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Vincent Caprio founded the Water Innovations Alliance Foundation (WIAF) in October 2008. In this role he created the Water 2.0 Conference series of which he is currently the Chairman Emeritus. As an early advocate for nanotechnology, Mr. Caprio is the Founder and Chairman Emeritus of the NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA). In 2002, he launched the highly successful NanoBusiness Conference series, now in its 19th year. 

A pioneer at the intersection of business and technology, Vincent Caprio possesses a unique ability to spot emerging and societally significant technologies in their early stages. He successfully creates brands and business organizations focused on specific technology markets, and launches events that not only educate, but also connect and empower stakeholders that include investors, technologists, CEOs and politicians. 

It is Mr. Caprio’s avid interest in history and background in finance that enabled him to be among the first to recognize the impact that specific technologies will have on business and society. By building community networks centered around his conferences, he has facilitated the growth of important new technologies, including nanotechnology, clean water technology and most recently, engineering software. 

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In the events sector, Mr. Caprio served as the Event Director who launched of The Emerging Technologies Conference in association with MIT’s Technology Review Magazine. He also acted as consultant to the leading emerging technology research and advisory firm Lux Research, for its Lux Executive Summit in 2005 & 2006. In 2002, Mr. Caprio served as the Event Director and Program Director of the Forbes/IBM Executive Summit. 

Prior to founding the NanoBCA, Mr. Caprio was Event Director for Red Herring Conferences, producing the company’s Venture Market conferences and Annual Summit reporting to Red Herring Magazine Founder and Publisher Tony Perkins, and Editor, Jason Pontin. His industry peers have formally recognized Mr. Caprio on several occasions for his talents in both tradeshow and conference management. 

Mr. Caprio was named Sales Executive of the Year in 1994 while employed with Reed Exhibitions, and was further honored with three Pathfinder Awards in 1995 for launching The New York Restaurant Show, Buildings Chicago and Buildings LA. 

Prior to joining Reed Elsevier’s office of the Controller in 1989, Mr. Caprio was employed at Henry Charles Wainwright investment group as a Senior Tax Accountant. In the 1980’s, he specialized in the preparation of 1120, 1065 and 1040 tax forms, and was also employed with the Internal Revenue Service from 1979- 1981. 

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Mr. Caprio graduated from Villanova University with a Bachelor of Science in Accounting/MIS from the Villanova School of Business. He received an MBA/MPA from Fairleigh Dickinson University. 

In the spring of 2015, Mr. Caprio was appointed to Wichita State University's Applied Technology Acceleration Institute (ATAI) as a water and energy expert. In 2017 he was named Program Director of the Center for Digital Transformation at Pfeiffer University. Mr. Caprio was elected in November 2016 and serves as the Easton, Connecticut Registrar of Voters. 

Mon, 23 May 2022 19:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.clarkson.edu/beacon-leadership-council
Killexams : Making the DevOps Pipeline Transparent and Governable

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Transcript

Shane Hastie: Good day folks. This is Shane Hastie for the InfoQ Engineering Culture podcast. Today, I'm sitting down with David Williams from Quali. David, welcome. Thanks for taking the time to talk to us today.

David Williams: Thanks, Shane. It's great to be here.

Shane Hastie: Probably my first starting point for most of these conversations is who's David?

Introductions [00:23]

David, he's a pretty boring character, really. He's been in the IT industry all his life, so there's only so many parties you can go and entertain people with that subject now. But I've been working since I first went to school. My first jobs were working in IT operations in a number of financial companies. I started at the back end. For those of you who want to know how old I was, I remember a time when printing was a thing. And so decorating was my job, carrying tapes, separating print out, doing those sort of things. So really I got a very grassroots level of understanding about what technology was all about, and it was nowhere near as glamorous as I've been full to believe. So I started off, I'd say, working operations. I've worked my way through computer operations systems administration, network operations. So I used to be part of a NOC team, customer support.

David Williams: I did that sort of path, as low as you can get in the ladder, to arguably about a rung above. And then what happened over that period of time was I worked a lot with distributed systems, lights out computing scenarios, et cetera and it enabled me to get more involved in some of the development work that was being done, specifically to manage these new environments, specifically mesh computing, clusters, et cetera. How do you move workloads around dynamically and how does the operating system become much more aware of what it's doing and why? Because obviously, it just sees them as workloads but needed to be smarter. So I got into development that way, really. I worked for Digital Equipment in its heyday, working on clusters and part of the team that was doing the operating system work. And so that, combined with my knowledge of how people were using the tech, being one of the people that was once an operations person, it enabled me as a developer to have a little bit of a different view on what needed to be done.

And that's what really motivated me to excel in that area, because I wanted to make sure that a lot of the things that were being built could be built in support of making operations simpler, making the accountability of what was going on more accountable to the business, to enable the services to be a little more transparent in how IT was using them around. So that throughout my career, luckily for me, the tech industry reinvents itself in a very similar way every seven years. So I just have to wait seven years to look like one of the smart guys again. So that's how I really got into it from the get go.

Shane Hastie: So that developer experience is what we'd call thinking about making it better for developers today. What are the key elements of this developer experience for us?

The complexity in the developer role today [02:54]

David Williams: When I was in development, the main criteria that I was really responsible for was time. It was around time and production rates. I really had no clue why I was developing the software. Obviously, I knew what application I was working on and I knew what it was, but I never really saw the results. So over the years, I wasn't doing it for a great amount of time, to be honest with you. Because when I started looking at what needed to be done, I moved quite quickly from being a developer into being a product manager, which by the way, if you go from development to product management, it's not exactly a smooth path. But I think it was something that enabled me to be a better product manager at the time, because then I understood the operations aspects, I was a developer and I understood what it was that made the developer tick because that's why I did it.

It was a great job to create something and work on it and actually show the results. And I think over the years, it enabled me to look at the product differently. And I think that as a developer today, what developers do today is radically more advanced than what I was expected to do. I did not have continuous delivery. I did not really have a continuous feedback. I did not have the responsibility for testing whilst developing. So there was no combined thing. It was very segmented and siloed. And I think over the years, I've seen what I used to do as an art form become extremely sophisticated with a lot more requirements of it than was there. And I think for my career, I was a VP of Products at IBM Tivoli, I was a CTO at BMT software, and I worked for CA Technology prior to its acquisition by Broadcom, where I was the Senior Vice President of Product Strategy.

But in all those jobs, it enabled me to really understand the value of the development practices and how these practices can be really honed in, in support between the products and the IT operations world, as well as really more than anything else, the connection between the developer and the consumer. That was never part of my role. I had no clue who was using my product. And as an operations person, I only knew the people that were unhappy. So I think today's developer is a much more... They tend to be highly skilled in a way that I was not because coding is part of their role. Communication, collaboration, the integration, the cloud computing aspects, everything that you have to now include from an infrastructure is significantly in greater complexity. And I'll summarize by saying that I was also an analyst for Gartner for many years and I covered the DevOps toolchains.

And the one thing I found out there was there isn't a thing called DevOps that you can put into a box. It's very much based upon a culture and a type of company that you're with. So everybody had their interpretation of their box. But one thing was very common, the complexity in all cases was significantly high and growing to the point where the way that you provision and deliver the infrastructure in support of the code you're building, became much more of a frontline job than something that you could accept as being a piece of your role. It became a big part of your role. And that's what really drove me towards joining Quali, because this company is dealing with something that I found as being an inhibitor to my productivity, both as a developer, but also when I was also looking up at the products, I found that trying to work out what the infrastructure was doing in support of what the code was doing was a real nightmare.

Shane Hastie: Let's explore that when it comes, step back a little bit, you made the point about DevOps as a culture. What are the key cultural elements that need to be in place for DevOps to be effective in an organization?

The elements of DevOps culture [06:28]

David Williams: Yeah, this is a good one. When DevOps was an egg, it really was an approach that was radically different from the norm. And what I mean, obviously for people that remember it back then, it was the continuous... Had nothing to do with Agile. It was really about continuous delivery of software into the environment in small chunks, microservices coming up. It was delivering very specific pieces of code into the infrastructure, continuously, evaluating the impact of that release and then making adjustments and change in respect to the feedback that gave you. So the fail forward thing was very much an accepted behavior, what it didn't do at the time, and it sort of glossed over it a bit, was it did remove a lot of the compliance and regulatory type of mandatory things that people would use in the more traditional ways of developing and delivering code, but it was a fledging practice.

And from that base form, it became a much, much bigger one. So really what that culturally meant was initially it was many, many small teams working in combination of a bigger outcome, whether it was stories in support of epics or whatever the response was. But I find today, it has a much bigger play because now it does have Agile as an inherent construct within the DevOps procedures, so you've got the ability to do teamwork and collaboration and all the things that Agile defines, but you've also got the continuous delivery part of that added on top, which means that at any moment in time, you're continually putting out updates and changes and then measuring the impact. And I think today's challenge is really the feedback loop isn't as clear as it used to be because people are starting to use it for a serious applications delivery now.

The consumer, which used to be the primary recipient, the lamp stacks that used to be built out there have now moved into the back end type of tech. And at that point, it gets very complex. So I think that the complexity of the pipeline is something that the DevOps team needs to work on, which means that even though collaboration and people working closely together, it's a no brainer in no matter what you're doing, to be honest. But I think that the ability to understand and have a focused understanding of the outcome objective, no matter who you are in the DevOps pipeline, that you understand what you're doing and why it is, and everybody that's in that team understands their contribution, irrespective of whether they talk to each other, I think is really important, which means that technology supporting that needs to have context.

I need to understand what the people around me have done to be code. I need to know what stage it's in. I need to understand where it came from and who do I pass it to? So all that needs to be not just the cultural thing, but the technology itself also needs to adhere to that type of practice.

Shane Hastie: One of the challenges or one of the pushbacks we often hear about is the lack of governance or the lack of transparency for governance in the DevOps space. How do we overcome that?

Governance in DevOps [09:29]

David Williams: The whole approach of the DevOps, initially, was to think about things in small increments, the bigger objective, obviously being the clarity. But the increments were to provide lots and lots of enhancements and advances. When you fragmented in that way and deliver the ability for the developer to make choices on how they both code and provision infrastructure, it can sometimes not necessarily lead to things being unsecure or not governed, but it means that there's different security and different governance within a pipeline. So where the teams are working quite closely together, that may not automatically move if you've still got your different testing team. So if your testing is not part of your development code, which in some cases it is, some cases it isn't, and you move from one set of infrastructure, for example, that supports the code to another one, they might be using a completely different set of tooling.

They might have different ways with which to measure the governance. They might have different guardrails, obviously, and everything needs to be accountable to change because financial organizations, in fact, most organizations today, have compliance regulations that says any changes to any production, non-production environment, in fact, in most cases, requires accountability. And so if you're not reporting in a, say, consistent way, it makes the job of understanding what's going on in support of compliance and governance really difficult. So it really requires governance to be a much more abstract, but end to end thing as opposed to each individual stay as its own practices. So governance today is starting to move to a point where one person needs to see the end to end pipeline and understand what exactly is going on? Who is doing what, where and how? Who has permissions and access? What are the configurations that are changing?

Shane Hastie: Sounds easy, but I suspect there's a whole lot of... Again, coming back to the culture, we're constraining things that for a long time, we were deliberately releasing.

Providing freedom withing governance constraints [11:27]

David Williams: This is a challenge. When I was a developer of my choice, it's applicable today. When I heard the word abstract, it put the fear of God into me, to be honest with you. I hated the word abstract. I didn't want anything that made my life worse. I mean, being accountable was fine. When I used to heard the word frameworks and I remember even balking at the idea of a technology that brought all my coding environment into one specific view. So today, nothing's changed. A developer has got to be able to use the tools that they want to use and I think that the reason for that is that with the amount of skills that people have, we're going to have to, as an industry, get used to the fact that people have different skills and different focuses and different preferences of technology.

And so to actually mandate a specific way of doing something or implementing a governance engine that inhibits my ability to innovate is counterproductive. It needs to have that balance. You need to be able to have innovation, freedom of choice, and the ability to use the technology in the way that you need to use to build the code. But you also need to be able to provide the accountability to the overall objective, so you need to have that end to end view on what you're doing. So as you are part of a team, each team member should have responsibility for it and you need to be able to provide the business with the things that it needs to make sure that nothing goes awry and that there's nothing been breached. So no security issues occurring, no configurations are not tracked. So how do you do that?

Transparency through tooling [12:54]

David Williams: And as I said, that's what drove me towards Quali, because as a company, the philosophy was very much on the infrastructure. But when I spoke to the CEO of the company, we had a conversation prior to my employment here, based upon my prior employer, which was a company that was developing toolchain products to help developers and to help people release into production. And the biggest challenge that we had there was really understanding what the infrastructure was doing and the governance that was being put upon those pieces. So think about it as you being a train, but having no clue about what gauge the track is at any moment in time. And you had to put an awful lot of effort into working out what is being done underneath the hood. So what I'm saying is that there needed to be something that did that magic thing.

It enabled you with a freedom of choice, captured your freedom of choice, translated it into a way that adhered it to a set of common governance engines without inhibiting your ability to work, but also provided visibility to the business to do governance and cost control and things that you can do when you take disparate complexity, translate it and model it, and then actually provide that consistency view to the higher level organizations that enable you to prove that you are meeting all the compliance and governance rules.

Shane Hastie: Really important stuff there, but what are the challenges? How do we address this?

The challenges of complexity [14:21]

David Williams: See, the ability to address it and to really understand why the problems are occurring. Because if you talk to a lot of developers today and say, “How difficult is your life and what are the issues?", the conversation you'll have with a developer is completely different than the conversation you'll have with a DevOps team lead or a business unit manager, in regards to how they see applications being delivered and coded. So at the developer level, I think the tools that are being developed today, so the infrastructure providers, for example, the application dictates what it needs. It's no longer, I will build an infrastructure and then you will layer the applications on like you used to be able to do. Now what happens is applications and the way that they behave is actually defining where you need to put the app, the tools that are used to both create it and manage it from the Dev and the Op side.

So really what the understanding is, okay, that's the complexity. So you've got infrastructure providers, the clouds, so you've got different clouds. And no matter what you say, they're all different impact, serverless, classic adoption of serverless, is very proprietary in nature. You can't just move one serverless environment from one to another. I'm sure there'll be a time when you might be able to do that, but today it's extremely proprietary. So you've got the infrastructure providers. Then you've got the people that are at the top layer. So you've got the infrastructure technology layer. And that means that on top of that, you're going to have VMs or containers or serverless something that sits on your cloud. And that again is defined by what the application needs, in respect to portability, where it lives, whether it lives in the cloud or it's partly an edge, wherever you want to put it.

