000-N35 Study Guide and braindumps VCE are perfect for busy people

killexams.com served newest and 2022 updated 000-N35 braindumps with braindumps and Actual Questions for new topics of IBM 000-N35 Exam. Practice our actual Questions and Answers to Improve your knowledge and pass your exam with High scores. We ensure your success in the Test Center, covering all the topics of exam and build your Knowledge of the 000-N35 exam. Pass4sure with our correct questions.

Exam Code: 000-N35 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
P2170-035 - IBM i2 Analyst Notebook Support Mastery Test v1
IBM approach
Killexams : IBM approach - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=IBM+approach&cc=us&format=RSS Search results Killexams : IBM approach - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=IBM+approach&cc=us&format=RSS https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : IBM: exact Earnings Are Not A Sign Of Fundamental Change
Entrance of modern office tower at City of Zürich.

Michael Derrer Fuchs

In the past few months International Business Machines (NYSE:IBM) has turned into one of the best performing tech names. Since I first covered the company in January of 2021 IBM returned 17%, compared to merely 8% for the broader equity market.

IBM total return Chart
Data by YCharts

During this timeframe the spin-off of Kyndryl (KD) was completed and now that the underperforming assets have been unloaded, expectations around the 'New IBM' are running high. Unfortunately, however, the strong share price performance since November of last year has little to do with IBM's fundamentals.

As we see in the graph below, the iShares Edge MSCI USA Momentum Factor ETF (MTUM) peaked also in November of last year and since then the gap with the iShares Edge MSCI USA Value Factor ETF (VLUE) has been expanding.

MTUM vs VLUE price
Data by YCharts

As expectations of monetary tightening begun to surface and inflationary pressures intensified, high duration and momentum stocks begun to underperform the lower duration value companies. I talked about this dynamic in my exact analysis called 'The Cloud Space In Numbers: What Matters The Most', where I showed why the high-growth names were at risk. More specifically, I distinguished between the companies in the bottom left-hand corner and those in the upper right-hand corner in the graph below.

Revenue Growth (fwd) vs. P/E Non-GAAP (fwd) - November 2021

prepared by the author, using data from Seeking Alpha

As we see in the graph below, the high flyers, such as Workday (WDAY), Salesforce (CRM) and Adobe (ADBE), have become the worst performers, while companies like IBM and Oracle (ORCL) that were usually associated with low expected growth and low valuation multiples became the new stars.

IBM vs peers price
Data by YCharts

Although this was good news for value investors as a whole and is a trend that could easily continue, we should distinguish between strong business performance and market-wide forces. Having said that, IBM shareholders should not simply assume that the strong share price performance is a sign of strong execution. Needless to say, the Kyndryl disastrous performance of losing 75% of its value in a matter of months also lies on the shoulders of current management of IBM.

Kyndryl market cap
Data by YCharts

A Closer Look At IBM's exact Earnings

IBM's recently reported quarterly numbers once again disappointed and the management seems to have largely attributed the U.S. dollar movement to the slightly lower guidance.

IBM 2022 Outlook

IBM Earnings Release

Alongside the guidance gross margins also fell across the board, with the exception of the Financing division, which is relatively small to the other business units.

IBM Q2 2022 margins

IBM Q2 2022 Earnings Release

Rising labour and component costs were also to blame during the quarter and the management is addressing these through pricing actions which should take some time.

Although this is likely true, IBM is also reducing spend on research and development and selling, general and administrative functions. Such actions are usually taken as a precaution during downturns, however, consistent lower spend in those areas could often have grave consequences.

IBM fixed costs

prepared by the author, using data from annual and quarterly reports

Last but not least, the reported EPS numbers from continuing operations should also be adjusted as I have outlined before.

IBM Q2 2022 EPS

IBM Q2 2022 Earnings Release

I usually exclude the royalty income and all income/expenses grouped in the 'other' category. These expenses/income usually have little to do with IBM's ongoing business and as such I deem them to be irrelevant for long-term shareholders.

IBM Intellectual Property Income

IBM Annual Report 2021

IBM other income

IBM Annual Report 2021

On an adjusted basis, EPS increased from $1.08 in Q2 2021 to $1.33 in Q2 2022, which although is a notable increase remains low. Just as a back of the envelope calculation, if we annualize the last quarterly result, we end up with a total EPS number of $5.3 or a forward P/E ratio of almost 25x. Given all the difficulties facing IBM and its growth profile, this still appears as too high.

Has Anything Changed Following The exact Earnings?

As expected, IBM continued on its strategy to fuel its growth through a frenzy of acquisitions and divestitures. Following the Kyndryl spin-off, the company completed four deals in a matter of just few months.

