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Oracle Planning 2020 Implementation Essentials
Oracle Implementation syllabus
Killexams : Oracle Implementation syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/1Z0-1080-20 Search results Killexams : Oracle Implementation syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/1Z0-1080-20 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Oracle Killexams : COMP_SCI 339: Intro to Databases

Quarter Offered

Winter : 11-12:20 TuTh ; Rogers
Spring : 9:30-10:50 TuTh (Rogers) or 2-3:20 (Crotty) ;

Prerequisites

Students must have completed COMP_SCI 214 & (COMP_SCI 213 or COMP_ENG 205), or be CS Grad students (MS or PhD) in order to register for this course.

Description

Data models and database design. Modeling the real world: structures, constraints, and operations. The entity relationship to data modeling (including network hierarchical and object-oriented), emphasis on the relational model. Use of existing database systems for the implementation of information systems.

  • Spring Section: Students must be familiar with Java programming prior to taking this course.
  • This course satisfies the Systems breadth requirement.

COURSE INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Rogers (Winter & Spring) and Andrew Crotty (Spring)

COURSE COORDINATORS: Prof. Peter Dinda & Prof. Jennie Rogers

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

  • Hector Garcia-Molina, Jeffrey D. Ullman, Jennifer D. Widom, Database Systems: The Complete Book, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2009. (Prof. Dinda)
  • Ramakrishnan, Raghu and Johannes Gehrke. "Database management systems." 3rd Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2002; ISBN-10: 0072465638, ISBN-13: 978-0072465631 (Winter & Spring; Prof. Rogers)

RECOMMENDED ADDITIONAL TEXTBOOKS:

  • Joe Celko, SQL for Smarties: Advanced SQL Programming, 5th edition, Morgan Kaufman, 2014. (Useful) (Prof. Dinda)
  • Tom Christiansen, brian d foy, Larry Wall, Jon Orwant, Programming Perl, 4th Edition, O’Reilly and Associates, 2012. (Useful) (Prof. Dinda)
  • Familiarity with concepts from discrete math such as set theory (COMP_SCI 212/310 for example) (Winter & Spring; Prof. Rogers)
  • Object-oriented programming experience, preferably with Java (Winter & Spring; Prof. Rogers)
  • Background in using a source code revision control system, especially git (Winter & Spring; Prof. Rogers)

COURSE OBJECTIVES: This course introduces the underlying concepts behind data modeling and database systems using relational database management systems (RDBMS, specifically Oracle), the structured query language (SQL), and web applications (Perl DBI inCGI) as examples.  Students are also introduced to the internals of an RDBMS engine.

COURSE GOALS:

Students learn:

  • How to model domains and data using the entity-relationship model
  • How to design a normalized schema in the relational data model
  • How to implement schemas using SQL
  • How to keep data consistent and safe with using the ACID properties (transactions) of a modern RDBMS
  • How to query data using SQL
  • How to interface to a modern RDBMS from a modern programming language
  • How such interfaces are used to create web applications
  • How an RDBMS provides quick access to data using indices, and how indices are implemented
  • How an RDBMS manages storage and the storage hierarchy
  • How an RDBMS optimizes and executes queries using the relational algebra, the theoretical underpinning of database systems
  • How an RDBMS implements transactions
  • Current topics

DETAILED COURSE TOPICS:

  1. Introduction to database-backed web applications
    1. Web systems, CGI and other application models
    2. Introduction to Perl
    3. Introduction to SQL and ACID
    4. Waterfall versus spiral models of development
  2. Entity-relationship data model
    1. Design principles
    2. Referential integrity and other constraints
  3. Relational data model
    1. Schemas and keys
    2. Functional and multi-valued dependencies
    3. Normalization and normal forms
    4. Translating ER schemas to relational schemas
  4. Relational algebra
    1. Bags and sets
    2. Basic operators
    3. Joins
    4. Grouping
    5. Expressions and constraints (statements)
    6. Equivalent expressions and optimization
  5. SQL in depth
    1. Writing constraints
    2. Advanced data types
    3. Regular expressions
    4. Nulls and 3-valued logic
    5. Indices
    6. Views
    7. Transactions
    8. Triggers
    9. Security (access control, SQL injection attacks)
  6. Storage systems and records
    1. Disks and RAID
    2. Record layout / free space management
    3. Buffer management
  7. B-Tree indices
    1. B+Tree
    2. Query and join implementations
  8. Hash indices
    1. Extensible hashing
    2. Linear hashing
    3. Query and join implementations
  9. Bitmap indices
    1. Query and join implementations
  10. Brief introduction to transaction implementation
    1. Logging (undo, redo, redo/undo)
    2. Locking (deadlock, lock ordering, two-phase locking)

HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS:

1. Entity-Relationship data model

2. Relational data model

3. Relational Algebra

LABORATORY PROJECTS:

  • Extending a database-backed web app 
  • Designing an implementing a database-backed web app
  • Implementing a component of an RDBMS

GRADES 

  • 50 % Projects
  • 10 % Homework
  • 20 % Midterm
  • 20 % Final
Sun, 03 Nov 2019 07:19:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/computer-science/academics/courses/descriptions/339.html
Killexams : Unlocking Africa’s Tech Innovation via Cloud Computing

Nigeria, among other African countries, is making giant stride in the area of technology innovation through cloud computing which is expected to unlock Africa’s potential, writes Emma Okonji

Digitalisation is permeating every industry with cloud computing rapidly becoming an essential component of business transformation in Nigeria and Africa. Powered by the energy so infused on the continent, there is a focus on consolidation and persistence as organisations drive digital transformation forward and Boost the quality of information and communications technology (ICT) services. The speed of development in each region of sub-Saharan Africa is astounding, with Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa and Rwanda making the waves in Africa. In the area of investment in Africa’s ICT development, Oracle has been present in Africa for the last 30 years and has been investing heavily in the continent from the very beginning. It is investing in the human capital across African countries where it does business in order to address the growing ICT skills gap in those regions.

Investment in African ICT

According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), overall spending on ICT in the Middle East, Turkey, and Africa (META) is set to grow 2.5 per cent year on year in 2019 to reach $213 billion. Group Vice President and Regional Managing Director for the META region, Jyoti Lalchandani, added that progressively more organisations experiment with emerging technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT) to drive innovation and Boost their customer experience. He said the most important task facing the region’s decision makers is the development of an effective digital transformation platform that can sustain and scale business operations.

Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) and Chief Information Officers (CIOs) on the continent have the cloud at the centre of their digital transformation strategies, knowing very well that without automation they will either be out of business, or be steering an organisation with flawed reporting. The ability to harvest, store and sort big data is therefore a critical element of business competitiveness.

Vice President for sub-Saharan Africa at Oracle, Andrew Sordam, in a statement, said Oracle and other technology organisations operating in Africa are contributing meaningfully towards the roadmaps of innovation and transformation. “Organisations across the continent are embarking on innovative digital transformation initiatives which is incredibly exciting, being able to participate in projects that are driving the continent forward in ways we can only imagine.

ICT is a large contributor to African society, with mobile connectivity enabling many enterprises to reach their customers like never before. Mobile and digital capabilities have given companies across the board new tactical strategies, such as fintechs using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to get a leg-up on traditional banks,” Sordam said.
According to him, companies in Africa can emerge from a situation where they have had more rudimentary applications and business processes to where they have unleashed the power of cloud technologies which makes it easier and far more efficient to automate services.

Cloud technology as enabler

Business leaders in Africa are seeing first-hand how the cloud is an enabler for innovation. Although organisations are progressively seeing an increase in movement to the cloud, a smart bet would be on many organisations going the route of cloud at customer. Oracle Cloud at Customer is designed to enable organisations to remove one of the biggest obstacles to cloud adoption—data privacy concerns related to where the data is stored.

According to Sordam, “In our experience, while organisations are eager to move their enterprise workloads to the public cloud, many have been constrained by business, legislative and regulatory requirements that have prevented them from being able to adopt the technology. Oracle Cloud at Customer provides organisations with choice regarding where their data and applications reside and a natural path to eventually, and easily, move business critical applications to the public cloud.

“On the continent there is no illusion about the importance of putting in place foundational infrastructure, and various industries are consolidating in order to tap into the power of automation, AI, machine learning and more. A traditional brick-and-mortar operation can transform into a customer-focussed, smart, reactive, relevant enterprise.”

He said Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) partnered Oracle in order to solve problems that had hampered the country’s revenue collection.

“A cumbersome and painful tax filing system meant the compliance rate was terribly low. The KRA’s vision is commitment to the concept of customer centricity. The implementation and rollout of iTax powered by Oracle Service Cloud, Policy Automation, Social Cloud and Marketing Cloud has brought the authority that much closer to achieving this. The end result is collecting more revenue to drive the development of the country, while also empowering its staff to serve customers in a digital era,” Sordam added.

Addressing skills shortage

Sordam is of the view that digital transformation meant there was need for a coordinated approach to addressing the skills shortage as well as the risks that technological disruption is causing, such as cybersecurity.

“We have put in place numerous initiatives to help address this challenge, with programmes across sub-Saharan Africa, including Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa and more. In 2017, Oracle Academy and The Global Peace Foundation of Kenya signed an agreement that will allow Oracle academy to support 24 public high schools in Kenya. As part of this, Oracle will train 180 teachers over three years to start teaching the Oracle Academy Java and Database courses. Driving the focus towards closing the skills gap is vital for big technology companies such as Oracle,” he said.

Similarly in Nigeria, Oracle Academy has announced a partnership with the Federal Ministry of Education, where the ministry will introduce the Oracle Academy computer science curriculum across 10,000 academic institutions, reaching 1.5 million students. To complement this, the Academy will facilitate the upskilling of 4,000 educators.
“In South Africa, our Oracle Graduate Leadership Programme, launched in 2014, helps youth develop specialised Information Technology (IT) skills required to succeed in the fourth industrial revolution. The programme has delivered eighty-four graduates to date and creates a future skills pipeline for Oracle and its partner community in the region,” he said.

Cloud on ground

Optimistic about how cloud on ground technology can unlock Africa’s potential and technology innovation, the Managing Director, Rack Centre, Mr. Tunde Coker, at a exact technology event in Lagos, explained that investment in cloud on ground, which is an acronym for easy access to ubiquitous cloud, would enhance the chances of unlocking Africa’s technology innovation, especially among technology start-ups.

“We have sufficient collocation facilities and capacities and we will be delighted to collocate the telecoms operators on our cloud on ground facilities. What we need do is to expand the capacity to accommodate colocation of telcos. We are carrier neutral and any telco could come to our centre to collocate. Our facility do not encourage competition among the telcos who will want to collocate on our facilities. Rather than the telcos building data expansion facilities, they can actually collocate on our facilities, bearing in mind that they will not need to worry about the challenges of connectivity and colocation, and this will help them focus on their core business. We have the facilities that will make telcos to expand and operate more efficiently,” Coker said.

Speaking on the importance of cloud on ground, Coker said the technology is a dedicated facility that offers cloud services to customers.

“With cloud on ground, we are fully ready to host data of various organisations in our facilities, delivering services at the right pricing with better quality performance, because our services offer very little latency period.

“We have millions of SMEs and technology start-ups in the country and what we are bringing with cloud on ground is to develop SMEs and start-ups and grow their services in Nigeria. Our cloud on ground allows small businesses to pay as they grow, without the need to buy the entire bundle from the beginning of the business. Cloud on ground gives international and local player the confidence to host their data within Nigeria, without any cause for concern. It gives access to international business and local service delivery. So the key factor for cloud on ground is that the data must be hosted in Nigeria at the Rack Centre facilities,” Coker said.

Cloud for improved security

Discussing cloud as a technology for improved security, efficiency and regulatory compliance, the Managing Director Oracle Nigeria, Mr. Adebayo Sanni, said organisations are struggling to cope with the increasing sophistication of today’s threat landscape. Zero-day exploits are on the rise and insider attacks are becoming increasingly prevalent, requiring more refined analysis and real-time remediation.

He, however, said the new cloud technology can ingest massive amounts of operational and security telemetry, analyse it in real time using purpose-built machine learning and react to findings using automation.

Sanni said Oracle and KPMG recently published the Cloud Threat Report; a report that explores from the depth of the trenches what security challenges are being faced across the globe; how they are responding to these security challenges and what technology solutions are enabling them to resolve these threats.

In addressing cybersecurity challenges, Sanni said data breaches that result in confidential data being compromised, whether it is just released to the general public or used for more malicious purposes, have become almost a daily occurrence, making cybersecurity a non-negotiable for organisations. This includes both educational awareness and the necessary hardware or software tools.

According to him, the increasing complexity of emerging technologies and advances in hacking practices mean that enterprises and their legacy networks, often built with kit bought from multiple vendors at the cheapest price at auction, by a procurement team over the years, are no longer safe.

“Companies are responding through several ways, including hiring CEOs who come from the cybersecurity space, as they know how to manage risk, and speeding up their migration to the cloud – with mature users understanding that cloud computing provides better security than on-premise environments.

He said in addition to the right to access, right to erasure and data portability, one of the key legislative requirements of various data privacy laws, is to be able to provide any individual with every piece of data an organisation holds on them, including all data records and any activity logs that may be stored.
This, he said, places the focus firmly on good data management, with the benefits being increased security and operational efficiency, to improved customer service.

“By turning to cloud computing at the infrastructure, platform and software level, businesses gain the ability to extract, collate and analyse data at incredible volumes and speed, even from across previously disparate systems, to ensure compliance.

