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Killexams : IBM BigInsights exam success - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/000-N38 Search results Killexams : IBM BigInsights exam success - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/000-N38 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : 3 Simple Changes Can Jumpstart Your Success, Says Former IBM VP Who Led a Billion-Dollar Team No result found, try new keyword!But time is not our most precious resource--attention is, according to Shelmina Abji, a former IBM vice president who ... "What differentiates our success is how we allocate our attention." ... Fri, 07 Oct 2022 22:32:00 -0500 text/html https://www.inc.com/minda-zetlin/career-success-tips-shelmina-abji-ibm.html Killexams : IBM’s former CEO downplays the importance of a college degree for six-figure earning ‘new collar’ jobs that now make up half of its workers

A four-year bachelor’s degree has long been the first rung to climbing America’s corporate ladder.

But the move to prioritize skills over a college education is sweeping through some of America’s largest companies, including Google, EY, Microsoft, and Apple. Strong proponents say the shift helps circumvent a needless barrier to workplace diversity.

“I really do believe an inclusive diverse workforce is better for your company, it’s good for the business,” Ginni Rometty, former IBM CEO, told Fortune Media CEO Alan Murray during a panel last month for Connect, Fortune’s executive education community. “That’s not just altruistic.”

Under Rometty’s leadership in 2016, tech giant IBM coined the term “new collar jobs” in reference to roles that require a specific set of skills rather than a four-year degree. It’s a personal commitment for Rometty, one that hits close to home for the 40-year IBM veteran.

When Rometty was 16, her father left the family, leaving her mother, who’d never worked outside the home, suddenly in the position to provide.

“She had four children and nothing past high school, and she had to get a job to…get us out of this downward spiral,” Rometty recalled to Murray. “What I saw in that was that my mother had aptitude; she wasn’t dumb, she just didn’t have access, and that forever stayed in my mind.”

When Rometty became CEO in 2012 following the Great Recession, the U.S. unemployment rate hovered around 8%. Despite the influx of applicants, she struggled to find employees who were trained in the particular cybersecurity area she was looking for.

“I realized I couldn’t hire them, so I had to start building them,” she said.

In 2011, IBM launched a corporate social responsibility effort called the Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) in Brooklyn. It’s since expanded to 11 states in the U.S. and 28 countries.

Through P-TECH, Rometty visited “a very poor high school in a bad neighborhood” that received the company’s support, as well as a community college where IBM was offering help with a technology-based curriculum and internships.

“Voilà! These kids could do the work. I didn’t have [applicants with] college degrees, so I learned that propensity to learn is way more important than just having a degree,” Rometty said.

Realizing the students were fully capable of the tasks that IBM needed moved Rometty to return to the drawing board when it came to IBM’s own application process and whom it was reaching. She said that at the time, 95% of job openings at IBM required a four-year degree. As of January 2021, less than half do, and the company is continuously reevaluating its roles.

For the jobs that now no longer require degrees and instead rely on skills and willingness to learn, IBM had always hired Ph.D. holders from the very best Ivy League schools, Rometty told Murray. But data shows that the degree-less hires for the same jobs performed just as well. “They were more loyal, higher retention, and many went on to get college degrees,” she said.

Rometty has since become cochair of OneTen, a civic organization committed to hiring, promoting, and advancing 1 million Black individuals without four-year degrees within the next 10 years.

If college degrees no longer become compulsory for white-collar jobs, many other qualifications—skills that couldn’t be easily taught in a boot camp, apprenticeship program, or in the first month on the job—could die off, too, University of Virginia Darden School of Business professor Sean Martin told Fortune last year.

“The companies themselves miss out on people that research suggests…might be less entitled, more culturally savvy, more desirous of being there,” Martin said. Rather than pedigree, he added, hiring managers should look for motivation.

That’s certainly the case at IBM. Once the company widened its scope, Rometty said, the propensity to learn quickly became more of an important hiring factor than just a degree.

This story was originally featured on Fortune.com

More from Fortune:

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Managing Gen Z is like working with people ‘from a different country’

The Renault Nissan empire once held together by fugitive Carlos Ghosn may slowly be unraveling

PayPal tells users it will fine them $2,500 for misinformation, then backtracks immediately

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 06:27:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/ibm-former-ceo-downplays-importance-165139880.html
Killexams : IBM Expands Partner Access To Training Resources

Channel programs News

Wade Tyler Millward

“We can‘t be essential unless our partners are skilled in our products and confident in going to their clients with our products and selling them with us and for IBM,” IBM channel chief Kate Woolley said.