IBM acquire Envizi

Seeking Alpha

IBM acquire Sentaca

Seeking Alpha

IBM acquire Randori

Seeking Alpha

IBM acquire Databand.ai

Seeking Alpha

As I have said before, all that does not bode well for the prospects of IBM's legacy businesses. Moreover, the management does not seem to be focused on organic growth numbers in their quarterly reviews which is even more worrisome.

Now that the underperforming assets have been off-loaded, IBM's dividend payments are still too high relative to its adjusted income.

IBM net income versus dividend

prepared by the author, using data from annual and quarterly reports

* adjusted for Intellectual property and custom development income, Other (income) and expense and Income/(loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax

As previously noted, this puts the company between a rock and a hard place. However, reducing or discontinuing the dividend could potentially result in an exodus of long-term shareholders.

We should also mention that IBM has been barely paying any taxes over exact years due to various tax credits (see below). This, however, is gradually changing and will likely provide yet another headwind on EPS numbers in the future.

IBM tax expense

prepared by the author, using data from annual and quarterly reports

Even though the narrative around IBM has been largely focused on its business turning around, the company's free cash flow per share continues to decline.

IBM free cash flow

prepared by the author, using data from annual and quarterly reports

Conclusion

A potential upside based on a successful turnaround story of IBM that is gravitating around the hybrid cloud is a major reason for many current and potential shareholders of IBM to hope for a light at the end of the tunnel. However, little seems to have changed at IBM following the spin-off of Kyndryl and a declining business also creates a significant moral hazard problem for management where more risk taking is incentivized. All that combined with the fact that IBM is doing M&A deals almost on a monthly basis, creates significant risks for long-term owners of the business.

Mon, 25 Jul 2022 02:53:00 -0500 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4525527-ibm-recent-earnings-not-sign-fundamental-change
Killexams : IBM report shows healthcare has a growing cybersecurity gap

Were you unable to attend Transform 2022? Check out all of the summit sessions in our on-demand library now! Watch here.


While enterprises are setting records in cybersecurity spending, the cost and severity of breaches continue to soar. IBM’s latest data breach report provides insights into why there’s a growing disconnect between enterprise spending on cybersecurity and record costs for data breaches. 

This year, 2022, is on pace to be a record-breaking year for enterprise breaches globally, with the average cost of a data breach reaching $4.35 million. That’s 12.7% higher than the average cost of a data breach in 2020, which was $3.86 million. It also found a record 83% of enterprises reporting more than one breach and that the average time to identify a breach is 277 days. As a result, enterprises need to look at their cybersecurity tech stacks to see where the gaps are and what can be improved.  

Enhanced security around privileged access credentials and identity management is an excellent first place to start. More enterprises need to define identities as their new security perimeter. IBM’s study found that 19% of all breaches begin with compromised privileged credentials. Breaches caused by compromised credentials lasted an average of 327 days. Privileged access credentials are also bestsellers on the Dark Web, with high demand for access to financial services’ IT infrastructure.  

The study also shows how dependent enterprises remain on implicit trust across their security and broader IT infrastructure tech stacks. The gaps in cloud security, identity and access management (IAM) and privileged access management (PAM) allow expensive breaches to happen. Seventy-nine percent of critical infrastructure organizations didn’t deploy a zero-trust architecture, when zero trust can reduce average breach losses by nearly $1 million. 

Enterprises need to treat implicit trust as the unlocked back door that allows cybercriminals access to their systems, credentials and most valuable confidential data to reduce the incidence of breaches. 

What enterprises can learn from IBM’s data on healthcare breaches 

The report quantifies how wide healthcare’s cybersecurity gap is growing. IBM’s report estimates the average cost of a healthcare data breach is now $10.1 million, a record and nearly $1 million over last year’s $9.23 million. Healthcare has had the highest average breach cost for twelve consecutive years, increasing 41.6% since 2020. 

The findings suggest that the skyrocketing cost of breaches adds inflationary fuel to the fire, as runaway prices are financially squeezing global consumers and companies. Sixty percent of organizations participating in IBM’s study say, they raised their product and service prices due to the breach, as supply chain disruptions, the war in Ukraine and tepid demand for products continue. Consumers are already struggling to meet healthcare costs, which will likely increase by 6.5% next year

The study also found that nearly 30% of breach costs are incurred 12 to 24 months after, translating into permanent price increases for consumers. 

“It is clear that cyberattacks are evolving into market stressors that are triggering chain reactions, [and] we see that these breaches are contributing to those inflationary pressures,” says John Hendley, head of strategy for IBM Security’s X-Force research team.  

