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Guest blog by Scott Haddow, Security Client Exec at IBM #Cyber2022

Cyber Security loves buzzwords, but they get over-exposed faster than Kevin Hart.  Looking at you, Zero-Trust.

If you haven't heard about Attack Surface Management (ASM) yet, you will.  But bear with me, because that's not a bad thing. 

ASM is still on the 'shiny and new' slope of Gartner's hype cycle, but it's already real and out in the wild keeping organisations safer. 

From cloud migrations to IoT integration and hybrid working, IT environments are changing fast – and that’s also true for their attack surfaces, leading to poor visibility of risk in real-time.

Q/ When is the best time to find weaknesses?

A/ Before an attack happens. 

It’s a beautiful concept that may seem naïve when measured against the daily reality of a SOC.  Cyber-nirvana is the goal but hard to get there if you’re stamping out fires all day.  

And this is where we approach the paradox at the heart of cyber security today, having largely abandoned the concept of the completely defensible perimeter.  Almost all the technologies in the SOC are designed to spot things after they happen; that is – after the threat actor is doing something we don’t want them to do inside our network.  AI and machine learning driven uber-suites of clever code that spot, correlate and jump on those trails before they snowball into a full-blown cyber heist.   I’m not suggesting that we don’t need all of that and a perimeter – because we do, but threat actors understand our defenses and are finding ways to slip under the radar of reactive security tooling in a never-ending game of cat and mouse. 

There’s a lot of different numbers for the average dwell time of an attacker before an event like ransomware detonation – but broadly the numbers agree that it’s more than 100 and less than 300 days.  That’s a long time to supply someone to figure out how your operation works.

Add to that that only about 1 in 5 enterprises can monitor their attack surfaces for changes in real time, or to put it another way, four fifths of the world’s enterprises can’t.    

The old question of how you would break into your own home if you were locked out is useful here but falls short when describing the cyber-attack surface, because you’d need to talk about windows you didn’t know you had and prevent an attacker from getting in through a plughole. 

The typical attacker has a laptop, some tools and an internet connection when they begin looking for a way in.  But it’s best not to underestimate our adversary – marketing shows us a lot of people in hoodies hunched over laptops, but it would be scarier to show a 24x7 Ransomware-aaS operation in the C2C marketplace.   This is organized and profitable crime, but regardless of the maturity of the organisation or individual attacking you, they begin on the outside of your environment.  What they look for is internet facing services, IPs, domains, networks, hostnames and so on.    In the process they will uncover your shadow IT, forgotten assets (like that test/dev environment everyone assumed someone else tore down), and other blind-spots and process failures, for example a brute-forceable and exposed login applet, or down-rev web server.  Those are the chinks in the armour offering a route in, and because they face out into the internet, they are highly tempting.  But (of course) they can’t be fixed until you know about them – which means that we need to wait for the lights to blink on the big reactive dashboard, and then you’ve got another fire to stamp out.

If we want to move to a proactive posture, using an Attack Surface Management tool like IBM Randori which scopes your attack surface like an attacker is a smart move.  If we can see what they see when they look at us from the outside, then we have a prioritized inventory of attack risk. 

That’s important because the last thing anyone needs is a report with an overwhelming list of to-do items on it, because we’re already putting out fires as it is.  Having issues ranked by their ‘temptation score’ lets the SOC team focus on the urgent fixes, and then schedule work on the less urgent stuff.  And because Randori only looks at your attack surface from the outside, it’s agentless and doesn’t need appliances.

Having a prioritized inventory of risk let’s you find those open windows and close them, which makes it harder for the attacker to get in. 

Nobody wants to be over exposed, not even Kevin Hart.

IBM has acquired Randori, a leading Attack Surface Management provider and recently named a cool vendor by Gartner.  Although ASM is an emerging technology IBM has never been afraid to be at the forefront of innovation. Find out more here https://www.randori.com/


Help to shape and govern the work of techUK’s Cyber Security Programme

Did you know that nominations are now open* for techUK’s Cyber Management Committee? We’re looking for senior representatives from cyber security companies across the UK to help lead the work of our Cyber Security Programme over the next two years. Find out more and how to nominate yourself/a colleagues here.

*Deadline to submit nomination forms is 17:00 on Tuesday 18 October.


Upcoming events 

Cyber Innovation Den

On Thursday 3 November, techUK will host our fourth annual Cyber Innovation Den online. This year we’ll explore efforts being made to realised the ambition set out in the National Cyber Strategy, with speakers taking a look at the progress we’ve seen to date, including the foundation of the UK Cyber Security Council, the reinvigoration of the Cyber Growth Partnership and the continued growth in the value of the sector to the UK economy.