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IBM has started giving registered members of its PartnerWorld program access to the training, badges and enablement IBM sales employees get along with a new learning hub for accessing materials.

The expansion is part of the Armonk, N.Y.-based tech giant’s investment in its partner program, IBM channel chief Kate Woolley told CRN in an interview.

“We can‘t be essential unless our partners are skilled in our products and confident in going to their clients with our products and selling them with us and for IBM,” said Woolley (pictured), general manager of the IBM ecosystem.

[RELATED: Channel Chief Kate Woolley: ‘No Better Time To Be An IBM Partner’]

Partners now have access to sales and technical badges showing industry expertise, according to a blog post Tuesday. Badges are shareable on LinkedIn and other professional social platforms. IBM sales representatives and partners will receive new content at the same time as it becomes available.

“This is the next step in that journey in terms of making sure that all of our registered partners have access to all of the same training, all of the same enablement materials as IBMers,” Woolley told CRN. “That’s the big message that we want people to hear. And then also in line with continuing to make it easier to do business with IBM, this has all been done through a much improved digital experience in terms of how our partners are able to access and consume.”

Among the materials available to IBM partners are scripts for sales demonstrations, templates for sales presentations and positioning offerings compared to competitors, white papers, analyst reports and solution briefs. Skilling and enablement materials are available through a new learning hub IBM has launched.

“The partners are telling us they want more expertise on their teams in terms of the IBM products that they‘re able to sell and how equipped they are to sell them,” Woolley said. “And as we look at what we’re hearing from clients as well, clients want that. … Our clients are saying, ‘We want more technical expertise. We want more experiential selling. We want IBM’ – and that means the IBM ecosystem as well – ‘to have all of that expertise and to have access to all the right enablement material to be able to engage with us as clients.’”

The company has doubled the number of brand-specialized partner sellers in the ecosystem and increased the number of technical partner sellers by more than 35 percent, according to IBM.

The company’s recent program changes have led to improved deal registration and introduced to partners more than 7,000 potential deals valued at more than $500 million globally, according to IBM. Those numbers are based on IBM sales data from January 2022 to August.

Along with the expanded access to training and enablement resources, Woolley told CRN that another example of aligning the IBM sales force and partners was a single sales kickoff event for employees and partners. A year ago, two separate events were held.

“I want our partners to continue to feel and see this as a big investment in them and representative of how focused we are on the ecosystem and how invested we are,” she said.

Wade Tyler Millward

Wade Tyler Millward is an associate editor covering cloud computing and the channel partner programs of Microsoft, IBM, Red Hat, Oracle, Salesforce, Citrix and other cloud vendors. He can be reached at wmillward@thechannelcompany.com.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:15:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/channel-programs/ibm-expands-partner-access-to-training-resources
Killexams : 3 Reasons IBM Is a Surprisingly Strong Buy

There's no denying it: This year's been a pretty lousy one for the market. The S&P 500 (^GSPC 2.65%) is down 23% year to date, and is sitting within easy reach of a new 52-week low. Blame the rout suffered by several key technology stocks, mostly, paving the way for most other equities.

There's a curious exception to this market-wide and tech sector weakness that's worth noting. IBM (IBM 1.23%) is holding up surprisingly well in the otherwise miserable environment. And it's arguably doing so for all the right reasons despite the specter of a recession. Here are the top three reasons.

1. Diversified business lines that are perpetually in demand

If the economy sours enough, it will take a toll on all businesses, with corporations being forced into extreme austerity. That's a worst-case scenario that doesn't seem a likely threat to IBM, though.

The company might not be positioned for significant growth, but it is positioned to generate revenue in almost any economic environment. Around one-third of its revenue stems from consulting work, while more than one-third comes from software sales. 

These aren't your typical consulting and software businesses, however. Much of it is contractual, meaning its client companies have pre-arranged access to employees or software for a specified period of time. Its annualized recurring software revenue, for example, now stands at $12.9 billion, making up roughly half of its current yearly software sales. Moreover, its software includes cybersecurity, data analysis, artificial intelligence, hybrid cloud computing, and transaction processing. These are service-based software suites that most of its customers rely on in a big way.