Getting quick wins in encryption

For healthcare providers with limited cybersecurity budgets, prioritizing these three areas can reduce the cost of a breach while making progress toward zero-trust initiatives. Getting identity access management (IAM) right is core to a practical zero-trust framework, one that can quickly adapt and protect human and machine identities are essential. IBM’s study found that of the zero-trust components measured in the study, IAM is the most effective in reducing breach costs. Leading IAM includes Akamai, Fortinet, Ericom, Ivanti, Palo Alto Networks and others. Ericom’s ZTEdge platform is noteworthy for its combining ML-enabled identity and access management, zero-trust network access (ZTNA), microsegmentation and secure web gateway (SWG) with remote browser isolation (RBI) and Web Application Isolation.

VentureBeat's mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative enterprise technology and transact. Learn more about membership.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 16:20:00 -0500 Louis Columbus en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/2022/08/01/ibm-report-shows-healthcare-has-a-growing-cybersecurity-gap/
Killexams : IBM Report: Data Breach Costs Reach All-Time High

For the twelfth year in a row, healthcare saw the costliest breaches among all industries with the average cost reaching $10.1 million per breach.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — IBM (NYSE: IBM) Security released the annual Cost of a Data Breach Report, revealing costlier and higher-impact data breaches than ever before, with the global average cost of a data breach reaching an all-time high of $4.35 million for studied organizations. With breach costs increasing nearly 13% over the last two years of the report, the findings suggest these incidents may also be contributing to rising costs of goods and services. In fact, 60% of studied organizations raised their product or services prices due to the breach, when the cost of goods is already soaring worldwide amid inflation and supply chain issues.

The perpetuality of cyberattacks is also shedding light on the “haunting effect” data breaches are having on businesses, with the IBM report finding 83% of studied organizations have experienced more than one data breach in their lifetime. Another factor rising over time is the after-effects of breaches on these organizations, which linger long after they occur, as nearly 50% of breach costs are incurred more than a year after the breach.

The 2022 Cost of a Data Breach Report is based on in-depth analysis of real-world data breaches experienced by 550 organizations globally between March 2021 and March 2022. The research, which was sponsored and analyzed by IBM Security, was conducted by the Ponemon Institute.

Some of the key findings in the 2022 IBM report include:

  • Critical Infrastructure Lags in Zero Trust – Almost 80% of critical infrastructure organizations studied don’t adopt zero trust strategies, seeing average breach costs rise to $5.4 million – a $1.17 million increase compared to those that do. All while 28% of breaches amongst these organizations were ransomware or destructive attacks.
  • It Doesn’t Pay to Pay – Ransomware victims in the study that opted to pay threat actors’ ransom demands saw only $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the cost of the ransom. Factoring in the high cost of ransom payments, the financial toll may rise even higher, suggesting that simply paying the ransom may not be an effective strategy.
  • Security Immaturity in Clouds – Forty-three percent of studied organizations are in the early stages or have not started applying security practices across their cloud environments, observing over $660,000 on average in higher breach costs than studied organizations with mature security across their cloud environments.
  • Security AI and Automation Leads as Multi-Million Dollar Cost Saver – Participating organizations fully deploying security AI and automation incurred $3.05 million less on average in breach costs compared to studied organizations that have not deployed the technology – the biggest cost saver observed in the study.

“Businesses need to put their security defenses on the offense and beat attackers to the punch. It’s time to stop the adversary from achieving their objectives and start to minimize the impact of attacks. The more businesses try to perfect their perimeter instead of investing in detection and response, the more breaches can fuel cost of living increases.” said Charles Henderson, Global Head of IBM Security X-Force. “This report shows that the right strategies coupled with the right technologies can help make all the difference when businesses are attacked.”

Over-trusting Critical Infrastructure Organizations

Concerns over critical infrastructure targeting appear to be increasing globally over the past year, with many governments’ cybersecurity agencies urging vigilance against disruptive attacks. In fact, IBM’s report reveals that ransomware and destructive attacks represented 28% of breaches amongst critical infrastructure organizations studied, highlighting how threat actors are seeking to fracture the global supply chains that rely on these organizations. This includes financial services, industrial, transportation and healthcare companies amongst others.

Despite the call for caution, and a year after the Biden Administration issued a cybersecurity executive order that centers around the importance of adopting a zero trust approach to strengthen the nation’s cybersecurity, only 21% of critical infrastructure organizations studied adopt a zero trust security model, according to the report. Add to that, 17% of breaches at critical infrastructure organizations were caused due to a business partner being initially compromised, highlighting the security risks that over-trusting environments pose.

Businesses that Pay the Ransom Aren’t Getting a “Bargain”

According to the 2022 IBM report, businesses that paid threat actors’ ransom demands saw $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the ransom amount paid. However, when accounting for the average ransom payment, which according to Sophos reached $812,000 in 2021, businesses that opt to pay the ransom could net higher total costs – all while inadvertently funding future ransomware attacks with capital that could be allocated to remediation and recovery efforts and looking at potential federal offenses.