Book now!

Cyber Security Dinner

In November techUK will host the first ever Cyber Security Dinner. The dinner will be a fantastic networking opportunity, bringing together senior stakeholders from across industry and government for informal discussions around some of the key cyber security issues for 2022 and beyond.

Book now!


Get involved

All techUK's work is led by our members - keep in touch or get involved by joining one of the groups below.

The Cyber Security Group provides a coherent voice for industry working in "high threat" areas - including defence, national security and resilience, the protection of critical national infrastructure, intelligence and organised crime.

The Cyber Management Committee sets the strategic vision for the cyber security programme, helping the programme engage with government and senior industry stakeholders.

The CSSMEF is comprised of SME companies from the techUK membership. The CSSMEF seeks to include a broad grouping of different SME companies working in the Cyber Security (CS) sectors.

Authors

Scott Haddow

Security Client Exec, IBM

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 20:13:00 -0500 text/html https://www.techuk.org/resource/ibm-cyber2022.html
Killexams : As NIST Prepares For Quantum Safe Security, IBM Rolls Out Support

The world of cryptography moves at a very slow, but steady pace. New cryptography standards must be vetted over an extended period and therefore new threats to existing standards need to be judged by decades-long timelines because updating crypto standards is a multiyear journey. Quantum computing is an important threat looming on the horizon. Quantum computers can solve many equations simultaneously, and based on Shor’s Algorithm, crypto experts estimate that they will be able to crack asymmetric encryption. In addition, Grover’s algorithm provides a quadratic reduction in decryption time of symmetric encryption. And the question these same crypto experts try to answer is not if this will happen, but when.

Today’s crypto algorithms use mathematical problems such as factorization of large numbers to protect data. With fault-tolerant quantum computers, factorization can be solved in theory in just a few hours using Shor’s algorithm. This same capability also compromises cryptographic methods based on the difficulty of solving the discrete logarithm problems.

The term used to describe these new, sturdier crypto standards is “quantum safe.” The challenge is we don’t know exactly when fault-tolerant quantum computers will have the power to consistently break existing encryption standards, which are now in wide use. There’s also a concern that some parties could obtain and store encrypted data for decryption later, when suitably capable quantum computers are available. Even if the data is over ten years old, there still could be relevant confidential information in the stored data. Think state secrets, financial and securities records and transactions, health records, or even private or classified communications between public and/or government figures.

U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) believes it’s possible that RSA2048 encryption can be cracked by 2035. Other U.S. government agencies and other security-minded entities have similar timelines. Rather than wait for the last minute to upgrade security, NIST started a competition to develop quantum-safe encryption back in 2016. After several rounds of reviews, on July 5th of this year, NIST chose four algorithms for the final stages of review before setting the standard. IBM developed three of them, two of those are supported in IBM’s Z16 mainframe today.

NISTNIST Announces First Four Quantum-Resistant Cryptographic Algorithms

The new IBM crypto algorithms are based on a family of math problems called structured lattices. Lattice problems have a unique characteristic that will make it reasonably difficult to solve with quantum computing. Structured lattice problems require solving for two unknowns – a multiplier array and an offset and is extremely difficult for quantum computing to solve the lattice problems. The shortest vector problem (SVP) and the closest vector problem (CVP) – upon which lattice cryptography is built – is considered extremely difficult to a quantum computer to solve. Each candidate crypto algorithm is evaluated not just for data security, but also for performance - the overhead cannot be too large for wide spread use.

The final selections are expected in 2024, but there’s still a chance there will be changes before the final standards are released.

MORE FROM FORBESIBM Lattice Cryptography Is Needed Now To Defend Against Quantum Computing Future

IBM Supports Quantum Safe in New Z-Series Mainframes

IBM made a strategic bet before the final NIST selections. The recently released IBM Z16 Series computers already support two of the final four quantum safe crypto candidates: the CRYSTALS-Kyber public-key encryption and the CRYSTALS-Dilithium digital signature algorithms. IBM is set to work with the industry to substantiate these algorithms in production systems. Initially, IBM is using its tape drive storage systems as a test platform. Because tape is often used for cold storage, it's an excellent medium for long-term data protection. IBM is working with its client base to find the appropriate way to roll out quantum-safe encryption to the market. This must be approached as a life cycle transformation. And, in fact, IBM is working with its customers to create a crypto-agile solution, which allows the exact crypto algorithm to change at any point in time without disrupting the entire system. It’s not just a rip and replace process. With crypto-agility, the algorithm is abstracted from the system software stack so a new algorithms can be deployed seamlessly. IBM is developing tools making crypto status part of the overall observability with a suitable dashboard to see crypto events, etc.

