Never waste time in search of 000-N19 practice questions, Just download from killexams.com

killexams.com recommends you definitely ought to try its free 000-N19 test. Its 000-N19 Exam Braindumps is really simple to use upon Mac, Windows, Google Android, Linux. You are able to print 000-N19 Latest Topics and make your own book to research as you travel. Whenever you believe that a person has enough understanding, take a practice check with VCE examination simulator. Killexams.com gives you a few months of free up-dates of 000-N19 IBM SmartCloud for Social Business Technical Sales Mastery Test v3 examination queries. Our accreditation group is constantly in your backup and upd

Exam Code: 000-N19 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
IBM SmartCloud for Social Business Technical Sales Mastery Test v3
IBM certification
Killexams : IBM certification - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=IBM+certification&cc=us&format=RSS Search results Killexams : IBM certification - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=IBM+certification&cc=us&format=RSS https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : IBM to up skill 100,000 Saudis in Five Years in AI, ML, and more No result found, try new keyword!Within the framework to be established, IBM will provide training and development programs for up to 100,000 Saudis over five years, which will boost the Kingdom’s leadership, with the Kingdom ... Sun, 17 Jul 2022 17:41:00 -0500 text/html https://www.itp.net/emergent-tech/ibm-to-up-skill-100000-saudis-in-five-years-in-ai-ml-and-more Killexams : Edology partners with IBM to launch Post Graduate Certificate Program in Data Science

Gurugram (Haryana) [India], July 30 (ANI/NewsVoir): Edology has announced a partnership with IBM, one of the world's top leading and reputed corporations, to introduce its Post Graduate Certificate Program in Data Science for working professionals and everyone wanting to enter the field of Data Science. Developed by IBM inventors and experts who hold numerous patents in the field of Data Science, this is the first IBM programme that has been completely designed by IBM and is being delivered by its faculty.

"The programme for the Edology x IBM Data Science course is a very special offering from IBM, and this is one-of-a-kind initiative," according to Hari Ramasubramanian, Leader, Business Development and Academia Relationships, IBM Expert Labs, India/South Asia. He further added, "There is a strong demand for skilled technology and trained professionals across the industry. Data science is not confined to IT. It includes all the verticals one can imagine-from board meetings to sports, data science brings a lot of value to organizations worldwide. For students, as well as professionals with experience, if you want to fast track your career on to the next level, this is the course you should be doing."

"The IBM Data Science certificate program through the Edology platform, will equip to adapt to the dynamics in the industry and drive technology innovation," said, Vithal Madyalkar, Program Director, IBM Innovation Centre for Education, India/South Asia. "The Data Science course modules will provide deep practical knowledge, coupled with broad-based industry alignment, interaction, talent discoverability as well as excellence in their professional practice."

A global Ed-Tech company, Edology helps students and professionals all around the world advance their careers in a variety of subjects, including data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, cyber security, and more.

Unique Offerings of the IBM x Edology PG Certificate Programme in Data Science:

- 100+ hours of Live classes by IBM experts

- Globally recognized IBM digital badge

- Job opportunities with 300+ corporate partners

- Edology-IBM Award for Top Performers

- 1 on 1 mentorship from industry experts

- 1 day networking session with IBM team

- Guaranteed interview with IBM for top performers in each cohort

- Dedicated career assistance team

Sumanth Palepu, the Business Head at Edology, states, "Statistical estimates reveal that the worldwide market size for Data Science and analytics is anticipated to reach around a whopping $450 billion by 2025, which also means that the rivalry would be quite severe at the employee level, the competition will be very fierce. Thus, this collaboration with IBM is now more essential than ever, so that we are collectively able to deliver advanced level teaching to the students and working professionals and they get first-hand industry knowledge with our IBM experts."

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjWGU_k2Dhg)

Edology is a Global Ed-Tech Brand that provides industry-powered education and skills to students and professionals across the world, to help them achieve fast-track career growth. Launched in 2017, Edology connects professionals from across the globe with higher education programmes in the fields of law, finance, accounting, business, computing, marketing, fashion, criminology, psychology, and more.

It's a part of Global University Systems (GUS), an international network of higher-education institutions, brought together by a shared passion of providing industry-driven global education accessible and affordable. All the programs of Edology are built with the objective of providing its learners career enhancement and strong CV credentials, along with a quality learning experience.

The courses offered by Edology include Data Science, Certification in AI and Machine Learning, Data Analytics, PGP in International Business, PGP in Renewable Energy Management, PGP in Oil and Gas Management among others. These offerings are done through hands-on industry projects, interactive live classes, global peer-to-peer learning and other facilities.

This story is provided by NewsVoir. ANI will not be responsible in any way for the content of this article. (ANI/NewsVoir)

DISCLAIMER

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to Excellerate our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 21:40:00 -0500 text/html https://www.business-standard.com/content/press-releases-ani/edology-partners-with-ibm-to-launch-post-graduate-certificate-program-in-data-science-122073000636_1.html
Killexams : Three Common Mistakes That May Sabotage Your Security Training

Phishing incidents are on the rise. A report from IBM shows that phishing was the most popular attack vector in 2021, resulting in one in five employees falling victim to phishing hacking techniques.

The Need for Security Awareness Training

Although technical solutions protect against phishing threats, no solution is 100% effective. Consequently, companies have no choice but to involve their employees in the fight against hackers. This is where security awareness training comes into play.

Security awareness training gives companies the confidence that their employees will execute the right response when they discover a phishing message in their inbox.