The persistence of ransomware, despite significant global efforts to impede it, is fueled by the industrialization of cybercrime. IBM Security X-Force discovered the duration of studied enterprise ransomware attacks shows a drop of 94% over the past three years – from over two months to just under four days. These exponentially shorter attack lifecycles can prompt higher impact attacks, as cybersecurity incident responders are left with very short windows of opportunity to detect and contain attacks. With “time to ransom” dropping to a matter of hours, it’s essential that businesses prioritize rigorous testing of incident response (IR) playbooks ahead of time. But the report states that as many as 37% of organizations studied that have incident response plans don’t test them regularly.

Hybrid Cloud Advantage

The report also showcased hybrid cloud environments as the most prevalent (45%) infrastructure amongst organizations studied. Averaging $3.8 million in breach costs, businesses that adopted a hybrid cloud model observed lower breach costs compared to businesses with a solely public or private cloud model, which experienced $5.02 million and $4.24 million on average respectively. In fact, hybrid cloud adopters studied were able to identify and contain data breaches 15 days faster on average than the global average of 277 days for participants.

The report highlights that 45% of studied breaches occurred in the cloud, emphasizing the importance of cloud security. However, a significant 43% of reporting organizations stated they are just in the early stages or have not started implementing security practices to protect their cloud environments, observing higher breach costs2. Businesses studied that did not implement security practices across their cloud environments required an average 108 more days to identify and contain a data breach than those consistently applying security practices across all their domains.

Additional findings in the 2022 IBM report include:

  • Phishing Becomes Costliest Breach Cause – While compromised credentials continued to reign as the most common cause of a breach (19%), phishing was the second (16%) and the costliest cause, leading to $4.91 million in average breach costs for responding organizations.
  • Healthcare Breach Costs Hit Double Digits for First Time Ever– For the 12th year in a row, healthcare participants saw the costliest breaches amongst industries with average breach costs in healthcare increasing by nearly $1 million to reach a record high of $10.1 million.
  • Insufficient Security Staffing – Sixty-two percent of studied organizations stated they are not sufficiently staffed to meet their security needs, averaging $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.

To get a copy of the 2022 Cost of a Data Breach Report, visit https://www.ibm.com/security/data-breach.

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 02:15:00 -0500 CS Staff en text/html https://www.campussafetymagazine.com/research/ibm-report-data-breach-costs-reach-all-time-high/
Killexams : The new CEO of Red Hat on his three-point master plan for capturing the hybrid cloud market and keeping close ties with parent company IBM
  • Matt Hicks, a 16-year Red Hat veteran, was named CEO of the open source firm last week.
  • Hicks shared with Insider his three-point plan for Red Hat to win the hybrid cloud market.
  • He will report to IBM CEO Arvind Krishna and is eyeing acquisitions in hybrid and edge computing.

Red Hat, the open source software company that IBM acquired for a record $34 billion in 2019, is gearing up to capture more of the hybrid cloud market with a new leader at its helm.

Matt Hicks, a 16-year Red Hat veteran who most recently led its products and technologies division, was appointed CEO last week. He takes over for Paul Cormier, who had been in the CEO seat for two years and will become chairman of Red Hat.

Red Hat has grown at a steady clip since it was bought by IBM as part of its ambition to become a leader in hybrid cloud, where customers use a combination of on-premises, physical data centers with cloud providers like Amazon Web Services for their IT infrastructure. 

It reported 17% growth in the second quarter earlier this week, and revenue from its flagship OpenShift software, which lets developers run code across multiple clouds and data centers, grew four and a half times from pre-acquisition, IBM said. Its software unit, which includes Red Hat, reported revenue of $6.2 billion.

The plan for Hicks and Cormier, who both now report to IBM CEO Arvind Krishna, is to continue what they consider a "close working relationship" with Krishna that hinges on maintaining Red Hat's independence and neutrality as a vendor that works openly with all the major cloud providers.

Some of that relationship has already paid off — IBM's sales force is selling Red Hat products, Cormier previously told Insider, boosting its reach.

Hicks, who has worked alongside Cormier for the past decade, said his plan for Red Hat's future isn't too different from his predecessor's, but will focus on three key areas.

"I'm in a pretty lucky position where I'm inheriting a phenomenal strategy, a core product strategy and team," Hicks told Insider. "And so my focus is on executing the opportunity that we have ahead of us."

First, the company is firmly targeting the hybrid cloud market. Echoing what parent company IBM has repeatedly called a trillion-dollar opportunity, Hicks said there's plenty more of that market up for grabs.