And then of course on top of that, you've got all the things that you can use that enables you to instrument and code to those things. So you've got things like Helm charts for containers, and you've got a Terraform where developing the infrastructure as code pieces, or you might be using Puppet or Chef or Ansible. So you've got lots of tools out there, including all the other tools from the service providers themselves. So you've got a lot of the instrumentation. And so you've got that stack. So the skills you've got, so you've got the application defining what you want to do, the developer chooses how they use it in support of the application outcome. So really what you want to be able to do is have something that has a control plane view that says, okay, you can do whatever you want.

Visibility into the pipeline [16:36]

David Williams: These are the skills that you need. But if people leave, what do you do? Do you go and get all the other developers to try and debug and translate what the coding did? Wouldn't it be cool instead to have a set of tech that you could understand what the different platform configuration tools did and how they applied, so look at it in a much more consistent form. Doesn't stop them using what they want, but the layer basically says, "I know, I've discovered what you're using. I've translated how it's used, and I'm now enabling you to model it in a way that enables everybody to use it." So the skills thing is always going to exist. The turnover of people is also very extremely, I would say, more damaging than the skills because people come and go quite freely today. It's the way that the market is.

And then there's the accountability. What do the tools do and why do they do it? So you really want to also deal with the governance piece that we mentioned earlier on, you also want to provide context. And I think that the thing that's missing when you build infrastructure as code and you do all these other things is even though you know why you're building it and you know what it does to build it, that visibility that you're going to have a conversation with the DevOps lead and the business unit manager, wouldn't it be cool if they could actually work out that what you did is in support of what they need. So it has the application ownership pieces, for example, a business owner. These are the things that we provide context. So as each piece of infrastructure is developed through the toolchain, it adds context and the context is consistent.

So as the environments are moved in a consistent way, you actually have context that says this was planned, this was developed, and this is what it was done for. This is how it was tested. I'm now going to leverage everything that the developer did, but now add my testing tools on top. And I'm going to move that in with the context. I'm now going to release the technology until I deploy, release it, into either further testing or production. But the point is that as things get provisioned, whether you are using different tools at different stages, or whether you are using different platforms with which to develop and then test and then release, you should have some view that says all these things are the same thing in support of the business outcome and that is all to do with context. So again, why I joined Quali was because it provides models that provide that context and I think context is very important and it's not always mentioned.

As a coder, I used to write lots and lots of things in the code that gave people a clue on what I was doing. I used to have revision numbers. But outside of that and what I did to modify the code within a set of files, I really didn't have anything about what the business it was supporting it. And I think today with the fragmentation that exists, you've got to deliver people clues on why infrastructure is being deployed, used, and retired, and it needs to be done in our life cycle because you don't want dormant infrastructure sitting out there. So you've got to have it accountable and that's where the governance comes in. So the one thing I didn't mention earlier on was you've got to have ability to be able to work out what you're using, why it's being used and why is it out there absorbing capacity and compute, costing me money, and yet no one seems to be using it.

Accountability and consistency without constraining creativity and innovation [19:39]

David Williams: So you want to be out of accountability and with context in it, that at least gives you information that you can rely back to the business to say, "This is what it cost to actually develop the full life cycle of our app, in that particular stage of the development cycle." So it sounds very complex because it is, but the way to simplify it is really to not abstract it, but consume it. So you discover it, you work out what's going on and you create a layer of technology that can actually provide consistent costing, through consistent tagging, which you can do with the governance, consistent governance, so you're actually measuring things in the same way, and you're providing consistency through the applications layer. So you're saying all these things happen in support, these applications, et cetera. So if issues occur, bugs occur, when it reports itself integrated with the service management tools, suddenly what you have there is a problem that's reported in response to an application, to a release specific to an application, which then associates itself with a service level, which enables you to actually do report and remediation that much more efficiently.

So that's where I think we're really going is that the skills are always going to be fragmented and you shouldn't inhibit people doing what they need. And I think the last thing I mentioned is you should have the infrastructure delivered in the way you want it. So you've got CLIs, if that's a preferred way, APIs to call it if you want to. But for those who don't have the skills, it's not a developer only world if I'm an abstraction layer and I'm more of an operations person or someone that doesn't have the deep diving code skills, I should need to see a catalog of available environments built by coding, built by the people that actually have that skill. But I should be able to, in a single click, provision an environment in support of an application requirement that doesn't require me to be a coder.

So that means that you can actually share things. So coders can code, that captures the environment. If that environment is needed by someone that doesn't have the skills, but it's consistently, because it has all that information in it, I can hit a click. It goes and provisions that infrastructure and I haven't touched code at all. So that's how you see the skills being leveraged. And you just got to accept the fact that people will be transient going forward. They will work from company to company, project to project, and that skills will be diverse, but you've got to provide a layer with which that doesn't matter.

Shane Hastie: Thank you very much. If people want to continue the conversation, where do they find you?

David Williams: They can find me in a number of places. I think the best place is I'm at Quali. It is David.W@Quali.com. I'm the only David W., which is a good thing, so you'll find me very easily. Unlike a plane I got the other day, where I was the third David Williams on the plane, the only one not to get an upgrade. So that's where you can find me. I'm also on LinkedIn, Dave Williams on LinkedIn can be found under Quali and all the companies that I've spoken to you about. So as I say, I'm pretty easy to find. And I would encourage, by the way, anybody to reach out to me, if they have any questions about what I've said. It'd be a great conversation.

Shane Hastie: Thanks, David. We really appreciate it.

David Williams: Thank you, Shane.

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Sun, 10 Jul 2022 13:55:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.infoq.com/podcasts/making-devops-pipeline-transparent/
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GBP65000 - GBP75000 per annum + + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

This household name is seeking a bright & commercially aware indirect procurement candidate to join their growing function.

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Homeworking

GBP75000 - GBP80000 per annum + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Iconic brand seeks a high-achieving procurement expert to join the ranks and drive a crucial spend category towards best-in-class.

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Ealing, England

£200.00 - £229.00 per day

Hays

Esteemed organisation seeking HR Business Partner from 4 month temporary assignment

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Peterborough, England

£55000.00 - £70000.00 per annum + car or car allowance, PMI

Hays

Strategic HR Business Partner for global organisation in Peterborough, up to £70k + car allowance, PMI, hybrid

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England

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Car + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Procurement Manager - Global Prof. Services Salary: £55-65,000 plus package + CIPS Sponsorship Location: Hertfordshire

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London (Central), London (Greater)

£40,000 - £50,000, pro rata

New Philanthropy Capital

Do you have evaluation skills, and want rewarding work in the charity sector? Join our team, exploring how charities can Strengthen how they helppeople.

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London, with hybrid working options

£40,000 - £50,000, pro rata

New Philanthropy Capital

Do you have quantitative research skills and want rewarding work in the charity sector? This roles explores how to use data to learn and innovate.

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London, England

£50000.00 - £60000.00 per annum

Hays

L&D Manager London - hybrid £50000 -£60000pa

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London

£56,678 - £61,606

Queen Mary University of London

Line Manage 2 people and be responsible for a team of 10 Work with marketing agencies across the globe to deliver campaigns About Our Client Que...

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London (Central), London (Greater)

£65 - 80,000+

Carter Ferris

Looking for an Associate Director desparate to develop their political career by shaping company narratives and influence political and policy environment

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London

Up to £500 per day OUTSIDE IR35

Castlefield Recruitment

Interim IT Senior Procurement Manager| Remote | £500 per day OUTSIDE IR35 | 6 Months Client:  Castlefield Recruitment are currently working with a ...

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London

GBP75000 - GBP85000 per annum + + 20% bonus + benefits

Bramwith Consulting

European CPRM Lead - Global Leading Food & Beverage Firm World leading food & beverage company, with a globally recognized brand seeks a European Comm

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London (Central), London (Greater)

up to £70k+++

Carter Ferris

Great, global agency and multi award-winning team, looking for strong Senior Account Director and Associate Director with experience of the energy ...

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Part home/part office (London) based

Circa £50,000 per annum

The UK Committee for UNICEF

This is a great opportunity to join the UK Committee for UNICEF (UNICEF UK) as our Lead Digital Analyst.

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Leatherhead, England

Up to £75000.00 per annum

Hays

Reward manager, up to £75,000, FTC until end of March 2023

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London (Central), London (Greater)

Up to £160k

Barker Graves

Strategy Director needed for a famous broadcast/ATL global agency

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London (Central), London (Greater)

£42,571 - £50,083 + £3366 London weighting Region:London

NSPCC

The Income Generation Directorate at the NSPCC has an exciting opportunity to lead the highly successful New Product Development and Innovation tea...

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Maidenhead

£43000 - £51000 per annum + excellent benefits

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

We are seeking a talented Project Manager to join our HRIS Project Team.

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Homeworking

GBP50000 - GBP60000 per annum + + Package + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

Strategic Procurement Manager - Raw Materials - Global and Iconic FMCG brand Location: London/Remote Salary: £50-60k + package

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Birmingham, West Midlands

Up to £90,000 + package

Langley Search & Interim

Do you have a passion for Managing the commercial and contractual aspects of complex engagements? If so bring your talents to one of the leading gl...

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London

£50k - 55k per year

Harris Hill

This senior role leads a small communications team to drive the charity's ambitious communications strategy forwards

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Staffordshire Police Headquarters, Weston Road, Stafford, Staffordshire, ST18 0YY

£96,996 - £114,888

Staffordshire Police

Assistant Chief Officer (Resources) - £96,996 - £114,888 Grade: Assistant Chief Officer Reports to: Deputy Chief Constable Salary: £96,996 - £114,8...

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London, England

£400.00 - £450.00 per day

Hays

Learning & Performance BP, 400 a day, 6 months, Tech Firm, London, Partially Remote

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Homeworking

GBP70000 - GBP95000 per annum + Benefits inc. Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Procurement Managing Consultant / Best-in-Class Consultancy / Home Based Contract / Birmingham / £70,000 - £95,000 + Benefits inc. Bonus

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London

£65000.00 - £75000.00 per annum + plus bonus and benefits

DNA Recruit

Account Director - Brand Partnerships and Activation Agency - London - £75K

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Riyadh

GBP50000 - GBP60000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Global Procurement Consultancy seeking a Procurement Officer specialising in Directs and Raw Materials - Joining a world renowned construction project

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City of London, England

£60000.00 - £90000.00 per annum

Hays

Senior Talent Acquisitions Partner within Technology in a Leading Fortune 500 Tech Solutions Firm

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London, City of London

Negotiable

DNA Recruit

Are you are Strategist with passion for shopper and retail?Would you like to be part of an inspiring team and work with some of the best brands in the

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London

£70000 - £80000 per annum

Major Players

Creative Director We are working with a alternative, independent creative agency who are looking for a Creative and art direction lead for global spor

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London (Central), London (Greater)

circa £75k

Corporate Communications Recruitment

Leading Communications agency are looking to hire a Sustainability communications lead/director. London based vacancy!

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Macclesfield, Cheshire

Up to £75,000 + package

Langley Search & Interim

Is finding strategic value in Marketing & Martech spend a passion of yours? Then bring your experience with you to a leading Financial Firm! My Cli...

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London (Central), London (Greater)

circa £100k

Corporate Communications Recruitment

Our client is an international specialist comms. consultancy. They are looking to hire a Media Coach with a financial journalism background.

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London (Central), London (Greater)

circa £100k

Corporate Communications Recruitment

Our client is a Consulting and Communications agency. They are looking to hire an IR Consultant with experience of capital markets and investor days.

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London (Central), London (Greater)

up to £100k

Corporate Communications Recruitment

An award winning global integrated agency with a strong corporate branding offer are looking to hire a head of brand strategy. Great opportunity!

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London, England

£50000.00 - £56000.00 per annum

Hays

Resource Manager, International Consulting Firm, 50K - 55K, London, Permanent, Hybrid.

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Flexible (Role based from one of this charity's 4 National offices, remote/hybrid working available)

£47,692 - £53,111 per annum plus excellent benefits

CHM

Could you lead a team of project, production and technical managers, and oversee the management of all this charity's Digital Projects & Programmes?

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London

£50,000 - £60,000 Per Annum

NFP People

We are looking for an exceptional Public Realm Manager with drive, and ambition to contribute to making the area more sustainable and welcoming.

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Dover – hybrid working (3x days in office)

Circa £100,000

VMA Group

Fantastic opportunity for a Head of Communications to join a well known business in the transportation and logistics sector.

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Leeds

£60,000 - £65,000

Michael Page Client Branded

Head of Supply Chain for BookTrust, the UK's largest children's memorizing charity Exciting period of transformation as part of their 5 year strate...

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London

£60000.00 - £70000.00 per annum + bonus & benefits

DNA Recruit

PR & Communications Director to join independent digital agency salary: £70K get in touch

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Homeworking

GBP90000 - GBP95000 per annum + Package

Bramwith Consulting

Role: IT/BPO Procurement Outsourcing Consultant Firm: FTSE 250 Professional Services Firm Salary: £90,000 - £95,000 + Package Location: London Contact

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London

GBP50000.00 - GBP70000.00 per annum + Excellent Bonus, Rapid Progression

Bramwith Consulting

Senior Procurement Consultant - MULTIPLE POSITIONS - Specialist Procurement Consultancy - London + Flexible Working - £50,000 + £70,000 + BONUS

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London

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + Package, Rapid Progression

Bramwith Consulting

Direct Procurement Senior Consultant - Leading Boutique Procurement Consultancy - London / South-East - £55,000- £65,000 Leading Boutique Procurement Consultancy is looking for a direct procurement senior consultant to bolster their rapidly growing

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Oxfordshire, England

£50000.00 - £55000.00 per annum

Hays

Talent Acquisition Manager - Central Oxford - Hybrid - Up to £55,000

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New York

£70000 - £85000 per annum

Major Players

Copywriter A leading global company is looking for an experienced Copywriter to join their team in New York working in the Marketing Consumer departme

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London (Central), London (Greater)

95000 - 110000

f1 Recruitment

A long-standing, forward thinking client of ours is looking for a Director / Board Director ideally with Financial Services experience or from anot...