As the saying goes, "knowledge is power," but the effectiveness of knowledge depends heavily on how it is delivered. When it comes to phishing attacks, simulations are among the most effective forms of training because the events in training simulations directly mimic how an employee would react in the event of an real attack. Since employees do not know whether a suspicious email in their inbox is a simulation or a real threat, the training becomes even more valuable.

Phishing Simulations: What does the training include?

It is critical to plan, implement and evaluate a cyber awareness training program to ensure it truly changes employee behavior. However, for this effort to be successful, it should involve much more than just emailing employees. Key practices to consider include:

  • Real-life phishing simulations.
  • Adaptive learning - live response and protection from real cyberattacks.
  • Personalized training based on factors such as department, tenure, and cyber experience level.
  • Empowering and equipping employees with an always-on cybersecurity mindset.
  • Data-driven campaigns

Because employees do not recognize the difference between phishing simulations and real cyberattacks, it's important to remember that phishing simulations evoke different emotions and reactions, so awareness training should be conducted thoughtfully. As organizations need to engage their employees to combat the ever-increasing attacks and protect their assets, it is important to keep morale high and create a positive culture of cyber hygiene.

Three common phishing simulation mistakes.

Based on years of experience, cybersecurity firm CybeReady has seen companies fall into these common mistakes.

Mistake #1: Testing instead of educating

The approach of running a phishing simulation as a test to catch and punish "repeat offenders" can do more harm than good.

An educational experience that involves stress is counterproductive and even traumatic. As a result, employees will not go through the training but look for ways to circumvent the system. Overall, the fear-based "audit approach" is not beneficial to the organization in the long run because it cannot provide the necessary training over an extended period.

Solution #1: Be sensitive

Because maintaining positive employee morale is critical to the organization's well-being, provide positive just-in-time training.

Just-in-time training means that once employees have clicked on a link within the simulated attack, they are directed to a short and concise training session. The idea is to quickly educate the employee on their mistake and provide them essential tips on spotting malicious emails in the future.

This is also an opportunity for positive reinforcement, so be sure to keep the training short, concise, and positive.

Solution #2: Inform relevant departments.

Communicate with relevant stakeholders to ensure they are aware of ongoing phishing simulation training. Many organizations forget to inform relevant stakeholders, such as HR or other employees, that the simulations are being conducted. Learning has the best effect when participants have the opportunity to feel supported, make mistakes, and correct them.

Mistake #2: Use the same simulation for all employees

It is important to vary the simulations. Sending the same simulation to all employees, especially at the same time, is not only not instructive but also has no valid metrics when it comes to organizational risk.

The "warning effect" - the first employee to discover or fall for the simulation warns the others. This prepares your employees to respond to the "threat" by anticipating the simulation, thus bypassing the simulation and the training opportunity.

Another negative impact is social desirability bias, which causes employees to over-report incidents to IT without noticing them in order to be viewed more favorably. This leads to an overloaded system and the department IT.

This form of simulation also leads to inaccurate results, such as unrealistically low click-through rates and over-reporting rates. Thus, the metrics do not show the real risks of the company or the problems that need to be addressed.

Solution: Drip mode

Drip mode allows sending multiple simulations to different employees at different times. Certain software solutions can even do this automatically by sending a variety of simulations to different groups of employees. It's also important to implement a continuous cycle to ensure that all new employees are properly onboarded and to reinforce that security is important 24/7 - not just checking a box for minimum compliance.

Mistake #3: Relying on data from a single campaign

With over 3.4 billion phishing attacks per day, it's safe to assume that at least a million of them differ in complexity, language, approach, or even tactics.

Unfortunately, no single phishing simulation can accurately reflect an organization's risk. Relying on a single phishing simulation result is unlikely to provide reliable results or comprehensive training.

Another important consideration is that different groups of employees respond differently to threats, not only because of their vigilance, training, position, tenure, or even education level but because the response to phishing attacks is also contextual.

Solution: Implement a variety of training programs

Behavior change is an evolutionary process and should therefore be measured over time. Each training session contributes to the progress of the training. Training effectiveness, or in other words, an accurate reflection of real organizational behavior change, can be determined after multiple training sessions and over time.

The most effective solution is to continuously conduct various training programs (at least once a month) with multiple simulations.

It is highly recommended to train employees according to their risk level. A diverse and comprehensive simulation program also provides reliable measurement data based on systematic behavior over time. To validate their efforts at effective training, organizations should be able to obtain a valid indication of their risk at any given point in time while monitoring progress in risk reduction.

Implement an effective phishing simulation program.

Creating such a program may seem overwhelming and time-consuming. That's why we have created a playbook of the 10 key practices you can use to create a simple and effective phishing simulation. Simply download the CybeReady Playbook or meet with one of our experts for a product demo and learn how CybeReady's fully automated security awareness training platform can help your organization achieve the fastest results with virtually zero effort IT.


Found this article interesting? Follow THN on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to read more exclusive content we post.
Wed, 03 Aug 2022 22:37:00 -0500 The Hacker News en text/html https://thehackernews.com/2022/08/three-common-mistakes-that-may-sabotage.html
Killexams : Colorado’s P-TECH Students Graduate Ready for Tech Careers (TNS) — Abraham Tinajero was an eighth grader when he saw a poster in his Longmont middle school’s library advertising a new program offering free college with a technology focus.

Interested, he talked to a counselor to learn more about P-TECH, an early college program where he could earn an associate’s degree along with his high school diploma. Liking the sound of the program, he enrolled in the inaugural P-TECH class as a freshman at Longmont’s Skyline High School.

“I really loved working on computers, even before P-TECH,” he said. “I was a hobbyist. P-TECH gave me a pathway.”


