivity using GUI only such as WLAN creation, security settings, QoS profiles, and advanced WLAN settings
25% 3.0 IP Connectivity
3.1 Interpret the components of routing table
3.1.a Routing protocol code
3.1.b Prefix
3.1.c Network mask
3.1.d Next hop
3.1.e Administrative distance
3.1.f Metric
3.1.g Gateway of last resort
3.2 Determine how a router makes a forwarding decision by default
3.2.a Longest match
3.2.b Administrative distance
3.2.c Routing protocol metric
3.3 Configure and verify IPv4 and IPv6 static routing
3.3.a Default route
3.3.b Network route
3.3.c Host route
3.3.d Floating static
3.4 Configure and verify single area OSPFv2
3.4.a Neighbor adjacencies
3.4.b Point-to-point
3.4.c Broadcast (DR/BDR selection)
3.4.d Router ID
3.5 Describe the purpose of first hop redundancy protocol
10% 4.0 IP Services
4.1 Configure and verify inside source NAT using static and pools
4.2 Configure and verify NTP operating in a client and server mode
4.3 Explain the role of DHCP and DNS within the network
4.4 Explain the function of SNMP in network operations
4.5 Describe the use of syslog features including facilities and levels
4.6 Configure and verify DHCP client and relay
4.7 Explain the forwarding per-hop behavior (PHB) for QoS such as classification, marking, queuing, congestion, policing, shaping
4.8 Configure network devices for remote access using SSH
4.9 Describe the capabilities and function of TFTP/FTP in the network
15% 5.0 Security Fundamentals
5.1 Define key security concepts (threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, and mitigation techniques)
5.2 Describe security program elements (user awareness, training, and physical access control)
5.3 Configure device access control using local passwords
5.4 Describe security password policies elements, such as management, complexity, and password alternatives (multifactor authentication, certificates, and biometrics)
5.5 Describe remote access and site-to-site VPNs
5.6 Configure and verify access control lists
5.7 Configure Layer 2 security features (DHCP snooping, dynamic ARP inspection, and port security)
5.8 Differentiate authentication, authorization, and accounting concepts
5.9 Describe wireless security protocols (WPA, WPA2, and WPA3)
5.10 Configure WLAN using WPA2 PSK using the GUI
10% 6.0 Automation and Programmability
6.1 Explain how automation impacts network management
6.2 Compare traditional networks with controller-based networking
6.3 Describe controller-based and software defined architectures (overlay, underlay, and fabric)
6.3.a Separation of control plane and data plane
6.3.b North-bound and south-bound APIs
6.4 Compare traditional campus device management with Cisco DNA Center enabled device management
6.5 Describe characteristics of REST-based APIs (CRUD, HTTP verbs, and data encoding)
6.6 Recognize the capabilities of configuration management mechanisms Puppet, Chef, and Ansible
6.7 Interpret JSON encoded data

Cisco Certified Network Associate - CCNA 2022
Cisco Certified mission
Killexams : Cisco Certified mission - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/200-301 Search results Killexams : Cisco Certified mission - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/200-301 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Cisco Killexams : The new Cisco Enterprise Certification – Everything you need to know

The CCNA Enterprise (Cisco Certified Network Associate) is an IT certification from Cisco Systems.

CCNA 200-301 Certification

  1. The CCNA Enterprise (Cisco Certified Network Associate) is an IT certification from Cisco Systems. The CCNA program began in 1998 with a basic certificate focusing on Routing and Switching. Since then, Cisco has expanded the program to cover many facets of computer networking and network administration, offering certifications at five increasingly demanding levels: Entry, Associate, Professional, Expert, and Architect. Among Cisco’s five-level network certification system, the CCNA family belongs to the Associate level, which is one step above the Entry level. Socheck this link right here nowfor more information.

As of February 24, 2020, Cisco has upgraded its certifications. The new Cisco certifications will now come in 4 skill levels (CCNA, Specialist, CCNP, and CCIE) in 6 specialty areas (Enterprise, Security, Service Provider, Collaboration, Data Center).

CCNA certification: The 200-301 takes the place of the 200-125

This is the significant change in the update, where the Special CCNAs (CCNA Security, Wireless, Voice, etc.) deliver way to a single CCNA which will be the starting point for all certification courses. We went from CCNA 200-125 to CCNA 200-301. Topics removed will be Models, EIGRP, OSPFv3, BGP, VTP, and APIC-EM, as well as WAN Topics like PPP, PPPoE, or GRE. The automation and programmability of networks are becoming a new field of purely theoretical knowledge. According to Cisco Press author Wendell Odom, the new CCNA 200-301 exam is 25% less dense than its predecessor CCNA 200-125.

The CCENT level and the ICND1 and ICND2 exams are disappearing in favor of a single, generic CCNA 200-301 Implementing and Administering Cisco Solutions exam.

  1. The Enterprise 200-301 is delivered in 5 days + 3 days of Self-study. Click here to view official content.

For its academic version, the CCNA1, CCNA2, CCNA3, and CCNA4 deliver way to:

  1. CCNA Enterprise I: Introduction to Networks (17 modules)
  2. CCNA Enterprise II: Fundamentals of Switching, Routing, and Wireless (16 modules)
  3. CCNA Enterprise III: Enterprise Networks, Security and Authorization (14 modules)

Add an alternative

Are youa networkengineer,system engineer,network administrator,and systems technician? Want to boost your career and take it to the next level?

  1. It is essential to know that the Cisco Enterprise certification is among the most demanded and valued major computer science certifications today. Today, most companies require IT certificates. Day by day, with technological advancements, businesses need skilled human resources to manage their network and security.
  2. That’s why investing in Enterprise 200-301 certification is one of the best decisions you can make. It is the starting point for Enterprise, Security, Data Center, Collaboration, and Service Provider courses.

By getting certified, you will be able to discover and deepen the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, and troubleshoot enterprise network infrastructures and thus climb the ladder with the most advanced Certifications.