“In a growing number of countries, data privacy regulation now stipulates where data must be stored, presenting organisations that want to use public cloud services with a challenge. However, the availability of innovative managed on-premise solutions now allows customers to move their workloads to the cloud while keeping critical information and applications within their own data centres,” Sanni said.

In the areas of education and automation, Sanni explained that with security at the core of a modern organisation, good governance for managing systems and people effectively is critical; strong authentication and encryption becomes a necessity. Backup, archiving and storage helps to further protect against ransomware, and mobile device management becomes an instrumental means of controlling information at the edge. According to him, if all these are effectively adhered to, Nigeria and the rest of Africa, would be better positioned to unlock technology innovation, using cloud computing, while insisting that by 2025, 80 per cent of cloud operations risk will supply way entirely, and a higher degree of intelligent automation will permeate the cloud platform.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2019/02/21/unlocking-africas-tech-innovation-via-cloud-computing/
Killexams : Information Management

MSc PG Certificate PG Diploma

2022 start September 

Information School, Faculty of Social Sciences

Prepare for your future career with the world’s number one school for Library and Information Management (QS Rankings 2021). Learn the core concepts and principles related to the systematic design and implementation of information, knowledge and data environments in organisational and networked contexts. The MSc and PG Diploma awards are CILIP accredited.

Course description

Ready yourself for a wide variety of organisational and consultancy roles that demand expertise in information and knowledge management. The emphasis of the programme is on developing your knowledge, skills and experience of design, implementation, management and governance effective information environments. This includes examining their purposes, functions and processes and mediating between information users, resources and systems in both organisational and networked contexts.

You'll also acquire practical experience in the use of new information and communications technologies and develop personal awareness and skills relevant to information management in a variety of workplace roles.

You'll learn basic foundations of information management concerning the systematic acquisition, storage, retrieval, processing and use of data, information and knowledge, in support of decision-making, sense-making and organisational goals.

If you have two or more years' relevant work experience in the information sector and wish to study for a higher degree, you may be interested in our Professional Enhancement programme. The programme is designed for people already in work who want to further their careers and allows greater freedom in module choice in recognition of your existing expertise.

Accreditation

The MSc and PG Diploma programmes are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Modules

A selection of modules are available each year - some examples are below. There may be changes before you start your course. From May of the year of entry, formal programme regulations will be available in our Programme Regulations Finder.

You’ll need 180 credits to get a masters degree, with 60 credits from core modules, 60 credits from optional modules and a dissertation (including dissertation preparation) worth 60 credits.

Core modules:

Information and Knowledge Management

This module addresses both the oretical and practical aspects ofmanaging information and knowledge in organisations, enqabling you to engagecritically with a number of current issues and debates in this field. It isdesigned around case studies of well known organisations and involves thedevelopment of skills in analysis and formulation of strategies fororganisational development. Assessed work focuses also on skills in reviewingthe domain and on the development of conceptual models for information andknowledge management.

15 credits
Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries

Information Retrieval (IR) systems are ubiquitous as searching has become a part of everyday life. For example, we use IR systems when we search the web, look for resources using a library catalogue or search for relevant information within organisational repositories (e.g. intranets). This module provides an introduction to the area of information retrieval and computerised techniques for organising, storing and searching (mainly) textual information items.

Techniques used in IR systems are related to, but distinct from, those used in databases. The emphasis for IR systems is to find documents that contain relevant information and separate these from a potentially vast set of non-relevant documents. The content of the module falls into two main areas: (1)  fundamental concepts of IR (indexing, retrieval, ranking, user interaction and evaluation) and (2) applying IR in specific contexts, bias in information retrieval, and dealing with non-textual and non-English content (multimedia and multilingual IR).

15 credits
Information Systems in Organisations

This module integrates Topics of organisation, management, and information systems, with an aim to offer the students an integrated set of concepts and tools for understanding information systems in organisations. During this module students will explore basic management and organisational theories and examine the impact of information systems on organisations. This course introduces key concepts which will be explored further in other modules on the information Management and Information Systems programmes.

15 credits
Information Governance and Ethics

This module explores a) the emergence of information and data as an economic resource; b) the governance challenges and ethical issues arising from organizations' systematic capture, processing, and use of information and data for organizational goals, e.g. value, risk, accountability, ownership, privacy etc; c) governance, ethical, legal and other frameworks relevant to the capture, processing and use of information and data within organizational and networked contexts; and d) technologies and techniques used in the governing and governance of information and data. Case examples from a number of domains, e.g. business, government, health, law, and social media illustrate the Topics investigated.

15 credits
Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

This module assists students in the identification of, and preparation of a dissertation proposal. Students will: learn about: on-going research in the School; identify and prepare a dissertation proposal; carry out a preliminary literature search in the area of the dissertation research topic; and be introduced to the use of social research methods and statistics for information management.

15 credits
Dissertation

This module enables students to carry out an extended piece of work on an Information School approved topic, so that they can explore an area of specialist interest to them in greater depth. Students will be supported through tutorials with a project supervisor, will apply research methods appropriate to their topic, and implement their work-plan to produce an individual project report. Students will already have identified a suitable course and designed a project plan in the pre-requisite unit Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

45 credits

Optional modules - one from:

Introduction to Programming

This module introduces students with little or no programming experience to the general purpose programming language Python. Python is popular and easy to learn for developing a wide range of information systems applications. The skills and understandings required to program in Python are valued by organisations and transfer to most other programming languages.

15 credits
Website Design and Search Engine Optimisation

This module aims to teach the key principles of search engine optimised (SEO) and user-centred website design; including areas of search optimised and accessible design, content strategy, requirements analysis, user experience, and Web standards compliance. Students will have opportunities to apply this knowledge to authentic design problems and develop web authoring skills valued by employers. In particular, students will be introduced to the latest web mark-up languages (currently HTML5 and CSS3) and issues surrounding long-term search ranking, globalisation, internationalisation and localisation - with a business focussed context.

15 credits
Information Systems Modelling

To consider the role of information modelling within the organisation and provide an appreciation of the rigorous methods that are needed to analyse, design, develop and maintain computer-based information systems. The course is intended to provide an introduction to information modelling techniques. Students gain experience in applying the wide range of systems analysis methods. Students cover Topics including: soft systems analysis; structured systems analysis methodologies; business process modelling; data flow modelling and object-oriented approaches (e.g. RUP/UML).

15 credits

Optional modules - three from:

Information Visualisation for Decision-Making

Organisations are nowadays challenged by the volume, variety, and speed of data collected from systems in internal and external environments. This module will focus on i) theoretical and methodological frameworks for developing visualisations; ii) how visualisations can be used to explore and analyse different types of data; iii) how visualisations can turn data into information that can be used to offer critical insights and to aid in decision-making by managers and others. Its module content includes: how to design visualisations, how to create and critique different visualisations, as well as good practices in information visualisation and dashboard design.

15 credits
Information Systems Project Management

This module aims to provide a broad understanding of the fundamentals of project management as they apply to the development of Information Systems (IS). The module uses a flexible approach combining face-to-face seminars with web-based learning material. The module will begin with an overview of the principles involved in IS project management; followed by a discussion of IS development methodologies and their different characteristics and specialisms. The rest of the module will discuss the requirements for various project control activities, including estimating development resources, risk management, guidelines for system quality assurance, and various project control techniques that have been developed in exact years. The module will culminate with a review of human resource management issues.

15 credits
Digital Business

The module addresses both theoretical and practical aspects of digital business. The module will cover the latest business trends and business models adopted by ecommerce companies so that students are able to recognise and relate to the current practice in business.  The module aims to equip the students with theoretical and business knowledge and entrepreneurial skills to understand and manage new ways of doing business in the digital economy.

15 credits
Researching Social Media

The module will examine the key theoretical frameworks and methods used in social media studies. Students will explore the following questions: 1) What can be learnt about society by studying social media? 2) How should researchers construct ethical stances for researching sites such as Facebook and Twitter? 3) What are the traditional and digital research methods and tools that can be applied to conduct research on social media? 4) What are the strengths and weaknesses of these methods?

15 credits
ICTs, Innovation and Change

This module aims at examining and exploring how organizations and human activity systems cope with change due to the new implementation or updating of Information Systems and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). This change occurs in complex social environments and has cultural, political, structural and ethical impacts that need to be carefully managed. The module will examine and explore how both managers and Information Systems practitioners can be better prepared for the unpredictability, unintended outcomes and possible harmful consequences of change caused by the introduction or update of Information Systems and ICTs. Therefore, the module aims at providing an understanding of both approaches and techniques for the management of this change.

15 credits
Database Design

Effective data management is key to any organisation, particularly with the increasing availability of large and heterogeneous datasets (e.g. transactional, multimedia and geo-spatial data). A database is an organised collection of data, typically describing the activities of one or more organisations and a core component of modern information systems. A Database Management System (DBMS) is software designed to assist in maintaining and utilising large collections of data and becoming a necessity for all organisations. This module provides an introduction to the area of databases and database management, relational database design and a flavour of some advanced Topics in current database research that deal with different kinds of data often found within an organisational context. Lectures are structured into three main areas:¿An introduction to databases¿The process of designing relational databases¿Advanced Topics (e.g. data warehouses and non-relational databases)The course includes a series of online tasks with supporting 'drop in¿ laboratories aimed at providing you with the skills required to implement a database in Oracle and extract information using the Structured Query Language (SQL).

15 credits
Academic and Workplace Library, Information and Knowledge Services

This module introduces students to the purposes, functions and practices of a range of academic research and other specialist library and information/knowledge services in the public and private sectors. It considers the challenges of delivering and developing services in a demanding, fast-moving and complex environment. Lectures are combined with sector-based case studies presented by visiting speakers drawn from diverse backgrounds giving extensive opportunities for interaction with specialist practitioners.

15 credits
User-Centred Design and Human-Computer Interaction

Interface design and usability are central to the experience of interacting with computers. The module introduces usability principles and the design process for interactive systems exploring four major themes. Firstly, user psychology and cognitive principles underlying interface design. Secondly, user interface architectures, modes of interaction, metaphors, navigational structures. Thirdly, the user interface design process including task analysis, modelling constructs and prototyping techniques. Fourthly, the evaluation of user interfaces covering concepts of usability, goals and types of evaluation. The module focus is on the underlying principles of HCI and user-centred design approach with practical sessions to demonstrate these principles.

15 credits
Archives and Records Management

This module prepares students for roles within archives and records management, with emphasis on archives.  Students will develop knowledge and awareness of key theories and practices in archives and records management. The module introduces students to some of the principal issues surrounding the provision of archives and records management services and the challenges of meeting user needs within an organisational context. In addition to presenting the fundamental principles the second part of the module focuses on specific Topics of interest, such as: community archiving, digital preservation, web archiving and oral history collecting.

15 credits

Other courses

Postgraduate Certificate requires a total of 60 credits
Postgraduate Diploma requires a total of 120 credits

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Open days

An open day gives you the best opportunity to hear first-hand from our current students and staff about our courses. You'll find out what makes us special.

Upcoming open days and campus tours

Duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time
  • 3 years part-time

Teaching

A variety of teaching methods are used, combining lectures from academic staff and professional practitioners with seminars, tutorials, small-group work and computer laboratory sessions.

There's a strong emphasis on problem-solving and individual aspects of learning, with the expectation that you’ll engage in independent study, studying and research in support of your coursework.

Teaching consists of two 15-week semesters, after which you’ll write your dissertation.

Assessment

Assessments vary depending on the modules you choose but may include essays, report writing, oral presentations, in-class tests and group projects.

There's also a dissertation of 10–15,000 words, which provides the opportunity, under one-to-one supervision, to focus on a course of your choice. You may choose to carry out your dissertation with an external organisation, for instance if you are a Professional Enhancement student, your project could be directly related to your work situation. In the past, students who have carried out such dissertations have welcomed the opportunity to tackle real-life problems.

Your career

We're the leading school of our kind in the UK and have a global reputation for excellence. Our MSc develops the skills you need to work in the fast-paced and evolving field of information management. After completing the course, you'll be equipped for a career in industry or research.

Our graduates have gone on to careers that include:

  • Project Manager, IBM
  • Metadata Specialist, The British Library
  • Wealth Planning Manager, China Merchants Bank
  • IT Director, Lloyds Banking Group
  • Business Analyst, Citibank
  • Director of Communications, Harvard University
  • Head of Library and Information Services, Foreign and Commonwealth Office
  • Vice-President, Goldman Sachs Japan Services Co.
  • Product Engineer, BenQ
  • Management Trainee, Jumei.com

Career pathways

Our modules prepare you for a range of career pathways, including the following. If you're interested in one of these career pathways, your tutors will recommend the most suitable module choices.

Digital Business

This involves managing and delivering products and services. Possible job titles include:

  • e-commerce manager
  • digital product/service delivery manager
  • digital marketer
  • digital product owner

Information Technology

This involves working with organisations to make improvements using information technologies. Possible job titles include:

  • business analyst
  • systems analyst
  • IT project manager
  • database administrator
  • operational researcher

Information Science

Information scientists manage an organisation's information resources and make sure they're readily available. Possible job titles include:

  • information manager
  • information officer
  • knowledge manager
  • management information analyst
  • information governance officer
  • business intelligence officer
  • reporting analyst
  • information analyst
  • data privacy analyst

Read more about careers in information

PhD student and Librarianship MA graduate Itzelle Medina Perea shares her experiences of studying at the Information School.

Facilities

We invested a six-figure sum to create leading-edge, flexible and technology-rich facilities for learning and teaching that are consistent with our reputation as a modern, highly respected and world-leading school. The new facilities include the iLab, the iSpace and a computer laboratory for collaborative learning.