He worked with an IBM mentor and interned at the company for six weeks as a junior. After graduating in 2020 with his high school diploma and the promised associate’s degree in computer science from Front Range Community College, he was accepted to IBM’s yearlong, paid apprenticeship program.

IBM hired him as a cybersecurity analyst once he completed the apprenticeship.

“P-TECH has given me a great advantage,” he said. “Without it, I would have been questioning whether to go into college. Having a college degree at 18 is great to put on a resume.”


Stanley Litow, a former vice president of IBM, developed the P-TECH, or Pathways in Technology Early College High Schools, model. The first P-TECH school opened 11 years ago in Brooklyn, New York, in partnership with IBM.

Litow’s idea was to get more underrepresented young people into tech careers by giving them a direct path to college while in high school — and in turn create a pipeline of employees with the job skills businesses were starting to value over four-year college degrees.

The program, which includes mentors and internships provided by business partners, gives high school students up to six years to earn an associate's degree at no cost.

SKYLINE HIGH A PIONEER IN PROGRAM

In Colorado, St. Vrain Valley was among the first school districts chosen by the state to offer a P-TECH program after the Legislature passed a bill to provide funding — and the school district has embraced the program.

Colorado’s first P-TECH programs started in the fall of 2016 at three high schools, including Skyline High. Over the last six years, 17 more Colorado high schools have adopted P-TECH, for at total of 20. Three of those are in St. Vrain Valley, with a fourth planned to open in the fall of 2023 at Longmont High School.

Each St. Vrain Valley high school offers a different focus supported by different industry partners.

Skyline partners with IBM, with students earning an associate’s degree in Computer Information Systems from Front Range. Along with being the first, Skyline’s program is the largest, enrolling up to 55 new freshmen each year.

Programs at the other schools are capped at 35 students per grade.

Frederick High’s program, which started in the fall of 2019, has a bioscience focus, partners with Aims Community College and works with industry partners Agilent Technologies, Tolmar, KBI Biopharma, AGC Biologics and Corden Pharma.

Silver Creek High’s program started a year ago with a cybersecurity focus. The Longmont school partners with Front Range and works with industry partners Seagate, Cisco, PEAK Resources and Comcast.

The new program coming to Longmont High will focus on business.

District leaders point to Skyline High’s graduation statistics to illustrate the program’s success. At Skyline, 100 percent of students in the first three P-TECH graduating classes earned a high school diploma in four years.

For the 2020 Skyline P-TECH graduates, 24 of the 33, or about 70 percent, also earned associate’s degrees. For the 2021 graduating class, 30 of the 47 have associate’s degrees — with one year left for those students to complete the college requirements.

For the most accurate 2022 graduates, who have two years left to complete the college requirements, 19 of 59 have associate’s degrees and another six are on track to earn their degrees by the end of the summer.

JUMPING AT AN OPPORTUNITY

Louise March, Skyline High’s P-TECH counselor, keeps in touch with the graduates, saying 27 are working part time or full time at IBM. About a third are continuing their education at a four year college. Of the 19 who graduated in 2022 with an associate’s degree, 17 are enrolling at a four year college, she said.

Two of those 2022 graduates are Anahi Sarmiento, who is headed to the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, and Jose Ivarra, who will study computer science at Colorado State University.

“I’m the oldest out of three siblings,” Ivarra said. “When you hear that someone wants to provide you free college in high school, you take it. I jumped at the opportunity.”

Sarmiento added that her parents, who are immigrants, are already working two jobs and don’t have extra money for college costs.

“P-TECH is pushing me forward,” she said. “I know my parents want me to have a better life, but I want them to have a better life, too. Going into high school, I kept that mentality that I would push myself to my full potential. It kept me motivated.”

While the program requires hard work, the two graduates said, they still enjoyed high school and had outside interests. Ivarra was a varsity football player who was named player of the year. Sarmiento took advantage of multiple opportunities, from helping elementary students learn robotics to working at the district’s Innovation Center.

Ivarra said he likes that P-TECH has the same high expectations for all students, no matter their backgrounds, and gives them support in any areas where they need help. Spanish is his first language and, while math came naturally, language arts was more challenging.

“It was tough for me to see all these classmates use all these big words, and I didn’t know them,” he said. “I just felt less. When I went into P-TECH, the teachers focus on you so much, checking on every single student.”

They said it’s OK to struggle or even fail. Ivarra said he failed a tough class during the pandemic, but was able to retake it and passed. Both credited March, their counselor, with providing unending support as they navigated high school and college classes.

“She’s always there for you,” Sarmiento said. “It’s hard to be on top of everything. You have someone to go to.”

Students also supported each other.

“You build bonds,” Ivarra said. “You’re all trying to figure out these classes. You grow together. It’s a bunch of people who want to succeed. The people that surround you in P-TECH, they push you to be better.”

SUPPORT SYSTEMS ARE KEY

P-TECH has no entrance requirements or prerequisite classes. You don’t need to be a top student, have taken advanced math or have a background in technology.

With students starting the rigorous program with a wide range of skills, teachers and counselors said, they quickly figured out the program needed stronger support systems.

March said freshmen in the first P-TECH class struggled that first semester, prompting the creation of a guided study class. The every other day, hour-and-a-half class includes both study time and time to learn workplace skills, including writing a resume and interviewing. Teachers also offer tutoring twice a week after school.

“The guided study has become crucial to the success of the program,” March said.

Another way P-TECH provides extra support is through summer orientation programs for incoming freshmen.

At Skyline, ninth graders take a three-week bridge class — worth half a credit — that includes learning good study habits. They also meet IBM mentors and take a field trip to Front Range Community College.

“They get their college ID before they get their high school ID,” March said.