Here’s a look at the six Cisco training courses you’ll get on offer today:

  1. Cisco Certified Technician CCT Routing and Switching 100-490:This course is not intended for novices. Instead, it is aimed at people who are already working in the networking industry and want to deepen their knowledge. It covers switching and routing technologies, remote device configuration, complex connectivity issues, and visiting thecompany websitefor more updates.
  2. Cisco Enterprise 200-301:This course will teach you how to pass the new CCNA certification, which Cisco introduced in February 2020. For those who don’t know, Enterprise 200-301 is the latest network certification for network administrators, engineer support, and data center operations. It covers automation, programmability, SDN, and wireless and security fundamentals.
  3. Cisco CCNP Enterprise ENARSI exam 300-410:If you want to work with routers and their associated technologies, you will need the Cisco CCNP Enterprise ENARSI certificate.

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To view the original version on The Express Wire visit The new Cisco Enterprise Certification – Everything you need to know

Sun, 17 Jul 2022 21:31:00 -0500 TheExpressWire en-US text/html https://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/the-new-cisco-enterprise-certification-everything-you-need-to-know
Killexams : What is Cyber Security and Why is it Important?

A student exploring what cyber security is, holding a tablet and standing in front of large machines at his internship.

In recent years, headlines about cyber security have become increasingly common. Thieves steal customer social security numbers from corporations’ computer systems. Unscrupulous hackers grab passwords and personal information from social media sites or pluck company secrets from the cloud. For companies of all sizes, keeping information safe is a growing concern.

What Is Cyber Security?

Cyber security consists of all the technologies and practices that keep computer systems and electronic data safe. And, in a world where more and more of our business and social lives are online, it’s an enormous and growing field with many types of job roles.

According to the Cyber Security & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), "Cyber security is the art of protecting networks, devices and data from unauthorized access or criminal use and the practice of ensuring confidentiality, integrity and availability of information."

What Is Information Security?

Information security is the processes and tools designed and used to protect sensitive business information from modification, disruption, destruction and inspection, according to CISCO.

Information security and cyber security are often confused. According to CISCO, information security is a crucial part of cyber security but is used exclusively to ensure data security.

Everything is connected by computers and the internet now, including communication, entertainment, transportation, shopping, medicine and more. A copious amount of personal information is stored among these various services and apps, which is why information security is critical.

Why Is Cyber Security Increasingly Important?

Getting hacked isn’t just a direct threat to the confidential data companies need. It can also ruin their relationships with customers and even place them in significant legal jeopardy. With new technology, from self-driving cars to internet-enabled home security systems, the dangers of cybercrime become even more serious.

So, it’s no wonder that international research and advisory firm Gartner Inc. predicts worldwide security spending will hit $170 billion in 2022, an 8% increase in just a year.

Jonathan Kamyck with text Jonathan Kamyck“We’re seeing a tremendous demand for cyber security practitioners,” said Jonathan Kamyck, associate dean of cyber security at Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU). “Most businesses, whether they’re large or small, will have an online presence, for example. Some of the things you would do in the old days with a phone call or face-to-face now happen through email or teleconference, and that introduces lots of complicated questions with regard to information.”

These days, the need to protect confidential information is a pressing concern at the highest levels of government and industry. State secrets can be stolen from the other side of the world. Companies whose whole business models depend on control of customer data can find their databases compromised. In just one high-profile 2017 case, personal information for 147.9 million people – about half the United States – was compromised in a breach of credit reporting company Equifax.

What Are Cyber Attacks?

Infographic with the text Common Cyber Attack Threats: Malware, Phising, Ransomware, VirusesA cyber attack is an unwelcomed attempt to steal, expose, alter, disable or destroy information through unauthorized access to computer systems, according to the International Business Machines (IBM).

There are many reasons behind a cyber attack, such as cyber warfare, cyber terrorism and even hacktivists, but these actions fall into three main categories: criminal, political and personal.

Attackers motivated by crime typically seek financial gain through money theft, data theft or business disruption. Similarly, personal attackers include disgruntled current or former employees who will take money or data in an attempt to attack a company's systems.  Socio-political motivated attackers desire attention for their cause, resulting in their attacks being known to the public, and this is a form of hacktivism. Other forms of cyber attacks include espionage, or spying to gain an unfair advantage over the competition, and intellectual challenging.

According to CISA, as of 2021, there is a ransomware attack every 11 seconds – a dramatic rise from every 39 seconds in 2019 (CISA PDF Source). In addition, small businesses are the target of nearly 43% of all cyber attacks, which is up 400%.

The Small Business Association (SBA) reports that small businesses make attractive targets and are typically attacked due to their lack of security infrastructure. The SBA also reports that a majority of small business owners felt their business was vulnerable to an attack. This is because many of these businesses:

  • Can't afford professional IT solutions
  • Have limited time to devote to cyber security
  • Don't know where to begin

What Are Types of Cyber Attacks and Threats?

Here are some of the most common threats among cyber attacks:

  • Malware: Malware, also known as malicious software, is intrusive software developed by cyber criminals to steal data or to damage and destroy computers and computer systems, according to CISCO. Malware has the capability of exfiltrating massive amounts of data. Examples of common malware are viruses, worms, trojan viruses, spyware, adware and ransomware.
  • Phishing: Phishing attacks are the practice of sending fraudulent communications while appearing to be a reputable source, according to CISCO. This is typically performed via email or on the phone. The goal is to steal sensitive information such as financial or login information – or to install malware onto a target's device.
  • Ransomware: Ransomware is a form of malware designed to encrypt files on a target device, rendering those files and the systems they rely on unusable, according to the CISA. Once the system has been encrypted, actors demand ransom in exchange for decryption.
  • Viruses: A virus is a harmful program intended to spread from computer to computer, as well as other connected devices, according to the SBA. The object of a virus is to deliver the attacker access to the infected systems. Many viruses pretend to be legitimate applications but then cause damage to the systems, steal data, interrupt services or download additional malware, according to Proofpoint.

Who Is Behind Cyber Attacks?

Attacks against enterprises can come from a variety of sources such as criminal organizations, state actors and private persons, according to IBM. An easy way to classify these attacks is by outsider versus insider threats.