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London (Central), London (Greater)

to £70k + good bonuses/benefits

Fill Recruitment

Experience design consultancy seeks an Account Director or Senior Account Director for London / Bristol or remote working

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London

GBP60000 - GBP65000 per annum + Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Role: IT Procurement Manager- World Renowned Fashion Retailer - London - £65K + Bonus + Benefits Global Leading Fashion Retailer presents a uniquely exciting opportunity for an ambitious IT Procurement Manager to autonomously manage a spend of £200m

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Homeworking

GBP45000 - GBP65000 per annum + Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Marketing Procurement Manager / FMCG / Globally Loved Brand / London / £45,000 - £65,000 + Benefits inc. Bonus

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London, England

£75000.00 - £80000.00 per annum

Hays

Senior HR Business Partner 12 Month FTC London City 2 days in the office £75,000 - £80,000

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City of London, England

£55000 - £60000 per annum

Morgan Law

My client is looking for a Head of HR to join their unique not for profit organisation on a 12 month contract. Based in the West End this small but prestigious charity offers the opportunity to work at strategic level reporting into the CEO.

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London, City of London

Up to £350 per day

Major Players

Freelance Digital Marketing Manager - 6-month contract - Flexible Hybrid - £350 per day [Inside IR35] Major Players are working with an industry leadi

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New York

Negotiable

Major Players

This pioneering blockchain engineering company created a well known and succesful crypto currency. They are also currently working on a number of exci

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London (Central), London (Greater)

To £80k plus benefits

Agencyland Limited

Are you an experienced Account Director who feels ready for their first Business Director role?

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Homeworking

GBP65000 - GBP75000 per annum + + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

This household name is seeking a bright & commercially aware indirect procurement candidate to join their growing function.

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London

GBP60000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Package

Bramwith Consulting

This expansive and global organisation are currently undergoing an exciting transformative period internally, and are now seeking a Procurement Business Partner specialising within commercial entertainment and production to join their highly specialised p

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London

GBP60000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Package

Bramwith Consulting

This expansive and global organisation are currently undergoing an exciting transformative period internally, and are now seeking a Procurement Business Partner specialising within commercial entertainment and production to join their highly specialised p

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CHILTERNS MS CENTRE, Near Wendover, Aylesbury, HP22 5LX

Hours approx. 30 to 37.5 hours per week. FTE Salary £60,000 to £65,000

Chilterns MS Centre Ltd

This is an exciting time for a dynamic CEO to lead the Chilterns MS Centre into its next chapter - a period of growth and expansion into new services.

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London

£350 - £370 per day

mustard md

Are you a Freelance Designer/ Artworker skilled in PPT & Keynote? I have the pleasure of working with one of the globe’s leading entertainment brands...

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London

£300 - £350 per day

mustard md

Freelance Motion Graphic Designer with availability from Mid August?   I have the pleasure of working one the globe’s leading entertainment brands who are looking for...

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Nationwide

£60,000

Music for Youth

We are seeking an exceptional Development Director with excellent knowledge of fundraising and philanthropy to lead and develop Music for Youth’s f...

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Blended between office and home (England and Wales)

£45,822 (Including £2610 market premia)+ £3520 London Allowance if applicable

Citizens Advice

Do you want to work for an organisation that makes a difference, every single day, to people from all walks of life?

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Homeworking

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Car & Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Iconic FMCG brand seeks a high-achieving procurement expert to join the ranks and drive a crucial spend category towards best-in-class.

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London, England

£70000.00 - £90000.00 per annum + Bonus, hybrid, negotiable

Hays

Reporting to the Director, Global Compensation, the Global Investments Compensation Manager will be responsible for providing advisory services to senior business leaders and HR business partners within our investment teams, in alignment with OMERS compen

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London, England

£50000 - £60000 per annum

Hays

HR Advisor/Junior HRBP, 55K, 16 Month FTC, Investment Management Firm, Flexible Hybrid Working, London

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Homeworking

GBP75000 - GBP80000 per annum + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Iconic brand seeks a high-achieving procurement expert to join the ranks and drive a crucial spend category towards best-in-class.

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City of London

GBP65000 - GBP75000 per annum + + Package + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Senior Procurement Manager - Global Pharmaceutical - North West London - 65-75K + package + flexible working

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London

GBP35000 - GBP70000 per annum + Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Procurement Consultant / Multiple Levels / Management Consultancy / Rapid Career Progression / London / Flexible Working / £35,000 - £70,000 + Benefits inc. Bonus

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London

£75000 - £80000 per annum

Major Players

ROLE: Associate Creative Director (Copywriter) Rare opportunity to work with an international integrated communications agency! Key Responsibilities

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Chelmsford

GBP75000 - GBP80000 per annum + + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Rapidly growing professional services firm seeks an experienced indirect procurement leader to join their procurement function during a period of exciting transformation and growth.

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South West England

to c£60k + bens and flexible working

Langley Search & Interim

My client, a logistics and supply chain transformation specialist, are looking to recruit a Subcontract Manager to work within a team managing high...

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London (Central), London (Greater)

Salary DOE plus bonus

createselect

Global Business Director ideally with drinks experience needed for a stunning agency in the emerging tech space.

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London

£56k per year

Harris Hill

Working for a health membership organisation, to best promote, market and communicate the continual professional development benefits of membership.

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London (Central)

up to c.£85k + bonus and benefits

Premier Resourcing UK

Brand new in-house Group Internal Communications and Change Management Lead position with global organisation.

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Leicester, Leicestershire

Competitive salary plus benefits

PA Housing

We’re looking for a proven HR & OD leader, who can draw on accomplished people and programme management skills to bring about organisational change.

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Andover, England

£50000.00 - £60000.00 per annum

Hays

A Senior HRBP role in Andover paying up to £60,000 pa doe for a multinational consumer goods organisation.

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London

£50k per year

Harris Hill

Make your mark in a dynamic business-facing non-profit organisation, working to get messages across to key audiences and Capital Markets stakeholders

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Homeworking

GBP70000 - GBP75000 per annum + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

This innovative flexible real estate services firm is searching for a strong Sourcing Manager to join their young, growing procurement team.

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Royal Docks, E16

£81,537 per annum

Greater London Authority

This is a really exciting opportunity for a highly skilled comms professional to play a leading role in shaping the work of the London Assembly. Th...

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Homeworking

GBP75000 - GBP90000 per annum + Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Procurement Managing Consultant / Best-in-Class Boutique Management Consultancy / London / Flexible Working / £75,000 - £90,000 + Benefits inc. Bonus

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Soho

£80/95K

Barker Graves

This is a first-class opportunity to work at one of London'sbest integrated creative agencies for an experienced Senior Account Director looking to...

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Newark

USD90000.00 - USD110000 per annum + Bonus + Private Health

Bramwith Consulting

Global Procurement Manager - HR & Professional Services Fortune 100 FMCG Newark, New Jersey $110,000 + Bonus + Private Healthcare Global FMCG seeks an ambitious procurement specialist to join their team in a newly created role to support the d

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Boston

USD130000.00 - USD140000.00 per annum + Excellent Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Senior Procurement Manager - GNFR - Global Retailer - Boston, MA - $130,000 - $140,000 + Package This global fashion retailer is looking to build out their Greenfield Procurement function across the North America region and is seeking an experienc

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City of London, England

£65000.00 - £70000.00 per annum

Hays

Learning and Development Manager, Permanent, Oxfordshire / Berkshire

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London, City of London

£50 - £70 per hour

Major Players

Freelance Paid Search / PPC Specialist - Hybrid - £50 - £70 per hour Major Players are working with a well-known beauty subscription brand, selling hi

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Kings Norton, Birmingham

£90,000 - £100,000 per annum

Harris Hill

We are a charity working across the West Midlands to provide quality services for autistic people and their families. We are looking for a strategi...

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City of London, London

£300 - £350 per day

Major Players

Freelance Display Planning Manager - Flexible Hybrid - £350 per day [Outside IR35] Major Players are working with a globally recognised agency, workin

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London

GBP55800 - GBP69000 per annum (dependent on experience)

Notting Hill Genesis

Summary Can you help us to deliver outstanding residential-led developments through successful partnerships with our contractors and professional con

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Oxford, England

Up to £80000.00 per annum

Hays

A great new role to support the global HR transformation within a charity.

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Betsi, North Wales

Pay Band 9

Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board

This is a new role for us at Betsi, and we are seeking an exceptional people leader with passion, energy and insight, and the experience to support...

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London

GBP40000 - GBP70000 per annum + + Package

Bramwith Consulting

An exciting opportunity has arisen to join a leading, niche, UK Management Consultancy; this organisation are seeking a results orientated, innovative procurement specialist to join their expansive function.

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London (Central)

Depending on experience

Premier Resourcing UK

Director of International PR GV5400 An integrated marketing communications consultancy have a fantastic opportunity to join a senior role as Di...

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Lincolnshire

Negotiable

Major Players

Marketing Operations Manager - New York - Working with Sports, Fashion, Events and Media!Major Players are working with a global market leader in spor

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London

Negotiable

Major Players

Design Director - New York - Working with Sports, Fashion, Events and Media!Major Players are working with a global market leader in sports, fashion,

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St. Albans, England

£95000.00 - £110000.00 per annum

Hays

Permanent Head of HR / HR Director, Near to ST Albans, £95,000-£110,000 + Benefits

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London

£45.5k - 53k per year

Harris Hill

Harris Hill are working with one of the UK's leading charities who is looking for a new Head of New Product Development and Innovation

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London, England

Up to £70000.00 per annum

Hays

HR Business Partner London - Hyrbid £70000pa

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Brighton, England

£50000.00 - £60000.00 per annum + benefits

Hays

Head of Employee Policy and Relations for the University of Sussex in Brighton

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Homeworking

GBP70000 - GBP85000 per annum + Package

Bramwith Consulting

Role: Software Sourcing Manger Firm: UK Leading Banking Group Location: London - Hybrid Working Salary: £70,000 - £85,000 + Package Contact: Tabitha -

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City of London

GBP80000 - GBP90000 per annum + bonus + flexi working

Bramwith Consulting

Head of Procurement Strategy - First-Class Procurement Function - £80-90k + Bonus + Package Location: Nationwide offices, including Manchester, Birmingham, and London (home working available)

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Leeds

£60,000 - £65,000

BookTrust

Head of Supply Chain for BookTrust, the UK's largest children's memorizing charity Exciting period of transformation as part of their 5 year strate...

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Outside London

Competitive base + full benefit's package

PA Consulting

Commercial & Procurement Specialist We adopt a hybrid model at PA, but your office base will be in the location nearest to you: Bristol, Cheltenha...

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Warwick

£50,000 - £55,000 Per Annum

NFP People

This organisation is seeking a talented, enthusiastic Head of Evaluation, Insights and Learning to join at this stage of the charity’s development.

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Stratford, London

£54,873 – £60,366

East London Waste Authority (ELWA)

Procurement Programme Manager East London Waste Authority (ELWA) £54,873 – £60,366 Full time Location: Stratford, London   About the role We have a...

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Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Circa £60 - £65k pa pro rata (pay review pending)

Arthur Rank Hospice Charity

The role provides strategic leadership & financial strategy for the Charity & is accountable for the provision of financial & performance information.

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Homeworking

GBP60000 - GBP70000 per annum + + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Highly regarded Technology organisation seeks an experience technology procurement candidate to join a newly created role in their expanding procurement function.

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London, England

£70000.00 - £90000.00 per annum + Bonus, hybrid, negotiable

Hays

Reporting to the Director, Global Compensation, the Global Investments Compensation Lead will be responsible for providing advisory services to senior business leaders and HR business partners within our investment teams, in alignment with OMERS compensat

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London, England

Up to £65000.00 per annum + + bonus + benefits

Hays

Senior HR Business Partner London - Hybrid £65000 + Bonus + Benefits

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London / flexible base, with regular meetings in London

£74k London / £70k regional

NCVO

This new role will see you work to deliver and embed the cultural change that provides the foundation for delivering our organisational strategy.

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Loughborough / Hybrid Working

£45,000 - £50,000 per annum

Youth Sport Trust

We are looking for an inspirational and experienced Head of Policy & Public Affairs to join our senior leadership team.

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London (Central), London (Greater)

to £80k + great benefits

Fill Recruitment

Ambitious central London customer engagement agency seeks a Business Director / equivalent with strong CRM experience

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London (Central)

Depending on experience

Premier Resourcing UK

Associate Director / Senior Associate Director – Energy & Sustainability GV5409 Exciting London agency looking to recruit someone with publ...

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London, England

£65000.00 - £90000.00 per annum + Bonus, hybrid, negotiable

Hays

Reporting to the Associate Director, Payroll and Global Mobility, the incumbent will lead the day-to-day activities of global mobility programs.

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Peterborough, England

£55000.00 - £70000.00 per annum + car or car allowance, PMI

Hays

Strategic HR Business Partner for global organisation in Peterborough, up to £70k + car allowance, PMI, hybrid

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Reading

GBP60000 - GBP65000 per annum + bonus + flexi working

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Manager - FTSE 250 Global FMCG Location: memorizing (Hybrid options available) Salary: £60,000 - 65,000 + excellent package

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Homeworking

GBP50000 - GBP60000 per annum + + Package + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

Packaging Strategic Procurement Manager - Global and Iconic FMCG brand Location: London/Remote Salary: £50-60k + package

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London

£80000 - £100000 per annum + work from home, unlimited holiday

Stonor

Finance Director role for growing marketing agency...

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Gloucestershire, England

£65000 - £75000 per annum

Morgan Law

Morgan Law are delighted to be recruiting for our public sector client based in Gloucestershire who are currently looking for an experienced Interim Associate Director of Resourcing.

Apply for this job

London (Greater)

£57,471 - £67,902

BFI

Salary £57,471 - £67,902 per annum We support flexible working We are seeking a Head of Procurement to be responsible for the provision of professi...

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St. Helens, England

Up to £65000.00 per annum

Hays

Permanent - National HR Manager - Full time - Hybrid Model - Exciting opportunity

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London, England

£65000.00 - £70000.00 per annum

Hays

Interim Regional HR BP- 12 month FTC - Facilities Management - London - c£65,000 - £70,000 plus car allowance

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London

Up to £350 per day

The Great & The Good

*Freelance Account Director* Advertising agency, London | 9m contract | TVC & ATL campaigns

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London

£60000 - £70000 per annum

Major Players

Creative Lead, Augmented RealityLondon (Hybrid/must be UK based)Perm or freelance to permOur leading tech co specialising in Augmented Reality (AR) is

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Temporarily Remote

£63,062 - £67,417 per annum (Plus £3,300 London Weighting if applicable)

NEA

National Energy Action is looking for a Director of Homes who will lead the charity's work to Strengthen the lives of people in fuel poverty.

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London, England

£100000.00 - £120000.00 per annum

Hays

Head of Executive & Partnering Talent Acquisition and Candidate Experience

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London (Greater)

£80,000 - £90,000

VMA Group

As Head of Corporate Communications for this FTSE 100 Energy business, you will be working closely with the Group Director of Corporate Affairs, CE...