"Customers are starting to understand that the public clouds will specialize in innovation and they'll probably be using multiple, and their on-premise environments aren't going away," he said. "We think only a quarter of workloads have been moved so far."

Second, Hicks said Red Hat is investing more in running its OpenShift software for customers directly. The company last year unveiled managed cloud services, an offering where it can fully manage customers' IT operations in cloud providers like AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud.

"It's a new area for us to execute and prove that we can be relied on for running mission-critical workloads, not just supporting them when customers run them," Hicks said. "I think it has equal opportunity."

Lastly, Red Hat is pushing heavily into edge computing, the model where processing power is placed closer to where data is created in the physical world, such as devices. For Red Hat, that means helping customers use their hybrid cloud infrastructure in edge environments like manufacturing floors.

Hicks says the open source company is focusing on the telecom and automotive industries, because "we do have to pick and make sure we're focused where we can deliver the most value, realistically." That includes investing in 5G, the next-generation telecommunications network that will support edge computing.

And Cormier, who has been with Red Hat for over two decades, says he will advise Red Hat's largest customers on their cloud deployments. He will run a strategic advisory board dedicated to those clients, he told Insider, and keep an office at Red Hat headquarters.

Critically, Cormier says he'll continue having a "big voice" when it comes to the company's acquisition strategy. "The only difference in the M&A strategy is, Matt will be the one making the final decision," he said.

Both IBM at large and Red Hat, in particular, appear to be gearing up for acquisition sprees amid the market downturn: Krishna recently said Big Blue is looking at firms specializing in hybrid cloud and automation, and Hicks told Insider Red Hat is focused on edge computing and hybrid cloud opportunities.

"There are a lot of options there," Hicks said. "I think it will be an exciting space to watch."

Sun, 24 Jul 2022 23:45:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/new-red-hat-ceo-plan-to-win-hybrid-cloud-market-2022-7
Killexams : IBM Flash Storage and Cyber Resiliency

Flash storage has historically had a reputation for delivering large amounts of storage capacity and high performance in a relatively small package. But with the current threat landscape, it has become important to focus on the resilience of flash. 

IBM's 2021 Cost of a Data Breach Report found that the average cost of a customer data breach is more than four million dollars, and recovery from such an event can take days or even weeks. IBM is responding to the need for protection and rapid recovery from ransomware and other cyber threats by releasing new data resilience capabilities for its FlashSystem family of all-flash arrays.

Flash storage with the power of data protection

Even if your company has a robust security strategy, you still need to be prepared if and when an attack succeeds. IBM empowers organizations to recover from this eventuality by enhancing its FlashSystem storage with IBM Safeguarded Copy. 

Safeguarded Copy enables flash storage to play a role in recovery by automatically creating point-in-time snapshots on production storage on an administrator-defined schedule. Once snapshots have been created, they cannot be changed or deleted. These protections prevent malware and internal threats from tampering with backups.

With Safeguarded Copy, companies can recover from an attack quickly and completely. Safeguarded Copy snapshots reside on the same FlashSystem storage as operational data, which dramatically reduces recovery time when compared to tiered or offsite copy-based recovery solutions.

Rapid recovery with IBM FlashSystem Cyber Vault

IBM has also enhanced its FlashSystem storage with IBM FlashSystem Cyber Vault to enable it to quickly perform all three stages of the recovery process: detection, response and recovery. 

Cyber Vault runs continuously and monitors snapshots as Safeguarded Copy creates them and uses standard database tools and other software to ensure Safeguarded Copy snapshots haven't been compromised. If Cyber Vault finds the snapshots have been corrupted, it interprets that as a sign of an attack. Cyber Vault can reduce recovery time from days to hours by quickly determining which snapshots to use.

Flash storage designed for resiliency

IBM has added members to its FlashSystem family that are built to deliver on performance while also providing resilience: FlashSystem 9500 and 7300. 

The FlashSystem 9500 is IBM's flagship enterprise storage array, designed for environments that need the highest capability and resilience. It offers twice the performance, connectivity and capacity of its predecessor and 50 percent more cache. The 9500 also provides data resilience with numerous safeguards, including multi-factor authentication (MFA) and secure boot to help certain only IBM-authorized software runs on the system. Additionally, IBM's FlashCore Modules (FCMs) offer real-time hardware-based encryption and up to 7x increase in endurance compared to commodity SSDs.

The IBM FlashSystem 7300 offers about 25 percent better performance than the previous generation of FlashSystem storage. It has a smaller footprint than the 9500 but runs the same software and features, including 3:1 real-time compression and hardware encryption. The FlashSystem 7300 supports up to 2.2PB effective capacity per 2U control enclosure. 