The kicker: CFO James Kavanaugh said a couple of years ago, "[For every $1 worth of business on a hybrid cloud platform], another $3 to $5 is
spent on software and another $6 to $8 on the cloud services." In other words, sales of hardware drive long-term software and consulting revenue, yet IBM's unique software and consulting offerings also drive hardware sales. It's a self-powering virtuous cycle.

IBM's solutions aren't something major enterprises can easily replace or simply stop using. In fact, the company argues that technology becomes an even more important growth driver when stagflation stifles traditional growth efforts.

2. IBM is making smart business-building acquisitions

Many companies make acquisitions to increase their revenue without much thought about where or how they fit in. But IBM's deals are made with purpose rather than rooted in status and stature. For instance, in July, the company announced its purchase of Databand.ai, adding the ability to spot errant digital data to the company's data-management arm. Earlier this year, it bought Neudesic, which operates a hybrid cloud consulting business specializing in Microsoft's Azure cloud platform.

None of the six deals the company has made this year have been particularly high-profile acquisitions. Neither have any of the other 20-plus acquisitions CEO Arvind Krishna has directed since taking the helm from Ginni Rometty in early 2020. IBM hasn't made any large-scale deals since buying Red Hat in 2019, in fact. But the smaller companies it's scooping up make its products more marketable.

While the recent acquisitions have been relatively small, analysts at Evercore ISI (EVR 1.29%) suggest IBM could be mulling an acquisition worth as much as $30 billion, potentially pushing the company into an all-new line of business that creates synergy with its existing ones.

3. A little something is better than a lot of nothing

Lastly, IBM might never dish out enormous organic growth again, but it offers something even more valuable to investors amid economic weakness: a healthy dividend. It currently yields 5.2%, and given the consistent recurring revenue of much of its business as well as how well its payouts are covered, there's no reason to fear this dividend is in jeopardy.

Investors in tune with the company's fiscals might not completely agree. Last fiscal year, IBM dished out $6.55 per share in dividends, but the company only earned $6.41 per share. That's clearly not sustainable.

But it was a year complicated by COVID-19 and more corporate restructuring. In November, IBM completed the spinoff of its managed infrastructure business now called Kyndryl (KD 5.59%). While spinoffs don't technically incur direct operational costs, they can often take an indirect toll on a company's focus and ability to adapt to changing market conditions. IBM hasn't exactly escaped inflationary pressures and the fallout from broken supply chains, either.

Regardless, the company's bottom line is growing again. Analysts collectively expect per-share earnings of $9.34 this year, followed by an improvement to $10.05 next year. That's far more than enough to continue funding the dividend and extend its 27-year streak of annual dividend growth.

Dividends may not be your thing. Amid economic uncertainty, though, collecting good income becomes a pretty big deal.

Wed, 28 Sep 2022 18:03:00 -0500 James Brumley en text/html https://www.fool.com/investing/2022/09/29/3-reasons-ibm-is-a-surprisingly-strong-buy/
Killexams : See Which Of The Latest 13F Filers Holds IBM No result found, try new keyword!In terms of shares owned, we count 6 of the above funds having increased existing IBM positions from 06/30/2022 to 09/30/2022, with 2 having decreased their positions. Looking beyond these ... Thu, 13 Oct 2022 02:26:00 -0500 text/html https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/see-which-of-the-latest-13f-filers-holds-ibm-1 Killexams : IBM Research Secures Future Safe From Quantum Attacks

Quantum computing will bring unimagined innovations to the world when it finally arrives in full glory. Still, quantum remains in the research labs at companies like IBM, Google, and Microsoft. While companies and research institutions are investing billions of dollars to increase the capacity of quantum systems, a time will come in the following years, or decades, when researchers will reach "quantum supremacy." But these large quantum marvels could also jeopardize the security of critical information systems. Researchers, including IBM are working to develop new security algorithms that will be resilient to these attacks.

The Quantum Threat to Security

While quantum can solve computing challenges far beyond what is possible today, its ability to find the factors of large prime numbers makes it the ideal cybersecurity safe cracker once quantum computing systems mature in their scale, quality, and speed. Every computer system and every bit of "secure" data could become vulnerable to attack from quantum-equipped nefarious actors. The World Economic Forum "estimate(s) that over 20 billion digital devices will need to be either upgraded or replaced in the next 10-20 years to use the new forms of quantum-resistant encrypted communication. We recommend that organizations start planning for this now.