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London

£50,681 - £55,961 per annum

Imperial Health Charity

Deputy Head of Volunteering London, W2 About Us We’re Imperial Health Charity, an organisation that helps our hospitals do more through grants, art...

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City of London, England

£75000.00 - £93000.00 per annum

Hays

Senior HR Business Partner / Financial Services / London City

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Watford

GBP400 - GBP500 per day +

Bramwith Consulting

This global FMCG company are seeking an interim procurement professional with experience across indirect procurement and ideally an SME in marketing procurement.

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London, England

£61000 - £70000 per annum

Morgan Law

My London based NHS client is looking for an experienced Interim HR Business Partner (Band 8b) to join their established team for a period of 6 months.

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London, England

£54000 - £60000 per annum

Morgan Law

My London based NHS client is looking for an experienced Interim HR Business Partner (band 8a) to join their establish team for a period of 6 months.

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London (Central), London (Greater)

£70k Basic + £30k OTE plus benefits

MODA Consult

This is such an exciting role, a Partnership Director working with tech platforms, at a leading digital / commerce agency. Something really different!

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London (Central), London (Greater)

£70k - £75k + benefits / flexible working

MODA Consult

This beautiful brand is looking for an Art Director / Creative to work within their in-house team. Outstanding interior design / furniture brand.

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City of London, England

£46727 - £54874 per annum + LGPS Pension Scheme

Morgan Law

Morgan Law are proud to be working with a popular London Based University in their search for an HR Business Partner. Reporting into the Head of Business Partnering you will work with your client group to support them across strategic and operational HR.

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London (Central), London (Greater)

£60,000 to £65,000 p.a. depending on experience

Paul Mellon Centre

The PMC seeks an experienced Finance Manager who will be responsible for managing our day-to-day financial processing, systems and reporting.

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Homeworking

GBP45000 - GBP60000 per annum + Package

Bramwith Consulting

Role: Indirect Procurement Category Manager Firm: FTSE100 Professional Services Firm Location: London / Remote Salary: £50,000 - £60,000 + Package Th

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City of London, England

Negotiable

Hays

Interim Talent Acquisition Specialist - Global Engineering - Rolling Contract

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London

£70000 - £80000 per annum

The Great & The Good

Amazing opportunity for a CX Group Account Director to join a fast-growing London agency.

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Homeworking

GBP70000 - GBP90000 per annum + Package

Bramwith Consulting

Role: Procurement Software Sourcing Lead Firm: Global Professional Services / BPO Location: London / 90% Remote Salary: £70,000 - £85,000 + Package T

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London, England

£50000.00 - £60000.00 per annum

Hays

TA Partner, 50K-60K, 5K travel allowance plus 15% bonus, hybrid model.

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London, England

£60000.00 - £65000.00 per annum

Hays

Senior TA Partner, 60K - 65K, London, Permanent, Hybrid Working, American Real Estate and Investment Firm.

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Berkshire

GBP75000 - GBP80000 per annum + car + bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Global Commodity Price Risk Manager (CPRM) - Global and Iconic FMCG brand Location: London/Remote Salary: £75-80k + car + package

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London, England

£60000.00 - £65000.00 per annum

Hays

Fully Remote Senior Recruiter EMEA, Data Centre/Tech Firm, 60K-65K, Permanent.

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Hertfordshire

£90,000 - £95,000 p.a.

Harris Hill

Harris Hill is delighted to be working with a hospice based in Letchworth Garden City to recruit a new Chief Executive. The hospice exists to provi...

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Homeworking

GBP50000 - GBP60000 per annum + + Package + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

Directs Strategic Procurement Manager - Global and Iconic FMCG brand Location: London/Remote Salary: £50-60k + package

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London, England

Negotiable

Hays

Interim HR Talent Implementation Project Manager - London Hybrid - Immediate start - Inside scope. Manage design and implementation of the Talent Management related modules on Success Factors.

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London, England

£90000.00 - £110000.00 per annum

Hays

Head of HR operations, Flexible on Location, Hybrid, Permanent

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Lincoln, Lincolnshire

Up to £63,862 per annum + benefits

Castlefield Recruitment

United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust (ULHT) are looking to identify a Head of Category – Clinical to join our Procurement Department. The role s...

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London (Central), London (Greater)

Competitive day rates

Fill Recruitment

Freelance SAMs, Account Directors, SADs, Group Account Directors and Business Directors required!

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London (Central), London (Greater)

to £90k + good benefits

Fill Recruitment

Creative charity / fundraising agency seeks an experienced team leader to join them as their new Client Services Director

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Watford

GBP400 - GBP500 per day +

Bramwith Consulting

This global FMCG company are seeking a passionate, up and coming procurement professional to join their renowned procurement function to join their wider Marketing Procurement Team.

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Homeworking

GBP70000 - GBP90000 per annum + Package

Bramwith Consulting

Technology Sourcing Manager - UK&I Financial Services Firm - £70-90,000 - Board-Level Exposure - Excellent Progression Opportunities Due to the rapid

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Homeworking

GBP70000 - GBP75000 per annum + Package

Bramwith Consulting

Role: Category Manager - Facilities Firm: UK Leading Real Estate Firm Location: London - Hybrid Working Salary: £70,000 - £75,000 + Package A unique

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London, England

£47000 - £52000 per annum

Morgan Law

My client, a large NHS Trust based in London are looking for 2 x Band 7 ER Caseworkers/Investigators for an initial 6 months period. The client will also consider secondment or permanent as an option for the right candidate.

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London, England

£375.00 - £400.00 per day

Hays

Interim Resourcing Advisor - remote - 6 months

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London, England

£500.00 - £592.00 per day

Hays

Interim Compensation Analyst - Immediate start - London Hybrid up to £592 per day Interim Compensation Analyst job Interim Reward Analyst job

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London, England

£52000 - £58000 per annum

Morgan Law

My public sector client is looking for an experienced Senior L&OD Manager

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South West London, England

Up to £85000.00 per annum

Morgan Law

Ready for the next step in your HR career? We have a great opportunity for an HR Director to join the Executive Team at a private hospital in South London.

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Northampton, England

£50000.00 - £60000.00 per annum

Hays

Permanent HR Manager, Northampton-Hybrid-£50,000-£60,000 + £7,000 car allowance.

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London, England

£500.00 - £650.00 per day

Hays

Global Talent Acquisition Consultant - Technology brand - 6-9 months

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Home based with flexible working

£50,000 - £60,000 Per Annum

NFP People

We are looking for a Business Development and Partnerships Manager who is ambitious and invested in conflict transformation.

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London

60,000-65,000

Guy's and St Thomas' Foundation

Be part of a game changing health foundation An instrumental new role in the organisation About Our Client Guy's & St Thomas' Foundation is an i...

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Chester, England

£50000.00 - £60000.00 per annum

Hays

Permanent - HR Business Partner - Chester - Full time - Monday - Friday - Competitive Salary - Hybrid Model

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London

£55k - 70k per year

Harris Hill

A brilliant opportunity for a senior philanthropy fundraiser.

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Remote (UK)

Up to £90k DOE plus benefits

air-recruitment

Are you the senior client services pro this really warm and friendly creative agency need?

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London

GBP60000 - GBP70000 per annum + Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Procurement Category Lead / Best-in-Class Fashion Organisation / Career Progression / London / £60,000 - £70,000 + Benefits inc. Bonus

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London

GBP65000 - GBP80000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Procurement Consulting opportunities - Market Leading Procurement Boutique Consultancy - Private Equity Backed - London + Travel - £65-80k + Package

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Flexible Location

£45,000 - £50,000 per annum

One Small Thing

Head of Training and Business Development Flexible Location The Organisation One Small Thing is striving for positive change across the justice sys...

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Woking, Surrey, GU21 4LL/Hybrid working

£50,000 - £60,000

WWF

Join the WWF-UK Science team as Chief Advisor for climate issues and play your part in saving our planet.

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Milton Keynes, England

£50000.00 - £69000.00 per annum + 27 days holiday & bank holidays

Hays

Senior HR Consultant-Change, 9 Month FTC, £50,000-£69,000, Milton Keynes, Hybrid

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Homeworking

GBP50000 - GBP60000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Procurement Category Specialist - Software & Data - Global Leading Law-Firm - London based + home working - £50-60k + packageThis leading global law f

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City of London, London

£350 - £450 per day

Major Players

Business Director Performance Content - Hybrid - £450 per day, 6 month contract Major Players are working with a globally recognised agency with unriv

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Homeworking

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Package + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Manager - Public Sector - Global Professional Services Firm Salary: £55-65,000 + package Location: Remote (option to base yourself in office)

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Reading

GBP60000 - GBP65000 per annum + + bonus + flexi working

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Manager - Global FMCG Location: memorizing (hybrid options available) Salary: £60-65,000 + excellent package

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Wakefield, West Yorkshire

£58,524 - £63,780 per annum

West Yorkshire Police

People Directorate, Diversity, Equality and Inclusion Department Location: Wakefield Salary: £58,524 - £63,780 per annum 1 permanent post - 37 hour...

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Homeworking

GBP80000 - GBP90000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Global Technology Sourcing Manager - Magic-Circle Law Firm - London + flexi-working - £80-90k + package This magic circle law firm, globally renowned

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London, England

Up to £60000.00 per annum + + bonus + benefits

Hays

HR Business Partner London - 1 day from office 4 days WFH £60000 + bonus + Benefits

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Amsterdam

EUR60000 - EUR80000 per annum + package

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Team Lead - Global FTSE 100 Conglomerate - Amsterdam - €80,000 + Package

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Dublin

EUR60000 - EUR80000 per annum + package

Bramwith Consulting

PROCUREMENT - GLOBAL HR/PROFESSIONAL SERVICES CATEGORY MANAGER - ICONIC FTSE 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES FIRM - DUBLIN+ FLEX WORKING - €85,000 + COMPREHENSIVE BENEFITS

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Dublin

EUR60000 - EUR100000 per annum + strong package

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Lead - Global Fortune 500 Financial Services Firm - Dublin - €60,000 - €100,000 + Package

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Dublin

EUR60000 - EUR85000 per annum + strong package

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Lead - Global Fortune 500 Financial Services Firm - Dublin - €60,000 - €85,000 + Package

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City of London

GBP40000 - GBP60000 per annum + bonus + benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Strategic Sourcing Manager, IT & Technology - Global FTSE 100 FMCG Player - Home based contract - £40,000 - £60,000 + Bonus & Benefits

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Dublin City Centre

EUR60000 - EUR90000 per annum + bonus + benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Strategic Sourcing Manager, IT & Technology - Global FTSE 100 FMCG Player - Dublin- £50,000 - €90,000 + Bonus & Benefits

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London (Central), London (Greater), Currently hybrid working

c. £61,000-63,000 pa

Paul Hamlyn Foundation

An exciting opportunity for an exceptional individual to join Paul Hamlyn Foundation as Head of People & Culture.

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Woking, Surrey GU21 4LL/Hybrid Working

£64,087 - £80,000

WWF

If you are expert in developing and implementing advocacy strategies this is a unique opportunity to use your skills to save the planet.

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London, England

Negotiable

Hays

Interim Benefits Manager EMEA - Financial services - London Hybrid Competitive day rate - inside scope of IR35 Interim Benefits job Interim Benefits Specialist Interim Benefits Consultant

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Telford, Old Park (Hybrid)

£54,744 per annum

Networx

Our client has an opportunity for a Governance Services Manager to join their team in Telford.

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Islington, London (Greater)

£59,000

Revitalise

Head of Capital Appeal  City Road, EC1V £59k Permanent / 37.5 hours per week   View the full job description and person specification visit our Rev...

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Ealing, West London

£80,000 pro rata plus benefits

Harris Hill

We are looking for an inspirational and empowering CEO to join us at this exciting and transitional stage of our development. London, £80,000

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London,SE11 & SW8

£51,000 to £55,000 plus benefits

Young Futures

Our modern, purpose-built, 9-bed therapeutic residential home where young women live in studios is looking for a Residential Team Manager.

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Croydon, south London (minimum 4 days per week on site)

£75,000

Harris Hill

Seeking next CEO to lead organisational development so we can deliver the best possible services to disabled people in south London.

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Somerset, Bath

£75000 - £80000 per annum

Major Players

ROLE: Creative Director (12months FTC) Fabulous opportunity to work with a global e-commerce wellbeing company. Ecommerce experience is a must for thi

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London (Central), London (Greater)

£60,000 to £75,000

VMA Group

The International Hydropower Association (IHA) is recruiting a Head of Communications and Advocacy to lead strategic communications and advocacy fo...

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Chelmsford

GBP75000 - GBP80000 per annum + + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Rapidly growing professional services firm seeks an experienced indirect procurement leader to join their procurement function during a period of exciting transformation and growth.

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London, England

£50000.00 - £65000.00 per annum

Hays

Learning & Development Partner London - Hybrid £50000 - £65000

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London, England

£50000.00 - £65000.00 per annum

Hays

Leaning Manager - Technical Learning London £50000 - £65000

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Andover, Hampshire

£70,000 - £85,000 p.a.

Harris Hill

Would you like to help shape our research strategy and help us become the funder we want to be? A leading charity focused on macular disease, the b...

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London (Greater)

Up to £120,000

Langley Search & Interim

My Client is a leading organisation in their field. They are currently looking for a specialist Category Lead – Utilities/Energy with experience in...

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London (Greater)

Up to £70k + bonus

createselect

Looking for an SEO expert to join our fabulous client as Head of SEO.

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London

£40k - 50k per year

Harris Hill

Sitting in the Operations team, you will understand the ins and outs of the Planning team, identify gaps and work with the full team to evolve these

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London, England

£55000.00 - £75000.00 per annum

Hays

Regional HR Manager / HR Business Partner Chartered Accountants £55,000 - £75,000 DOE

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City of London, London

£120000 - £900000 per annum

DNA Recruit

Are you are a Senior Planning Strategist or a Planning Director with experience in consumer and retail?Are you a natural leader who takes full respons

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Homeworking

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Car & Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Iconic FMCG brand seeks a high-achieving procurement expert to join the ranks and drive a crucial spend category towards best-in-class.