The IBM FlashSystem family offers two- and three-site replication along with configuration options that can include an optional 100 percent data availability guarantee for business continuity.

Explore next-generation flash storage

The IBM FlashSystem family is continuously evolving with expanded capabilities around capacity, performance and data protection. 

WWT can help your company evaluate and choose the right flash storage solution to meet your needs. WWT is an IBM-designated global and regional systems integrator (SI) and solution provider, and we know how important data protection is for modern companies. We encourage your organization to take a holistic approach to data resilience.

Sun, 24 Jul 2022 17:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wwt.com/article/ibm-flash-storage-and-cyber-resiliency
Killexams : The Quantum Decade: Canada’s foresight is paying off, says IBM Canada

“Quantum computing is no longer a futuristic concept," says Frank Attaie, IBM Canada’s general manager, technology

Article content

For a country with a legacy of dominance in natural resource industries — forestry, mining, oil and gas and marine — it seems counterintuitive for it also to rank as a global leader in one of the most dynamic and complex computing technologies ever known, yet here we are.

Advertisement 2

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

Canada recognized early on that quantum computing presents a staggering amount of potential across all facets of society, including the economy, medicine, climate change, academics, research, manufacturing and so much more. In fact, Canada is ranked fifth in total quantum science expenditures and first among G7 nations in per-capita spending on quantum research. The country has invested more than $1 billion in quantum science over the past decade and is investing $360 million more to launch a National Quantum Strategy to bolster quantum research, advance quantum-ready technologies and attract business and talent.

Frank Attaie, IBM Canada’s general manager, technology, says that Canada’s foresight is paying off: “Quantum computing is no longer a futuristic concept. The world has entered into the Quantum Decade, an era when Canadian enterprises are beginning to see quantum computing’s business value.” Over the last year, there have been unprecedented advances in hardware, software development and services that validate the technology’s momentum, creating an ecosystem that paves the way for further breakthroughs and helps prepare the market for the adoption of this revolutionary technology.

Advertisement 3

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

In February, IBM announced — in partnership with the Government of Quebec — it will accelerate discovery in artificial intelligence, semiconductors, high-performance computing and quantum computing, including installation of the first IBM Quantum System One in Canada. What this could mean for science and research in the country is unprecedented, says Attaie.

“What we do know,” continued Attaie, “is that the quantum challenge is too big for any one entity. As quantum moves from the lab to the real world, ecosystems are forming to support collaborative innovation and open-source development.” Potential ecosystems likely include a quantum computing technology partner, quantum computing developers and academic partners.

Advertisement 4

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

A successful model of this is the membership of the Université de Sherbrooke in the IBM Quantum Network, a community of Fortune 500 companies, academic institutions, startups and national research labs working with IBM to advance quantum computing. Since the university joined the IBM Quantum Network as a Hub in 2020, other industry leaders such as Lockheed Martin Canada and CMC Microsystems have joined as Hub members. This is in addition to another 12 IBM Quantum Network start-ups and academic partners across the country, actively exploring quantum with our technology and scientists.  

Frank Attaie, IBM Canada’s general manager, technology. SUPPLIED
Frank Attaie, IBM Canada’s general manager, technology. SUPPLIED

The Quantum Decade needs a quantum workforce

“Innovation alone cannot unlock the full potential of quantum computing,” said Attaie. “We need the people and skills to do so.” Estimates indicate there are only about 3,000 skilled quantum workers in the market today, a base that needs to dramatically increase to exploit the full potential of quantum this decade and beyond. And while Canada’s foresight into the future of quantum has helped prime the sector with extraordinary levels of expertise, the growth of the industry will need much, much more, says Attaie.

Advertisement 5

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

“For Canada to be quantum ready, industry needs to engage critical constituencies, from domain experts to students, to enable quantum computing skills to blossom.” These include quantum developer certification, as well as bootcamp-like educational programs and investments in educator training that empower a diverse workforce.

The decade ahead — enterprises will see the payoff of quantum

While the power and capacity of quantum is clear, how the Quantum Decade will unfold is not. How will governments implement quantum computing as part of their economic growth strategies? What novel use cases will researchers uncover and put into play?

Attaie agrees there are many unknowns as to how the Quantum Decade will evolve but is confident its end will look nothing like the beginning. “We will be working with quantum processors with thousands of qubits, we will have a whole workforce with years of experience, and enterprises will have seen the payoff of quantum,” said Attaie. “Make no mistake, quantum computing is a whole new paradigm. Every technology leader should be actively building quantum into their plans so that they’re ready for its rapid evolution over the next decade.”