What constitutes "adequate size" might supply us some false comfort: a 2019 study suggested that a computer with 20 million qubits would take eight hours to break modern encryption. Today's quantum computers are on the order of only 100 qubits. But while that implies that the threat is in the distant future, one must consider that a bad actor doesn't need to wait for the massive quantum system to materialize. The "Steal now, crack later" approach leads to a latent future security threat. Consequently, organizations should deploy quantum-safe security as soon as possible to minimize future risk.

Stopping Quantum Attacks Before They Begin

Consequently, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a bureau of the U.S. Department of Commerce, has been conducting an ongoing search for quantum-safe security algorithms that are both secure and efficient. After all, we need our laptops, cars, and mobile phones to also be able to resist attacks from quantum-equipped bad actors. After four rounds of submissions, NIST selected four algorithms from a slate of 82 candidates. IBM Research had submitted 3 of the four chosen algorithms. All submissions have been subjected to research by industry scrutiny by government agencies, academic scientists, and mathematicians. This process is now reaching its conclusion; the NIST is expected to publish standards based on these 4 algorithms sometime in 2024.

The NIST contest covers the two aspects of security that could be vulnerable to quantum computing: public key encapsulation (used for public-key encryption and key establishment) and digital signatures (used for identity authentication and non-repudiation). For the former, NIST selected the CRYSTALS-Kyber algorithm. NIST selected three algorithms for signatures: CRYSTALS-Dilithium, FALCON, and SPHINCS+, with CRYSTALS-Dilithium as the primary algorithm in the signature category.

The Telco Industry Steps Up to Address Quantum Safe

On September 29, GSMA announced the formation of the GSMA Post-Quantum Telco Network Taskforce, of which IBM and Vodafone are initial members, to help define policy, regulation and operator business processes to enhance protections of telecommunications in a future of advanced quantum computing. Since virtually all organizations and sectors conduct commerce on the internet, and the 800 providers whose pipes that carry all the internet traffic, the Telco industry is a good place to start. We expect other sectors to follow suit, perhaps starting with banking, government, and health care.

IBM Adds Quantum-Safe Security to the IBM z16

Given the magnitude of the potential risks, and the predominance of IBM Z systems in security-critical applications, IBM has included future-proof digital signature support in its latest z16 mainframe using CRYSTALS-Kyber and CRYSTALS -Dilithium algorithms selected by NIST. z16 implements this algorithm across multiple layers of firmware to help protect business-critical infrastructure and data from future quantum attacks. IBM has said it is also working to bring these new methods to the broader market.

In addition, IBM has developed a multi-step process to assist clients toward rapidly making institutions quantum safe. The company works with clients to identify where they are vulnerable to quantum-based cryptography attacks, assess cryptographic maturity and dependencies, and identify near-term achievable cryptographic goals and projects. The risks clients may face vary substantially based on the type of applications and data an organization handles and the state of its current cryptography.

Conclusions

Quantum computing's potential threat to global information security may seem to be a distant and abstract risk. However, the inevitable advances of quantum technology and the "Steal now, crack later" approach bad actors are undertaking to make quantum-safe a genuine and pressing matter for vendors and IT organizations. IBM wasted no time bringing that technology to market in the IBM z16. IBM Research has contributed three of the four algorithms the NIST quantum-safe contest has selected to be the most viable, secure, and efficient of the 70 techniques evaluated.

Beyond the NIST-approved algorithms, IBM Is working to provide “crypto agility”, helping organizations not only replace the soon-to-fail existing algorithms but also transform their security practices to remain resilient as new threats emerge in the post-quantum world. Creating crypto observability, enabling ongoing monitoring and actions on crypto-related security items, will help keep the world safer from bad actors with virtually unlimited computing capacity at their disposal.

More information can be found at here.

Disclosures: This article expresses the opinions of the authors, and is not to be taken as advice to purchase from nor invest in the companies mentioned. Cambrian AI Research is fortunate to have many, if not most, semiconductor firms as our clients, including Blaize, Cerebras, D-Matrix, Esperanto, FuriosaAI, Graphcore, GML, IBM, Intel, Mythic, NVIDIA, Qualcomm Technologies, Si-Five, SiMa.ai, Synopsys, and Tenstorrent. We have no investment positions in any of the companies mentioned in this article and do not plan to initiate any in the near future. For more information, please visit our website at https://cambrian-AI.com.