Outsider or external threats include organized criminals, professional hackers and amateur hackers (like hacktivists).

Insider threats are typically those who have authorized access to a company's assets and abuse them deliberately or accidentally. These threats include employees who are careless of security procedures, disgruntled current or former employees and business partners or clients with system access.

Developing Cyber Awareness

Infographic with the text Good Security Measures: Downloading the latest patches and software updates, Ensuring data is secure, Make sure employees use strong passwordsCyber security awareness month takes place every October and encourages individuals and organizations to own their role in protecting their cyberspace, according to Forbes, although anyone can practice being mindful of cyber security at any time. Awareness of the dangers of browsing the web, checking emails and interacting online in general are all part of developing cyber security awareness.

Cyber security awareness can mean different things to different people depending on their technical knowledge. Ensuring appropriate training is available to individuals is a great way to motivate lasting behavioral changes.

While cyber security awareness is the first step, employees and individuals must embrace and proactively use effective practices both professionally and personally for it to truly be effective, according to Forbes.

Getting started with cyber security awareness is easy, and many resources are readily available on the CISA government website based on your needs. Whether you need formal training or a monthly email with cyber security tips and tricks, any awareness and training can impact behavior and create a positive change in how you view cyber security.

What Are the Types of Cyber Security?

Here are the most common types of cyber security available:

  • Application Security: Application security describes security used by applications to prevent data or code within the app from being stolen or hijacked. These security systems are implemented during application development but are designed to protect the application after deployment, according to VMWare.
  • Cloud Security: Cloud security involves the technology and procedures that secure cloud computing environments against internal and external threats. These security systems are designed to prevent unauthorized access and keep data and applications in the cloud secure from cyber security threats, according to McAfee.
  • Infrastructure Security: Critical infrastructure security describes the physical and cyber systems that are so vital to society that their incapacity would have a debilitating impact on our physical, economic or public health and safety, according to CISA.
  • Internet of Things (IoT) Security: IoT is the concept of connecting any device to the Internet and other connected devices. The IoT is a network of connected things and people, all of which share data about the way they are used and their environments, according to IBM. These devices include appliances, sensors, televisions, routers, printers and countless other home network devices. Securing these devices is important, and according to a study by Bloomberg, security is one of the biggest barriers to widespread IoT adaption.
  • Network Security: Network security is the protection of network infrastructure from unauthorized access, abuse or theft. These security systems involve creating a secure infrastructure for devices, applications and users to work together, according to CISCO.

Do You Need a Degree To Be a Cyber Security Professional?

A cyber security degree provides an opportunity for students to develop skills and a mindset that empowers them to begin a career in securing systems, protecting information assets and managing organizational risks.

Alex Pettito with the text Alex PettitoAlex Petitto ’21 earned his bachelor’s in cyber security. Petitto always wanted to work within the IT sector, and he chose cyber security because it’s an exponentially growing field. He transferred credits from a community college through a U.S. Air Force program and finished his bachelor's in under two years. "It was much quicker than I thought it would be,” he said.

It didn't take long for Petitto to begin exploring his career options. "Even before finishing (my) degree, I … received multiple invites to interview for entry-level positions within the industry and received three job offers," said Petitto. He decided to remain within the Air Force and transfer to a cyber security unit as opposed to joining the private sector.

Petitto said his cyber security degree opened doors for him in the field – “a monumental goal for me," he said. "This degree was a critical first step for breaking into the industry."

Your cyber security degree program can also connect you with experiential learning opportunities to further your growth as a cyber security professional. For example, the annual National Cyber League (NCL) has a competition wherein students from across the U.S. practice real-world cyber security tasks and skills. SNHU recently placed 9th out of over 500 colleges participating in the NCL competition.

Career Opportunity and Salary Potential in Cyber Security

As companies large and small scramble to respond to the growing threats, jobs in the cyber security field are growing fast. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts that employment for information security analysts will grow by 33% through 2030. That’s more than twice as fast as the average computer-related occupation and four times as fast as American jobs in general.

To help fill the need for more professionals in the cyber security world, CyberSeek, a project funded by the federal government and supported by industry partners, provides detailed information on the demand for these workers by state. The tool shows that, across the country, there were 180,000 job openings for information security analysts between May 2021 and April 2022, with only 141,000 professionals holding jobs in the role, reflecting an unfilled demand of 39,000 workers.

“There’s a huge shortfall right now in entry-level and midlevel cyber security roles,” Kamyck said. “You’re looking at demand across all business sectors, with companies of all sizes.

CyberSeek lists the following entry-mid-and advanced-level roles available in the field. Average salaries are based on job openings posted between May 2021 and April 2022.

Entry-level Cyber Security Roles

  • Cyber Crime Analyst: Cyber crime analysts make an average salary of $100,000, and common skills necessary for the role include computer forensics, information security and malware engineering.
  • Cyber Security Specialist: Cyber security certified make an average salary of $104,482, and important skills for the role include information security, network security and information assurance.
  • Incident and Intrusion Analyst: Incident analysts make an average salary of $88,226, and common skills needed include project management, network security and intrusion detection.
  • IT Auditor: Information technology auditors make an average salary of $110,000, and common skills for the role include internal auditing and audit planning, accounting and risk assessment.

Mid-level Cyber Security Roles

  • Cyber Security Analyst: Cybersecurity analysts make an average of $107,500, and the top skills required include information security and systems, network security and threat analysis.
  • Cyber Security Consultant: Consultants in cyber security make an average salary of $92,504 and need skills in information security and surveillance, asset protection and security operations.
  • Penetration and Vulnerability Tester: Penetration testers make an average salary of $101,091 and need skills in penetration testing, Java, vulnerability assessment and software development.

Advanced-level Cyber Security Roles

  • Cyber Security Architect: Cyber security architects make an average salary of $159,752, and top skills for the role include software development, network and information security and authentication.
  • Cyber Security Engineer: Cyber security engineers make an average of $117,510 a year and need cryptography, authentication and network security skills.
  • Cyber Security Manager:  Managers in this field earn an average salary of $130,000, and top skills include project management, network security and risk management.