During a session in June, 15 IBM mentors helped the students program a Sphero robot to travel along different track configurations. Kathleen Schuster, who has volunteered as an IBM mentor since the P-TECH program started here, said she wants to “return some of the favors I got when I was younger.”

“Even this play stuff with the Spheros, it’s teaching them teamwork and a little computing,” she said. “Hopefully, through P-TECH, they will learn what it takes to work in a tech job.”

Incoming Skyline freshman Blake Baker said he found a passion for programming at Trail Ridge Middle and saw P-TECH as a way to capitalize on that passion.

“I really love that they provide you options and a path,” he said.

Trail Ridge classmate Itzel Pereyra, another programming enthusiast, heard about P-TECH from her older brother.

“It’s really good for my future,” she said. “It’s an exciting moment, starting the program. It will just help you with everything.”

While some of the incoming ninth graders shared dreams of technology careers, others see P-TECH as a good foundation to pursue other dreams.

Skyline incoming ninth grader Marisol Sanchez wants to become a traveling nurse, demonstrating technology and new skills to other nurses. She added that the summer orientation sessions are a good introduction, helping calm the nerves that accompany combining high school and college.

“There’s a lot of team building,” she said. “It’s getting us all stronger together as a group and introducing everyone.”

THE SPARK OF MOTIVATION

Silver Creek’s June camp for incoming ninth graders included field trips to visit Cisco, Seagate, PEAK Resources, Comcast and Front Range Community College.

During the Front Range Community College field trip, the students heard from Front Range staff members before going on a scavenger hunt. Groups took photos to prove they completed tasks, snapping pictures of ceramic pieces near the art rooms, the most expensive tech product for sale in the bookstore and administrative offices across the street from the main building.

Emma Horton, an incoming freshman, took a cybersecurity class as a Flagstaff Academy eighth grader that hooked her on the idea of technology as a career.

“I’m really excited about the experience I will be getting in P-TECH,’ she said. “I’ve never been super motivated in school, but with something I’m really interested in, it becomes easier.”

Deb Craven, dean of instruction at Front Range’s Boulder County campus, promised the Silver Creek students that the college would support them. She also gave them some advice.

“You need to advocate and ask for help,” she said. “These two things are going to help you the most. Be present, be engaged, work together and lean on each other.”

Craven, who oversees Front Range’s P-TECH program partnership, said Front Range leaders toured the original P-TECH program in New York along with St. Vrain and IBM leaders in preparation for bringing P-TECH here.

“Having IBM as a partner as we started the program was really helpful,” she said.

When the program began, she said, freshmen took a more advanced technology class as their first college class. Now, she said, they start with a more fundamental class in the spring of their freshman year, learning how to build a computer.

“These guys have a chance to grow into the high school environment before we stick them in a college class,” she said.

Summer opportunities aren’t just for P-TECH’s freshmen. Along with summer internships, the schools and community colleges offer summer classes.

Silver Creek incoming 10th graders, for example, could take a personal financial literacy class at Silver Creek in the mornings and an introduction to cybersecurity class at the Innovation Center in the afternoons in June.

Over at Skyline, incoming 10th graders in P-TECH are getting paid to teach STEM lessons to elementary students while earning high school credit. Students in the fifth or sixth year of the program also had the option of taking computer science and algebra classes at Front Range.

EMBRACING THE CHALLENGE

And at Frederick, incoming juniors are taking an introduction to manufacturing class at the district's Career Elevation and Technology Center this month in preparation for an advanced manufacturing class they’re taking in the fall.

“This will provide them a head start for the fall,” said instructor Chester Clark.

Incoming Frederick junior Destini Johnson said she’s not sure what she wants to do after high school, but believes the opportunities offered by P-TECH will prepare her for the future.

“I wanted to try something challenging, and getting a head start on college can only help,” she said. “It’s really incredible that I’m already halfway done with an associate’s degree and high school.”

IBM P-TECH program manager Tracy Knick, who has worked with the Skyline High program for three years, said it takes a strong commitment from all the partners — the school district, IBM and Front Range — to make the program work.

“It’s not an easy model,” she said. “When you say there are no entrance requirements, we all have to be OK with that and support the students to be successful.”

IBM hosted 60 St. Vrain interns this summer, while two Skyline students work as IBM “co-ops” — a national program — to assist with the P-TECH program.

The company hosts two to four formal events for the students each year to work on professional and technical skills, while IBM mentors provide tutoring in algebra. During the pandemic, IBM also paid for subscriptions to tutor.com so students could get immediate help while taking online classes.

“We want to get them truly workforce ready,” Knick said. “They’re not IBM-only skills we’re teaching. Even though they choose a pathway, they can really do anything.”

As the program continues to expand in the district, she said, her wish is for more businesses to recognize the value of P-TECH.

“These students have had intensive training on professional skills,” she said. “They have taken college classes enhanced with the same digital credentials that an IBM employee can learn. There should be a waiting list of employers for these really talented and skilled young professionals.”

©2022 the Daily Camera (Boulder, Colo.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 02:41:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govtech.com/education/k-12/colorados-p-tech-students-graduate-ready-for-tech-careers
Killexams : The right and wrong way to use artificial intelligence

For decades, scientists have been giddy and citizens have been fearful of the power of computers. In 1965 Herbert Simon, a Nobel laureate in economics and also a winner of the Turing Award (considered “The Nobel Prize of computing”), predicted that “machines will be capable, within 20 years, of doing any work a man can do.” His misplaced faith in computers is hardly unique. Sixty-seven years later, we are still waiting for computers to become our slaves and masters.