We have three research labs on-site with workspace for over 80 researchers and a dedicated IT support team to assist with technical queries and requests. 

We also have a number of other newly-refurbished spaces which are available to all our researchers.

More about the Information School facilities.

Department

The University of Sheffield Information School is ranked number one in the world for library and information management in the QS World University Rankings by subject 2021. These rankings are based upon academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact.

The school has been at the forefront of developments in the information field for more than fifty years. The subject is characterised by its distinctive, interdisciplinary focus on the interactions between people, information and digital technologies. It has the ultimate goal of enhancing information access, and the management, sharing and use of information, to benefit society.

When you come to study with us you'll be an integral part of our research culture. The school is your home and we pride ourselves on the friendliness and helpfulness of our staff.

We offer an outstanding academic education through a wide range of taught postgraduate degrees which embed the principles of research-led teaching.

When you join any of our degree programmes you'll develop a critical understanding of current issues in library and information management. You'll benefit from being taught by staff who are undertaking leading-edge research and who have many links with industry.

As part of our mission to provide world-quality university education in information, we aim to inspire and help you pursue your highest ambitions for your academic and professional careers.

Entry requirements

Main course

You'll need at least a 2:1 in any subject.

You do not need work experience.

Professional Enhancement

This is a different route to the main course. It's aimed at those who already have relevant work experience.

To apply for this course you need either:

  • an undergraduate degree in any subject discipline and at least 2 years' relevant work experience, or
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject together with an acceptable relevant professional qualification and at least 2 years' relevant work experience, or
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject area, and at least 5 years' relevant work experience.

If you do not have an undergraduate degree but have other qualifications and substantial relevant work experience you may be considered for entry onto the Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma courses.

Overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component or equivalent.

Pathway programme for international students

If you're an international student who does not meet the entry requirements for this course, you have the opportunity to apply for a pre-masters programme in Business, Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Sheffield International College. This course is designed to develop your English language and academic skills. Upon successful completion, you can progress to degree level study at the University of Sheffield.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Apply

You can apply for postgraduate study using our Postgraduate Online Application Form. It's a quick and easy process.

Applications close on Friday 5 August 2022 at 5pm.

Apply now

Any supervisors and research areas listed are indicative and may change before the start of the course.

Our student protection plan

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Thu, 01 Oct 2020 03:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/courses/2022/information-management-msc-pg-certificate-pg-diploma
Killexams : DDA JE Recruitment 2022: Check Syllabus & Latest test Pattern Post-wise

DDA JE Syllabus & test Pattern 2022: Delhi Development Authority (DDA) will be conducting the Single Stage Online Written test for eligible Indian candidates to fill up 279 vacancies of Junior Engineer (Civil/Electrical/Mechanical), Junior Translator (Official Language), Programmer, Assistant Director (Landscape), and Planning Assistant. Online applications were invited for the DDE Recruitment 2022 from 10th June 2022 to 10th July 2022. The Single Stage Online Written test will be held on 16th August 2022 for the posts of Assistant Director (Landscape), Planning Assistant, Jr. Translator (Official Language) and on 27th August 2022 for Programmer. Date of examination for the post of Jr. Engineer (Civil) and Jr. Engineer (Elect./Mech.) will be declared separately.

In this article, we share the DDA JE Syllabus & test Pattern for the posts of Assistant Director (Landscape), Junior Engineer (Civil), Junior Engineer (Elect. / Mech.), Programmer, Junior Translator (Official Language), and Planning Assistant.

DDA Recruitment 2022 Calendar

Events Important Dates
Opening date & time for online registration 11th June 2022 (10 am)
Last date & time for online registration and fee payment  10th July 2022 (6 pm) 

Single Stage Online Written Exam

Assistant Director (Landscape), Planning Assistant, Jr. Translator (Official Language) 

16th August 2022

Programmer

27th August 2022

DDA Recruitment test Pattern 2022

For Assistant Director (Landscape), Junior Engineer (Civil/ Elec/ Mech), Programmer, Planning Assistant Posts

Name of the Subject

Number of Questions

Number of Marks

Duration

Respective discipline

120

120

2 hours

Reasoning

Quantitative Aptitude

General Awareness

English Language

For Junior Translator (Official Language) post

Stage I

Name of the Subject

Number of Questions

Number of Marks

Duration

General English

100

100

2 Hours

General Hindi

100

100

Stage II Convention Paper (Pen & Paper Method)

Name of the Subject

Number of Questions

Number of Marks

Duration

Translation from Hindi to English

100

100

2 Hours

Translation from English to Hindi

100

100

NOTE: The medium of the On-Line examination will be Hindi / English only for all categories of posts.  Penalty for wrong answers: in all such cases where the question is of 01 marks, there will be penalty of 0.33 marks (negative marking) for wrong answers/multiple answers marked by a candidate in the objective type question papers having four alternatives. However, where question is of 02 marks, there will be penalty of 0.66 marks (negative marking).

For the post of Junior Translator (Official Language): Stage II examination shall be evaluated in respect of only those candidates who attain the minimum qualifying standards in Stage I examination as may be fixed at the discretion of the Authority. Merit list will be prepared on the basis of marks obtained in Stage I and Stage II taken together.

Also Read: DDA JE Recruitment 2022: Check Eligibility, Age, Qualifications, How to Apply 

Also Read: DDA JE Recruitment 2022: Check Preparation Strategies for Reasoning & General Awareness

DDA Recruitment Syllabus 2022

For Assistant Director (Landscape), Junior Engineer (Civil/ Elec/ Mech), Programmer, Planning Assistant Posts

Assistant Director (Landscape)

Part-I:

1. Plants: Familiarity with local flora; criteria for plant selection; history of planting design; planting as a design element with respect to trees, shrubs, ground cover and creepers; planting features like form, leaf color and texture, color of flowers and fruits in different seasons; role of plant material in environmental improvement (e.g. soil conservation, modification of microclimate); maintenance of plant material; preparation of planting concepts, planting plans and plant schedules; estimation of costs and bill of quantity. Planting design in various environments such as woodlands, forests, rural areas, urban areas, roadside planting in urban and rural areas, industrial sites and in habitats such as grasslands, woodlands, sloping areas, marshes, bogs, wetlands, waterside and aquatic planting etc. Planting for shelter, windbreaks and shelter belts, visual effect and accent; Field ecology: Quadrat, line transect, community analysis.

2. Geology, Hydrology & Geomorphology: minerals and metals; rock type (igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic); principles of stratigraphy and geology of India; relationships between geology, soils and vegetation; morphology and classification of soil type; properties of soils; soil management (evaluation, water conservation, fertility and plant nutrition, degradation control and reclamation techniques); hydrological cycle, sources of surface water; watersheds and drainage basins; infiltration characteristics; rainwater harvesting, artificial recharge; groundwater management, ground water pollution; landscape evolution.

3. Site Planning and Landscape Engineering: Site planning process; site character and design requirement relation; site survey and appraisal; contours and grading principles; efficient surface drainage pattern and watershed area, calculation of surface runoff, catchments areas and discharge rate; types of drainage systems, design of surface and sub-surface drainage elements; sports field drainage; earthwork volume computations; construction of roads, parking, paths, plazas, planter, water elements, etc; external lighting; irrigation and plumbing system; street/ site furniture; landscape working drawings; site mobilization and protection measures; water conservation; protection of water retention structures; soil conservation and erosion control measures; land reclamation and rehabilitation process; disposal of sludge, fly-ash, solid and liquid waste; transportation corridors; environment-friendly materials; sustainable landscape features (bioswales, bio retention ponds etc); estimation of costs and preparation of bill of quantities, specifications and tender documents.

4. Landscape Design and Communication: Urban and rural landscape appraisal, analysis and design; application of ecological principles; language skills for technical report ‘writing and- professional communications with planning authorities, statutory bodies, contractors and other professionals; communication techniques in digital media; research ability towards establishing a strong theoretical background. Ecology: Concept of ecosystem: energy flow; production; biogeochemical cycles; carbon cycle, global water cycles, nitrogen cycle; bioaccumulation and biomagnifications; ecosystem services; ecosystem types; ecological succession and maturity; population dynamics; ecosystem management; climate change.

5. Theory of Landscape Architecture: Concepts of space, time and scale in terms of garden, landscape and nature; evolution of landscape and garden design in relation to art, architecture and city planning; changing perceptions of man’s relationship with nature in various phases of history; environmental and behavioral theories; social and cultural dimensions of landscape; Ancient Indian traditions; Landscape from various geographic locations and periods, highlighting aspects of Form, Space and Order; Development of landscape design and gardens; Eastern, Central and Western traditions; Ancient Heritage: Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome. Western Civilization: Europe; Italy, France and England. The middle-east: The Persian tradition and its far reaching influence. Eastern Civilisation: China and Japan. Ancient and medieval period in India; Mughal and Rajput Landscapes. Influences and linkages across cultures and traditions, e.g Chinese tradition and the English Landscape style, influence of Persian traditions towards the West and East. Colonial landscape development in India.

6. Nineteenth-Century Europe: Open space development in its urban design and planning context. Early industrial towns and the Garden City movement. USA: Further evolution of the public park as a major component of urban landscape. The work of F. L. Olmsted and other pioneers. Park-Systems and suburban development centered on open space. The Modern Movement: changing concepts of space and the relationship of architecture and landscape illustrated through studies of selected works of the modern masters. Post-war development in Europe: New Towns in England and the concept of Landscape Structure. Landscape Urbanism; Examples of open space development in new towns and urban renewal to illustrate the close conceptual relationship between town planning, urban design and landscape architecture (e.g. Haussmann’s Paris, Lutyen’s Delhi); influence of Ian McHarg on mid and late 20th Century landscape architecture. The work of selected twentieth century landscape architects, in the west as well as in India. Contemporary concepts and concerns: “Green” Architecture and EnergySaving site planning and Landscape Architecture; Cultural landscapes, their definition, identification, characteristics and policies; Landscape inventory and conservation of historical landscape; Artistic sensibility in Landscape Architecture, land art; new developments in urban landscape design. The Indian Context: Understanding contemporary attitudes to open space design in India: ancient horticultural tradition, Mughal influence, British colonial influence. Trends in landscape design in India in the late 20th and the first decade of the 21st Century.

7. Landscape Economics, Management & Horticultural Practice: Economics: Cost and benefits related to open space development; costs: intangible costs, depletion of natural resources, Management: Landscape management at the regional scale in relation to soil conservation, water management, grassland management, forestry and agriculture. Management practices related to urban ecology and urban habitats, such as urban forests, river banks, regional parks and greenbelts: ecological, economic and administrative issues. Management models. Horticulture Practice: Nursery establishment and Plant propagation. Establishment and maintenance of grass, shrubs and trees with respect to: ground preparation, planting and transplanting, pruning;

8. Landscape Resources: Settlements and Landscape: Siting and evolution of cities; Role of landform, water systems, climate and vegetation; Illustrative studies of cities in India and elsewhere; Microclimate; Air pollution; Solid waste management; conservation of water resources and vegetation cover; Urban forest; Landscape heritage; City development Plans, Zonal Plans. Development controls and their role in the conservation and creation of urban landscape; Delhi Master Plan; National Environment Policy; The rural landscape; Forest types of India; Biodiversity, urban biodiversity, Wetlands: definition, wetland values and conservations; Wastelands management; Land reclamation and rehabilitation; Watersheds and its management; Ramsar Convention, Forest Policy and management of forest resources. Conservation Forestry, Bye laws and planning regulations applicable to landscape development.

9. Landscape Conservation and Regional Landscape Planning; Concept of Landscape Planning and Landscape Conservation; Landscape Assessment techniques; Basic quantitative methods of collecting, analyzing, projecting and presenting data for Landscape Planning. Landscape Conservation: Priorities, Policies and Programmes; National parks and other protective designations; Biodiversity and Biosphere reserves; Endangered landscapes; Aspects of watershed management. The application of landscape planning techniques to large scale developments such as infrastructure and power projects, extractive and manufacturing industry, new towns and urban extensions, and developments for tourism and eco-tourism; Landscape perception, visual assessment and the aesthetic dimension of landscape planning. Environmental Impact Assessment and the Environmental Impact Statement: Theory and Practice; role of Environmental Legislation and the Ministry of Environment and Forests.

10. Landscape Project Management and Professional Practice: The role of statutory and regulatory bodies such as the Municipal Corporation, N.D.M.C, D.D.A and Urban Art commission etc.; Construction administration , Implementation process; Sequence of activities from inception to completion; progress evaluation and monitoring: (Estimation), Site documentation, Techniques of inspection and quality control; Construction documents Comparison of various kind of tenders with regard to objectives, utility and appropriateness. Tender Documentation and evaluation of tender; negotiations with contractors. Contract Documentation: Forms of contract; General and special conditions, specifications, Bill of quantities; significant clauses pertaining to defects, maintenance, arbitrations, etc. Parties to the contract; their roles, contractual relationships and legal obligations; Forms of agreement, conditions of engagement, scope of work and services to be provided. Scale of Professional Fees: Relationship of Landscape Architect with other professionals. Landscape Design Competitions: Types, Guidelines.

Junior Engineer (Civil)

Civil Engineering

Building Materials: Physical and Chemical properties, classification, standard tests, uses and manufacture/quarrying of materials e.g. building stones, silicate based materials, cement (Portland), Asbestos products, Timber and Wood based Products, laminates, bituminous materials, paints, varnishes.

Surveying: Principles of surveying, working of properties, compass and bearing, plane table surveying, theodolite traverse, adjustment of theodolite, levelling and contouring, curvature, refraction, permanent adjustment of dumpy level, methods of contouring and uses of a control map, tachometric survey.