This story was provided by IBM Canada for commercial purposes.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 05:14:00 -0500 en-CA text/html https://ottawacitizen.com/sponsored/news-sponsored/the-quantum-decade-canadas-foresight-is-paying-off-says-ibm-canada
Killexams : IBM report shows cyberattacks growing fast in number, scale No result found, try new keyword!A new report out of IBM shows that when it comes to the rising threat of data breaches, it’s the consumer – not the company – fronting the price tag. Fri, 29 Jul 2022 22:30:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bizjournals.com/triad/news/2022/07/30/ibm-data-cyberattacks-growing-in-number-scale.html Killexams : One in five data breaches due to software supply chain compromise, IBM report warns
Emma Woollacott 27 July 2022 at 15:04 UTC
Updated: 28 July 2022 at 07:55 UTC

Attack vector cost businesses 2.5% more in one year

Supply chain attacks on the rise, costing businesses more year on year

Supply chain attacks on the rise, costing businesses more year on year as organizations failing to implement zero trust strategies.

This is according to IBM’s new Cost of a Data Breach report, which found that one in five breaches occurred because of a compromise at a business partner, with a supply chain breach taking on average 26 days longer to identify and contain than the global average.

The total cost of a supply chain compromise was $4.46 million – 2.5% higher than average.

The report also found that the global average cost of a data breach has hit an all-time high of $4.35 million – up nearly 13% over the last two years.

“Seventeen per cent of breaches in critical infrastructure organizations occurred due to a business partner being initially compromised – this shows us that organizations need to put more focus on the security controls that govern third party access,” John Hendley, head of strategy at IBM Security X-Force told The Daily Swig.

Zero trust, zero problems?

Critical infrastructure organizations such as financial services, industrial, transportation, and healthcare companies are a growing target for these attacks, says IBM, and zero trust is the best way to guard against attack.

“Organizations need to be more vigilant than ever and closely scrutinize these external points of access into their environment, whether that’s through direct network access, applications, or even physical access,” says Hendly.

“Supply chain attacks are of great concern, both because of how insidious they are and how extreme their impacts can be. We saw this play out with SolarWinds, and we’ll surely see more of these attacks in the future.”

Read more of the latest news about software supply chain attacks

Those organizations that had implemented a zero trust security approach saw breaches cost them less, with an average cost saving of $1.5 million.

However, critical infrastructure organizations in particular are failing to do this, with only one in five having adopted a zero trust model, compared with an overall global average of 41%.

Javvad Malik, lead security awareness advocate at KnowBe4, says that greater transparency is needed across the supply chain, along with greater technical assurance that all components are adequately secured.

“We’ve seen many organizations breached, not for the organization itself, but because it will provide a way into another. Popular examples of these include Target, RSA, and more recently SolarWinds,” he told The Daily Swig.

“While many organisations try to mitigate risks by sending out lengthy questionnaires to third parties it deals with to determine the level of security they employ, it is often not sufficient to cover the entire supply chain, and even if it was, it doesn’t provide technical assurance.”

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE ‘We’re still fighting last decade’s battle’ – Sonatype CTO Brian Fox on the struggle to secure the neglected software supply chain

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 19:55:00 -0500 en text/html https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/one-in-five-data-breaches-due-to-software-supply-chain-compromise-ibm-report-warns
Killexams : IBM Security report finds data breaches are costlier than ever before

A new report from IBM Security today reveals that data breaches are costlier and more impactful than ever before.

IBM Security’s 2022 Cost of a Data Breach Report, based on analysis of real-world data breaches experienced by 550 organizations globally between March 2021 and March 2022, found that the average cost of a data breach has hit an all-time high of $4.35 million.

Figures relating to large companies and the cost involved in dealing with data breaches may seem academic to many, but interestingly the report suggests that the increasing cost of these incidents — up 13% over the last two years — is contributing to rising costs of goods and services. Sixty percent of studied organizations raised their product or service prices after experiencing a data breach. Those increases come at a time the cost of goods is already increasing from inflation and supply chain issues.

Data breaches were also found not to be one-offs, with 83% of studied organizations having experienced more than one data breach in their lifetime. Another factor rising over time is the after-effects of breaches on these organizations, which linger long after they occur, as nearly 50% of breach costs are incurred more than a year after the breach.

Whether companies are exclusively to blame for lax cybersecurity is arguable, but many were found lacking in adopting cutting-edge and more modern security practices. Eighty percent of critical infrastructure organizations studied were found to have not adopted zero-trust strategies, seeing average breach costs rise to $5.4 million – a $1.17 million increase compared with those that do.

Companies either in the early stages or who have not started applying security practices across their cloud environments were found to have $660,000 higher average breach costs than studied organizations with mature security across their cloud environments.

Conversely, organizations that have fully deployed security artificial intelligence and automation incurred $3.05 million less on average in breach costs compared to studied organizations that have not deployed the technology – the biggest cost saver observed in the study.