Businesses have spent hundreds of billions of dollars on AI moonshots that have crashed and burned. IBM’s “Dr. Watson” was supposed to revolutionize health care and “eradicate cancer.” Eight years later, after burning through $15 billion with no demonstrable successes, IBM fired Dr. Watson.

Advertisement

In 2016 Turing Award Winner Geoffrey Hinton advised that “We should stop training radiologists now. It’s just completely obvious that within five years, deep learning is going to do better than radiologists.” Six years later, the number of radiologists has gone up, not down. Researchers have spent billions of dollars working on thousands of radiology image-recognition algorithms that are not as good as human radiologists.

What about those self-driving vehicles, promised by many including Elon Musk in his 2016 boast that “I really consider autonomous driving a solved problem. I think we are probably less than two years away.” Six years later, the most advanced self-driving vehicles are arguably Waymos in San Francisco, which only operate between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. on the least crowded roads and still have accidents and cause traffic tie-ups. They are a long way from successfully operating in downtown traffic during the middle of the day at a required 99.9999% level of proficiency.

Advertisement

The list goes on. Zillow’s house-flipping misadventure lost billions of dollars trying to revolutionize home-buying before they shuttered it. Carvana’s car-flipping gambit still loses billions.

We have argued for years that we should be developing AI that makes people more productive instead of trying to replace people. Computers have wondrous memories, make calculations that are lightning-fast and error-free, and are tireless, but humans have the real-world experience, common sense, wisdom and critical thinking skills that computers lack. Together, they can do more than either could do on their own.

Weekdays

Catch up on the day’s top five stories every weekday afternoon.

Effective augmentation appears to be finally happening with medical images. A large-scale study just published in Lancet Digital Health is the first to directly compare AI cancer screening when used alone or to assist humans. The software comes from a German startup, Vara, whose AI is already used in more than 25% of Germany’s breast cancer screening centers.

Researchers from Vara, Essen University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center trained the algorithm on more than 367,000 mammograms, and then tested it on 82,851 mammograms that had been held back for that purpose.

In the first strategy, the algorithm was used alone to analyze the 82,851 mammograms. In the second strategy, the algorithm separated the mammograms into three groups: clearly cancer, clearly no cancer, and uncertain. The uncertain mammograms were then sent to board-certified radiologists who were given no information about the AI diagnosis.

Doctors and AI working together turned out to be better than either working alone. The AI pre-screening reduced the number of images the doctors examined by 37% while lowering the false-positive and false-negative rates by about a third compared to AI alone and by 14%-20% compared to doctors alone. Less work and better results!

As machine learning improves, the AI analysis of X-rays will no doubt become more efficient and accurate. There will come a time when AI can be trusted to work alone. However, that time is likely to be decades in the future and attempts to jump directly to that point are dangerous.

We are optimistic that the productivity of many workers can be improved by similar augmentation strategies — not to mention the fact that many of the tasks that computers excel at are dreadful drudgery; e.g., legal research, inventory control and statistical calculations. But far too many attempts to replace humans entirely have not only been an enormous waste of resources but have also undermined the credibility of AI research. The last thing we need is another AI winter where funding dries up, resources are diverted and the tremendous potential of these technologies are put on hold. We are optimistic that the accumulating failures of moonshots and successes of augmentation strategies will change the way that we think about AI.

Advertisement

Funk is an independent technology consultant who previously taught at National University of Singapore, Hitotsubashi and Kobe Universities in Japan, and Penn State, where he taught courses on the economics of new technologies. Smith is the author of ”The AI Delusion” and co-author (with Jay Cordes) of ”The 9 Pitfalls of Data Science” and ”The Phantom Pattern Problem.”

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 21:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-the-right-and-wrong-way-to-use-artificial-intelligence-20220806-txybtmlcwfgddnfdozvynz5u64-story.html
Killexams : Cloud giants certified while others wait on sovereignty scheme

Google and IBM have been cleared by the Digital Transformation Agency as approved cloud service suppliers under Australia’s data sovereignty scheme while dozens of other companies wait on authorisation. The agency has been forced to scale back the program as it comes into force this month.

The US giants are the most accurate additions to the federal government’s Hosting Certification Framework (HCF), joining the likes of AWS, Microsoft, Oracle, and local companies Vault Cloud and AUCloud among the nine cloud providers now cleared.

Seven more companies have been certified Strategic as either data centre facility providers, service providers, or both.

The certified cohorts are outnumbered by dozens more companies which have applied for accreditation but are yet to be cleared by the Digital Transformation Agency (DTA).

Parliament House
The Hosting Certification Framework has come in to force with dozens of companies waiting on accreditation

Some are waiting a reported six months plus, with the apparent delay leading to the DTA introducing a last-minute exemption for government agencies to request use of providers that are not yet certified.

The exemption is needed because the HCF came into force this month after a yearlong grace period, mandating that agencies host all sensitive government data, whole-of-government systems and systems rated to a protected classification level with certified providers.

The scheme allows the government to specify and maintain stringent ownership and control conditions on the providers, and follows previous concerns within government about data sovereignty and risk exposure, including replatforming costs.

AThe highest Strategic level — which all the approved companies have obtained so far — guarantees that providers will cover all the government’s reasonable re-platforming costs if they breach the contract.

When introduced last year the scheme was criticised by parts of the industry because of potentially onerous requirements and a lack of transparency in the certification process.

For example, the largest cloud provider in the world Amazon Web Services was awarded strategic certification, which is understood to be based on undertakings it has with the DTA to eventually achieve full compliance.

An InnovationAus.com attempt to have details of the undertakings released under freedom of information laws was rejected. This came despite others in the industry publicly disclosing their certification undertakings to encourage transparency in the scheme.