Soil Mechanics: Origin of soil phase diagram, definitions of void ratio, porosity, degree of saturation, water content, specific gravity of soil grains and unit weights, grain size distribution curves for different solid and their uses. Atterjerg's limits, ISI soil classification, plasticity chart, coefficient of permeability, effective stress, consolidation of soils. Calculation of shear strength of soils, direct shear test, vane shear test, triaxial test, soil compaction, Lab compaction, Lab compaction test, moisture content and bearing capacity of soils, plate load test, standard penetration test.

Hydraulics: Fluid properties, hydrostatics, measurements of flow, Bernoulli's theorem and its application, flow through pipes, flow in open channels, weirs, flumes, spillways, pumps and turbines.

Environmental Engineering: Quality of water, source of water supply, purification of water, distribution of water, need of sanitation, sewerage system, circular sewers, oval sewer, sewer appurtenances, surface water drainage, sewage treatments.

Structural Engineering: Theory of structures: Elasticity constants, type of beams, determinate and indeterminate, bending moment and shear force diagrams of simply supported, cantilever and over hanging beams. Moment of area and moment of inertia for rect. & circular section, bending moment and shear stress for tee, channel and compound sections, chimneys, dams and retaining walls, eccentric loads, slope deflection of simply supported and cantilever beams, critical load and columns, torsion of circular section.

Concrete Technology: Properties, Advantages and uses of concrete, cement aggregates quality, water cement ratio, workability, mix design, storage, batching, mixing, placement, compaction, finishing and curing of concrete, quality control of concrete, hot weather and cold weather concreting, repair and maintenance of concrete structure.

RCC Design:

RCC beams: flexural strength, shear strength, bond strength, design of single reinforced beans, lintels, cantilever beams, double reinforced beams, one way slabs, two way slabs, isolated footings, reinforced brick work. T-beams, columns, staircases, retaining walls, water tanks (RCC design questions may be based on both Limit State method and Working Stress method).

Steel Design: Steel design and construction of steel columns, beams, roof trusses, plate girders.

Junior Engineer (Electrical/Mechanical)

General Engineering (Electrical and Mechanical)

Electrical Engineering

Basic Electrical Engg.: Elect. Measurements, Concepts of current, voltage, resistance, power and energy, their units, Ohm’s law.

Circuit Law: Kirchooff’s law, solution of simple network problems, Network theorems and their applications, Electro-magnetism, concept of flux, e m f, reluctance, magnetic circuits. Electromagnetic induction, self and mutual inductance. A.C. fundamentals, instantaneous, peak, R.M.S. and average values of alternating waves, Equation of sinusoidal wave form, simple series and parallel AC. circuits consisting of R.L. and C, Resonance. Measurement and measuring instruments, Moving coil and moving iron ammeters and voltmeters, Extension of range, Wattmeters, Multimeters, megger, Basic Electronics.

Electrical machines: Basic principles of D.C. motors, generators, their characteristics, Speed control and starting of D.C. motors, losses and efficiency of D.C. machines.1-Phase and 3-phase transformers: Principles of operation, equivalent circuit, voltage regulation, O.C. and S.C. tests, efficiency, auto transformers. Synchronous machines, generation of 3-phase e m f, armature reaction, Voltage regulation, parallel operation of two alternators, synchronizing, starting and applications of synchronous motors. 3-Phase Induction motor, rotating magnetic field, principle of operation, equivalent circuit, torque-speed characteristics, starting and speed control of 3-phase induction motors, Fractional KW motors, 1-phase induction motors, A.C. series motor, reluctance motor.

General, Transmission and Distribution: Different types of power stations, Load factor, diversity factor, demand factor, simple problems thereon, cost of generation, inter- connection of power stations. Power factor improvement, various types of tariffs, types of faults, short circuit current for symmetrical faults. Switchgears- rating of circuit breakers: Principles of a extinction by oil and air, H.R.C. fuses, Protection, earth leakage, over current, Buchhotgz relay, Merz- Prince system of protection of generators & transformers, protection of feeders and bus bars. Lightning arresters, Various transmission and distribution systems, Comparison of conductor materials, efficiency for different systems. Utilization of Electrical Energy, Illumination, electric heating, Electric welding, electroplating, electric drives and motors.

Mechanical Engineering

Flow of Fluids: Laminar & turbulent flow, equation of continuity, Bernoulli’s theorem, measurement of discharge, flow through pipes, friction losses, Forces of jet impinging on vanes, blades, work done and efficiency, classification of turbines & pumps.

Thermal Engineering: Laws of thermodynamics, change in entropy in various processes; uses of steam, Properties of steam table & charts; Construction & Working of Cochran, Lancashire locomotive & Babcock & Wilcox boilers, working of steam turbine, Otto & Diesel Cycles, working of IC engines, Carburetion, Solex Carburettor. Diesel fuel, pump & injector: Cooling & lubrication.

Production Engineering: Foundry- Different casting processes, concept of Patterns; types of mould making, purring defect in castings, causes & remedies, Welding-classification and types of welding, Testing and defects in welds. Lathes- working of lathe, various tools, operation on lathes, types of lathes. Drilling operations performed on drilling machines. Description, principles of working and various operations on machine tools, milling machine, shaper, grinder, boring and slotting machines.

Strength of Materials: Stresses in composite bars, relation between elastic constants, Resilience under different types of loads, SF and BM diagrams; stresses in beams-combined direct and bending stresses, Struts and columns – Euler’s and Rankin’s theories, Torsion of circular shafts.

Theory of Machines: Simple Machines – Four bar chain, Slider crank chain, double slider crank chain, Flywheel – Turning moment diagrams. Fluctuation of energy, Friction-in collar and pivots, plate clutch, conical clutch, journal bearing. Transmission of power through flat and V-belts, Gears, profile of gears, Governors- Watt and Hartnell governors.

Programmer

Computer Architecture, Computer Organization. Data Communication And Net-Working, Artificial Intelligence, Micro-Processors, Number Systems & Digital Logics, Peripherals And Storage Devices.

Operating Systems: Windows, Unix And Linux

Programming: Programming in Angular Java, PSP, Asp.Net, Java And Android/ Mobile Aps Programming, Programming In D2k, Programming In Visual Basic, PL/SQL, HTML.

Data Base Management (DBMS): Oracle 8i And Above, SQL server 2003 and above, Open Sources DBMS, My SQL Sybase Ingress etc.

Internet and Web Technologies

Planning Assistant

i. Basic concepts of urban planning and Architecture, Planning Legislation and GIS

Section 1: Architecture Elements, construction, architectural styles and examples of different periods of Indian and Western History of Architecture; Oriental, Vernacular and Traditional architecture; Architectural developments since Industrial Revolution; Influence of modern art on architecture; Art nouveau, Eclecticism, International styles, Post Modernism, Deconstruction in architecture; exact trends in Contemporary Architecture; Works of renowned national and international architects.

Section 2: Environmental Planning and Design Ecosystem- natural and man-made ecosystems; Ecological principles Concepts of Environmental Impact Analysis; Environmental considerations in planning and design; database for incorporation of environmental concerns in planning analysis, land suitability analysis, vulnerability analysis; Climate responsive design; Solar architecture; methods of addressing environmental quality; Green Building Concepts and Rating; ECBC; Building Performance Simulation and Evaluation; Environmental pollution- types, cause, controls and abatement strategies.

Section 3: Services, Infrastructure and Transportation Urban infrastructure- Transportation, Water Supply, Sewerage, Drainage, Solid Waste Management, Electricity and Communications, Process and Principles of Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering; Road capacity; Traffic survey method; Traffic flow characteristics; Traffic analyses and design considerations; Travel demand forecasting; Land use transportation – urban from inter-relationships; Design of roads, intersections/ grade separates and parking areas, Hierarchy of roads and level of service; Traffic and transport management and control in urban areas; Mass transportation planning; Para-transits and other modes of transportations Pedestrian and slow moving traffic planning; Intelligent Transportation Systems.

Section 4: Planning Legislation and GIS Planning legislation will include acts and legislation related to development management and maintenance of Delhi and other towns of NCR, municipal corporation and local bodies, Land Acquisition Act, PPP etc. Local self- Governance.

ii. Delhi Development Act, (DD Act), 1957 will include all sections and provisions of the Act.

iii. Master plan of Delhi 1962-2021 will include provisions, strategies and Master Plan proposals as per documents published from time to time.

Junior Translator

Stage-I:

a) General Hindi: 100 marks (Objective type)

b) General English: 100 marks (Objective type)

The questions will be designed to test the candidate's understanding of the languages and literature, correct use of words, phrases and idioms, and ability to write the languages correctly, precisely, and effectively. The questions will be of degree level.

Stage-II:

Translation and Essay: 200 Marks (Conventional Type) The paper will contain two passages for translation-one passage for translation from Hindi to English and one passage for translation from English to Hindi, and an Essay each in Hindi and English, to test the candidates‟ translation skills and their ability to write as well as comprehend the two languages correctly, precisely and effectively. The level of the paper will be consistent with the educational qualifications prescribed.

DDA Recruitment 2022 Apply Online

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 01:07:00 -0500 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/articles/dda-je-recruitment-syllabus-latest-exam-pattern-post-wise-1655467788-1
Killexams : Information Systems

MSc PG Certificate PG Diploma

2022 start September 

Information School, Faculty of Social Sciences

Aimed at graduates from any discipline, this course will teach you to design and implement information systems and effective project management techniques alongside practical computing skills, including computer programming. The MSc and PG Diploma awards are CILIP accredited.

Course description

By the end of the course, you'll have an in-depth understanding of information systems within an organisational context, emphasising issues related to information, people, information technologies and the business environment. You'll have gained practical skills related to the design and analysis of information systems. Your knowledge and skills will be highly valued in industry, commerce and academia.

We have world-leading research groups in areas such as database systems, information retrieval, speech recognition, information extraction and information management. This means you'll not only gain knowledge of the well-established fundamentals, but also the most current and advanced theories and techniques.

The course focuses on core Topics in information systems including information systems modelling, project management and the impact of information systems on organisations and society. These are complemented by practical skills in computer programming and the study of professional issues in computing.

You can then tailor the course to your own interests by choosing from more specialised Topics including those with a more technical focus such as database design and human-computer interaction, or Topics that focus on how information management can be used to benefit organisations through digital business and business intelligence.

If you have two or more years' relevant work experience in the information sector and wish to study for a higher degree, you may be interested in our Professional Enhancement programme. The programme is designed for people already in work who want to further their careers, and allows greater freedom in module choice in recognition of your existing expertise.

Accreditation

CILIP accredited for the MSc and PG Diploma awards

Modules

A selection of modules are available each year - some examples are below. There may be changes before you start your course. From May of the year of entry, formal programme regulations will be available in our Programme Regulations Finder.

You’ll need 180 credits to get a masters degree, with 75 credits from core modules, 45 credits from optional modules and a dissertation (including dissertation preparation) worth 60 credits.

Core modules:

Professional Issues

This module aims to promote an awareness of the wider social, legal and ethical issues of computing. It describes the relationship between technological change, society and the law, emphasising the powerful role that computers and computer professionals play in a technological society. It also introduces the legal areas which are specific and relevant to the discipline of computing (e.g., intellectual property, liability for defective software, computer misuse, etc) and aims to provide an understanding of ethical concepts that are important to computer professionals, and experience of considering ethical dilemmas.

15 credits
Information Systems Modelling

To consider the role of information modelling within the organisation and provide an appreciation of the rigorous methods that are needed to analyse, design, develop and maintain computer-based information systems. The course is intended to provide an introduction to information modelling techniques. Students gain experience in applying the wide range of systems analysis methods. Students cover Topics including: soft systems analysis; structured systems analysis methodologies; business process modelling; data flow modelling and object-oriented approaches (e.g. RUP/UML).

15 credits
Information Systems in Organisations

This module integrates Topics of organisation, management, and information systems, with an aim to offer the students an integrated set of concepts and tools for understanding information systems in organisations. During this module students will explore basic management and organisational theories and examine the impact of information systems on organisations. This course introduces key concepts which will be explored further in other modules on the information Management and Information Systems programmes.

15 credits
Information Systems Project Management

This module aims to provide a broad understanding of the fundamentals of project management as they apply to the development of Information Systems (IS). The module uses a flexible approach combining face-to-face seminars with web-based learning material. The module will begin with an overview of the principles involved in IS project management; followed by a discussion of IS development methodologies and their different characteristics and specialisms. The rest of the module will discuss the requirements for various project control activities, including estimating development resources, risk management, guidelines for system quality assurance, and various project control techniques that have been developed in exact years. The module will culminate with a review of human resource management issues.

15 credits
Information Systems and the Information Society

The module develops students' critical understanding of the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on social change in 'the Information Society'. Work will revolve around three key themes: the digital divide, community and digital rights.

15 credits
Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

This module assists students in the identification of, and preparation of a dissertation proposal. Students will: learn about: on-going research in the School; identify and prepare a dissertation proposal; carry out a preliminary literature search in the area of the dissertation research topic; and be introduced to the use of social research methods and statistics for information management.

15 credits
Dissertation

This module enables students to carry out an extended piece of work on an Information School approved topic, so that they can explore an area of specialist interest to them in greater depth. Students will be supported through tutorials with a project supervisor, will apply research methods appropriate to their topic, and implement their work-plan to produce an individual project report. Students will already have identified a suitable course and designed a project plan in the pre-requisite unit Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

45 credits

Optional modules - one from:

Foundations of Object Oriented Programming

This module introduces the foundations of object-oriented programming using the language Java. The emphasis of the module is on software engineering principles, and concepts underpinning object-oriented design and development are introduced from the outset. By the end of the module, you will be able to design, implement and test moderately complex Java programs.