What Does a Cyber Security Professional Do?

Infographic with the text Types of Cyber Security: Application security, cloud security, infastructure security, internet of things (IOT) security, network securityKamyck said cyber security professionals could play a wide range of roles in a modern company. For example, some small businesses may hire a single person to handle all kinds of work protecting data. Others contract with consultants who can offer a variety of targeted services. Meanwhile, larger firms may have whole departments dedicated to protecting information and chasing down threats.

While companies define roles related to information security in a variety of ways, Kamyck said there are some specific tasks that these employees are commonly called on to do. In many cases, they must analyze threats and gather information from a company’s servers, cloud services and employee computers and mobile devices.

“An analyst’s job is to find meaning in all of that data, see what’s concerning,” he said. “Is there a breach? Is someone violating a policy?”

In many cases, Kamyck said, security certified work with other information technology professionals to ensure a company’s systems are secure. That involves not just technical know-how but also people-oriented skills.

But breaches don’t just take the form of someone hacking into a server. They can also involve customer lists sent through unencrypted email, a password written on a sticky note in a cubicle or a company laptop stolen from an employee’s car.

Depending on their specific role, cyber security professionals must also think strategically. In many industries, companies rely on employees having quick access to highly sensitive data, such as medical records or bank account information.

“The goal is to balance the needs of the company or the organization you’re working for with the need to protect the confidentiality of customer data and trade secrets,” Kamyck said.

Kamyck said people who do well in these jobs tend to be curious, competitive and willing to keep learning to stay up to date with rapidly changing technology. The work draws on multidisciplinary knowledge, and people who continue with the work find there are a variety of directions they can take in their careers.

For example, Kamyck said, if you're interested in the business side, you might become a manager or run audits that let companies know where they need to Excellerate to meet compliance. If you love the adversarial part of the job, you might become a penetration tester, essentially an “ethical hacker” who tests for system vulnerabilities by trying to get through them.

How To Get Into Cyber Security

If you’re wondering how to get into cyber security, it’s clear there are many positions out there. The question is how to make sure you’re a good fit for them. According to BLS, most information security analyst jobs require at least a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information assurance, programming or another related field.

In some cases, the work calls for a Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Information Systems. That degree typically takes an additional two years of study and involves both technical and business management courses.

Cyber security job requirements also sometimes include related work experience. Rather than jumping right into the security side of information technology, you can start as a network or computer systems administrator. Depending on the specific cyber security position, employers may have other job requirements. For instance, keeping databases secure might be an ideal job for someone who’s spent time as a database administrator and is also well-versed in security issues.

Aside from work experience and college degrees, some employers also prefer job candidates who have received certifications demonstrating their understanding of best practices in the field. For example, the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) credential validates a professional’s general knowledge and abilities in information security. There are also more specific certificates, which can highlight specialized knowledge of computer architecture, engineering or management.

Whatever path new employees in cyber security want to follow, Kamyck said, those who are willing to make an effort to learn the field will find abundant opportunities.

“There’s needs in government. There’s needs in finance. There’s needs in education,” Kamyck said. “There’s a tremendous unfilled need.”

Discover more about SNHU's online cyber security degree: Find out what courses you'll take, skills you'll learn and how to request information about the program.

Nicholas Patterson is a writer at Southern New Hampshire University. Connect with him on LinkedIn.

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.snhu.edu/about-us/newsroom/stem/what-is-cyber-security
Killexams : I Was Wrong About Microsoft And Google

Perhaps it was Donald Trump refusing to ever admit he was wrong (about President Obama’s birthplace, immigrants, crowd size, weather maps, Russia, Kim Jong-un, climate change, Covid, voter fraud, infrastructure week – it’s a long list), but like avoiding certain things (orange skin, drinking bleach, committing treason), publicly admitting error has suddenly become fashionable. The New York Times recently featured eight “I Was Wrong” columns by pundits like Thomas Friedman, Michelle Goldberg, and Paul Krugman admitting they were wrong about Trump voters, Facebook, Al Franken, Chinese censorship, protests, capitalism, inflation, and Mitt Romney (and his dog). It was fun studying these admissions, although they all followed the same formula: I may have been wrong about this specific issue, but I was still right about the big picture! I only regret the Times wasn’t able to solicit a contribution from Susan Collins.

In this spirit, I have my own admission. Two summers ago – back when Susan Collins was more than a punchline and overt treason was just a gleam in Donnie’s eye – Microsoft and Google announced efforts to calm America’s troubled streets (George Floyd, Breonna Taylor) with free online programs to close the digital skills gap. Microsoft announced new curriculum from LinkedIn Learning and the GitHub Learning Lab and lowered the cost of certifications to bring digital skills to an additional 25M Americans. In Google’s case, it was 100,000 scholarships for new online certificates (data analyst, project manager, UX designer). In a Gap Letter titled The False Allure of Online Training, I lampooned the tech giants, saying “when the problems include racial injustice and generational damage, online training is biting off more than it can chew.” I went on to highlight the fact that neither company planned to actually hire any of the newly trained talent. “Microsoft and Google: if they’re not good enough for you, why should another employer want them?”

So allow me join the ranks of penitent pundits by acknowledging I was wrong to castigate Microsoft and Google for launching online courses (although right as rain about the big picture – skills gap, lack of clear pathways to socioeconomic mobility, death of the American Dream). Doing so violated a principle I hold dear: not letting the best be the enemy of the good. Sure, it would be great if Microsoft and Google could singlehandedly wrench America’s workforce into alignment with employer needs. But that’s asking too much, even for businesses that collectively generate over $200B in annual profit.

I now recognize that casting aspersions on Microsoft and Google is like blaming McGraw-Hill and HMH for what ails K-12 education. Actually worse, because Microsoft and Google have better curriculum. And it’s not just these two. AWS, Salesforce, VMware, Cisco, Oracle, Pega, Appian, Workday, Facebook, Adobe, CompTIA, SAP, Snowflake, and lots of other tech leaders have built out high-quality, skills-based online courses leading to certification exams for the most in-demand digital skills. Besides addressing skills employers want but can’t find, these courses have something else in common. They’re all 100% asynchronous.