These new algorithms must be deployable to existing computing platforms, even at the edge. However, it's not going to feasible to upgrade every system; it’s probably going to be an industry-by-industry effort and industry consortia will be required. For example, IBM, GSMA (Global System for Mobile Communication Association), and Vodafone recently announced they will work via a GSMA Task Force to identify a process to implement quantum-safe technologies across critical telecommunications infrastructure, including the networks underpinning internet access and public utility management. The telecommunication network carries financial data, health information, public-sector infrastructure systems, and sensitive business data which needs to be protected as it traverses global networks.

IBM Research BlogHow IBM is helping make the world's networks quantum safe | IBM Research Blog

What’s Next for Quantum Safe Algorithms

Fault-tolerant quantum computing is coming. When it will be available is still a guessing game, but the people who most care about data security are targeting 2035 to have quantum-safe cryptographic algorithms in place to meet the threat. But that’s not good enough. We need to start protecting critical data and infrastructure sooner than that, considering the length of time systems are deployed in the field and data is stored. Systems such as satellites and power stations are not easy to update in the field.

And there’s data that must be stored securely for future retrieval, including HIPAA (for medical applications), tax records, toxic substance control act and clinical trial data, and others.

Even after the deployment of these new algorithms, this is not the end – there may still be developments that can break even the next generation quantum-safe algorithms. The struggle between those that want to keep systems and data safe and those that want to crack them continues and why companies should look to building in crypto agility into their security plans.

Tirias Research tracks and consults for companies throughout the electronics ecosystem from semiconductors to systems and sensors to the cloud. Members of the Tirias Research team have consulted for IBM and other companies throughout the Security, AI and Quantum ecosystems.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Kevin Krewell en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/tiriasresearch/2022/10/07/as-nist-prepares-for-quantum-safe-security-ibm-rolls-out-support/
Killexams : Grow your skillset: how you can advance your career with a professional certificate

After leaving school, Kevin Curtis spent 20 years working as a call operator in a security operations centre. It’s a job he’d still be doing now if he hadn’t had his interest piqued in building websites after starting a blog. He took an online course in coding to find out more – and that, he says, “sparked an interest which eventually became an interest in data analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence”.

This intrigue eventually led to a career change. Curtis now works as a data entry coordinator for a corporate investment firm, a new direction he sought after studying for the IBM Data Science Professional Certificate on Coursera. “The programme goes through the process of getting information, gathering, preparing and then visualising data and putting it through basic machine learning algorithms,” he says.

For those like Curtis who don’t have many formal qualifications, Coursera offers the opportunity to acquire the in-demand business skills needed to change careers. With 5,200 courses available, there’s plenty of choice. They range from introductory courses for beginners to bachelor’s and master’s degrees from world-class universities – and everything in between.

Anyone who wants to find out more about online learning has the option to take one of the many free courses on offer, but many choose, as Curtis did, to work towards completing a Professional Certificate programme – a course typically lasting a few months, in which learners can build job-specific skills such as project management, digital marketing and cybersecurity. Professional Certificates, offered in partnership with global businesses, such as the Google Data Analytics Professional Certificate, IBM Data Science Professional Certificate and Meta Social Media Marketing Professional, are highly valued by employers and can help you gain new skills that enable you to switch careers.

Although students typically spend about eight hours a week in study, a principal attraction of Coursera is that students can work at their own pace. Curtis has now taken dozens of Coursera programmes, including the IBM Applied AI Professional Certificate. The suggested length of time for study was six months, but he completed it in just one. “I just fly through those things, especially when you have some knowledge already on those areas,” he says.

Learning is asynchronous (you don’t have to attend a lecture or seminar at a set time), and study materials are typically a mix of short videos and set texts, with revision quizzes to test knowledge at the end of each module. You can, however, ask questions to tutors or join an online discussion forum with other students.

Students can pay for each course individually, but Curtis chose the Coursera Plus option, which, for an annual subscription of £329, provides unlimited access to more than 90% of the learning programmes. Whenever he wants to learn a new skill for work, he turns to Coursera. “The annual subscription for me is brilliant because I dip in and out of things all the time. It’s a huge catalogue of different skills.”