Thu, 29 Sep 2022 06:16:00 -0500 Karl Freund en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/karlfreund/2022/09/29/ibm-research-prepares-for-a-world-safe-from-quantum-attacks/
Killexams : Better Dividend Stock: AT&T vs. IBM

AT&T (T 2.13%) and IBM (IBM 1.23%) both underwent dramatic transformations over the past year. AT&T divested DirecTV, merged WarnerMedia with Discovery to create Warner Bros. Discovery (WBD -0.89%) , and sold many of its non-core assets to prioritize the growth of its core telecom business. IBM spun off its sluggish managed IT services unit as Kyndryl (KD 5.59%) and focused on expanding its higher-growth hybrid cloud and AI services instead.

Both companies billed those transformations as fresh beginnings for their aging, cluttered, and slow-growth businesses. However, IBM's stock has only risen 5% since it closed its spin-off of Kyndryl last November. AT&T's stock has declined about 15% since it spun off its WBD shares this April. 

A person holds a large piggy bank.

Image source: Getty Images.

Those post-spinoff returns were disappointing, but AT&T and IBM both trade at dirt-cheap valuations and pay high dividends. Could those strengths make them compelling bear market buys as rising rates rattle the markets?

AT&T faces near-term headwinds

AT&T expects its total revenue to rise by the low-single digits this year. Within that total, its expects its wireless service revenue (which accounted for 51% of its top line last quarter) to increase 4%-5%.

That's significantly lower than Verizon's (VZ 2.20%) projected growth of 8.5%-9.5% in wireless service revenue this year. Verizon also ranks first in the domestic wireless market in terms of total subscribers, followed by T-Mobile and then AT&T. It's generally a red flag when the underdog is growing at a slower clip than the market leader. However, AT&T still expects its broadband revenue -- which includes its Fiber segment -- to grow more than 6% for the full year.

Those two core businesses look stable, but AT&T's total operating and adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) margins both declined year-over-year last quarter as it ramped up the expansion of its 5G networks and recognized a higher mix of revenue from its lower-margin business wireline division.

AT&T also reduced its full-year FCF (free cash flow) guidance from $16 billion to $14 billion, citing higher-than-expected capex, elevated investments to gain new subscribers, and delayed customer payments as the top challenges. However, that FCF can still easily cover its planned dividend payments of $8 billion this year. AT&T also maintained its full-year forecast for 0%-2% adjusted earnings per share (EPS) growth.

IBM faces similar challenges

After spinning off Kyndryl last year, IBM claimed it could generate mid-single-digit annual sales growth and $35 billion in FCF over the following three years. To accomplish that, it predicted its high-single-digit growth in consulting revenue and its mid-single-digit growth in software revenue would offset the flat growth of its infrastructure unit.

Analysts expect IBM's revenue to rise nearly 5% this year. That stable growth should mainly driven by Red Hat, the open source software developer it acquired in 2019, and its other cloud-based services.

Instead of going head-to-head against Amazon, Microsoft, and Alphabet's Google in the crowded public cloud infrastructure market, IBM believes it can carve out a niche in "hybrid" cloud services, which link private on-site clouds to public cloud platforms. It also plans to help companies analyze all of that data with open source AI services.

That plan seems sound, but IBM's consulting and infrastructure gross margins still declined year-over-year in the first half of the year as it grappled with higher labor and component costs. It also slightly reduced its full-year FCF forecast from $10.0-$10.5 billion to $10 billion in the second quarter. That should still easily cover its estimated dividend payments of $6 billion this year. Analysts expect its adjusted EPS to increase 18% for the full year.

The valuations and verdict

AT&T trades at just seven times forward earnings and pays a forward dividend yield of 6.7%. IBM trades at a higher forward price-to-earnings ratio of 13, while paying a lower forward yield of 5.2%.

AT&T's stock might seem cheaper, but it's also growing at a slower rate than IBM. AT&T's margins could also continue to decline as it faces tough direct competition from Verizon and T-Mobile in the crowded wireless market. IBM's focus on the smaller hybrid cloud niche could help it avoid comparable clashes with Amazon, Microsoft, and Google.