In this era of digital transformation, self-paced online courses are just like textbooks: necessary but insufficient. Learners and job seekers who can successfully complete these courses on their own probably don’t need much help getting a good job. They’re not the ones we should be thinking about. And for those who don’t yet have a good job – struggling frontline and gig workers without the necessary motivation, aptitude, and preparation to progress on their own (and where life is likely to get in the way even if they hit that trifecta) – I’d bet completion rates on asynchronous tech credentials are below the education equivalent of the Mendoza Line (the MOOC Line i.e., 5%).

Microsoft, Google and the rest can’t be expected to solve this problem. They’re not schools or training companies and will never be (principally because they turn up their noses at low gross margins). But they can recognize the problem. And so kudos to Google, which back in February announced $100M of funding for wraparound services, specifically funding Year Up and Merit America to provide synchronous engagement for job seekers. Wraparound services include instruction (i.e., classes), coaching, and interview prep. And while they have their attention, Year Up and Merit America will also work on soft skills like teamwork and communication. Google’s goal is 20,000 additional (low-income, underrepresented) certificate completers, or $5K per life transformed.

Deploying wraparound services to mine America’s newly discovered motherlode of tech training courseware for the benefit of tens of millions who’ve been shut out of the digital economy also has the potential to fix our broken workforce system. I’ve written previously about state and local workforce boards, which prioritize speed-to-placement and counseling over human capital development and therefore find themselves in a vicious circle of attracting only the lowest skill jobs and job seekers. Now a new service provider is seeking to play the role of Year Up for workforce boards. ShiftUp is delivering similar wraparound services for in-demand tech credentials, dramatically elevating 5% completion rates; ShiftUp is currently over 75% for these in-demand credentials. ShiftUp is now supporting workforce boards in New Jersey, Michigan, and Washington DC. Again, the price tag is in the neighborhood of $5K per life transformed.

With nonprofits and workforce boards taking the lead on making tech credentials accessible and meaningful for displaced and underserved Americans, where are colleges and universities in this pixelated picture? Largely nowhere. Sure, hundreds of schools have signed up for AWS Academy and Pathstream is helping over 30 colleges and universities deliver certifications from Facebook, Salesforce, Tableau, and Asana. But all told, well under 5% of accredited institutions are pairing instruction with any off-the-shelf online courses from tech leaders to create faster + cheaper pathways to good jobs.

Why are colleges missing the boat? First, there are dozens of tech companies. Developing a comprehensive tech credential offering would require going company-by-company. And within a university, who’s set up to do this?

I came to the answer two weeks ago during a tech tête-à-tête with a dean at a Midwestern university. The e-mail discussion involved this very subject: how her university could begin to offer these wondrous new tech credentials. I suggested she’d need to add synchronous instruction in order to make them work for students. Her response:

Synchronous is not quality online education. It is something else but not ONLINE. It is a hybrid and I am not sure why anyone would think that is the way to go. On demand, on your own time is imperative for today's consumer. Like MOOCs this will not last.

Why she cited MOOCs – a model that failed primarily due to lack of synchronous engagement – to make her point is a door I opted not to walk through. But I suggested that if she wanted to reach those seeking to land a good first job, she might take a different view, and cited Google’s $100M investment.

Her response:

I have been in the business a long time, this is the flavor of the month like MOOCs which I knew were not going to last (and a lot more than 100M got spent on MOOCs). We would be happy to create asynchronous versions for our [hundreds of] corporate partners.

And with that clarifying statement, I pinpointed my correspondent: dean of a continuing education division with a mandate to serve corporate partners, make money, and contribute that money back to the core university. She’s serving customers and her customers’ employees are different in many ways from the typical Merit America participant: early 30s with a decade or more working in restaurants and retail. One way in particular they’re different: they’re much more likely to have the motivation, aptitude, and preparation to complete asynchronous online courses unaided.

Unfortunately, if you talk to a college or university about Microsoft, Google, AWS, Salesforce and the like, this is where you end up: the periphery, a borderland known as continuing education. There’s little sense that these remarkable new educational resources could be useful for full-time students or help the institution fulfill its mission. And that’s a shame.

Which leads me to a third reason for university inaction on tech credentials. As Postsecondary Analytics’ Nate Johnson said on last week’s Inside Higher Education (The Key) podcast, amidst enrollment wreckage, there are bright spots in student demand: areas like technology. “But those are the most costly fields for... instruction... You have to hire people who have those skills.”

So even if colleges could figure out how to gather these credentials and somehow activate the core instead of continuing education, they’d still have to find instructors. And where are colleges going to find people to teach AWS, Pega, Snowflake, and Workday? Not from Ph.D programs! Experts are out there, but they’re scarce (hence skills gap). And they’ll be hard for colleges to recruit: they’re practitioners, not career educators, and they’re already making a much better living than career educators. Colleges would have to appeal to their better angels. And to do that, they’ll probably have to figure out how to serve students who really need the leg up these programs can provide.

In response to these challenges, Hire-Train-Deploy leader SkillStorm — an Achieve Partners portfolio company — came up with an answer. SkillStorm entered into agreements with AWS, Pega, Salesforce, Appian, and CompTIA and is setting up white-label tech cert programs for university partners. What SkillStorm calls its Accelerator program solves problems #1 and #3: the first one-stop shop for the most in-demand tech certifications with a large bench of qualified instructors. Then SkillStorm runs synchronous programs (one hour per day, five days per week). By working with multiple colleges and aggregating enrollments, SkillStorm is able to launch cohorts weekly. (The one problem SkillStorm hasn’t solved yet is continuing education; that’s where SkillStorm is plugging in.)