As the scheme came in to force with a backlog of accreditation requests and a limited number of approved providers, the DTA scaled back the requirements of the scheme.

The HCF requirements now apply only to “all new and extensions to existing contracts for hosting services” and not all existing government contracts, as the DTA had previously stated.

And after warnings from the industry about the challenge of applying the HCF to software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers, the DTA has exempted SaaS and managed service providers from the HCF “until the next iteration of the policy is defined”.

Do you know more? Contact James Riley via Email.

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:31:00 -0500 en-AU text/html https://www.innovationaus.com/cloud-giants-certified-while-others-wait-on-sovereignty-scheme/
Killexams : Cybrary confronts the cyberskills gap head on; raises $25M

Were you unable to attend Transform 2022? Check out all of the summit sessions in our on-demand library now! Watch here.


As we move deeper into 2022, almost every company is feeling the cyberskills gap to some degree. Now with the cyber workforce gap hitting 2.72 million, it’s unsurprising that IBM research recently found that 83% of organizations have had more than one data breach.  

With the workforce gap showing no sign of closing, training is becoming critical for employees to teach cybersecurity professionals the skills they need to thrive amid today’s complex threat landscape. 

Addressing the cyberskills gap 

As the cyberskills gap continues to grow, more and more organizations are recognising the need to use training — rather than hiring — to fix the shortage. 

“Studies continue to show that a cybersecurity staffing shortage is placing organizations at risk, and the skills shortage and its associated impacts have not improved over the past few years,” said Kevin Hanes, CEO of Cybrary, a cybersecurity skills training platform. 

“Products and technology will not help solve this fundamental issue; rather, investing in people is key to narrowing the cybersecurity skills gap and helping to combat increasing burnout and human error,” Hanes said. 

Hanes says that Cybrary is aiming to address these challenges by providing cybersecurity practitioners with the “right training at the right time” to equip them to respond to modern threats. 

It does this by providing them with a platform they can use to access learning materials and prepare for professional certifications with scenario-based training and over 1,900 learning activities. 

A look at the IT training market 

Cybrary is competing against a range of cybersecurity training providers that offer online, in-person training and boot camps. The provider sits loosely within the global IT training market, which researchers valued at $68 billion in 2020, and estimate will reach a value of $97.6 billion by 2026. 

One of Cybrary’s competitors is Pluralsight, which offers a mixture of courses, skill-assessments labs, and hands-on learning developed by industry experts on courses such as Microsoft Azure Deployment, AWS Operations and Ruby Language Fundamentals. 

Pluralsight most recently announced raising $430.4 million in revenue in 2020. 

Another competitor is Infosec, a cybersecurity training and security awareness training provider with over 2,000 resources, including over 1,400 cybersecurity courses and cyber ranges, and live boot camps with instructor-led training. According to Zoominfo, Infosec has raised $31 million in revenue

However, Hanes argues that Cybrary differentiates itself from other solutions on the market by offering up-to-date learning material at a lower price point. 

“Cybrary’s platform allows individuals and teams to skill up on their own time from anywhere in the world. And with the Cybrary Threat Intelligence Group (CTIG) and SMEs developing new content in real time, Cybrary users can be confident that we are providing them with high-quality training that covers the latest threats and vulnerabilities impacting the industry.” 

Today, Cybrary announced it has raised $25 million as part of a series C funding round, bringing its total funding to $48 million following a $19 billion series B funding round in 2019. 

The organization intends to use the funding to enhance its R&D across engineering, product and marketing teams, while growing the capabilities of the Cybrary Threat Intelligence Group.

More broadly, the funding highlights that investors are looking to security training as a potential solution to bridge the cyberskills gap. 

VentureBeat's mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative enterprise technology and transact. Learn more about membership.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 08:00:00 -0500 Tim Keary en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/2022/08/02/cybrary-cyber-skills-gap/
Killexams : IBM chief says better tech training 'a must'

The head of IBM in the UK is urging government, industry and academia to work together to Excellerate training for recruits and existing staff so that Europe's chronic shortage of tech skills can be overcome.

Sreeram Visvanathan, chief executive of IBM UK and Ireland, says that research across Europe by the tech corporation, which has operations in more than 170 nations, found that offering education and skills training was now seen as a top priority for many companies looking to Excellerate AI recruitment.

Writing on the techUK website, Mr Visvanathan says the research found almost 70 per cent of tech employees and job-seekers believed that potential recruits lacked the skills necessary for a career in AI.

"The impact of this deficit has the potential to stifle digital innovation and hold back economic growth," he warns.

The IBM report, ‘Addressing the AI Skills Gap in Europe’, concluded that, while technical capabilities were vital for a career in the sector, problem solving was considered the most critical soft skill needed for tech roles.

However, almost a quarter of tech recruiters recorded difficulties in  finding job applicants with this aptitude, along with shortfalls in critical and strategic thinking.

Mr Visvanathan says the report showed that offering education and skills training had become a top priority for many companies and that IBM had already taken "proactive steps" to upskill existing employees and job applicants.

He points to the launch of the IBM SkillsBuild programme, which is free to participants and has brought together two other, skills-based learning schemes: the Open P-TECH and SkillsBuild.

"Through the programme, students, educators, job-seekers, and the organisations that support them have access to free digital learning, resources, and support focused on the core technology and workplace skills needed to succeed in jobs," says Mr Visvanathan.

But he adds that a great deal remains to be done to solve the skills gap. "What’s required now is for industry, government and academia to work together to put existing ideas into practice and to think of new ways to solve the challenge.

"At the start of the year, the DCMS (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Department) announced £23 million of government funding to create 2,000 scholarships in AI and data science in England.