I'm not a big fan of either stock right now, but IBM clearly seems like a more well-balanced dividend play than AT&T. Meanwhile, AT&T won't impress the bulls again until it generates stronger FCF and earnings growth again.

 

Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Leo Sun has positions in AT&T, Alphabet (A shares), Amazon, and Warner Bros. Discovery, Inc. The Motley Fool has positions in and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, and Microsoft. The Motley Fool recommends T-Mobile US, Verizon Communications, and Warner Bros. Discovery, Inc. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Sat, 24 Sep 2022 15:16:00 -0500 Leo Sun en text/html https://www.fool.com/investing/2022/09/24/better-dividend-stock-att-vs-ibm/
Killexams : IBM set to buy Dialexa, adding to list of more than 25 acquisitions since April 2020

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK – In a move to enhance its hybrid cloud and AI capabilities, IBM will buy the digital product engineering consulting services firm Dialexa in a deal that will close later this year.

IBM announced the deal in a statement, which also notes that the purchase of the firm will “deepen IBM’s product engineering expertise and provide end-to-end digital transformation services for clients.”

When the deal closes, Dialexa will become the sixth company bought by IBM in 2022.

But Big Blue has been on a buying frenzy since April 2020, when Arvind Krishna became the company’s CEO.  According to the company, IBM has acquired more than 25 other firms, with 13 to bolster IBM Consulting.

The latest acquisition of Dialexa points toward how IBM may grow its consulting services presence.

“In this digital era, clients are looking for the right mix of high-quality products to build new revenue streams and Strengthen topline growth,” said John Granger, senior vice president, IBM Consulting, in a statement. “Dialexa’s product engineering expertise, combined with IBM’s hybrid cloud and business transformation offerings, will help our clients turn concepts into differentiated product portfolios that accelerate growth.”

The company’s 300 employees are based in Dallas and in Chicago, and will join IBM Consulting, according to the statement.  Among the firm’s clients is Toyota Motor North America, which will invest $2.5 billion in North Carolina to build the company’s first U.S. electric battery manufacturing plant in Randolph County.

Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://wraltechwire.com/2022/09/23/ibm-set-to-buy-dialexa-adding-to-list-of-more-than-25-acquisitions-since-april-2020/
Killexams : IBM Teams With 20 Historically Black Colleges and Universities to Address Cybersecurity Talent Shortage

HBCUs will work with IBM to establish Cybersecurity Leadership Centers, giving students and faculty access to IBM training, software, and certifications at no cost.

WASHINGTON, Sept. 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- During the National HBCU Week Conference convened by the U.S. Department of Education and the White House, IBM (NYSE: IBM) announced its collaboration with 20 Historically Black College and Universities (HBCUs) to help them establish Cybersecurity Leadership Centers.

IBM Corporation logo. (PRNewsfoto/IBM)

With 500,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in the U.S., the need for expertise is critical: According to a recent IBM Security study, insufficiently staffed organizations average $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.**

"Collaborations between academia and the private sector can help students prepare for success. That's especially true for HBCUs because their mission is so vital," said Justina Nixon-Saintil, Vice President, IBM Corporate Social Responsibility and ESG. "The Cybersecurity Leadership Centers we're co-creating with Historically Black College and Universities epitomize our commitment to the Black community and STEM education; it also builds on our pledge to train 150,000 people in cybersecurity over three years."

IBM will collaborate with the following 20 HBCUs across 11 states to co-create Cybersecurity Leadership Centers, helping to create talent for employers and opportunities for students. (Six of these collaborations were previously announced in May*)

  • AlabamaAlabama A&M University, Talladega College, Tuskegee University
  • Florida– Edward Waters University, Florida A&M University
  • GeorgiaAlbany State University, Clark Atlanta University*
  • LouisianaGrambling State University, Southern University System*, Xavier University of LA*
  • MarylandBowie State University, Morgan State University*
  • MississippiAlcorn State University
  • North CarolinaNorth Carolina A&T State University*, North Carolina Central University
  • South Carolina South Carolina State University*, Voorhees University
  • TexasTexas Southern University
  • VirginiaNorfolk State University
  • West Virginia– West Virginia State University

Through IBM's collaboration, faculty and students at participating schools will have access to coursework, lectures, immersive training experiences, certifications, IBM Cloud-hosted software, and professional development resources, all at no cost to them. This includes access to:

  • Cybersecurity curricula: IBM will develop for each participating HBCU, a customized IBM Security Learning Academy portal – an IBM client offering – including courses designed to help the university enhance its cybersecurity education portfolio. In addition, IBM will continue to supply access to IBM SkillsBuild.
  • Immersive learning experience: Faculty and students of participating HBCUs will have an opportunity to benefit from IBM Security's Command Center, through which they can experience a highly realistic, simulated cyberattack, designed to prepare them and train them on response techniques. Moreover, HBCUs' faculty will have access to consultation sessions with IBM technical personnel on cybersecurity.
  • Software: Multiple IBM Security premier enterprise security products hosted in the IBM  Cloud
  • Professional development: Forums to exchange best practices, learn from IBM experts, and discover IBM internships and job openings

About IBM Education

As part of the company's Corporate Social Responsibility efforts, IBM's education portfolio takes a personalized, diverse, and deep approach to STEM career readiness. IBM's pro bono programs range from education and support for teens at public schools and universities, to career readiness resources for aspiring professionals and job seekers. IBM believes that education is best achieved through the collaboration of the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors.

IBM SkillsBuild is a free education program focused on underrepresented communities, that helps adult learners, and high school and university students and faculty, develop valuable new skills and access career opportunities. The program includes an online platform that is complemented by customized practical learning experiences delivered in collaboration with a global network of partners. The online platform offers over 1,000 courses in 19 languages on cybersecurity, data analysis, cloud computing and many other technical disciplines — as well as in workplace skills such as Design Thinking. Most important, participants can earn IBM-branded digital credentials that are recognized by the market. The customized practical learning experiences could include project-based learning, expert conversations with IBM volunteers, mentors, premium content, specialized support, connection with career opportunities, access to IBM software, among others. As of February 2022, IBM SkillsBuild operates in 159 counties and is supporting 1.72M learners since its launch.

About IBM Security

IBM Security offers one of the most advanced and integrated portfolios of enterprise security products and services. The portfolio, supported by world-renowned IBM Security X-Force® research, enables organizations to effectively manage risk and defend against emerging threats. IBM operates one of the world's broadest security research, development, and delivery organizations, monitors 150 billion+ security events per day in more than 130 countries, and has been granted more than 10,000 security patents worldwide. For more information, please check www.ibm.com/security, follow @IBMSecurity on Twitter or visit the IBM Security Intelligence blog.

Announced in May 2022
** Cost of a Data Breach Report 2022, conducted by Ponemon Institute, sponsored & analyzed by IBM

Media Contact:

Ari Fishkind
IBM Media Relations
fishkind@us.ibm.com

 

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SOURCE IBM

Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/ibm-teams-with-20-historically-black-colleges-and-universities-to-address-cybersecurity-talent-shortage-1031756319
Killexams : IBM gives its Linux mainframe a major update null © IBM null

IBM has announced the latest version of its Linux-focused mainframe - the LinuxOne Emperor 4 as the company leads with promises of reduced energy consumption and increased sustainability.

While the z16 mainframe, which was announced by the company in April 2022, is optimized for IBM’s z/OS operating system, the LinuxOne Emperor 4 is designed to support Linux operating systems in a bid to obtain a significant portion of the Linux market.

Big Blue’s latest mainframe supports 32 Telum processors and can provide up to 40TB of RAIM. The Emperor 4 also provides “seven nines” of availability, which should translate to three seconds of downtime per year.

Mainframes for Linux distros are increasingly popular among financial services organizations, with Citibank being a user of IBM’s LinuxOne mainframes, combined with the MongoDB database

With its latest iteration, it’s clear that IBM’s focus is on increasing environmental pressures. In a release, it claims that the Emperor 4 “can reduce energy consumption by 75%, space by 50%, and the CO2e footprint by over 850 metric tons annually.”

This expression of commitment towards creating more sustainable products goes hand-in-hand with IBM’s own research which suggests that around half of the CEOs that took part saw sustainability as their highest priority, and indeed one of their greatest challenges.

The integration of artificial intelligence inference should also serve to Strengthen latency.

Availability for the IBM LinuxOne Emperor 4 is scheduled for September 14, 2022, with entry- and mid-range models set to follow in the first half of 2023.

Via VentureBeat

Tue, 13 Sep 2022 03:17:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/ibm-gives-its-linux-mainframe-a-major-update/ar-AA11Mme9
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