With partners like Pathstream and SkillStorm Accelerator, colleges and universities have no excuse for avoiding Microsoft, Google, and the other companies leading digital transformation. And while higher education will instinctively push these programs to continuing ed, as soon as these programs come online, the appeal for students who’ve paid for longer and more expensive degree bundles will become obvious. As these last-mile skills could not be more meaningful for landing good jobs, core students will find them and either force schools to include them in degree programs or perhaps convince colleges to situate them as building blocks in stackable credentials (e.g., upside-down degrees).

Come to think of it, after unjustly accusing them two years ago, the only one with an excuse for avoiding Microsoft and Google is me.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 01:00:00 -0500 Ryan Craig en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/ryancraig/2022/08/05/i-was-wrong-about-microsoft-and-google/
Killexams : Chemeketa Community College

Chemeketa Community College is a regional leader in cybersecurity education located in beautiful Salem, Oregon and is one of only three Oregon community colleges to be designated as a Center of Academic Excellence in 2-year Cybersecurity Education by the National Security Administration and Department of Homeland Security. It is the mission of Chemeketa Community College to help increase the security of our communities and country by preparing students to readily take on the challenges of being a cybersecurity professional. While working through their education, Chemeketa students have the opportunity not only to earn a degree, but to earn multiple IT certifications through their coursework and to build real-world work experience through Chemeketa's cooperative work experience program.

During the typical Chemeketa cybersecurity student's first year of education, they become familiarized with the foundational skills and concepts necessary to become a successful cybersecurity practitioner. In this initial year, students undertake classes in digital literacy, personal cybersecurity, programming, operating systems, computer hardware, and networking. During this time, students have the opportunity to earn their EC-Council Certified Secure Computer User certification, ComptTIA A+ certification, and entry-level Cisco networking certifications.

As students move into their second year of education they will begin to narrow their focus on cybersecurity and begin thinking about their future careers as they take classes relating to data security, computer forensics, and ethical hacking and work towards EC-Council cybersecurity certifications such as Certified Ethical Hacker and Certified Hacking Forensics Investigator. During this time, the foundational knowledge from their first year is continued to be built upon as students refine their understanding of IT concepts in the context of cybersecurity while studying server management, database management, and computer architecture. Finally, a cybersecurity student's final term includes a class specifically designed to reinforce all of the concepts taught during their program and to prepare them for the CompTIA Security+ certification exam.

Chemeketa Community College has been serving the Salem, Oregon community since 1969 and over the years Chemeketa's community involvement has created connections with local employers that provide students with myriad internship opportunities. Through the Chemeketa Cooperative Work Experience program, every Chemeketa cybersecurity student has the opportunity to earn credit while simultaneously taking their first steps into industry. These internships allow the Chemeketa student a flexible way to begin the transition from academic to professional life as they work on finishing their degree.

Graduates of the Cybersecurity Program at Chemeketa Community College are awarded the degree of Associate of Applied Science in Cybersecurity and will be well postured for entry-level positions as a cybersecurity analyst, penetration tester, digital forensic examiner, security operation center staff, and numerous other related roles in both the private and public sectors. For students who are interested in continuing their education, the Associate of Applied Science degree provides students with the ability to continue their education in cybersecurity or a related field at a four-year institution while still having credentials that they can put to use while advancing their education.

For more than 50 years, Chemeketa Community College has committed itself to transforming lives and our community through exceptional learning experiences in the Mid-Willamette Valley. As the second largest community college in Oregon, Chemeketa serves 30,000 students annually at its Salem and Yamhill Valley campuses, as well as centers in Brooks, Eola, Winema, Dallas, Woodburn, and Chemeketa Center for Business and Industry (CCBI).

Chemeketa Community College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educational institution.

Chemeketa Community College

Salem, OR

503-399-5000

Fri, 07 May 2021 04:52:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.newsweek.com/insights/leading-cybersecurity-programs-2021/chemeketa-community-college
Killexams : MEEZA Continues Celebrating Multiple Achievements As Cisco Partner

(MENAFN- The Peninsula) The Peninsula

Doha: MEEZA, Qatar's prominent Managed and Cloud IT services and solutions provider, has received multiple recognitions from Cisco for its expanded activities and competence in the public sector in Qatar, being awarded as Cisco's 'Public Sector Partner of the Year' in Qatar, achieving 'Cisco Gold Integrator Partner' certification for 2022-2023, and 'Customer Experience Specialization'. 

MEEZA was awarded as 'Public Sector Partner of the Year' in Qatar by Cisco on the Comstor and Cisco Partner Day in acknowledgement of its expansion and performance in the public government sector.

MEEZA passed the audit and maintained the Cisco Gold Integrator Partner' certification for 2022-2023. The company met all personnel, specialization and support requirements and has demonstrated that it is qualified to sell, install and support Cisco Solutions in the Gulf region.

MEEZA has also achieved its sixth specialization - 'Customer Experience Specialization' - from Cisco, a new mandate for MEEZA to maintain the Cisco Gold Integrator Partner Level.

Commenting on the achievements, MEEZA CEO Eng. Ahmad Abdulla Al Muslemani said,“These recognitions embody our continued managed IT market leadership position and trust in MEEZA expertise and capabilities as a major provider in Qatar and the region. Our partnership with Cisco keeps expanding year after year based on mutual trust and exchange of experiences to ensure that our clients receive the best services that are on par with international standard.

“We are happy to receive these recognitions from Cisco, a globally renowned leader in IT and networking. This is an exciting time for us to further prove our competence as the preferred and reliable Qatari IT service provider.” 

Hasan Khan, General Manager, Cisco Qatar, said:“We are always proud of MEEZA's performance in the public domain and its capabilities to deliver excellent services to customers. These recognitions build on the previous accolades MEEZA has received for its professional approach to service delivery.

MEEZA has proven its capabilities to assist companies to achieve their digital transformation goals.” 

These recognitions followed the previous achievement of Cisco's Gold Service Integrator and Gold Service Provider certificate.

MEEZA is a well-established managed IT service provider in Qatar with extensive skill set in managing complex environments, full understanding of country regulations and backed by government agreements and strategic partnerships.