"The new scholarships from this funding will ensure more people can build successful careers in AI, create and develop new and bigger businesses, and will Excellerate the diversity of this growing and innovative sector.

"I hope to see further investment and programs such as ours with SkillsBuild as key drivers in change. Finding solutions and initiatives such as these will ensure we are providing a significant boost for the UK while providing a rewarding career for many."


Related practicing from Relocate Global

Subscribe to Relocate Extra, our monthly newsletter, to get all the latest international assignments and global mobility news.Relocate’s new Global Mobility Toolkit provides free information, practical advice and support for HR, global mobility managers and global teams operating overseas.Global Mobility Toolkit download factsheets resource centreAccess hundreds of global services and suppliers in our Online Directory 
Sun, 31 Jul 2022 23:49:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.relocatemagazine.com/news/ibm-chief-says-better-tech-training-a-must-technology-dsapsted-0722
Killexams : Falcons training camp: 50 photos from Friday's open practice No result found, try new keyword!On Friday, the Atlanta Falcons held their third training camp practice, but it was the first day that fans were allowed to attend. Here are 50 of the best images from Friday’s open practice at IBM ... Fri, 29 Jul 2022 07:45:48 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nfl/falcons-training-camp-50-photos-from-fridays-open-practice/ss-AA1070JF Killexams : IBM Expands Its Power10 Portfolio For Mission Critical Applications

It is sometimes difficult to understand the true value of IBM's Power-based CPUs and associated server platforms. And the company has written a lot about it over the past few years. Even for IT professionals that deploy and manage servers. As an industry, we have become accustomed to using x86 as a baseline for comparison. If an x86 CPU has 64 cores, that becomes what we used to measure relative value in other CPUs.

But this is a flawed way of measuring CPUs and a broken system for measuring server platforms. An x86 core is different than an Arm core which is different than a Power core. While Arm has achieved parity with x86 for some cloud-native workloads, the Power architecture is different. Multi-threading, encryption, AI enablement – many functions are designed into Power that don’t impact performance like other architectures.

I write all this as a set-up for IBM's announced expanded support for its Power10 architecture. In the following paragraphs, I will provide the details of IBM's announcement and provide some thoughts on what this could mean for enterprise IT.

What was announced

Before discussing what was announced, it is a good idea to do a quick overview of Power10.

IBM introduced the Power10 CPU architecture at the Hot Chips conference in August 2020. Moor Insights & Strategy chief analyst Patrick Moorhead wrote about it here. Power10 is developed on the opensource Power ISA. Power10 comes in two variants – 15x SMT8 cores and 30x SMT4 cores. For those familiar with x86, SMT8 (8 threads/core seems extreme, as does SMT4. But this is where the Power ISA is fundamentally different from x86. Power is a highly performant ISA, and the Power10 cores are designed for the most demanding workloads.

One last note on Power10. SMT8 is optimized for higher throughput and lower computation. SMT4 attacks the compute-intensive space with lower throughput.

IBM introduced the Power E1080 in September of 2021. Moor Insights & Strategy chief analyst Patrick Moorhead wrote about it here. The E1080 is a system designed for mission and business-critical workloads and has been strongly adopted by IBM's loyal Power customer base.

Because of this success, IBM has expanded the breadth of the Power10 portfolio and how customers consume these resources.

The big reveal in IBM’s accurate announcement is the availability of four new servers built on the Power10 architecture. These servers are designed to address customers' full range of workload needs in the enterprise datacenter.

The Power S1014 is the traditional enterprise workhorse that runs the modern business. For x86 IT folks, think of the S1014 equivalent to the two-socket workhorses that run virtualized infrastructure. One of the things that IBM points out about the S1014 is that this server was designed with lower technical requirements. This statement leads me to believe that the company is perhaps softening the barrier for the S1014 in data centers that are not traditional IBM shops. Or maybe for environments that use Power for higher-end workloads but non-Power for traditional infrastructure needs.

The Power S1022 is IBM's scale-out server. Organizations embracing cloud-native, containerized environments will find the S1022 an ideal match. Again, for the x86 crowd – think of the traditional scale-out servers that are perhaps an AMD single socket or Intel dual-socket – the S1022 would be IBM's equivalent.

Finally, the S1024 targets the data analytics space. With lots of high-performing cores and a big memory footprint – this server plays in the area where IBM has done so well.

In addition, to these platforms, IBM also introduced the Power E1050. The E1050 seems designed for big data and workloads with significant memory throughput requirements.

The E1050 is where I believe the difference in the Power architecture becomes obvious. The E1050 is where midrange starts to bump into high performance, and IBM claims 8-socket performance in this four-socket socket configuration. IBM says it can deliver performance for those running big data environments, larger data warehouses, and high-performance workloads. Maybe, more importantly, the company claims to provide considerable cost savings for workloads that generally require a significant financial investment.

One benchmark that IBM showed was the two-tier SAP Standard app benchmark. In this test, the E1050 beat an x86, 8-socket server handily, showing a 2.6x per-core performance advantage. We at Moor Insights & Strategy didn’t run the benchmark or certify it, but the company has been conservative in its disclosures, and I have no reason to dispute it.

But the performance and cost savings are not just associated with these higher-end workloads with narrow applicability. In another comparison, IBM showed the Power S1022 performs 3.6x better than its x86 equivalent for running a containerized environment in Red Hat OpenShift. When all was added up, the S1022 was shown to lower TCO by 53%.

What makes Power-based servers perform so well in SAP and OpenShift?