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City of London

GBP80000 - GBP90000 per annum + + Package + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

Global IT Vendor Lead - FTSE 50 Media Giant Salary: £60-70,000 plus package Location: London (flexible basis)

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City of London

GBP55000 - GBP80000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Procurement Generalist - Leading Consultancy - Flexible Working - Paid Travel Leading consultancy seeks an established procurement profession

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England

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Car + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Procurement Manager - Global prof Services Salary: £55-65,000 plus package + CIPS Sponsorship Location: Hertfordshire

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London

GBP65000 - GBP80000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Procurement Consulting opportunities - Market Leading Procurement Boutique Consultancy - Private Equity Backed - London + Travel - £65-80k + Package

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London

GBP700 - GBP800 per day +

Bramwith Consulting

INTERIM - Global senior Procurement Manager - Market Data and Vendor Management - London - Global Financial Services Firm - £700-800pd Leading Europea

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City of London

GBP55000 - GBP80000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Procurement Generalist - Leading Consultancy - Flexible Working - Paid Travel Leading consultancy seeks an established procurement profession

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London

GBP50000 - GBP65000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Global Financial Services Major - Procurement supplier Governance and 3rd party risk - London - £55-60k + competitive financial package Global financi

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London (Central)

£90k-£110k + bonus and benefits.

Premier Resourcing UK

Senior Counsel position with leading international communications agency. £110k + bonus/benefits.

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Coventry, England

Up to £55000.00 per annum + Bonus & Benefits

Wright Solutions

This is an exciting opportunity to join a major UK business as a modern day and strategically minded HR Business Partner.

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High Wycombe, England

£60000 - £65000 per annum + hybrid working, car allowance, bonus

Henlee Resourcing

Reporting to the Head of HR Business Partnering, the purpose of the role is to build great relationships with your Senior Stakeholders / Client Group to enable them to deliver on the Company vision as well as to continue the great work around belonging, t

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London, England

£340.00 - £460.00 per day

Hays

Interim Contingent Hire Business Manager - +6 months - partially remote

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Northamptonshire, England

£65000.00 - £75000.00 per annum + Car allowance, Private Medical

Hays

HR Systems Implementation Lead (12 month Fixed term contract) £65,000-£75,000 Northamptonshire

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London

Up to £75000.00 per annum + £50,000 commission

Tomorrow Recruitment

Director of Growth and New Business for design agency

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City of London, England

Up to £70000 per annum

Morgan Law

We are recruiting for an Interim HR Systems Lead, for an initial 2 year fixed term contract.

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Lancashire, England

£71963.00 - £77257.00 per annum

Hays

As the Head of Human Resources, you will have a passionate belief in the role of high-quality HR services that enable and empower leaders and staff to transform outcomes for children and young people.

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Kent, England

£400 - £500 per day + Outside IR35

Morgan Law

My client, a multi-academy trust based in Kent is looking for an HR Project Manager/Consultant to join them as they look to Strengthen on their HR System & Payroll offering across the trust.

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Brighton, Sussex

circa £90,000

Harris Hill

Our organisation is looking for an inspirational and dynamic leader who shares our commitment to our mission and values, and to providing people-fi...

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London/WFH

£80,000-£100,000 +equity

YOU Search & Select

This is a strategic development role for serious players. It’s why bullsh*tters need not apply.

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Remote/London

£70,000-£90,000 +package

YOU Search & Select

Q. What do you call an exec producer who’s great at leading teams? A. Invisible. Why? As that’s the way you like it.

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Homeworking

GBP75000 - GBP80000 per annum + Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Iconic brand seeks a high-achieving procurement expert to join the ranks and drive a crucial spend category towards best-in-class.

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City of London

GBP60000 - GBP90000 per annum + Package

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Lead - Hardware, Software & Telecoms - Global Consultancy - FTSE100 Blue-Chip Clientele - Fast-Track Progression - £60-90k + PackageGlo

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Homeworking

GBP70000 - GBP100000 per annum + Car & Bonus

Bramwith Consulting

Procurement Business Partner / Industry-Leading FMCG Organization / Transformation / memorizing / Flexible Working / £70,000 - £100,000 + Benefits inc. Bonus & Car

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London, England

£55000.00 - £60000.00 per annum

Hays

Senior HR Advisor London - Hyrbid £55000 - £60000pa

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Homeworking

GBP500 - GBP700 per day + Remote Working

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect IT Procurement Manager / Industry-Leading Pharmaceutical organization / Remote Working / £600pd - £700pd

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Homeworking

GBP500 - GBP700 per day + Flexible Working

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect IT Procurement Manager / Global Financial Services / London / Flexible Working / Interim Position / £600 - £700pd

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City of London

GBP45000 - GBP80000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Indirect Generalist - Central London - Flexible Working - £45,000-£80,000 Bright and dynamic individuals sought by Leading Management Consultancy, bas

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City of London, England

£55000.00 - £65000.00 per annum

Hays

Established Stock Exchange Listed Global Investment Management Firm

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London

£75000 - £95000 per annum

Stonor

One of the UK's longest established, and most well-respected media groups is looking for a Head of Partnerships.

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Anywhere in the UK

£54,600 per annum

Wildfowl & Wetland Trust

Head of UK Programmes Anywhere in the UK 37.5 hours a week £54,600 per annum This position can be undertaken anywhere in the UK but is ideally base...

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Loughborough, Leicestershire

circa £85,000

Harris Hill

The national charity and leading voice for disabled people in sport and activity is looking for a new Chief Executive Officer (CEO) who can lead th...

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Shrewley

£45k - 50k per year

Harris Hill

You will work collaboratively across the charity to ensure all communications are on brand, deliver key messaging and engage target audiences.

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London, England

£50000.00 - £60000.00 per annum

Hays

HR Operations Partner London up tp £55000 - £60000pa

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London, England

£50000.00 - £70000.00 per annum + Bonus, hybrid, negotiable

Hays

A fully autonomous Senior HRIS Specialist role, where you will have full ownership to design, implement, and bring to life an established but under utilised HRIS system.

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Multiple UK Locations Available

Competitive

The HR Dept

Want to run your own HR business and be your own boss? The HR Dept's trusted brand and network supports you at every stage from setup to success.

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London (Greater)

Up to £150'000 + benefits

Brook Street

Director (Financial PR - Tech, Natural Resources, Financial Services ). Leading Corporate & Financial PR Agency. Competitive Salary.

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Homeworking

GBP50000 - GBP60000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Procurement Category Specialist - Software & Data - Global Leading Law-Firm - London based + home working - £50-60k + packageThis leading global law f

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Homeworking

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Package + Flexi Working

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Manager - Public Sector - Global Professional Services Firm Salary: £55-65,000 + package Location: Remote (option to base yourself in office)

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London (Central), London (Greater)

Circa £65,000 - £75,000

VMA Group

The Global Cement and Concrete Association, GCCA, is growing its team and looking for a seasoned Head of Media, content and engagement.

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Dublin City Centre

EUR60000 - EUR90000 per annum + bonus + benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Strategic Sourcing Manager, IT & Technology - Global FTSE 100 FMCG Player - Dublin- £50,000 - €90,000 + Bonus & Benefits

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Amsterdam

EUR60000 - EUR80000 per annum + package

Bramwith Consulting

IT Procurement Team Lead - Global FTSE 100 Conglomerate - Amsterdam - €80,000 + Package

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Dublin City Centre

EUR55000 - EUR90000 per annum + bonus + benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Software Technology Procurement Manager - Strategic Growth Initiative - £25bn+ Professional Services Giant - DUBLIN

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Dublin

EUR60000 - EUR80000 per annum + package

Bramwith Consulting

PROCUREMENT - GLOBAL HR/PROFESSIONAL SERVICES CATEGORY MANAGER - ICONIC FTSE 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES FIRM - DUBLIN+ FLEX WORKING - €85,000 + COMPREHENSIVE BENEFITS

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London, England

£60000.00 - £70000.00 per annum

Hays

Interim HR Manager - Immediate start - 10 month FTC - London Hybrid - £60-70k pro rata

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Nottingham, England

£40927.00 - £50296.00 per annum

Hays

HR Business Partner - Education - 6 month FTC - Flexible & hybrid working - up to £50296

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London client, can be based 100% home based

up to £450 per day (inside IR35)

Langley Search & Interim

Interim FM Contract Manager opportunity, initially assignment likely to be until the end of the year, £450 per day (inside IR35), London based clie...

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London

GBP75000 - GBP85000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Logistics Category Manager - Global FMCG Major - £75-85,000 + Excellent Benefits Package -Home Working Following a transformation of their global com

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London, England

£48997.00 - £68790 per annum + Civil Service Pension

Morgan Law

Fantastic opportunity for an experienced Leadership Development specialist to join the UK's largest Police Service.

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London

£90000 - £110000 per annum

Major Players

I am working with a leading global creative and media agency, who specialise in social-first advertising, building brands up through digital platforms

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Hybrid working with regular weekend and evening working

£108,000

Samaritans

We are looking for a strategic and collaborative leader who will lead the development and drive the People Strategy.

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London

£80000 - £90000 per annum + + bens

Major Players

Leading UK agency are looking for an Experience Designer (XD) with world-class creativity & ability to bring real, relevant human insights into commu

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London (Central), London (Greater)

up to £100k

Corporate Communications Recruitment

An award winning global integrated agency with a strong corporate branding offer are looking to hire a head of brand strategy. Great opportunity!

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Homeworking

GBP55000 - GBP65000 per annum + + Car & Benefits

Bramwith Consulting

Iconic FMCG brand seeks a high-achieving procurement expert to join the ranks and drive a crucial spend category towards best-in-class.

Apply for this job

Elizabeth

USD90000.00 - USD100000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

HR & Professional Services Procurement Specialist - Fortune 100 FMCG - Elizabeth - New Jersey - $100,000 + Package Global FMCG seeks an ambitious procurement specialist to join their team in a newly created role to support the development of thei

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London

GBP75000 - GBP85000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Procurement Category Manager - Logistics - Big4 Consultancy - London/WFH - £85,000 + £6,000 car 12% bonus and other benefits One of the world largest

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London

GBP55000 - GBP70000 per annum +

Bramwith Consulting

Global Category Specialist (indirects) - Esteemed Professional Services Firm - £65k - Multiple Locations - Global Sourcing As one of the most recognis

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London, East London

£75000 - £85000 per annum

Major Players

Job Title - Client Services Director The Role / Company Major Players are working with a retail design and production agency who provide retail activa

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London, England

£300.00 - £450.00 per day

Hays

Interim Benefits Manager EMEA - Financial services - London Hybrid £300-450 per day inside scope of IR35

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Wakefield, England

£44000 - £59000.00 per annum + no site parking , flexible working

Hays

An intersting mix of strategic & operational HR , you will lead a small HR team on a day-day basis.

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London, SE22 8RB

£55,602 - £65,599

Charter Schools Educational trust

Are you an experienced, self-motivated, and ambitious Human Resources leader looking to make an impact in a growing and thriving Multi-Academy Trus...

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Hybrid working: Home working / Marleigh, Cambridge

c £70,000

Anglian Learning

Anglian Learning Director of People Location: Hybrid working: Home working / Marleigh, Cambridge Salary: c £70,000 Closing date: Monday 5th Septemb...

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Department for Work and Pensions

Department for Work and Pensions Deputy Director, Head of Campaigns Salary: Up to £85,000 Location: This role can be based any of the following DWP...

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3 month HR Policy interim, for a membership organisation in London, paying £195-210 per day, starting ASAP.

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6 month Interim Compensation Advisor role, paying £300-350 per day, starting ASAP.

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We have an exciting opportunity for an experienced HR professional to join one of the country's highest performing and fastest growing multi academy trusts, currently operating over 30 primary and secondary schools nationally.

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Permanent L&D Consultant role with a trade union in London hybrid working 2 days per week paying up to £52,485.

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Corporate Communications Recruitment

Communications agency are looking to hire a business relationship director to lead their team across their media coaching and comms offer! Urgent!

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Communications agency are looking to hire a Sustainability consultant. Ideally you will have agency/consultancy and communications experience.

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Carter Ferris

A fantastic opportunity to effectively launch a new inhouse PR division within this high profile, high talent London based creative agency. You wil...

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Cake Distribution Limited

An exciting new opportunity has arisen with in CAKE a leading independent kids and family content distribution and TV production company.

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Senior Talent Acquisitions Partner within Technology in a Leading Fortune 500 Tech Solutions Firm

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Permanent HR Manager, Northampton-Hybrid-£50,000-£60,000 + £7,000 car allowance.

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HR Analyst / Workforce Analyst / HR Systems

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ITN

This role is responsible for managing all aspects of publicity for award-winning news programme, Channel 4 News, and associated digital platforms. ...

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Barker Graves

Energetic visionary CX Strategy Directors needed for a range of exciting network and independent communications agencies

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The Foundry - Original

Associate Director sought by highly creative, award-winning agency that helps brands understand and engage audiences

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The Foundry - Original

Are you available to take on a 12 month contract within the healthcare practice of a global agency, starting soonest?

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A mid-sized consultancy, part of a larger privately owned group, is looking for a successor or deputy to the CEO

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YOU Search & Select

I honestly thought these types of roles had disappeared. Lost to a time when customer care and trusted client partner actually meant something...

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Head of Human Resources - International Bank - £90,000 - £110,000 - Dependant on experience

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Morgan Law

We are seeking an interim EDI Consultant to work with a global marine conservation charity.

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Premier Resourcing UK

Associate Director – Consumer/FMCG GV5399 Based in central London, this multi-award winning agency who are growing quickly with a great team, are ...

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Fill Recruitment

Digitally led agency seeks Midweight or Senior Strategist for a rare role with unrivalled variety - to £70k

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Ann Sharman Consulting

Are you Senior Strategist looking for the next step up? Iconic Global Strategy Consultancy seeks an Associate Directory of Strategy with a b2b focus.

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Tue, 02 Aug 2022 21:03:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.managementtoday.co.uk/why-co-creation-leads-powerful-digital-innovation/article/1792268
Killexams : Cybersecurity - what’s the real cost? Ask IBM
(Pixabay)

Cybersecurity has always been a concern for every type of organization. Even in normal times, a major breach is more than just the data economy’s equivalent of a ram-raid on Fort Knox; it has knock-on effects on trust, reputation, confidence, and the viability of some technologies. This is what IBM calls the “haunting effect”.

A successful attack breeds more, of course, both on the same organization again, and on others in similar businesses, or in those that use the same compromised systems. The unspoken effect of this is rising costs for everyone, as all enterprises are forced to spend money and time on checking if they have been affected too.

But in our new world of COVID-19, disrupted economies, climate change, remote working, soaring inflation, and looming recession, all such effects are all amplified. Throw in a war that’s hammering on Europe’s door (with political echoes across the Middle East and Asia) and it’s a wonder any of us can get out of bed in the morning.

So, what are the real costs of a successful cyberattack – not just hacks, viruses, and Trojans, but also phishing, ransomware, and concerted campaigns against supply chains and code repositories?