15 credits
Introduction to Programming

This module introduces students with little or no programming experience to the general purpose programming language Python. Python is popular and easy to learn for developing a wide range of information systems applications. The skills and understandings required to program in Python are valued by organisations and transfer to most other programming languages.

15 credits

Optional modules - two from:

Digital Business

The module addresses both theoretical and practical aspects of digital business. The module will cover the latest business trends and business models adopted by ecommerce companies so that students are able to recognise and relate to the current practice in business.  The module aims to equip the students with theoretical and business knowledge and entrepreneurial skills to understand and manage new ways of doing business in the digital economy.

15 credits
Researching Social Media

The module will examine the key theoretical frameworks and methods used in social media studies. Students will explore the following questions: 1) What can be learnt about society by studying social media? 2) How should researchers construct ethical stances for researching sites such as Facebook and Twitter? 3) What are the traditional and digital research methods and tools that can be applied to conduct research on social media? 4) What are the strengths and weaknesses of these methods?

15 credits
Information Governance and Ethics

This module explores a) the emergence of information and data as an economic resource; b) the governance challenges and ethical issues arising from organizations' systematic capture, processing, and use of information and data for organizational goals, e.g. value, risk, accountability, ownership, privacy etc; c) governance, ethical, legal and other frameworks relevant to the capture, processing and use of information and data within organizational and networked contexts; and d) technologies and techniques used in the governing and governance of information and data. Case examples from a number of domains, e.g. business, government, health, law, and social media illustrate the Topics investigated.

15 credits
Business Intelligence

We will cover the principles and practices of gathering and synthesizing business intelligence from the external environment, including organisations,  competitive intelligence operations, environmental scanning activities, market intelligence, and strategic intelligence using open source information. A  secondary focus for the module is the role of BI software in organizations to collect and analyse internal information. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the ways in which business people use information and of how information is used to support strategic decision- making. Students will learn how to carry out effective searches using both free and fee-based resources, and will study key issues concerning the value, cost and availability of information. The module will concentrate primarily on external information resources but also covers the ways in which information internal to   an organisation can be used strategically to enhance competitive advantage. Students will learn through a combination of lectures and practical exercises, and  will have opportunities to develop expertise in using business-focused electronic information services.

15 credits
ICTs, Innovation and Change

This module aims at examining and exploring how organizations and human activity systems cope with change due to the new implementation or updating of Information Systems and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). This change occurs in complex social environments and has cultural, political, structural and ethical impacts that need to be carefully managed. The module will examine and explore how both managers and Information Systems practitioners can be better prepared for the unpredictability, unintended outcomes and possible harmful consequences of change caused by the introduction or update of Information Systems and ICTs. Therefore, the module aims at providing an understanding of both approaches and techniques for the management of this change.

15 credits
Database Design

Effective data management is key to any organisation, particularly with the increasing availability of large and heterogeneous datasets (e.g. transactional, multimedia and geo-spatial data). A database is an organised collection of data, typically describing the activities of one or more organisations and a core component of modern information systems. A Database Management System (DBMS) is software designed to assist in maintaining and utilising large collections of data and becoming a necessity for all organisations. This module provides an introduction to the area of databases and database management, relational database design and a flavour of some advanced Topics in current database research that deal with different kinds of data often found within an organisational context. Lectures are structured into three main areas:¿An introduction to databases¿The process of designing relational databases¿Advanced Topics (e.g. data warehouses and non-relational databases)The course includes a series of online tasks with supporting 'drop in¿ laboratories aimed at providing you with the skills required to implement a database in Oracle and extract information using the Structured Query Language (SQL).

15 credits
User-Centred Design and Human-Computer Interaction

Interface design and usability are central to the experience of interacting with computers. The module introduces usability principles and the design process for interactive systems exploring four major themes. Firstly, user psychology and cognitive principles underlying interface design. Secondly, user interface architectures, modes of interaction, metaphors, navigational structures. Thirdly, the user interface design process including task analysis, modelling constructs and prototyping techniques. Fourthly, the evaluation of user interfaces covering concepts of usability, goals and types of evaluation. The module focus is on the underlying principles of HCI and user-centred design approach with practical sessions to demonstrate these principles.

15 credits

Other courses:

Postgraduate Certificate requires a total of 60 credits
Postgraduate Diploma requires a total of 120 credits

The content of our courses is reviewed annually to make sure it's up-to-date and relevant. Individual modules are occasionally updated or withdrawn. This is in response to discoveries through our world-leading research; funding changes; professional accreditation requirements; student or employer feedback; outcomes of reviews; and variations in staff or student numbers. In the event of any change we'll consult and inform students in good time and take reasonable steps to minimise disruption. We are no longer offering unrestricted module choice. If your course included unrestricted modules, your department will provide a list of modules from their own and other subject areas that you can choose from.

Open days

An open day gives you the best opportunity to hear first-hand from our current students and staff about our courses. You'll find out what makes us special.

Upcoming open days and campus tours

Duration

  • 1 year full-time
  • 2 years part-time
  • 3 years part-time

Teaching

A variety of teaching methods are used, combining lectures from academic staff and professional practitioners with seminars, tutorials, small-group work and computer laboratory sessions. There is strong emphasis on problem-solving and individual aspects of learning, with the expectation that you will engage in independent study, studying and research in support of your coursework.

Teaching consists of two 15-week semesters, after which you will write your dissertation.

Assessment

Assessments vary depending on the modules you choose but may include essays, report writing, oral presentations, in-class tests and group projects.

There is also a dissertation of 10–15,000 words, which provides the opportunity, under one-to-one supervision, to focus in depth on a course of your choice. You may choose to carry out your dissertation with an external organisation, for instance if you are a Professional Enhancement student, your project could be directly related to your own work situation. In the past, students who have carried out such dissertations have welcomed the opportunity to tackle real-life problems.

Your career

After completing the course, you'll be equipped to pursue a variety of roles across a wide range of industries. Our students have found work as business or data analysts, IT business consultants, information systems managers and in enterprise architecture.

Department

The University of Sheffield Information School is ranked number one in the world for library and information management in the QS World University Rankings by subject 2021. These rankings are based upon academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact.

The school has been at the forefront of developments in the information field for more than fifty years. The subject is characterised by its distinctive, interdisciplinary focus on the interactions between people, information and digital technologies. It has the ultimate goal of enhancing information access, and the management, sharing and use of information, to benefit society.

When you come to study with us you'll be an integral part of our research culture. The school is your home and we pride ourselves on the friendliness and helpfulness of our staff.

We offer an outstanding academic education through a wide range of taught postgraduate degrees which embed the principles of research-led teaching.

When you join any of our degree programmes you'll develop a critical understanding of current issues in library and information management. You'll benefit from being taught by staff who are undertaking leading-edge research and who have many links with industry.

As part of our mission to provide world-quality university education in information, we aim to inspire and help you pursue your highest ambitions for your academic and professional careers.

Entry requirements

Main course

You’ll need at least a 2:1 in any subject. Relevant work experience is an advantage but we’ll supply consideration to candidates without experience.

Professional Enhancement

This is a different route to the main course. It's aimed at those who already have relevant work experience.

To apply for this course you need either:

  • an undergraduate degree in any subject discipline and at least 2 years' relevant work experience.
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject together with an acceptable relevant professional qualification and at least 2 years' relevant work experience.
  • an undergraduate degree in any subject area, and at least 5 years' relevant work experience.

If you do not have an undergraduate degree but have other qualifications and substantial relevant work experience you may be considered for entry onto the Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma courses.

Overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component.

Pathway programme for international students

If you're an international student who does not meet the entry requirements for this course, you have the opportunity to apply for a pre-masters programme in Business, Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Sheffield International College. This course is designed to develop your English language and academic skills. Upon successful completion, you can progress to degree level study at the University of Sheffield.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the department.

Apply

You can apply for postgraduate study using our Postgraduate Online Application Form. It's a quick and easy process.

Applications close on Friday 5 August 2022 at 5pm.

Apply now

Any supervisors and research areas listed are indicative and may change before the start of the course.

Our student protection plan

Recognition of professional qualifications: from 1 January 2021, in order to have any UK professional qualifications recognised for work in an EU country across a number of regulated and other professions you need to apply to the host country for recognition. Read information from the UK government and the EU Regulated Professions Database.

Thu, 01 Oct 2020 03:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/courses/2022/information-systems-msc-pg-certificate-pg-diploma
Killexams : Software Engineering BS

A software development degree that encompasses technical issues affecting software architecture, design, and implementation as well as process issues that address project management, planning, quality assurance, and product maintenance.

Program skills

Students learn principles, methods, and techniques for the construction of complex and evolving software systems. The software engineering program encompasses both technical issues affecting software architecture, designs and implementation, as well as process issues that address project management, planning, quality assurance, and product maintenance. The program has a strong emphasis on teamwork and communication skills. The software engineering coursework maintains a balance between engineering design and software processes in both required and elective courses. As with other engineering fields, mathematics and natural science fundamentals are taken in the early years.  A three-course sequence in a domain outside the program’s core requirements allows students to apply their software engineering skills to a variety of fields including science, engineering, and business. Finally, students complete a two-term senior project as the final demonstration of their abilities and preparation for immediate employment and long-term professional growth in software development organizations.

Program facilities equipment

The department provides a variety of facilities where students collaborate on projects, polish their skills, and consult with faculty. Outfitted with the latest hardware and software technology, our facilities reflect our commitment to teamwork, interactive learning, and professional education. From the team rooms to the Collaboration Lab, our facilities are designed to support students and mimic a real-world software development environment.

Program job titles reported

Application Engineer; Associate Software Engineer; Embedded Software Engineer; Full Stack Developer; Global Technology Analyst; iOS Developer; Quality Assurance Engineer; Software Test Engineer; System Infrastructure Engineer; Web Developer

Program significant points

  • RIT’s Software Engineering Program was the first undergraduate software engineering program in the US.
  • The Bachelor of Science degree program in Software Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

Select program hiring partners

Apple; Constant Contact; Datto; Facebook; Google; HubSpot; IBM; Intuit; JPMorgan Chase & Co; L3harris; Lockheed Martin; Microsoft; Oracle; U.S. Department of Defense; Wayfair

96.3%

Outcome Rates*

Total percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled in full-time graduate study, or are pursuing alternative plans (military service, volunteering, etc.).

83.70%

Knowledge Rate

*Total percentage of graduates for whom RIT has verifiable data, compared to national average knowledge rate of 41% per NACE.

Outcome % of Students
Employed 96.30%
Full-time Graduate Study 0%
Alternative Plans 0%
Outcome % of Students
Employed 96.30%
Full-time Graduate Study 0%
Alternative Plans 0%

Accreditation

The bachelor of science in software engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

Cooperative Education

Cooperative Education

What’s different about an RIT education? It’s the career experience you gain by completing cooperative education and internships with top companies in every single industry. You’ll earn more than a degree. You’ll gain real-world career experience that sets you apart. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries.

Co-ops and internships take your knowledge and turn it into know-how. Your computing co-ops will provide hands-on experience that enables you to apply your computing knowledge in professional settings while you make valuable connections between classwork and real-world applications.

Students in the software engineering degree are required to complete three blocks (40 weeks) of cooperative education experience.

Tue, 09 Jun 2020 20:27:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.rit.edu/careerservices/study/software-engineering-bs?q=redirects/emcs/programoverviews/home/computing-information-sciences/item/software-engineering-bs
Killexams : Upcoming City Council Agenda For Tuesday

Here is the upcoming City Council agenda for Tuesday:

I. Call to Order by Chairman Henderson.

II. Pledge of Allegiance/Invocation (Councilwoman Berz).

III. Special Presentation.

IV. Minute Approval.
Order of Business for City Council

V. Ordinances – Final Reading: PLANNING

a. 2020-0043 MAP Engineers (RT-1 Residential Townhouse Zone to R-3 Residential Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 6402 Shallowford Road, from RT-1 Residential Townhouse Zone to R-3 Residential Zone, subject to certain conditions. (District 6) (Recommended for approval by Planning and recommended for denial by Staff)

b. 2020-0073 3331 St. Elmo GP/Kevin Boehm (M-1 Manufacturing Zone to UGC Urban General Commercial Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 3331 St. Elmo Avenue, from M-1 Manufacturing Zone to UGC Urban General Commercial Zone. (District 7) (Recommended for approval by Planning and Staff)

c. 2020-0079 Douglas Street, LLC c/o Jason Geraci (Amend Condition). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to amend Condition No. 4 from Ordinance No. 11363 of previous Case No. 2002-0132 for the property located at 811 Douglas Street, more particularly described herein, subject to certain conditions. (District 8) (Recommended for approval by Planning and Staff)

VI. Ordinances – First Reading: PLANNING

a. 2020-0038 ASA Engineering (R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 7301 Shallowford Road, from R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone, subject to certain conditions. (District 4) (Recommended for approval by Planning) (Deferred from 07-21-2020)
2020-0038 ASA Engineering (R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 7301 Shallowford Road, from R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone, subject to certain conditions. (Staff Version)
2020-0038 ASA Engineering (R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 7301 Shallowford Road, from R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone. (Applicant Version)

b. 2020-0045 Christine Williams (R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential
Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code,
Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 1515 East th
14 Street, from R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone, subject to certain conditions. (District 8) (Recommended for approval by Planning and Staff) (Deferred from 08-11-2020) 2020-0045 Christine Williams (R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential
Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 1515 East th 14 Street, from R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone. (Applicant Version)

PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION

Public Works

c. An ordinance amending Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 31, Sewers, Mains and Drains, Article VIII, Stormwater Management, Division 2, New Development and Redevelopment Requirements, Section 31-314, Private Property Responsibilities, subsection (D)(v), so as to change the SCM Inspector certification date due to the Coronavirus pandemic.
       