The value of Power is derived both from the CPU architecture and the value IBM puts into the system and server design. The company is not afraid to design and deploy enhancements it believes will deliver better performance, higher security, and greater reliability for its customers. In the case of Power10, I believe there are a few design factors that have contributed to the performance and price//performance advantages the company claims, including

  • Use Differential DIMM technology to increase memory bandwidth, allowing for better performance from memory-intensive workloads such as in-memory database environments.
  • Built-in AI inferencing engines that increase performance by up to 5x.
  • Transparent memory encryption performs this function with no performance tax (note: AMD has had this technology for years, and Intel introduced about a year ago).

These seemingly minor differences can add up to deliver significant performance benefits for workloads running in the datacenter. But some of this comes down to a very powerful (pardon the redundancy) core design. While x86 dominates the datacenter in unit share, IBM has maintained a loyal customer base because the Power CPUs are workhorses, and Power servers are performant, secure, and reliable for mission critical applications.

Consumption-based offerings

Like other server vendors, IBM sees the writing on the wall and has opened up its offerings to be consumed in a way that is most beneficial to its customers. Traditional acquisition model? Check. Pay as you go with hardware in your datacenter? Also, check. Cloud-based offerings? One more check.

While there is nothing revolutionary about what IBM is doing with how customers consume its technology, it is important to note that IBM is the only server vendor that also runs a global cloud service (IBM Cloud). This should enable the company to pass on savings to its customers while providing greater security and manageability.

Closing thoughts

I like what IBM is doing to maintain and potentially grow its market presence. The new Power10 lineup is designed to meet customers' entire range of performance and cost requirements without sacrificing any of the differentiated design and development that the company puts into its mission critical platforms.

Will this announcement move x86 IT organizations to transition to IBM? Unlikely. Nor do I believe this is IBM's goal. However, I can see how businesses concerned with performance, security, and TCO of their mission and business-critical workloads can find a strong argument for Power. And this can be the beginning of a more substantial Power presence in the datacenter.

Note: This analysis contains insights from Moor Insights & Strategy Founder and Chief Analyst, Patrick Moorhead.

Moor Insights & Strategy, like all research and tech industry analyst firms, provides or has provided paid services to technology companies. These services include research, analysis, advising, consulting, benchmarking, acquisition matchmaking, and speaking sponsorships. The company has had or currently has paid business relationships with 8×8, Accenture, A10 Networks, Advanced Micro Devices, Amazon, Amazon Web Services, Ambient Scientific, Anuta Networks, Applied Brain Research, Applied Micro, Apstra, Arm, Aruba Networks (now HPE), Atom Computing, AT&T, Aura, Automation Anywhere, AWS, A-10 Strategies, Bitfusion, Blaize, Box, Broadcom, C3.AI, Calix, Campfire, Cisco Systems, Clear Software, Cloudera, Clumio, Cognitive Systems, CompuCom, Cradlepoint, CyberArk, Dell, Dell EMC, Dell Technologies, Diablo Technologies, Dialogue Group, Digital Optics, Dreamium Labs, D-Wave, Echelon, Ericsson, Extreme Networks, Five9, Flex, Foundries.io, Foxconn, Frame (now VMware), Fujitsu, Gen Z Consortium, Glue Networks, GlobalFoundries, Revolve (now Google), Google Cloud, Graphcore, Groq, Hiregenics, Hotwire Global, HP Inc., Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Honeywell, Huawei Technologies, IBM, Infinidat, Infosys, Inseego, IonQ, IonVR, Inseego, Infosys, Infiot, Intel, Interdigital, Jabil Circuit, Keysight, Konica Minolta, Lattice Semiconductor, Lenovo, Linux Foundation, Lightbits Labs, LogicMonitor, Luminar, MapBox, Marvell Technology, Mavenir, Marseille Inc, Mayfair Equity, Meraki (Cisco), Merck KGaA, Mesophere, Micron Technology, Microsoft, MiTEL, Mojo Networks, MongoDB, MulteFire Alliance, National Instruments, Neat, NetApp, Nightwatch, NOKIA (Alcatel-Lucent), Nortek, Novumind, NVIDIA, Nutanix, Nuvia (now Qualcomm), onsemi, ONUG, OpenStack Foundation, Oracle, Palo Alto Networks, Panasas, Peraso, Pexip, Pixelworks, Plume Design, PlusAI, Poly (formerly Plantronics), Portworx, Pure Storage, Qualcomm, Quantinuum, Rackspace, Rambus, Rayvolt E-Bikes, Red Hat, Renesas, Residio, Samsung Electronics, Samsung Semi, SAP, SAS, Scale Computing, Schneider Electric, SiFive, Silver Peak (now Aruba-HPE), SkyWorks, SONY Optical Storage, Splunk, Springpath (now Cisco), Spirent, Splunk, Sprint (now T-Mobile), Stratus Technologies, Symantec, Synaptics, Syniverse, Synopsys, Tanium, Telesign,TE Connectivity, TensTorrent, Tobii Technology, Teradata,T-Mobile, Treasure Data, Twitter, Unity Technologies, UiPath, Verizon Communications, VAST Data, Ventana Micro Systems, Vidyo, VMware, Wave Computing, Wellsmith, Xilinx, Zayo, Zebra, Zededa, Zendesk, Zoho, Zoom, and Zscaler. Moor Insights & Strategy founder, CEO, and Chief Analyst Patrick Moorhead is an investor in dMY Technology Group Inc. VI, Dreamium Labs, Groq, Luminar Technologies, MemryX, and Movandi.

Wed, 13 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Matt Kimball en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/moorinsights/2022/07/14/ibm-expands-its-power10-portfolio-for-mission-critical-applications/
000-N19 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List