According to IBM’s latest annual survey, breach costs have risen by an unlucky 13% over the past two years, as attackers, which include hostile states, have probed the systemic and operational weaknesses exposed by the pandemic.

The global average cost of a data breach has reached an all-time high of $4.35 million – at least, among the 550 organizations surveyed by the Ponemon Institute for IBM Security (over a year from March 2021). Indeed, IBM goes so far as to claim that breaches may be contributing to the rising costs of goods and services. The survey states:

Sixty percent of studied organizations raised their product or services prices due to the breach, when the cost of goods is already soaring worldwide amid inflation and supply chain issues.

Incidents are also “haunting” organizations, says the company, with 83% having experienced more than one data breach, and with 50% of costs occurring more than a year after the successful attack.

Cloud maturity is a key factor, adds the report:

Forty-three percent of studied organizations are in the early stages [of cloud adoption] or have not started applying security practices across their cloud environments, observing over $660,000 in higher breach costs, on average, than studied organizations with mature security across their cloud environments.

Forty-five percent of respondents run a hybrid cloud infrastructure. This leads to lower average breach costs than among those operating a public- or private-cloud model: $3.8 million versus $5.02 million (public) and $4.24 million (private).

That said, those are still significant costs, and may suggest that complexity is what deters attackers, rather than having a single target to hit. Nonetheless, hybrid cloud adopters are able to identify and contain data breaches 15 days faster on average, says the report.

However, with 277 days being the average time lag – an extraordinary figure – the real lesson may be that today’s enterprise systems are adept at hiding security breaches, which may appear as normal network traffic. Forty-five percent of breaches occurred in the cloud, says the report, so it is clearly imperative to get on top of security in that domain.

IBM then makes the following bold claim :

Participating organizations fully deploying security AI and automation incurred $3.05 million less on average in breach costs compared to studied organizations that have not deployed the technology – the biggest cost saver observed in the study.

Whether this finding will stand for long as attackers explore new ways to breach automated and/or AI-based systems – and perhaps automate attacks of their own invisibly – remains to be seen. Compromised digital employee, anyone?

Global systems at risk

But perhaps the most telling finding is that cybersecurity has a political dimension – beyond the obvious one of Russian, Chinese, North Korean, or Iranian state incursions, of course.

Concerns over critical infrastructure and global supply chains are rising, with threat actors seeking to disrupt global systems that include financial services, industrial, transportation, and healthcare companies, among others.

A year ago in the US, the Biden administration issued an Executive Order on cybersecurity that focused on the urgent need for zero-trust systems. Despite this, only 21% of critical infrastructure organizations have so far adopted a zero-trust security model, according to the report. It states:

Almost 80% of the critical infrastructure organizations studied don’t adopt zero-trust strategies, seeing average breach costs rise to $5.4 million – a $1.17 million increase compared to those that do. All while 28% of breaches among these organizations were ransomware or destructive attacks.

Add to that, 17% of breaches at critical infrastructure organizations were caused due to a business partner being initially compromised, highlighting the security risks that over-trusting environments pose.

That aside, one of the big stories over the past couple of years has been the rise of ransomware: malicious code that locks up data, enterprise systems, or individual computers, forcing users to pay a ransom to (they hope) retrieve their systems or data.

But according to IBM, there are no obvious winners or losers in this insidious practice. The report adds:

Businesses that paid threat actors’ ransom demands saw $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the ransom amount paid.

However, when accounting for the average ransom payment – which according to Sophos reached $812,000 in 2021 – businesses that opt to pay the ransom could net higher total costs, all while inadvertently funding future ransomware attacks.”

The persistence of ransomware is fuelled by what IBM calls the “industrialization of cybercrime”.

The risk profile is also changing. Ransomware attack times show a massive drop of 94% over the past three years, from over two months to just under four days. Good news? Not at all, says the report, as the attacks may be higher impact, with more immediate consequences (such as destroyed data, or private data being made public on hacker forums).

My take

The key lesson in cybersecurity today is that all of us are both upstream and downstream from partners, suppliers, and customers in today’s extended enterprises. We are also at the mercy of reused but compromised code from trusted repositories, and even sometimes from hardware that has been compromised at source.

So, what is the answer? Businesses should ensure that their incident responses are tested rigorously and frequently in advance – along with using red-, blue-, or purple-team approaches (thinking like a hacker, a defender, or both).

Regrettably, IBM says that 37% of organizations that have IR plans in place fail to test them regularly. To paraphrase Spinal Tap, you can’t code for stupid.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 BRAINSUM en text/html https://diginomica.com/cybersecurity-whats-real-cost-ask-ibm
Killexams : Teaching AI to ask clinical questions

image: Researchers are working toward machine-learning models that can help doctors more efficiently find information in a patient’s health record. view more 

Credit: MIT News, with images from iStockphoto

CAMBRIDGE, MA – Physicians often query a patient’s electronic health record for information that helps them make treatment decisions, but the cumbersome nature of these records hampers the process. Research has shown that even when a doctor has been trained to use an electronic health record (EHR), finding an answer to just one question can take, on average, more than eight minutes.

The more time physicians must spend navigating an oftentimes clunky EHR interface, the less time they have to interact with patients and provide treatment.

Researchers have begun developing machine-learning models that can streamline the process by automatically finding information physicians need in an EHR. However, training effective models requires huge datasets of relevant medical questions, which are often hard to come by due to privacy restrictions. Existing models struggle to generate authentic questions — those that would be asked by a human doctor — and are often unable to successfully find correct answers.

To overcome this data shortage, researchers at MIT partnered with medical experts to study the questions physicians ask when reviewing EHRs. Then, they built a publicly available dataset of more than 2,000 clinically relevant questions written by these medical experts.

When they used their dataset to train a machine-learning model to generate clinical questions, they found that the model asked high-quality and authentic questions, as compared to actual questions from medical experts, more than 60 percent of the time.

With this dataset, they plan to generate vast numbers of authentic medical questions and then use those questions to train a machine-learning model which would help doctors find sought-after information in a patient’s record more efficiently.

“Two thousand questions may sound like a lot, but when you look at machine-learning models being trained nowadays, they have so much data, maybe billions of data points. When you train machine-learning models to work in health care settings, you have to be really creative because there is such a lack of data,” says lead author Eric Lehman, a graduate student in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).

The senior author is Peter Szolovits, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) who heads the Clinical Decision-Making Group in CSAIL and is also a member of the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab. The research paper, a collaboration between co-authors at MIT, the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab, IBM Research, and the doctors and medical experts who helped create questions and participated in the study, will be presented at the annual conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics.

“Realistic data is critical for training models that are relevant to the task yet difficult to find or create,” Szolovits says. “The value of this work is in carefully collecting questions asked by clinicians about patient cases, from which we are able to develop methods that use these data and general language models to ask further plausible questions.”

Data deficiency

The few large datasets of clinical questions the researchers were able to find had a host of issues, Lehman explains. Some were composed of medical questions asked by patients on web forums, which are a far cry from physician questions. Other datasets contained questions produced from templates, so they are mostly identical in structure, making many questions unrealistic.

“Collecting high-quality data is really important for doing machine-learning tasks, especially in a health care context, and we’ve shown that it can be done,” Lehman says.

To build their dataset, the MIT researchers worked with practicing physicians and medical students in their last year of training. They gave these medical experts more than 100 EHR discharge summaries and told them to read through a summary and ask any questions they might have. The researchers didn’t put any restrictions on question types or structures in an effort to gather natural questions. They also asked the medical experts to identify the “trigger text” in the EHR that led them to ask each question.

For instance, a medical expert might read a note in the EHR that says a patient’s past medical history is significant for prostate cancer and hypothyroidism. The trigger text “prostate cancer” could lead the expert to ask questions like “date of diagnosis?” or “any interventions done?”

They found that most questions focused on symptoms, treatments, or the patient’s test results. While these findings weren’t unexpected, quantifying the number of questions about each broad course will help them build an effective dataset for use in a real, clinical setting, says Lehman.

Once they had compiled their dataset of questions and accompanying trigger text, they used it to train machine-learning models to ask new questions based on the trigger text.

Then the medical experts determined whether those questions were “good” using four metrics: understandability (Does the question make sense to a human physician?), triviality (Is the question too easily answerable from the trigger text?), medical relevance (Does it makes sense to ask this question based on the context?), and relevancy to the trigger (Is the trigger related to the question?).

Cause for concern

The researchers found that when a model was given trigger text, it was able to generate a good question 63 percent of the time, whereas a human physician would ask a good question 80 percent of the time.

They also trained models to recover answers to clinical questions using the publicly available datasets they had found at the outset of this project. Then they tested these trained models to see if they could find answers to “good” questions asked by human medical experts.

The models were only able to recover about 25 percent of answers to physician-generated questions.

“That result is really concerning. What people thought were good-performing models were, in practice, just awful because the evaluation questions they were testing on were not good to begin with,” Lehman says.

The team is now applying this work toward their initial goal: building a model that can automatically answer physicians’ questions in an EHR. For the next step, they will use their dataset to train a machine-learning model that can automatically generate thousands or millions of good clinical questions, which can then be used to train a new model for automatic question answering.

While there is still much work to do before that model could be a reality, Lehman is encouraged by the strong initial results the team demonstrated with this dataset.

###

This research was supported, in part, by the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab. Additional co-authors include Leo Anthony Celi of the MIT Institute for Medical Engineering and Science; Preethi Raghavan and Jennifer J. Liang of the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab; Dana Moukheiber of the University of Buffalo; Vladislav Lialin and Anna Rumshisky of the University of Massachusetts at Lowell; Katelyn Legaspi, Nicole Rose I. Alberto, Richard Raymund R. Ragasa, Corinna Victoria M. Puyat, Isabelle Rose I. Alberto, and Pia Gabrielle I. Alfonso of the University of the Philippines; Anne Janelle R. Sy and Patricia Therese S. Pile of the University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center; Marianne Taliño of the Ateneo de Manila University School of Medicine and Public Health; and Byron C. Wallace of Northeastern University.     


Wed, 13 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/959260
Killexams : History of Artificial Intelligence

Of the myriad technological advances of the 20th and 21st centuries, one of the most influential is undoubtedly artificial intelligence (AI). From search engine algorithms reinventing how we look for information to Amazon’s Alexa in the consumer sector, AI has become a major technology driving the entire tech industry forward into the future.

Whether you’re a burgeoning start-up or an industry titan like Microsoft, there’s probably at least one part of your company working with AI or machine learning. According to a study from Grand View Research, the global AI industry was valued at $93.5 billion in 2021.

AI as a force in the tech industry exploded in prominence in the 2000s and 2010s, but AI has been around in some form or fashion since at least 1950 and arguably stretches back even further than that.

The broad strokes of AI’s history, such as the Turing Test and chess computers, are ingrained in the popular consciousness, but a rich, dense history lives beneath the surface of common knowledge. This article will distill that history and show you AI’s path from mythical idea to world-altering reality.

Also see: Top AI Software 

From Folklore to Fact

While AI is often considered a cutting-edge concept, humans have been imagining artificial intelligences for millenniums, and those imaginings have had a tangible impact on the advancements made in the field today.

Prominent mythological examples include the bronze automaton Talos, protector of the island of Crete from Greece, and the alchemical homunculi of the Renaissance period. Characters like Frankenstein’s Monster, HAL 9000 of 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Skynet from the Terminator franchise are just some of the ways we’ve depicted artificial intelligence in modern fiction.

One of the fictional concepts with the most influence on the history of AI is Isaac Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics. These laws are frequently referenced when real-world researchers and organizations create their own laws of robotics.

In fact, when the U.K.’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) published its 5 principles for designers, builders and users of robots, it explicitly cited Asimov as a reference point, though stating that Asimov’s Laws “simply don’t work in practice.”

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella also made mention of Asimov’s Laws when presenting his own laws for AI, calling them “a good, though ultimately inadequate, start.”

Also see: The Future of Artificial Intelligence

Computers, Games, and Alan Turing

As Asimov was writing his Three Laws in the 1940s, researcher William Grey Walter was developing a rudimentary, analogue version of artificial intelligence. Called tortoises or turtles, these tiny robots could detect and react to light and contact with their plastic shells, and they operated without the use of computers.

Later in the 1960s, Johns Hopkins University built their Beast, another computer-less automaton which could navigate the halls of the university via sonar and charge itself at special wall outlets when its battery ran low.

However, artificial intelligence as we know it today would find its progress inextricably linked to that of computer science. Alan Turing’s 1950 paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence, which introduced the famous Turing Test, is still influential today. Many early AI programs were developed to play games, such as Christopher Strachey’s checkers-playing program written for the Ferranti Mark I computer.

The term “artificial intelligence” itself wasn’t codified until 1956’s Dartmouth Workshop, organized by Marvin Minsky, John McCarthy, Claude Shannon, and Nathan Rochester, where McCarthy coined the name for the burgeoning field.

The Workshop was also where Allen Newell and Herbert A. Simon debuted their Logic Theorist computer program, which was developed with the help of computer programmer Cliff Shaw. Designed to prove mathematical theorems the same way a human mathematician would, Logic Theorist would go on to prove 38 of the first 52 theorems found in the Principia Mathematica. Despite this achievement, the other researchers at the conference “didn’t pay much attention to it,” according to Simon.

Games and mathematics were focal points of early AI because they were easy to apply the “reasoning as search” principle to. Reasoning as search, also called means-ends analysis (MEA), is a problem-solving method that follows three basic steps:

  • Ddetermine the ongoing state of whatever problem you’re observing (you’re feeling hungry).
  • Identify the end goal (you no longer feel hungry).
  • Decide the actions you need to take to solve the problem (you make a sandwich and eat it).

This early forerunner of AI’s rationale: If the actions did not solve the problem, find a new set of actions to take and repeat until you’ve solved the problem.

Neural Nets and Natural Languages

With Cold-War-era governments willing to throw money at anything that might deliver them an advantage over the other side, AI research experienced a burst of funding from organizations like DARPA throughout the ’50s and ’60s.

This research spawned a number of advances in machine learning. For example, Simon and Newell’s General Problem Solver, while using MEA, would generate heuristics, mental shortcuts which could block off possible problem-solving paths the AI might explore that weren’t likely to arrive at the desired outcome.

Initially proposed in the 1940s, the first artificial neural network was invented in 1958, thanks to funding from the United States Office of Naval Research.

A major focus of researchers in this period was trying to get AI to understand human language. Daniel Brubow helped pioneer natural language processing with his STUDENT program, which was designed to solve word problems.