VII. Resolutions:

ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

a. A resolution authorizing the Mayor or his designee to enter into an Agreement to Exercise Option to Renew with the Forgotten Child Fund, Inc., in substantially the form attached, for the lease of approximately 19,516 square feet of warehouse space at 1815 E. Main Street, identified as Tax Map No. 156B-D-009, for a term of six (6) months, for the amount of $1.00. (District 8)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

b. A resolution authorizing the Chief Information Officer to enter into an agreement with Applications Software Technology, LLC (“AST”) regarding “statements of work” relating to the Master Service Agreement for ERP – Oracle implementation, hosting, maintenance, and support services multi-year implementation, for Fiscal Years 2021 through 2025, for an amount not to exceed $9.6 million, subject to appropriation of funds.

PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION

Public Works

c. A resolution authorizing the approval of Change Order No. 3 for J&J Contractors, Inc. of Chattanooga, TN, relative to Contract No. Y-15-008-201, the new Avondale YFD Center, for an increased amount of $128,939.25, to authorize a contingency in the amount of $10,000.00, for a revised contract amount of $5,969,188.25, for an amount not to exceed $5,979,188.25. (District 8)

d. A resolution authorizing the Administrator for the Department of Public Works to award Contract No. Y-15-008-204 to Davis Kee Outdoor of Chattanooga, TN, Avondale Youth and Family Development Center Landscaping Project, in the amount of $108,895.00, plus a contingency amount of $10,000.00, for an amount not to exceed $118,895.00. (District 8)

Transportation

e. A resolution authorizing the Administrator for the Department of Transportation to enter into an agreement with Talley Construction Company, Inc. relative to Contract
th No. T-15-035 for construction services associated with Chestnut Street from west 4
Street to the north of Aquarium Way and Bailey Avenue, and from east of Norfolk Southern Railroad to Dodds Avenue, in the amount of $2,526,291.66, with a contingency amount of $252,629.17, for a total amount of $2,778,920.83. (Districts 7, 8 & 9)
                                  
f. A resolution authorizing the Administrator for the Department of Transportation to enter into an agreement with Integrated Properties, LLC relative to Contract No. T-20-012 for construction services associated with the Area 3 Commercial District Streetscape Improvements at Glass Street and Dodson Avenue, in the amount of $209,011.45, with a contingency amount of $15,988.55, for a total amount of $225,000.00. (Districts 8 & 9)

g. A resolution authorizing the approval of Change Order No. 1 for Jamison Construction, LLC relative to Contract No. T-19-008-201, Bailey Avenue Bridge Repairs, for an increased amount of $10,000.00, for a revised contract amount not to exceed $276,787.95. (District 9)

VIII. Purchases.

IX. Other Business.

X. Committee Reports.

XI. Recognition of Persons Wishing to Address the Council.

XII. Adjournment.
          

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2020 CITY COUNCIL AGENDA 6:00 PM

1. Call to Order by Chairman Henderson.

2. Pledge of Allegiance/Invocation (Councilman Oglesby).

3. Special Presentation.

4. Minute Approval.
Order of Business for City Council

5. Ordinances - Final Reading: PLANNING

a. 2020-0038 ASA Engineering (R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 7301 Shallowford Road, from R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone, subject to certain conditions. (District 4) (Recommended for approval by Planning) (Deferred from 07-21-2020)
2020-0038 ASA Engineering (R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 7301 Shallowford Road, from R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone, subject to certain conditions. (Staff Version)
2020-0038 ASA Engineering (R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 7301 Shallowford Road, from R-1 Residential Zone to C-4 Planned Commerce Center Zone. (Applicant Version)

b. 2020-0045 Christine Williams (R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential
Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code,
Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 1515 East th
14 Street, from R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone, subject to certain conditions. (District 8) (Recommended for approval by Planning and Staff) (Deferred from 08-11-2020) 2020-0045 Christine Williams (R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential
Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone). An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code,
  Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, so as to rezone property located at 1515 East th
 14 Street, from R-1 Residential Zone to R-T/Z Residential Townhouse/Zero Lot Line Zone. (Applicant Version)

PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION

Public Works

c. An ordinance amending Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 31, Sewers, Mains and Drains, Article VIII, Stormwater Management, Division 2, New Development and Redevelopment Requirements, Section 31-314, Private Property Responsibilities, subsection (D)(v), so as to change the SCM Inspector certification date due to the Coronavirus pandemic.

6. Ordinances - First Reading: PLANNING

a. An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, Article
XVI. Downtown Chattanooga Form-Based Code, relative to recommended improvements based on the one year review. (Districts 2, 7 & 8) (Deferred from 08-04-2020)

b. An ordinance to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part II, Chapter 38, Zoning Ordinance, Article V. Zoning Regulations, Division 5. R-T/Z Residential Townhouse Zero Lot Line Zone to delete the maximum density requirements and to establish minimum lot size requirements for single-family detached and townhouse dwellings, and to permit a maximum of four multiple single-family detached dwellings on one lot within the Urban Overlay Zone. (Deferred from 08-04-2020)

7. Resolutions:

ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

a. A resolution authorizing the Administrator for the Department of Economic and Community Development to apply for, and if awarded, accept a BlueCross Healthy Place Grant, sponsored by BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Health Foundation (BCBS), for an amount not to exceed $750,000.00 per project.
                         
PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION

Transportation

b. A resolution authorizing the Administrator for the Department of Transportation to enter into a Pedestrian Undergrade Crossing Agreement with CSX Transportation, Inc. for the South Chickamauga Creek Extension relative to Contract No. T-14-036, for an amount not to exceed $350.00.

c. A resolution authorizing the Administrator for the Department of Transportation to enter into a Construction Agreement with CSX Transportation, Inc. for the South Chickamauga Creek Extension relative to Contract No. T-14-036, for an amount not to exceed $138,053.00.

YOUTH AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT

d. A resolution authorizing the Administrator for the Department of Youth and Family Development to pay Teaching Strategies for seventy-five (75) Early Childhood Creative Curriculum Kits, in the amount of $124,655.00.

8. Purchases.

9. Other Business.

10. Committee Reports.

11. Recognition of Persons Wishing to Address the Council.

12. Adjournment.

Sat, 30 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.chattanoogan.com/2020/8/14/413599/Upcoming-City-Council-Agenda-For-Tuesday.aspx
Killexams : Human-Centered Computing Bachelor of Science Degree Course Sem. Cr. Hrs. First Year ISTE-110

General Education – First-Year Writing: FYW: Ethics in Computing (WI)

Computing and the Internet are now integral parts of our lives. In this course, we consider and discuss how ethical theories and principles can inform and provide guidance about interactions and uses of computing technologies. Topics include the development interpretation, and application of ethical theory, moral values, personal responsibility, codes of conduct, ethics in the real and virtual worlds, intellectual property, and information security. This is a Writing Intensive (WI) course. Students are provided with guidance and opportunities for improving informal and formal writing skills. Grades received on writing assignments will constitute a significant component of the final course grade. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-140

Web & Mobile I

This course provides students with an introduction to internet and web technologies, and to development on Macintosh/UNIX computer platforms. Topics include HTML and CSS, CSS3 features, digital images, web page design and website publishing. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals, concepts and standards. Additional Topics include the user experience, mobile design issues, and copyright/intellectual property considerations. Exercises and projects are required. Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-262

Foundations of Human Centered Computing

This course explores how the fields of psychology, digital design, and computing converge in the design, development, and evaluation of new technologies that people find effective and enjoyable to use. Students will investigate the field of human-computer interaction (HCI), with a focus on how users' various sensory, motor, and cognitive abilities are essential to their successful use of technology. Students will be exposed to modern research methods and paradigms in field of human-computer interaction, including predictive modeling, heuristic evaluation, interpretive methods, and experimental user testing. Students will learn key design principles and guidelines and apply them to analyze existing designs and conduct a design process that is centered on human users of technology. (Prerequisite: ISTE-140 or IGME-230 or NACA-172 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

3 NMDE-111

New Media Digital Design Survey I

This project-based course is an investigation of the computer as an illustrative, imaging, and graphical generation tool. It develops foundational design skills in raster and vector image creation, editing, compositing, layout and visual design for online production. Emphasis will be on the application of visual design organization methods and principles for electronic media. Students will create and edit images, graphics, layouts and typography to form effective design solutions for online delivery. (This course is restricted to students in the WMC-BS or HCC-BS or NMDE-BFA or NWMEDID-BS or DIGHSS-BS program.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 PSYC-101

General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective: Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3 PSYC-223

General Education – Elective: Cognitive Psychology

This course examines how people perceive, learn, represent, remember and use information. Contemporary theory and research are surveyed in such areas as attention, pattern and object recognition, memory, knowledge representation, language acquisition and use, reasoning, decision making, problem solving, creativity, and intelligence. Applications in artificial intelligence and human/technology interaction may also be considered. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3 STAT-145

General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Introduction to Statistics I

This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement test score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3 STAT-146

General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Introduction to Statistics II

This course is an elementary introduction to the Topics of regression and analysis of variance. The statistical software package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on business applications. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4 YOPS-10

RIT 365: RIT Connections

RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0  

General Education – Elective

3  

Open Elective

3 Second Year GCIS-123

Software Development and Problem Solving I

A first course introducing students to the fundamentals of computational problem solving. Students will learn a systematic approach to problem solving, including how to frame a problem in computational terms, how to decompose larger problems into smaller components, how to implement innovative software solutions using a contemporary programming language, how to critically debug their solutions, and how to assess the adequacy of the software solution. Additional Topics include an introduction to object-oriented programming and data structures such as arrays and stacks. Students will complete both in-class and out-of-class assignments. Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).

4 GCIS-124

Software Development and Problem Solving II

A second course that delves further into computational problem solving, now with a focus on an object-oriented perspective. There is a continued emphasis on basic software design, testing & verification, and incremental development. Key Topics include theoretical abstractions such as classes, objects, encapsulation, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, software design comprising multiple classes with UML, data structures (e.g. lists, trees, sets, maps, and graphs), exception/error handling, I/O including files and networking, concurrency, and graphical user interfaces. Additional Topics include basic software design principles (coupling, cohesion, information expert, open-closed principle, etc.), test driven development, design patterns, data integrity, and data security. (Prerequisite: C- or better in SWEN-123 or CSEC-123 or GCIS-123 or equivalent course.) Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4 ISTE-99

School of Information Second Year Seminar

This course helps students prepare for cooperative employment by developing job search approaches and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of IST fields to help focus their skill development strategies. Students are introduced to the Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education, and learn about their professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés, cover letters, and prepare for interviewing. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to HCC-BS or CMIT-BS or WMC-BS or COMPEX-UND Major students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0 ISTE-240

Web & Mobile II

This course builds on the basics of web page development that are presented in Web and Mobile I and extends that knowledge to focus on theories, issues, and technologies related to the design and development of web sites. An overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information architecture, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including HTTP, web client and server programming, and dynamic page generation from a database also will be explored. Development exercises are required. (Prerequisites: (ISTE-120 or CSCI-140 or CSCI-141 or NACA-161 or IGME-105 or IGME-101 or NMAD-180 or GCIS-123) and (ISTE-140 or NACA-172 or IGME-230 or IGME-235) or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-264

Prototyping and Usability Testing

This course will explore how modern human centered computing design and evaluation methodologies can be effectively used to create high-quality and usable technologies for a variety of users. Students will learn how an initial design can be evaluated and improved through the use of prototyping and user evaluations. Students will investigate a variety of high- and low-fidelity prototyping techniques, plan an iterative design process for an application, conduct an evaluation of a prototype, and analyze the results of user testing to drive a design process. Programming is required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-262 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).