MEEZA, a Qatar Foundation venture, is centered on a mission and vision to enable, support, and drive sustainable development in Qatar's information technology sector in line with the Qatar National Vision 2030. It offers scalable, highly available and resilient cloud services that are used to Excellerate customer engagement, facilitate the transformation of products and services, and empower businesses.

MEEZA is a fast-growing player in cloud computing services, both in regional and international markets. It continues to innovate and offer cost-effective IT solutions and services to help its clients focus on their core business.

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Tue, 05 Jul 2022 20:26:00 -0500 Date text/html https://menafn.com/1104485802/MEEZA-Continues-Celebrating-Multiple-Achievements-As-Cisco-Partner
Killexams : Cisco lays out a roadmap that it says will help government digitise India No result found, try new keyword!As the country comes to terms with concepts like work from home and online education because of the COVID-19 pandemic, digitisation of sectors is not just a mere option but extremely crucial. The ... Tue, 02 Aug 2022 15:23:27 -0500 en-in text/html https://www.msn.com/en-in/money/technology/cisco-lays-out-a-roadmap-that-it-says-will-help-government-digitise-india/ar-AA10fqVY?fromMaestro=true Killexams : Cisco Networking Academy to offer skills training to all North Dakotans

The U.S.   Cisco


North Dakota is the first state in the nation to provide these courses statewide at no cost to all residents.

The Cisco Networking Academy Skills for All program provides free, quality, mobile, self-paced, online learning aligned to industry jobs, providing a pathway to a career in technology.

There are numerous courses, badging and industry certifications available, with an emphasis on cybersecurity, along with coding, networking essentials, Internet of Things (IoT) and other technology-focused courses.

“This statewide program will greatly benefit the people of North Dakota by providing opportunities to acquire best-in-class skills in highly sought after, in-demand and growing professions,” Burgum said.

“Skills for All provides North Dakota residents from all backgrounds and experiences the opportunity to obtain 21st century skills and help our state build a strong and competitive workforce.”

The Skills for All program expands the number of courses offered from seven to almost 25, and new course modules are continually being added.

Fri, 22 Jul 2022 20:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.poandpo.com/companies/cisco-networking-academy-to-offer-skills-training-to-all-north-dakotans/
Killexams : ConvergeOne Achieves Cisco Environmental Sustainability Specialization, Reaffirming its Commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility ConvergeOne Achieves Cisco Environmental Sustainability Specialization, Reaffirming its Commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility

PR Newswire

BLOOMINGTON, Minn., July 12, 2022

BLOOMINGTON, Minn., July 12, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- ConvergeOne, the preeminent services-led provider of cloud, collaboration and digital modernization solutions, today announced that it has received the Cisco Environmental Sustainability Specialization for its efforts to help customers move to the latest technologies while responsibly recycling or refurbishing used hardware.

ConvergeOne Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NACR) (PRNewsFoto/)

With this specialization, ConvergeOne demonstrates its commitment to partnering with Cisco to make a positive environmental impact and eliminate wasteful practices by enacting a circular consumption model. In a business environment made even more competitive by economic changes and global concerns, ConvergeOne helps customers make smart decisions that turn challenges and obstacles into alternatives and opportunities.

ConvergeOne has a longstanding commitment to environmental sustainability. Recently, ConvergeOne received the Bronze sustainability rating from EcoVadis, an independent rating agency that assesses environmental performance and corporate social responsibility. The Bronze rating places ConvergeOne in the top 50 percent of global companies within the same industry for its sustainability management system and advanced approach to corporate social responsibility.

"Our sustainability strategy centers around our commitment to doing what's right and making an impact. With the Cisco Environmental Sustainability Specialization, we demonstrate our ability to help customers achieve key sustainability targets by finding new ways to repurpose their existing technologies," said John A. McKenna Jr., Chairman and CEO, ConvergeOne. "ConvergeOne differentiates and reimagines the future with proven, progressive and purposeful solutions. In these times of disruption and resilience, we are purpose-built to play a critical role in building a better future for our team, our customers and communities."

ConvergeOne is a leading Cisco partner that has also been awarded the distinctions of Cisco Master Collaboration, Security, Data Center & Hybrid Cloud, and Advanced Customer Experience Specializations. With these Master and Advanced Specializations, ConvergeOne is recognized as a top-tier Cisco partner with the highest skill level and expertise in architectures across the entire Cisco portfolio.

ConvergeOne has earned distinction as a Cisco Gold Partner for possessing broad expertise across multiple disciplines and demonstrating a measurably high level of customer satisfaction in assisting customers with infrastructure and applications cloud modernization. By delivering purpose-built solutions, ConvergeOne helps customers manage risk and accelerate digital transformation with modern infrastructure that is flexible, dynamic, and able to evolve with the needs of the business.

For more than a decade, ConvergeOne has developed deep technical expertise across the entire Cisco portfolio, including Cloud Customer Experience, Cyber Security, Data Center, Enterprise Networking, and Unified Communications. ConvergeOne was recognized with five awards at the Cisco Partner Summit 2021. Notably, ConvergeOne received the Global Award for Customer Experience Partner of the Year for rising to market shifts and demonstrating transformative thought leadership for customers transitioning to subscription and XaaS pricing models.

About ConvergeOne

ConvergeOne is a proven, services led cloud and applications solution provider that utilizes its intellectual property and unique methodologies to create value for customers and develop progressive solutions that connect people with purpose. Over 14,000 enterprise and mid-market customers trust ConvergeOne to achieve their business outcomes with cloud, collaboration, enterprise networking, data center and cybersecurity solutions. Our investments in cloud infrastructure and professional and managed services provide transformational opportunities for customers to achieve financial and operational benefits with leading technologies. Our 2021 NPS of 80, placing us in the World Class category for the fourth consecutive year, is a testament to our ability to provide customers with the highest level of customer satisfaction, responsiveness and expertise. ConvergeOne has partnerships with more than 300 global industry leaders, including Dell Technologies, AWS, Avaya, Cisco, IBM, Genesys, and Microsoft to customize specific business outcomes. We deliver solutions with a total lifecycle approach, including strategy, design and implementation with professional, managed and support services. ConvergeOne holds more than 5,600 technical certifications across hundreds of engineers throughout North America, including three Customer Success Centers. More information is available at convergeone.com.