In 1966, Joseph Weizenbaum introduced the first chatbot, ELIZA, an act which Internet users the world over are grateful for. Roger Schank’s conceptual dependency theory, which attempted to convert sentences into basic concepts represented as a set of simple keywords, was one of the most influential early developments in AI research.

Also see: Data Analytics Trends 

The First AI Winter

In the 1970s, the pervasive optimism in AI research from the ’50s and ’60s began to fade. Funding dried up as sky-high promises were dragged to earth by a myriad of the real-world issues facing AI researching. Chief among them was a limitation in computational power.

As Bruce G. Buchanan explained in an article for AI Magazine: “Early programs were necessarily limited in scope by the size and speed of memory and processors and by the relative clumsiness of the early operating systems and languages.” This period, as funding disappeared and optimism waned, became known as the AI Winter.

The period was marked by setbacks and interdisciplinary disagreements amongst AI researchers. Marvin Minsky and Frank Rosenblatt’s 1969 book Perceptrons discouraged the field of neural networks so thoroughly that very little research was done in the field until the 1980s.

Then, there was the divide between the so-called “neats” and the “scruffys.” The neats favored the use of logic and symbolic reasoning to train and educate their AI. They wanted AI to solve logical problems like mathematical theorems.

John McCarthy introduced the idea of using logic in AI with his 1959 Advice Taker proposal. In addition, the Prolog programming language, developed in 1972 by Alan Colmerauer and Phillipe Roussel, was designed specifically as a logic programming language and still finds use in AI today.

Meanwhile, the scruffys were attempting to get AI to solve problems that required AI to think like a person. In a 1975 paper, Marvin Minsky outlined a common approach used by scruffy researchers, called “frames.”

Frames are a way that both humans and AI can make sense of the world. When you encounter a new person or event, you can draw on memories of similar people and events to deliver you a rough idea of how to proceed, such as when you order food at a new restaurant. You might not know the menu or the people serving you, but you have a general idea of how to place an order based on past experiences in other restaurants.

From Academia to Industry

The 1980s marked a return to enthusiasm for AI. R1, an expert system implemented by the Digital Equipment Corporation in 1982, was saving the company a reported $40 million a year by 1986. The success of R1 proved AI’s viability as a commercial tool and sparked interest from other major companies like DuPont.

On top of that, Japan’s Fifth Generation project, an attempt to create intelligent computers running on Prolog the same way normal computers run on code, sparked further American corporate interest. Not wanting to be outdone, American companies poured funds into AI research.

Taken altogether, this increase in interest and shift to industrial research resulted in the AI industry ballooning to $2 billion in value by 1988. Adjusting for inflation, that’s nearly $5 billion dollars in 2022.

Also see: Real Time Data Management Trends

The Second AI Winter

In the 1990s, however, interest began receding in much the same way it had in the ’70s. In 1987, Jack Schwartz, the then-new director of DARPA, effectively eradicated AI funding from the organization, yet already-earmarked funds didn’t dry up until 1993.

The Fifth Generation Project had failed to meet many of its goals after 10 years of development, and as businesses found it cheaper and easier to purchase mass-produced, general-purpose chips and program AI applications into the software, the market for specialized AI hardware, such as LISP machines, collapsed and caused the overall market to shrink.

Additionally, the expert systems that had proven AI’s viability at the beginning of the decade began showing a fatal flaw. As a system stayed in-use, it continually added more rules to operate and needed a larger and larger knowledge base to handle. Eventually, the amount of human staff needed to maintain and update the system’s knowledge base would grow until it became financially untenable to maintain. The combination of these factors and others resulted in the Second AI Winter.

Also see: Top Digital Transformation Companies

Into the New Millennium and the Modern World of AI

The late 1990s and early 2000s showed signs of the coming AI springtime. Some of AI’s oldest goals were finally realized, such as Deep Blue’s 1997 victory over then-chess world champion Gary Kasparov in a landmark moment for AI.

More sophisticated mathematical tools and collaboration with fields like electrical engineering resulted in AI’s transformation into a more logic-oriented scientific discipline, allowing the aforementioned neats to claim victory over their scruffy counterparts. Marvin Minsky, for his part, declared that the field of AI was and had been “brain dead” for the past 30 years in 2003.

Meanwhile, AI found use in a variety of new areas of industry: Google’s search engine algorithm, data mining, and speech recognition just to name a few. New supercomputers and programs would find themselves competing with and even winning against top-tier human opponents, such as IBM’s Watson winning Jeopardy! in 2011 over Ken Jennings, who’d once won 74 episodes of the game show in a row.

One of the most impactful pieces of AI in exact years has been Facebook’s algorithms, which can determine what posts you see and when, in an attempt to curate an online experience for the platform’s users. Algorithms with similar functions can be found on websites like Youtube and Netflix, where they predict what content viewers want to watch next based on previous history.

The benefits of these algorithms to anyone but these companies’ bottom lines are up for debate, as even former employees have testified before Congress about the dangers it can cause to users.

Sometimes, these innovations weren’t even recognized as AI. As Nick Brostrom put it in a 2006 CNN interview: “A lot of cutting edge AI has filtered into general applications, often without being called AI because once something becomes useful enough and common enough it’s not labelled AI anymore.”

The trend of not calling useful artificial intelligence AI did not last into the 2010s. Now, start-ups and tech mainstays alike scramble to claim their latest product is fueled by AI or machine learning. In some cases, this desire has been so powerful that some will declare their product is AI-powered, even when the AI’s functionality is questionable.

AI has found its way into many peoples’ homes, whether via the aforementioned social media algorithms or virtual assistants like Amazon’s Alexa. Through winters and burst bubbles, the field of artificial intelligence has persevered and become a hugely significant part of modern life, and is likely to grow exponentially in the years ahead.

Mon, 25 Jul 2022 09:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.eweek.com/enterprise-apps/history-of-artificial-intelligence/
Killexams : Breakthrough quantum algorithm

City College of New York physicist Pouyan Ghaemi and his research team are claiming significant progress in using quantum computers to study and predict how the state of a large number of interacting quantum particles evolves over time. This was done by developing a quantum algorithm that they run on an IBM quantum computer. "To the best of our knowledge, such particular quantum algorithm which can simulate how interacting quantum particles evolve over time has not been implemented before," said Ghaemi, associate professor in CCNY's Division of Science.

Entitled "Probing geometric excitations of fractional quantum Hall states on quantum computers," the study appears in the journal of Physical Review Letters.

"Quantum mechanics is known to be the underlying mechanism governing the properties of elementary particles such as electrons," said Ghaemi. "But unfortunately there is no easy way to use equations of quantum mechanics when we want to study the properties of large number of electrons that are also exerting force on each other due to their electric charge.

His team's discovery, however, changes this and raises other exciting possibilities.

"On the other front, recently, there has been extensive technological developments in building the so-called quantum computers. These new class of computers utilize the law of quantum mechanics to preform calculations which are not possible with classical computers."

We know that when electrons in material interact with each other strongly, interesting properties such as high-temperature superconductivity could emerge," Ghaemi noted. "Our quantum computing algorithm opens a new avenue to study the properties of materials resulting from strong electron-electron interactions. As a result it can potentially guide the search for useful materials such as high temperature superconductors."

He added that based on their results, they can now potentially look at using quantum computers to study many other phenomena that result from strong interaction between electrons in solids. "There are many experimentally observed phenomena that could be potentially understood using the development of quantum algorithms similar to the one we developed."

The research was done at CCNY -- and involved an interdisciplinary team from the physics and electrical engineering departments -- in collaboration with experts from Western Washington University, Leeds University in the UK; and Schlumberger-Doll Research Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and Britain's Engineering and Science Research Council.

Story Source:

Materials provided by City College of New York. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/07/220727110714.htm
Killexams : Open innovation networks between academia and industry: an imperative for breakthrough therapies
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    Killexams : AT PRINCETON IN THE 1950s Killexams : PRINCETON IN THE 1950s

    Michael S. Mahoney
    Program in History of Science
    Princeton University

    (English original of "Princeton explore le nouveau calcul", Les Cahiers de Science & Vie, No. 53 [October 1999], pp. 14-19)

    In the 1950s Princeton University was undergoing a transition from a predominantly liberal-arts college to a research university. The faculty in science and engineering had distinguished themselves during the war and returned to Princeton eager to continue their well funded investigations. The federal government, persuaded of the value of a scientific infrastructure, was equally eager to provide the funding. Over the next fifteen years, Princeton began the move to Big Science, as it became the home of an accelerator, a jet propulsion laboratory, a fusion reactor, and the professional staffs needed to support them. Government agencies paid for more than hardware. Even before the establishment of the National Science Foundation, contracts with the research offices of the armed services and with the Atomic Energy Commission included generous funding for faculty and their graduate assistants. Princeton was far from alone in enjoying the new prestige of the sciences and the funding that came with it. Its experience was being repeated across the country. But Princeton had a special advantage. Together with the Institute for Advanced Study, formally separate but closely allied in practice, it had a tradition of excellence in the mathematical sciences. It was among the first places to have a computer. And it was the only place that had John von Neumann.

    Princeton's Computer

    Von Neumann returned to Princeton following the Second World War with a variety of new projects in mind. In particular, he wanted to build a computer. His brief collaboration with John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, the creators of ENIAC at the University of Pennsylvania, had led to the famous "Draft Report on the EDVAC" (1945), in which von Neumann laid down the basic architecture that has since come to bear his name. He persuaded the Institute for Advanced Study to enter into a joint project with RCA's Sarnoff Laboratory and with Princeton University to translate his design into a working machine, which could then serve as the basis for research into the scientific possibilities of high-speed numerical computation, especially in the area of meteorology. Additional funding came from the Army, the Navy, and later the Atomic Energy Commission. (1)

    First proposed in 1945, the IAS computer took six years to build, but even before completion it was being replicated at laboratories and universities across the U.S. and around the world, including Moscow's Academy of Sciences. Although the first calculations were done for the Los Alamos laboratories, von Neumann intended his machine for experiments in computation rather than production computing. Believing that "hydrodynamical problems are the prototype for anything involving non-linear partial differential equations", he focused at first on numerical meteorology, an area of obvious interest to his military sponsors. But he was interested in the range of problems that could be addressed and so made the computer available to researchers in numerical methods, statistics, traffic simulation, and even history of astronomy. His friend and Princeton colleague, Eugene Wigner (Nobel Prize 1963), used the IAS computer for statistical studies of the wave functions of quantum mechanical systems. Martin Schwarzschild of the University's Observatory explored the interiors of stars by means of numerical models. These were problems for which no analytical solution was known, and for von Neumann they were a test of the value of the computer to scientific research. Princeton's astrophysicists in particular took advantage of the new tool and the possibilities it presented for modeling phenomena unreachable by direct experiment. They would account for up to half the time on the IAS computer for the three years (1956-59) it was operated by the University.

    Despite the early advantage, neither the Institute nor the University became a center of research in computing per se. At both institutions, the focus lay on the use of the computer as a tool for science rather than as an object of study in its own right. No more computers were designed and built in Princeton. When the IAS computer was retired at the end of the '50s, the University turned to IBM for a new system to support the work of its scientists and engineers. Yet, many of the new directions in computer science that were pursued elsewhere have a Princeton connection made in the 1950s. Many of the people who shaped the computer as a scientific instrument and as a subject of scientific inquiry studied or taught at Princeton during the period and later recalled the inspiration and encouragement they had encountered here.

    Among the several new areas of research that von Neumann pursued in the decade after the war, three had special importance both for computing and for Princeton: computation of non-linear problems, game theory, and the theory of automata. The first was built into the meteorology project and other applications of the IAS computer. His game theory dated originally from a seminal paper in 1928 but had languished until 1940 when conversations with Oskar Morgenstern, a Vienna-trained member of Princeton's Economics Department, stimulated von Neumann's interest in the application of game theory to economics. The result of their collaboration over the next several years was the classic Theory of Games and Economic Behavior (Princeton, 1944). At first, economists in general and especially at Princeton showed little interest in the work. But in the late 1940s it engaged the enthusiasm of several faculty and graduate students in the mathematics department, who explored the relation of game theory to linear and non-linear programming and gave the new field its definitive shape during the 1950s. One of those students, John Nash, won the 1994 Nobel Prize in Economics for work done then.

    New Directions in Mathematics

    What was striking about the Princeton mathematics department in the 1950s was its openness to new directions in the field and to applications of mathematics to new areas, indeed to applied mathematics in general. It was symbolized perhaps by the department's two chairmen during the period, Solomon Lefschetz and his student and successor, Albert W. Tucker. Both had established their careers as topologists but were now turning in new directions. In 1946 Lefschetz initiated a long-term project, funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), on non-linear differential equations with particular focus on nonlinear oscillations, the theory of operators, and combinatorial problems in logistics. A few years later, Tucker started the Princeton Logistics Project, also under ONR sponsorship, with a focus on the geometry and computations of solutions of 2-person and n-person games, network theory, and variations and perturbations of "linear programming" methods. Working in close collaboration, their two projects brought a variety of mathematical fields to bear on new approaches to non-linear systems. While maintaining the department's traditional strength in analysis and topology, they fostered wide-ranging explorations into dynamical systems, mathematical programming, decision theory, and computation. Several of the people involved went on to the RAND Corporation, where they continued their work in the area, often in collaboration with the Princeton groups.

    It was a time of new possibilities, made all the more exciting by the openness of the Princeton mathematical community to new ideas and approaches. Martin Shubik, one of the seminal figures in computer-based experimental economics, came to Princeton in 1949 to study game theory as a graduate student in economics but found little interest in his own department. The mathematics department became his intellectual home. As he later reminisced,

    The general attitude around Fine Hall [the home of the department] was that no one really cared who you were or what part of mathematics you worked on as long as you could find some senior member of the faculty and make a case to him that it was interesting and that you did it well. ... To me the striking thing at that time was not that the mathematics department welcomed game theory with open arms - but that it was open to new ideas and new talent from any source, and it could convey a sense of challenge and a belief that much new and worthwhile was happening. (2)

    Perhaps the most extreme example was Marvin Minsky's dissertation in 1954 on the "Theory of Neural-Analog Reinforcement Systems", in which he began his explorations into what would soon become artificial intelligence. Tucker agreed to serve as adviser. Minsky was going where mathematicians had not gone, but as Tucker later recalled, "he had these ideas, and I for one felt that it was more useful to the world to have him develop these ideas, which were completely original, than to do something, say, in topology, which he could very easily have done." (3)

    In 1956, Minsky teamed up with another Princeton Ph.D., John McCarthy, and with Claude Shannon of Bell Laboratories and Nathaniel Rochester of IBM, to propose a summer institute at Dartmouth on a subject they called "artificial intelligence". McCarthy, who had done a dissertation on differential equations under Lefschetz but who had also been active with the game theorists, subsequently became interested in formal reasoning on the computer. In a related effort to enlist support in the area, he had joined with Shannon to edit a volume on Automata Studies, which was supported in part by the Logistics Project and which appeared in Princeton's Annals of Mathematics Studies. Although the contributions to the volume did not take the direction McCarthy had hoped, they did lay a foundation for the newly emerging theory of computation. Again, the seminal inspiration came from von Neumann.