3 ISTE-266

Design for Accessibility

This course will explore the design, evaluation, and use of computing and information technologies to benefit people with disabilities and older adults. Students will learn how to analyze the accessibility of existing software or websites, and they will learn how to design technology that can be effectively, enjoyably, and efficiently used by people with diverse sensory, motor, and cognitive abilities. Students will learn about cutting-edge ways in which science and technology has provided assistance and accessibility for people with disabilities. Students will learn how to investigate the needs of users with disabilities, design technologies according to universal design or accessibility principles, interpret key accessibility regulations and guidelines, and include people with disabilities in the design and evaluation of new technologies. Programming is required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-264 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

3 ISTE-499

Undergraduate Co-op (summer)

Students perform paid, professional work related to their program of study. Students work full-time during the term they are registered for co-op. Students must complete a student co-op work report for each term they are registered; students also are evaluated each term by their employer. A satisfactory grade is given for co-op when both a completed student co-op report and a corresponding employer report that indicates satisfactory student performance are received. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0 NMDE-112

New Media Digital Design Survey II

Through formal studies and perceptual understanding, including aesthetics, graphic form, structure, concept development, visual organization methods and interaction principles, students will design graphical solutions to communication problems for static and interactive projects. Students will focus on creating appropriate and usable design systems through the successful application of design theory and best practices. Assignments exploring aspects of graphic imagery, typography, usability and production for multiple digital devices and formats will be included. (Prerequisite: NMDE-111 or NMAD-155 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 PSYC-250

General Education – Elective: Research Methods I (WI-PR)

This course will serve as an introduction to research methods in psychology, with the goal of understanding research design, analysis and writing. Topics include examining the variety of methods used in psychology research, understanding research ethics, developing empirical hypotheses, designing experiments, understanding statistical concepts, interpreting results, and writing research and review papers in APA style. This is a required course for all psychology majors, and is restricted to students in the psychology program. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H and STAT-145 or STAT-145H equivalent course and student standing in PSYC-BS or HCC-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 PSYC-251

General Education – Elective: Research Methods II (WI-PR)

This course will serve as an advanced research methods course in psychology, and will build on the foundational knowledge presented in Research Methods I. Topics and tasks for this course include designing single and multi-factor experiments, interpreting correlational research, completing statistical analyses appropriate to design, completing and analyzing an IRB application, understanding observational and survey research, and presenting results in APA style. This is a required course for all psychology majors, and is restricted to students in the psychology program. (Prerequisites: PSYC-250 and STAT-146 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3  

General Education – Social Perspective

3  

General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective

3 Third Year ISTE-252

Foundations of Mobile Design

This course is an introduction to designing, prototyping, and creating applications and web applications for mobile devices. These devices include a unique set of hardware and communications capabilities, incorporate novel interfaces, are location aware, and provide persistent connectivity. Topics covered include user interaction patterns, connectivity, interface design, software design patterns, and application architectures. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-240 or IGME-330 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-499

Undergraduate Co-op (summer)

Students perform paid, professional work related to their program of study. Students work full-time during the term they are registered for co-op. Students must complete a student co-op work report for each term they are registered; students also are evaluated each term by their employer. A satisfactory grade is given for co-op when both a completed student co-op report and a corresponding employer report that indicates satisfactory student performance are received. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0  

HCC Concentration Courses

12  

General Education – Artistic Perspective

3  

General Education – Global Perspective

3  

General Education – Immersion 1

3  

Open Electives

6 Fourth Year ISTE-500

Senior Development Project I

The first course in a two-course, senior level, system development capstone project. Students form project teams and work with sponsors to define system requirements. Teams then create architectures and designs, and depending on the project, also may begin software development. Requirements elicitation and development practices introduced in prior coursework are reviewed, and additional methods and processes are introduced. Student teams are given considerable latitude in how they organize and conduct project work. (This course is restricted to WMC-BS, HCC-BS, CMIT-BS, and 2 ISTE-499 completed or (1 ISTE-498 completed and 1 ISTE-499 completed).) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3 ISTE-501

Senior Development Project II (WI-PR)

The second course in a two-course, senior level, system development capstone project. Student teams complete development of their system project and package the software and documentation for deployment. Usability testing practices introduced in prior course work are reviewed, and additional methods and processes are introduced. Teams present their developed system and discuss lessons learned at the completion of the course. (Prerequisites: ISTE-500 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3  

HCC Concentration Courses

6  

General Education – Ethical Perspective

3  

General Education – Immersion 2, 3

6  

Open Elective

3  

General Education - Elective

3 Total Semester Credit Hours

120

Wed, 16 Feb 2022 23:13:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.rit.edu/computing/study/human-centered-computing-bs
Killexams : Campus Technology Impact Awards

We are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2020-2021 Campus Technology Impact Awards:

Clemson University

Project: VR Mondi
Project lead: Kyle David Anderson, senior director of global engagement
Tech lineup: Blender, Mozilla Hubs, Sketchfab, SketchUp, Trello, WhatsApp, Zoom

VR Mondi is a suite of immersive and interactive 3D environments representing international locations of educational significance, within which instructors and students acquire discipline-specific knowledge and meet with global peers to increase intercultural competencies. Created and managed by international student teams from research and conception to implementation, VR Mondi brings an engaging pedagogical tool to faculty across the university and expands students' access to global learning.

Columbus State Community College

Project: Composition studying Bank
Project lead: Nick Lakostik, associate professor of English
Tech lineup: EBSCO, LexisNexis, Microsoft, Springshare

The Composition studying Bank is a digital OER replacing the traditional anthology for composition courses, saving Columbus State students over $200,000 each semester. Among the features that set it apart from other resources: Text, video and audio content is fully accessible to students with disabilities; copyright is meticulously respected; web resources with monthly viewing limits are avoided; and thorough summaries, info bubbles and tags enhance usability. Creation and ongoing maintenance of the CRB has been informed by department trainings, user surveys, focus groups and testing.

Indiana University

Project: Keep Teaching
Project lead: Anastasia (Stacy) Morrone, associate vice president, Learning Technologies
Tech lineup: Citrix, Instructure, Kaltura, Unizin, Zoom

Keep Teaching is an extensive collection of resources and best practices for shifting from face-to-face to online instruction during prolonged campus or building closures, offering both technological and pedagogical support. The materials are openly available to institutions all over the world, through Creative Commons licensing allowing others to reuse with proper attribution. A companion website for students, Keep Learning, offers key tips and resources for learning from home.

Syracuse University

Project: Orange SUccess Initiative
Project lead: Hopeton Smalling, functional business analyst
Tech lineup: Blackboard, Hobsons, Microsoft, Oracle

Orange SUccess is a data-informed process for student advising/case management, intervention selection and community support to Boost the student experience. More than a technology rollout, the initiative has created a culture of change and accountability, balancing people, process, technology and politics at a diverse institution.

Olivet Nazarene University

Project: Your Way
Project lead: Kathleen Lueckeman, chief strategy officer
Tech lineup: FormAssembly, Google, Grammarly, Microsoft, Qualified, Salesforce, Tableau, Valence

Olivet increased equity and access and bent the cost curve using technology to offer tuition-free general education courses for adult students and provide a low-risk pathway to a college degree. The self-paced courses offer always-on content accessible on any device, unlimited re-takes on homework and tests, gamification to keep students motivated, and self-service support resources. On the administrative side, Olivet revamped advertising, marketing, recruitment, admissions and onboarding, flattening siloes, removing administrative barriers and lowering costs both for the university and for students.

University of North Texas

Project: UNT Insights Program
Project lead: Jason Simon, associate vice president for data, analytics and institutional research
Tech lineup: Pinnacle Solutions, SAS

In the face of tremendous upheaval for higher education, UNT built an enterprise-wide analytics initiative from the ground up — on a strong foundation of data governance and culture change. As a result, the institution has gone from "data rich, insight poor" to integrating data modeling, data training, data visualization and predictive analytics for data-informed decision-making — and has seen a significant boost in enrollment and graduation rates.

Texas State University

Project: Digital Scholarly Research Ecosystem
Project lead: Ray Uzwyshyn, director, Library Collections and Digital Services
Tech lineup: Dataverse, DSpace, Omeka, Open Journal Systems, ORCID, Vireo

Using entirely open source software, Texas State created a groundbreaking online scholarly research ecosystem to empower faculty and graduate student research, raise research profiles in search engines and enable global collaboration and sharing. Researchers' work has been made more visible and findable, elevating faculty, graduate students and institution alike.

Indiana University

Project: Idea Garden - Growing Your Ideas Organically
Project lead: Julie Johnston, director of learning spaces
Tech lineup: Corsair, Crestron, Dell, Google, HTC VIVE, Klipsch, LulzBot, Mersive, Microsoft, Oculus, Planar, Samsung, Skytech Gaming

The Idea Garden is a vibrant "thinker space" that offers all students an opportunity to engage in collaborative, cross-disciplinary experiences by providing them with hands-on interaction with cutting-edge technology. The space pairs biophilic design and a serene atmosphere with a plethora of technologies for creativity and exploration, along with individualized student support and resources. Its goal: to inspire students to learn beyond the curriculum, acquire skills based on their interests and passions, and foster the spirit of lifelong learning.

University of Michigan

Project: ECoach
Project lead: Tim McKay, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Physics, Astronomy, Education, and associate dean for Undergraduate Education
Tech lineup: Developed in-house

ECoach is a personalized coaching tool for students in large courses where one-on-one communication between instructors and students is otherwise impossible. Students receive feedback from the tool on how to succeed in a course, based on data from university systems as well as student survey input and informed by behavioral science techniques. And an underlying research framework provides immense opportunities for studying how students learn, use course resources, and the impact of interventions on learning behaviors.

Harvard University

Project: Harvard Innovation Labs Virtual Ecosystem  
Project lead: Ian Boyd, associate director, technology & strategy 
Tech lineup: ClickUp, Gatheround, Mailchimp, Microsoft, Slack, SoWork, Vimeo, WordPress, YouTube, Zoom

The Harvard Innovation Labs created a virtual innovation ecosystem, accessed by thousands of members of the Harvard community, that nurtures ideation and venture creation. Born out of the emergency pivot to remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, the virtual ecosystem has become a permanent part of the Innovation Labs' efforts to foster innovation and entrepreneurship, using technology to build community, communication and collaboration among students, advisers and alumni as well as potential customers, investors and employees. Through the virtual ecosystem, venture teams have developed a range of products and services — often focused on the pandemic and/or social justice — that are impacting millions of people around the world.  

Sun, 16 Aug 2020 15:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://campustechnology.com/impact
Killexams : Datadog: What You Need To Know Before The Earnings On Thursday
Shot of a young woman using a digital tablet while working in a server room

Charday Penn/E+ via Getty Images

(Disclaimer: before we start, I'm not a developer or a software engineer. So, if despite my efforts, there are still mistakes in this article, please let me know!)

Datadog? What?

Datadog log

Datadog

Datadog (NASDAQ:DDOG) is not an easy company to understand if you don't work in software (hence the disclaimer above). I will try to dissect the company and hopefully, at the end of the article, you understand what it does and how it makes money. I also take a brief look at the earnings.

An introduction to Datadog and its history

Logo Datadog

Datadog

Datadog was founded in 2010 by Olivier Pomel and Alexis Lê-Quôc, who are still leading the company, Pomel as the CEO, Lê-Quôc as the CTO (Chief Technology Officer). The two Frenchmen are long-time friends and colleagues. They met in the Ecole Centrale in Paris, where they both got computer science degrees.

Olivier Pomel CEO Datadog

Datadog

(Olivier Pomel, from the company's website)

Olivier Pomel is an original author of the VLC Media Player, which a lot of you will know or recognize the logo.

VLC Media Player

VLC Media Player

(The VLC Media Player Icon)

Pomel and Lê-Quôc both worked at Wireless Generation, a company that built data systems for K-12 teachers. For those who don't know the American educational system, K-12 stands for all years between kindergarten and the 12th grade, from age 5 to 18. K-12 has three stages: elementary school (K-5), middle school (K6-8) and high school (K9-12).

Wireless Generation is now called Amplify and it offers assessments and curriculum sources for education to schools. Wireless Generation was sold to Newscorp in 2010, which was the sign for the two friends to go and found their own company. Pomel was VP of Technology for Wireless Generation and he built out his team from a handful of people to almost 100 of the best engineers in New York.

Yes, you read that right, New York. Because Pomel and Lê-Quôc knew many people in the developer scene in New York, Datadog is one of the few big tech companies not based in Silicon Valley. The company's headquarters are still in Manhattan today, on 8th Avenue, in the New York Times building, close to Times Square and the Museum Of Modern Art.

Before Wireless Generation, Pomel also worked at IBM Research and several internet startups.

Alexis Lê-Quôc is Pomel's co-founder, friend, and long-time colleague. He is the current CTO of Datadog.

Alexis Lê-Quôc, CTO Datadog

Datadog

(Alexis, Lê-Quôc, from the company's website)

Alexis Lê-Quôc served as the Director of Operations at Wireless Generation. He built a team as well there and a top-notch infrastructure. He also worked at IBM Research and other companies like Orange and Neomeo.

DevOps, Very Important For Datadog

He has been a long-time proponent of the DevOps movement and that's important to understand Datadog. The DevOps movement tried to solve the problem that many developers and operators worked next to and even against each other, almost acting as enemies. DevOps focuses on how to put them together to make everything more frictionless. Developers often blamed the operational side if there was a problem (for example, the database that was not up-to-date) and operators blamed developers (a mistake in the code). By working together in teams, good communication and even as much integration between the teams as possible, DevOps tried to solve that problem.

The problem was that there was no software for a unified platform for DevOps and Datadog helped solve that problem. If you want to know where the problem is, it's good to have a central observability platform for DevOps and Datadog set it as its task to make that.

As a tech company in New York, Datadog had quite a lot of trouble raising money initially. But once it had secured money, it started building, releasing the first product in 2012, a cloud infrastructure monitoring service, just ten years ago. It had a dashboard, alerting, and visualizations.

In 2014, Datadog expanded to include AWS, Azure, Google Cloud Platform, Red Hat OpenShift and others.

Because of the French origin of the founders, it was natural for them to think internationally from the start. The company set up a large office and R&D center in France to conquer Europe quite early in its history, in 2015 already, just three years after the launch of its first product.

Also in 2015, it acquired Mortar Data, a great acquisition. Up to then, Datadog just aggregated data from servers, databases and applications to unify the platform for application performance. That was already revolutionary at the time. Datadog already had customers like Netflix (NFLX), MercadoLibre (MELI) and Spotify (SPOT). But Mortar Data added meaningful insights to Datadog's platform. This allowed Datadog's customers to Boost their applications constantly.

Datadog really needed this as companies like Splunk (SPLK) and New Relic (NEWR) had done or were in the process of doing the same. Datadog was seen as a competitor of New Relic at the time. To a certain extent, that is still the same today.

In 2017, Datadog did a French acquisition with Logmatic.io, which specialized in searching and visualizing logs. It made Datadog the first to have APM (application performance monitoring), infrastructure metrics and log management on a single platform.