About Cisco

Cisco is the worldwide leader in technology that powers the Internet. Cisco inspires new possibilities by reimagining your applications, securing your enterprise, transforming your infrastructure, and empowering your teams for a global and inclusive future. Discover more on The Network and follow Cisco on Twitter at @Cisco.

ConvergeOne Media Contact:

Gabrielle Lukianchuk, Vice President, Marketing, ConvergeOne
678.781.0937
glukianchuk@convergeone.com 

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SOURCE ConvergeOne

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 00:09:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.morningstar.com/news/pr-newswire/20220712cg13300/convergeone-achieves-cisco-environmental-sustainability-specialization-reaffirming-its-commitment-to-corporate-social-responsibility
Killexams : Kinetic by Windstream Deploys Cisco and Qwilt’s Open Caching Solution to Elevate Streaming Experience in North America
  • Enhanced solution combines Cisco’s edge compute and networking infrastructure with Qwilt’s Edge Cloud for Content Delivery

  • Improves streaming quality and delivery economics across Kinetic’s network while significantly increasing delivery capacity for live and on-demand content

  • Creates a telco cloud foundation for future use cases such as website delivery and edge computing

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., August 02, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Cisco and Qwilt today announced the deployment of their unique content delivery solution across the North American network of Kinetic by Windstream, to enable superior streaming performance to its customers throughout the United States. The adoption of Cisco and Qwilt’s open caching solution considerably improves the quality and efficiency of live and on-demand video delivery while increasing Kinetic’s network capacity for other forms of media.

Kinetic will deploy Qwilt’s open caching technology across its 170,000 miles of fiber network across the US. The deployment helps Kinetic address the growing number of live streaming events and other media consumption, as households increasingly turn to streaming services and expect broadcast quality to the home. Cisco’s edge compute and networking infrastructure, combined with Qwilt’s Open Edge Cloud for Content Delivery Solution, makes this possible by preparing Kinetic’s network to support increasing data volumes and improving the streaming experience.

Gary Cooke, Senior Vice President of Engineering for Kinetic, said: "We tell our customers ‘High Speed for Here’ – whether live, on-demand, or other forms of media content. By partnering with Qwilt and Cisco, we’re ensuring our fiber-backed network has the scalability and capacity needed to handle the growth in demand for all forms of streaming content. By integrating innovative edge technologies across our network, we’re bringing high quality content closer to our customers than ever before."

Open caching, an open architecture developed and endorsed by the Streaming Video Alliance, offers a platform that federates content delivery infrastructure deployed deep inside service provider networks. It provides open APIs, protection, and security mechanisms for content publishers. The open caching approach helps service providers quickly deploy an edge delivery footprint and addresses the needs of global and regional content providers for more capacity, consistency in content delivery, and performance assurance. The deployment also creates a telco cloud foundation for future use cases, such as website delivery and edge computing.

Theodore Tzevelekis, Vice President and Head of Business Development, Mass-scale Infrastructure Group, Cisco, said: "Streaming is the future of content delivery, but it doesn’t have to mark the end of great quality content experiences. By embracing content delivery at the edge through open caching technology, service providers are embracing a new model to manage their network capacity. Working alongside Qwilt, we’re equipping Kinetic by Windstream with the tools needed to bring fantastic experiences to its customers across North America and in doing so, democratize capacity across its nationwide infrastructure."

Alon Maor, CEO and Co-Founder of Qwilt, said: "Soaring demand for streamed content brings an urgent need for service providers to scale their networks for the future. Through Cisco and Qwilt’s united vision, we empower service providers like Kinetic by Windstream to do more with their assets while accelerating their digital transformations. We look forward to helping modernize the way Kinetic delivers content and ready their growing network for the future of content experiences."

ENDS

About Qwilt

Qwilt’s mission is to deliver connected experiences at the quality they were imagined. Its model is built on partnerships with service providers and content publishers, globally, to create a fabric that powers high-performance delivery of media and applications at the very edge of neighborhoods, big and small.

Qwilt’s open architecture and inclusive business model make local edge delivery more accessible than ever before, unlocking more reliable, higher quality-of-experience at greater scale than previously possible. A growing number of the world’s leading content publishers and cable, telco, and mobile service providers rely on Qwilt for Edge Cloud services, including BT, Telecom Argentina, Telecom Italia, and Verizon.

Founded in 2010, Qwilt is a leader of the Open Caching movement and a founding member of the Streaming Video Alliance. Qwilt is backed by Accel Partners, Bessemer Venture Partners, Cisco Ventures, Disruptive, Innovation Endeavors, Marker, and Redpoint Ventures. For more information, visit www.qwilt.com.

###

About Cisco

Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) is the worldwide leader in technology that powers the Internet. Cisco inspires new possibilities by reimagining your applications, securing your data, transforming your infrastructure, and empowering your teams for a global and inclusive future. Discover more on The Newsroom and follow us on Twitter.

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco's trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company.

###

About Kinetic

Kinetic by Windstream is a business unit of Windstream Holdings, a privately held FORTUNE 1000 communications and software company. Kinetic provides premium broadband, entertainment and security services through an enhanced fiber network to consumers and businesses primarily in rural areas in 18 states. The company also offers managed communications services, including SD-WAN and UCaaS, and high-capacity bandwidth and transport services to businesses across the U.S. Additional information is available at GoKinetic.com. Follow us on Twitter at @GoKineticHome.

From Fortune. ©2021 Fortune Media IP Limited. All rights reserved. Used under license. Fortune and Fortune 1000 are registered trademarks of Fortune Media IP Limited and are used under license. Fortune is not affiliated with, and does not endorse products or services of, Windstream.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220802005146/en/

Contacts

Azhar Uddin
azhar@platformcomms.com

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 en-SG text/html https://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/kinetic-windstream-deploys-cisco-qwilt-120000449.html
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