    The Science of Computers

    In designing the IAS computer, von Neumann worked from an overall vision that far exceeded current technical capabilities. Beginning in the late 1940s and continuing until his death in 1957, he explored the conditions under which computers might detect and correct their own failures, might replicate themselves, and might even evolve to ever more complex forms. The model, of course, was the living organism and in particular the human brain. While von Neumann pictured computers assembling copies of themselves in a sea of physical parts, his friend Stanislaw Ulam suggested the model of a cellular automaton, a multi-dimensional array of finite machines changing state in response to the states of their immediate neighbors. Although the University of Michigan would be home to research in that area for the next twenty years, von Neumann's discussion of "growing automata" refocused attention on finite automata, and there Princeton mathematicians had fundamental things to say.

    From the beginning, von Neumann insisted that the computer not only met the computational needs of traditional mathematical science and provided new means of handling previously intractable mathematical systems, but also opened areas of investigation previously thought inaccessible to mathematics, for example, the growth of organisms and the workings of the human mind. Here, the computer would serve as a model of these systems, and an understanding of the model would rest on an adequate theory of the computer itself. But that, too, was largely uncharted territory, where von Neumann himself felt lost. "We are," he proclaimed, "very far from possessing a theory of automata which deserves that name, that is, a properly mathematical-logical theory."

    What would such a theory look like? At first glance it would seem to take mathematics onto unfamiliar and difficult terrain.

    There exists today a very elaborate system of formal logic, and, specifically, of logic as applied to mathematics. This is a discipline with many good sides, but also with certain serious weaknesses. This is not the occasion to enlarge upon the good sides, which I certainly have no intention to belittle. About the inadequacies, however, this may be said: Everybody who has worked in formal logic will confirm that it is one of the technically most refractory parts of mathematics. The reason for this is that it deals with rigid, all-or-none concepts, and has very little contact with the continuous concept of the real or of the complex number, that is, with mathematical analysis. Yet analysis is the technically most successful and best-elaborated part of mathematics. Thus formal logic is, by the nature of its approach, cut off from the best cultivated portions of mathematics, and forced onto the most difficult part of the mathematical terrain, into combinatorics.

    The theory of automata, of the digital, all-or-none type, as discussed up to now, is certainly a chapter in formal logic. It will have to be, from the mathematical point of view, combinatory rather than analytical. (4)

    Von Neumann did not elaborate on the nature of that combinatory mathematics, nor suggest from what areas of current mathematical research it might be drawn.

    As noted above, the Princeton mathematics department was already engaged in forging new relationships between analysis and combinatorics. In Alonzo Church, it had leading figure in mathematical logic, whose students of two generations played leading roles in constructing the mathematical theory von Neumann was seeking. While still graduate students employed during the summer at IBM in 1957, Michael Rabin and Dana Scott wrote their seminal paper on "Finite Automata and Their Decision Problems".

    Princeton during the 1950s fits into the story of "science and the computer" in a complex and indirect way, perhaps best illustrated by the story of the lambda calculus. It was created by Church during the two years that he was away from Princeton between his graduate studies and his career on the faculty. He conceived it as a means of eliminating free variables from logical expressions and hence of making it possible to denote predicates without reference to the nature of their variables. In his early career at Princeton, the lambda calculus formed the basis of his logic and an area of active research by his students. One of these, Stephen C. Kleene , showed in his doctoral dissertation how one could do arithmetic in the system. Church believed at first that the lambda calculus could avoid Russell's paradox and then Gödel's dilemma, but Church's students soon established that it did neither, and in 1937 Alan Turing, who had come to Princeton to study with Church, showed that the lambda calculus was computationally equivalent to the Turing machine. By the late 1940s, Church had relegated the lambda calculus to a footnote in his Introduction to Mathematical Logic (1956), and it appeared only in special cases in Kleene's own Introduction to Metamathematics (1952).

    In 1958, John McCarthy was devising a new computer language for his research into mechanical theorem proving and what he called his "advice taker", a program for symbolic reasoning. Needing a notation for applying an abstract function to an indefinitely long list of arguments, he turned to the list of Annals of Mathematics Studies and there found Church's treatise on the lambda calculus. By McCarthy's own account, he did not understand much of the theory itself, but he did adopt the notation as a metalanguage for his new language, Lisp, which quickly became the language of choice for artificial intelligence programming and established the paradigm of functional programming.

    But in addition to artificial intelligence, McCarthy was also interested in a mathematical theory of computation which would take account of the semantics of programs, that is, of processes or functions by which programs transformed input into output. While he thought in terms of Lisp, others attracted to his agenda of formal semantics, focused on the lambda calculus itself. The problem with the lambda calculus as a theoretical foundation, as commentators on McCarthy's work had pointed out, was that it did not have a mathematical model. In and of itself, it did not constitute a mathematical theory of computation, as McCarthy had claimed.

    In the late 1960s, the problem came under the scrutiny of Dana Scott, who had turned again to questions of computation following work in logic and model theory. Critical of the efforts of Christopher Strachey in Cambridge and Jaco de Bakker in Amsterdam to base a mathematical semantics on the lambda calculus, Scott set out to show that it would not work, only then to discover the mathematical model that lambda calculus had lacked. The resulting theory of denotational semantics, based on continuous lattices, forged new links between the theory of computation and modern abstract algebra, in particular category theory. It also confirmed the lambda calculus as the foundation of functional programming languages. None of this happened in Princeton in the 1950s, but it began there.

    Recent work has brought the lambda calculus around to some of the original themes motivating von Neumann's study of automata and pertinent to this issue of Cahiers de science et vie. For theoretical biologists Walter Fontana, Gunther Wagner, and Leo Buss, the lambda calculus has become a tool for modeling the interaction of molecules as they combine and recombine to form ever larger structures. At stake are the questions of self-organization and the emergence of complexity capable of self-replication and even evolution. As Fontana describes it at his website (http://www.santafe.edu/~walter/AlChemy/alchemy.html) in terms reminiscent of the Princeton agendas of the 1950s,

    By investigating the consequences of a many-body dynamical setting of λ-expressions we have generated a diversity of self-maintaining organizations with the desired properties, i.e., resistance to perturbation, extensibility, and history dependence.

    Perhaps symbolically, in September Fontana joined the Program in Theoretical Biology at the Institute for Advanced Study, thus bringing the lambda calculus back to its birthplace.


    1. For details on the IAS computer and related projects, see William Aspray, John von Neumann and the Origins of Modern Computing (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1990).

    2. Martin Shubik, "Game Theory at Princeton, 1949-1955: A Personal Reminiscence", in Toward a History of Game Theory, ed. E. Roy Weintraub (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1992), 151-63; at 153 and 161-2.

    3. Interview in The Princeton Mathematics Community in the 1930s: An Oral History Project (Princeton University, 1985), PMC36, p.4.

    4. John von Neumann, "On a logical and general theory of automata" in Cerebral Mechanisms in Behavior--The Hixon Symposium, ed. L.A. Jeffries (New York: Wiley, 1951), 1-31; repr. in Papers of John von Neumann on Computing and Computer Theory, ed. William Aspray and Arthur Burks (Cambridge, MA/London: MIT Press; Los Angeles/San Francisco: Tomash Publishers, 1987), 391-431; at 406.

    Wed, 11 May 2022 19:02:00 -0500 text/html https://www.princeton.edu/~hos/Mahoney/articles/cahscivie/cahscivie.htm
    Killexams : BSc Information Technology Management for Business / Course details

    Course description

    Developed in collaboration with leading global blue-chip employers, this course aims to create `the ideal graduate' whose skills cover the challenging middle ground between business and IT.

    The uniqueness of the course is recognised by over 40 employers who maintain its quality and relevance to their sectors. Accenture, BBC, BT, Credit Suisse, Deloitte, IBM, Unilever and many other companies help to deliver the course through project work, student mentoring and a range of professional development activities.

    This course is also available with a one-year work placement - view BSc (Hons) IT Management for Business with Industrial Experience course details .

    Aims

    The Information Technology Management for Business Degree is home to future leaders of the IT industry. Together with your outstanding fellow students from around the world, you will learn the application of technology within the modern workplace across diverse industries. Everything on the IT Management for Business programme is focused on the application of practice, enabling you to understand the real life challenges faced by industry

    No previous technology experience is required to join the programme, only a passion for harnessing innovation and creativity to Strengthen the management of IT.

    Special features

    • Complete team projects set by employers such as Procter and Gamble and Credit Suisse
    • Bi-annual on-campus ITMB showcase and recruitment events - present your project work to the likes of Amazon, Bank of America, Barclays, Fujitsu and Procter & Gamble - just a small selection of the 40+ employers who support the degree
    • Other events include business challenges, competitions, graduate and placement student panels and skills sessions delivered by companies such as KPMG, Fujitsu and Bank of America

    Teaching and learning

    You will normally study four or five course units per semester. Each week there are usually two hours of lectures for each course unit and a one hour workshop in alternate weeks, although this varies slightly. You are expected to double this in private study. Group work and group or individual presentations will form a regular part of your assignments.

    Coursework and assessment

    Essays, multiple choice tests, project reports and presentations, in-class tests and weekly assignments constitute the coursework component of assessment, although the nature and proportion of coursework varies across course units. The remainder of assessment is by unseen examination. Depending on the degree course, in your final year you can choose to do a research-based dissertation or project. We aim to strike a balance between examinations and assessed coursework as well as providing opportunities for feedback on progress through non-assessed work.

    Course unit details

    You take courses totalling 360 credits over the duration of your studies in order to graduate with Honours; 120 credits in each year of study. Generally, one semester courses are worth 10 credits and full year courses are worth 20 credits. As your studies progress you have increasing flexibility in choosing courses which suit your personal interests and career aspirations.

    Course content for year 1

    Project work integrates business and IT throughout the degree. Our current first-year project is supported by Credit Suisse and involves developing an application to solve a real business problem.

    In addition to foundation-level course units in IT, you will also study marketing, economics and work psychology. By the end of your first year you will have presented your team project to employers at two employer showcases and participated in skills sessions delivered by companies such as KPMG, Fujitsu, and Bank of America.

    Course units for year 1

    The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

    Course content for year 2

    During your second year of study you will undertake core course units in Business Analysis, Digital Strategy, User Experience Design and Data Analytics.

    What sets the ITMB programme at Manchester apart is our ability to provide you with the opportunity to customise your programme of study to ensure that it fulfils a learning experience that meets your individual goals.

    Our current second year Integrative Team Project is supported by Procter and Gamble, where you will be tasked with the undertaking of a yearlong team consultancy project, the result of which will be showcased to employers at the end of both semesters.

    Course units for year 2

    The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

    Course content for year 3

    Your final year provides an in-depth view of big data and business analytics, IT risk and architecture. You will gain practical skills in the design and application of business IT architectures through a core unit developed with IBM, which applies a case study from the global technology giant.

    You will also undertake your own final year research project - the development of an IT solution to a business problem which will encompass; investigation, requirement analysis, design and evaluation of your proposed solution.

    Previous ITMB students have studied a variety of courses including; how large corporations use technology to manage teams across geographic locations and time zones, IT provision in the treatment of diabetes in the NHS, and investigated the implications of the rise in social networking on management.

    Course units for year 3

    The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

    Scholarships and bursaries

    The Manchester Bursary is available to UK students registered on an undergraduate degree course at Alliance MBS who have had a full financial assessment carried out by Student Finance England. 

    In addition, Alliance MBS will award a range of Social Responsibility Scholarships to UK and international/EU students. These awards are worth £2,000 per year across three years of study. You must achieve A*AA at A-level (or equivalent qualification) and be able to demonstrate a significant contribution and commitment to social responsibility. The School will also award a number of International Stellar Scholarships to international students achieving A*AA at A-level (or equivalent qualification). Additional eligibility criteria apply - please see our scholarship pages for full details.

    Course collaborators

    The distinctive feature of this group of programmes is the strategic involvement of world-class firms within the IT sector who partner with Alliance Manchester Business School to provide input to the course, in the form of prestigious `guru' lectures, real business problems or projects, and mentoring. The degree has been introduced and directly supported by business and commercial input.

    What our students say

    Hear from current ITMB students over on our YouTube channel:

    • Final year student Srishti is originally from the UAE - she talks about her transformative experience on the programme, including the integrative team project and volunteering initiatives at the University
    • Ioana is originally from Romania - she talks about her experience on the programme, including her full-year work placement at Procter & Gamble
    • ITMB graduate Ellis works at Amazon Web Services as an account manager - he talks about why he chose to study ITMB at Manchester and how the skills honed during his degree are relevant to his graduate role
    • ITMB graduate David works at the Bank of America - he talks about how his work placement at the Bank of America led to a graduate position

    Facilities

    John Rylands University Library is renowned as one of the most extensive libraries in the world. This is complemented by our specialist business and management Eddie Davies Library which provides a dedicated service to Alliance MBS undergraduates. There is increasing provision of information via various web-based services and much of your memorizing material will be available through e-journals. These and other standard computing services, such as access to the internet and word processing, are available through computer clusters across campus in departmental buildings, libraries and halls of residence. Many buildings in and around the campus are also equipped with free wifi access.

    Personal development plans

    PDPs are aimed at helping you develop awareness of generic transferable and subject-specific skills, Strengthen independent learning and provide a record of your academic learning and achievement.

    Academic advisors

    All new Alliance MBS students are allocated an academic advisor who you will meet in regular sessions as part of a first-year course unit. Where possible, you will keep the same academic advisor throughout your time here. Your advisor will support you throughout your studies on matters of an academic nature, from providing feedback on a practice essay in preparation for your `formal' assessment at the end of each semester to discussing your PDP or writing you a reference. We also have a dedicated undergraduate assessment and student support centre within the School, who will be your first point of contact for any ill health or other personal problems which are affecting your work.

    Student mentoring

    We operate a peer mentoring scheme which aims to provide you with a second or final year 'mentor' to provide practical assistance with orientation and induction as well as advice and information on any aspect of student life.

    Disability support

    Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email:  dass@manchester.ac.uk
    Thu, 20 Aug 2015 02:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/2022/06246/bsc-information-technology-management-for-business/course-details/
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