Ransomware victims in the study that opted to pay threat actors’ ransom demands saw only $610,000 less in average breach costs compared with those that chose not to pay – not including the cost of the ransom. Given the high price of ransom payments, the report notes, the financial toll may rise even higher, suggesting that paying the ransom may not be an effective strategy.

The most costly form of data breach among the companies studied was found to be phishing. Compromised credentials were the most common cause of a breach at 19% but phishing, accounting for 16% of breaches, led to average breach costs of $4.91 million.

Other highlights in the report included healthcare breath costs hitting double digits for the first time, with an average breach in the sector resulting in a cost of $10.1 million. Insufficient security staffing was noted to be a serious issue, with 62% of organizations saying they are not sufficiently staffed to meet their security needs, averaging $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.

“Businesses need to put their security defenses on the offense and beat attackers to the punch,” Charles Henderson, global head of IBM Security X-Force, said in a statement. “It’s time to stop the adversary from achieving their objectives and start to minimize the impact of attacks.”

Image: IBM Security

Show your support for our mission by joining our Cube Club and Cube Event Community of experts. Join the community that includes Amazon Web Services and Amazon.com CEO Andy Jassy, Dell Technologies founder and CEO Michael Dell, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger and many more luminaries and experts.

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 16:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://siliconangle.com/2022/07/27/ibm-security-report-finds-data-breaches-costlier-ever/
Killexams : IBM’s Cost of a Data Breach Report finds invisible ‘cyber tax’

Were you unable to attend Transform 2022? Check out all of the summit sessions in our on-demand library now! Watch here.


When it comes to operational challenges, few mistakes are as costly as data breaches. Just one exploited vulnerability can lead to millions in damages, not just due to upfront disruption, but a loss of respect from consumers and potential compliance liabilities. 

Unfortunately, the cost of a data breach is only going up. Today, IBM Security released its annual “Cost of a Data Breach” report conducted by Ponemon Institute, which found that the cost of a data breach in 2022 totaled $4.35 million, an increase of 2.6% since last year’s total of $4.24 million. 

The research also found that organizations that fell victim to cyberattacks were prime target for follow-up attacks as part of a “haunting effect”, with 83% of organizations studied having had more than one data breach. 

For enterprises, the report highlights that new approaches are required to mitigate the impact of data breaches, particularly in the face of a growing number of sophisticated attacks, which can’t always be prevented. 

The hostile reality of the threat landscape 

As the cost of a data breach continues to rise amid a threat landscape of rampant double and triple extortion ransomware attacks and identity-related breaches, it’s becoming increasingly clear that traditional approaches to enterprise security need to be reevaluated. 

In the last week alone, T Mobile and Twitter found out the cost of a data breach first hand with the former agreeing to pay customers $350 million as part of a post-breach settlement, and the latter having to deal with the negative fallout after a hacker claimed to have accessed data on 5.4 million users. 

With the impact of such breaches causing millions in damage, many organizations decide to pass costs onto consumers, as part of an invisible cyber tax. In fact, IBM found that for 60% of organizations, breaches led to price increases passed on to customers. 

“What stands out most in this year’s finding is that the financial impact of breaches is now extending well beyond the breaches organizations themselves,” said Head of Strategy, IBM Security X-Force, John Hendley. 

“The cost is trickling down to consumers. In fact, if you consider that two or three companies within a supply chain may have suffered a breach and increased their prices, there’s this multiplier effect that’s ultimately hitting the consumer’s wallet. Essentially, we’re now beginning to see a hidden “cyber tax” that individuals are paying as a result of the growing number of breaches occurring today compounded with the more obvious disruptive effects of cyberattacks,” Hendley said. 

When asked why the cost of data breaches continued to grow, Hendley explained that there’s a high volume of attacks occurring, but only a limited number of skilled security professionals available to respond to them.

This is highlighted in the research with 62% of organizations saying they weren’t sufficiently staffed to meet their security needs.

What are the implications for CISOs and security leaders 

Although the report highlights the bleakest of the current threat landscape, it also points to some promising technologies and methodologies that enterprises can use to reduce the cost of data breaches. 

For instance, one of the most promising findings was that organizations with fully deployed security AI and automation can expect to pay $3.05 million less during a data breach, and on average cut the time to identify and contain a breach by 74-days. 

At the same time, organizations that implement zero trust can expect to pay 1 million less in breach costs than those that don’t. 

Finally, those organizations maintain an incident response team and regularly tested IR plans can expect to cut the cost by $2.66 million.

VentureBeat's mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative enterprise technology and transact. Learn more about membership.

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 23:01:00 -0500 Tim Keary en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/2022/07/26/cost-of-a-data-breach/
000-N35 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List