In 2019, Datadog bought Madumbo, another French company. It's an AI-based application testing platform. In other words, because of the self-learning capabilities, the platform becomes more and more powerful in finding weak links and reporting them without the need to write additional code. Instead, it interacts with the application in a way that is as organic as possible, through test e-mails, password testing, and many other interactions while testing everything for speed and functionality. The bot can also detect JavaScript weaknesses. The capability was immediately added to the core platform of Datadog.

Also in 2019, Datadog founded a Japanese subsidiary and in September of 2019, Datadog went public.

Datadog IPO September 2019

CNBC

(The Datadog IPO, source)

Before it had its IPO, Cisco (CSCO) tried to buy Datadog above the range of its IPO price. Pomel about how he thought about this $8B offer:

Wow this is a lot of money! But at the same time I see all this potential and everything else in front of us and there’s much more we can build

Datadog decided not to sell and on the first day that the company traded, it jumped to a valuation of almost $11B.

The name Datadog is a remarkable one. None of the founders had or particularly liked dogs. In Wireless Generation, Pomel and Lê-Quôc, named their production servers "dogs”, staging servers "cats" and so on. “Data dogs” were production databases. There were dogs to be afraid of. Pomel:

“Data Dog 17” was the horrible, horrible, Oracle database that everyone lived in fear of. Every year it had to double in size and we sacrificed goats so the database wouldn’t go down.

So it was really the name of fear and pain and so when we started the company we used Datadog 17 as a code name, and we thought we’d find something nicer later. It turns out everyone remembered Datadog so we cut the 17 so it wouldn’t sound like a MySpace handle and we had to buy the domain name, but it turned out it was a good name in the end.

What Datadog does

Datadog describes what it does as 'Modern monitoring & security'. I could supply you the explanation of what that means myself, but if founder and CEO Olivier Pomel does a really good job in explaining from a high level what Datadog does here why would I not let him do it, right?

Whenever you watch a movie online or whenever you buy something from a store, in the back end, there’s ten thousand or tens of thousands of servers and applications and various things that basically participate into completing that – either serving the video or making sure your credit cards go through with the vendor and clears everything with your bank.

What we do is actually instrument all of that, we instrument the machines, the applications, we capture all of the events – everything that’s taking place in there, all of the exhausts from those machines and applications that tell you what they’re doing, how they’re doing it, what the customers are doing.

We bring all that together and help the people who need to make sense of it understand what’s happening: is it happening for real, is it happening at the right speed, is it still happening, are we making money, who is churning over time. So we basically help the teams – whether they are in engineering, operations, product or business – to understand what these applications are doing in real time for their business.

In the old days, you had a development team that made an application and it took maybe six months before it was operational. For the next few years, that was it, no changes could be made. If the developers regretted a weakness, they had to wait for a few years, until the next upgrade.

That changed with the cloud. You could now constantly upgrade and developers can easily make changes without going through a whole administrative and technological drag of a process. If you implement a certain code and you think there is a better solution the next day, no problem. Moreover, Datadog will show you what doesn't really work well.

Olivier Pomel gives a few examples of issues Datadog can help its customers with:

There’s a number of things our customers can’t do on their own. For example they don’t know what’s happening beyond their account on a cloud provider. One thing we do for them is we tell them when we detect an issue that is going to span across different customers on the cloud provider. We tell them “hey you’re having an issue right now on your AWS and it’s not just you. It’s very useful because otherwise they have no way to know and they see your screen will go red and they have to figure out why that is.

Other things we do is we‘re going to watch very large amounts of signals that they can’t humanly watch, so we’re going to look at millions of metrics and we’re going to tell them the ones that we know for sure are important and not behaving right now, even if they didn’t know that already, if they didn’t know “I should watch this”, “I should put an alert on that”, “I should go and figure out if this changes”. These are examples of what we do for them.

The problems that Datadog solves

Datadog helps with observability and this in turn limits downtime, controls the development and implementation, finds and fixes problems and provides insight into every detail necessary on a unified platform.

But to make it even more like real life and where Datadog can make a difference, Olivier Pomel has a good way of explaining what problem Datadog exactly solves. He talks about Wireless Generation, where he and Alexis Lê-Quôc were the head of development and operations.

I was running the development team, and he was running the operation team. We knew each other very well, we had worked together, we were very good friends. We started the teams from scratch so we hired everyone, and we had a “no jerks” policy for hiring, so we were off to a good start. Despite all that, we ended up in a situation where operations hated development, development hated operations, we were finger pointing all day.

So the starting point for Datadog was that there must be a better way for people to talk to each other. We wanted to build a system that brought the two sides of the house together, all of the data was available to both and they speak the same language and see the same reality.

It turns out, it was not just us, it was the whole industry that was going this way.

Datadog covers what it calls 'the three pillars of observability': metrics, traces and logs (next to other things).

A metric is something that is a data point that is measured and tracked over time. It's used to assess, compare and track code production or performance.

Traces are everything that has to do with a program's execution, the metadata that connects everything. When you clicked on this article, that took you from the link in your mail to here but this is being retrieved from a database. Those connections can be found in traces. Traces are often used for debugging or making the software better.

Logs are events that are being generated by any of the participants in any of the systems. There are system logs (which have to do with the operating system), application logs (which have to do with the activity in the application, the interactions), or security logs (which log access and identity).

Companies used to have several software solutions for each separately. For metrics, companies had monitoring software like Graphite. For metrics, developers needed other software, APM or application performance monitoring. This was New Relic (NEWR), for example. And then for logs, there used to be log management software like Splunk (SPLK).

These platforms didn't talk to each other and developers or operators had to open them all separately and compare the silos manually. That didn't make sense, of course. Problems often went across borders; therefore, it makes sense to unify everything on one platform and that's exactly what Datadog did.

This allows observability teams to act much faster, especially because Datadog also provides the context of why something unexpected happens.

The solutions that companies use, are more and more complex, weaving together more applications, more multiple cloud hosting, more APIs, bigger or more teams working on separate projects simultaneously, edge cloud computing and so on. More than ever, there is a need for 'the one to rule them all' when it comes to observability, which is the fight that Datadog seems to have won.

If you look at the company's timeline, you see that initially, it only had infrastructure monitoring, so metrics. Datadog added logs and traces but other things too along the way.

Datadog timeline

Datadog's S-1

As you can see, when Datadog added the "three pillars of observability" it didn't rest on its laurels.

In 2019, it introduced RUM or real-user monitoring. It's a product that allows the Datadog customer to see the interactions of real users with their products (a site, for example, or a game). Think about how many people who have downloaded a game click on the explanation of the game before playing and which mistakes they still make, how many immediately start playing, if they can find the play button fast enough, and so on. Or think about new accounts. If there is a steep drop, Datadog will flag this and engineers can investigate this. Maybe the update had a bug that doesn't allow users to use logging in through their Apple account anymore, for example.

I'm returning to synthetics in a minute, but I first want to mention security, which is not on the roadmap above yet. As we all know, security has become much more important than just a few years ago and therefore it's important to also integrate security people into the DevOps team and make it a DevSecOps team. Datadog has already adapted for the new DevSecOps movement.

It introduced the Datadog Cloud Security Platform in August of 2021, which means that it now offers a full-stack security context on top of Datadog’s observability capabilities. Again, just like with DevOps, the company is early in what is clearly a developing trend (pun not intended) in software, the integration of security certified into the core team of DevOps. Datadog offers a unified platform for all three and security issues can be coupled to data across the infrastructure, the network and applications. It allows security teams to respond faster and gain much more granular insights after the breach has been solved.

Again, Datadog solves a real problem here. As more and more data move to the cloud, security teams often had less and less visibility, while the attacks become more and more sophisticated. That's why it's important to supply back that visibility to these teams and supply them a tool to implement security. Developers and operations can implement security into all levels of software, applications and infrastructure.

Datadog also added synthetics in 2019, as I already mentioned before. Synthetics are the simulation of user behavior to see if everything works as it should, even if no users are on the system yet. That was added through Datadog's acquisition of Madumbo, as we saw earlier. Pomel about synthetics:

There is an existing category for that. It’s not necessarily super interesting on its own. It tends to be a bit commoditized and it’s a little bit high churn, but it makes sense as part of a broader platform which we offer. When you have a broader platform, the churn goes away and the fact it is commoditized can actually differentiate by having everything else on the platform.

And then Pomel adds a short but very interesting sentence:

There’s a few like that, and there’s more we’re adding.

So, you shouldn't expect the expansion of Datadog to stop anytime soon.

How Datadog makes money

In short, Datadog makes money through a SaaS model, Software-as-a-Service. That means that customers have to pay monthly. But let's look at how this works in more detail.

Datadog uses a land-and-expand model. It uses a free tier that is limited in volume. Basically, you can get the infrastructure observability for free if you have less than five servers. You will have to pay if you have more servers, as it makes no sense to not add certain servers.

Datadog pricing

Datadog

(Source)

This is how Datadog defines a host:

A host is any physical or virtual OS instance that you monitor with Datadog. It could be a server, VM, node (in the case of Kubernetes) or App Service Plan instance (in the case of Azure App Services).

This is what you get in the different plans:

Datadog what you get in the different plans

Datadog

Datadog what you get in the different plans

Datadog

(Source)

It's important to know that this is just the infrastructure module. Datadog is a master in cross-selling and upselling existing customers and sells them several of these modules:

Datadog different modules

Datadog

This is another example, for APM & Continuous Profiler.

Datadog APM and Continuous Profiler pricing

Datadog

Other modules, like log management, are usage-based pricing:

Datadog log management usage based pricing

Datadog

I won't list all the pricing possibilities for all modules here. You can go to this page if you want to see them all.

Datadog's Sales Approach

The sales approach the company takes is really aimed at developers. When I hear Olivier Pomel talk about the approach, it reminds me so much of Twilio's founder and CEO Jeff Lawson's approach to sales and doing business in general, summarized in the title of his book: "Ask Your Developer." It means that the sales strategy is bottom-up: after having convinced developers, they convince their CIO or CTO and then the big contracts are made.

For large enterprises, Datadog works a bit differently, but not that much. They first talk to the CIO and they let their teams test the software (with the free tier) to get feedback. After a certain time, Datadog comes back and it often results in an order form that is being signed.

Olivier Pomel about this approach:

Small company or large company – the product is adopted the same way. The users in the end are very similar. When you’re a developer at a very large enterprise you don’t think of yourself differently as a developer at a start-up or smaller company. There’s more and more communities between those.

There are four types of sales teams in Datadog. The enterprise sales team obviously sells to large companies, the customer success sales team takes care of the onboarding and cross-selling to existing customers. The partner team works with reseller, referral partners, system integrators and other outside sellers. The inside sales team is the team that focusses on bringing in new customers.

As you may guess, there is a lot of training for the salespeople, so they stay on top of their industry. They also have to translate a customer's problems to one or several product offerings.

Affordability is important to Datadog. Founder and CEO Olivier Pomel:

In terms of pricing philosophy though, we had to be fair in what we wanted to achieve with the price. And the number one objective for us was to be deployed as widely as possible precisely so we could bring all those different streams of data and different teams together. I wanted to make sure we were in a situation where customers were not deploying us in one place and then forgetting the rest because it can’t afford it.

Pomel also gives an interesting insight into how the company decided on its pricing for the company's customers:

We looked at the overall share, what it would get, how much they would pay for their infrastructure, we decided which fraction of that we thought they could afford for us , then we divided that by the salary and infrastructure so we could actually get a price that scales.

Now the most important thing about pricing as we’ve been scaling it – and customers send us more and more data – is to make sure that customers have the control and they can align what they pay with the value of what they get.

This customer-centricity of the pricing model is an important point of differentiation.

The Earnings: What I Pay Attention To

Datadog is to report its earnings on Thursday. Very important to me is revenue growth. The consensus estimate for revenue is $381.28M, up 63.25% YoY. But Datadog has beaten the consensus in every single quarter since it became a public company.

Datadog revenue beats

Seeking Alpha Premium

The consensus for EPS (on an adjusted base) stands at $0.15 but in the previous quarter, Datadog blew away the estimates too. The consensus was $0.13 but the company brought in $0.24.

When you look at free-cash flow margins, you see that Datadog is very profitable. This is revenue and free cash flow.

Chart
DDOG Free Cash Flow data by YCharts

$335.95M on total revenue of $1.193B means there is an FCF margin of 28%. But that still improves. In the previous quarter, Q1 2022, the company had an FCF margin of almost 36%, very impressive. Especially if you look at how little the company invests in sales, compared to other high-growth companies. And SG&A (sales, general and administrative costs) continues to go down as a percentage of revenue, despite the very high revenue growth of what could be 70%.

Datadog SG&A going down

Seeking Alpha Premium

Of course, with a forward PS of 20 and a forward PE of 134, the stock is not cheap. But if you are a long-term investor, and for me that means at least three years, preferably longer, I think Datadog is a very exciting stock to own and well worth the premium, especially if you look at the high free cash flow. Let's see if the company keeps executing when it announces its the earnings on Thursday.

Some of you might wonder if they should buy before earnings. I'm not a market timer but I invest for the long term. Every two weeks, I add money to my portfolio and I often scale into positions over years. So, investing for me is a constant process, not a point in time. For me, the best situation is that Datadog has great earnings but the stock drops anyway for a small detail that doesn't really matter. In that case, I would definitely add a bit more than usual.

In the meantime, keep growing!

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 08:51:00 -0500 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4528355-datadog-what-you-need-to-know-before-the-earnings-on-thursday
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