Students can study in their own time, using videos and set texts. Photograph: Tom Werner/Getty Images

Like Curtis, John Guinn doesn’t have a bachelor’s degree, but has used Coursera as a way to acquire and expand his professional skills. Guinn started his career as a telecoms engineer before setting up a travel agency. A weekly gig as a travel expert on a community radio show led to an interest in journalism, and he took a master’s degree in online journalism with a university – although this was not done through Coursera. He now works as a local news journalist, reporting on the activities of local authorities.

For Guinn, Coursera has offered him an easily accessible way of gaining the skills he needs to enable him to Strengthen at his job. He has taken seven courses so far, including a short course on scepticism, offered by the University of California, to Strengthen his ability to ask thoughtful questions. “Although my online journalism master’s taught me how to do online journalism, it didn’t teach me how to be a journalist,” he says.

Another Coursera course where he enriched his knowledge, and hence his questioning skills, was the Act on Climate: Steps to Individual, Community, and Political Action course, run by the University of Michigan. This has enabled Guinn to challenge local authorities directly about their policies relating to climate change.

The other courses he’s studied, more technical in nature, such as Visualization for Data Journalism, have taught him how to analyse and visualise data. These have been invaluable in enabling him to spot information tucked away in the spreadsheets that local authorities are legally required to publish. Close analyses can generate important local news stories by revealing information that a local authority is reluctant to publicise. It has enabled Guinn to spot, for example, that, despite making public pronouncements about the importance of recycling, one council’s recycling rate has gone down while its incineration rate has gone up.

Guinn plans to continue taking Coursera courses to sharpen his journalism and data analysis skills and, like Curtis, has signed up for an annual Coursera Plus subscription. He hopes these skills will help him move into more in-depth investigative journalism, focusing, in particular, on climate change.

Both Guinn and Curtis have found that Coursera courses can be life-transforming, contributing to their current positions. “Based on the value I’ve got from it, I’d absolutely recommend it,” says Curtis.

Whether you’re at the beginning of your career journey or looking to enhance your skillset to make a mid-career transition, you can choose from a range of learning experiences on Coursera to find the programmes that are right for you.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 22:08:00 -0500 Kim Thomas en text/html https://www.theguardian.com/your-career-compass/2022/oct/07/grow-your-skillset-how-you-can-advance-your-career-with-a-professional-certificate?amp;amp
Killexams : IBM, Albany State University Partner on Cybersecurity Center (TNS) — Albany State University is collaborating with International Business Machine Corp. ( IBM) as one of 20 schools to establish a Cybersecurity Leadership Center. The center will provide students and faculty access to IBM training, software, and certifications at no cost.

With 500,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in the U.S., the need for expertise is critical. According to a recent IBM Security study, insufficiently staffed organizations average $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.

"The collaboration with IBM is an important component of our strategy to prepare our students to positively contribute to the demanding STEM field," Albany State President Marion Fedrick said. " ASU will benefit from this long-term collaboration by integrating IBM's curriculum into our program, leveraging the resources to train our faculty and students, and expanding the pipeline of students who will be the work force of the future to work in current STEM careers as well as the ones yet to be imagined."


Through IBM's collaboration, faculty and students at participating schools will have access to coursework, lectures, immersive training experiences, certifications, IBM cloud-hosted software, and professional development resources, all at no cost to them. This includes access to:
  • Cybersecurity curricula: IBM will develop for each participating HBCU a customized IBM Security Learning Academy portal — an IBM client offering — including courses designed to help the university enhance its cybersecurity education portfolio. In addition, IBM will continue to supply access to IBM SkillsBuild.
  • Immersive learning experience: Students and faculty at participating HBCUs will have an opportunity to benefit from IBM Security's Command Center, through which they can experience a highly realistic, simulated cyberattack, designed to prepare them and train them on response techniques. Moreover, HBCUs' faculty will have access to consultation sessions with IBM technical personnel on cybersecurity.
  • Software: Multiple IBM Security premier enterprise security products hosted in the IBM Cloud
  • Professional development: Forums to exchange best practices, learn from IBM experts, and discover IBM internships and job openings

"Collaborations between academia and the private sector can help students prepare for success," Justina Nixon-Saintil, the vice president of IBM Corporate Social Responsibility and ESG, said. "That's especially true for HBCUs because their mission is so vital. "The Cybersecurity Leadership Centers we're co-creating with historically black colleges and universities epitomize our commitment to the black community and STEM education; it also builds on our pledge to train 150,000 people in cybersecurity over three years."

©2022 The Albany Herald, Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Mon, 26 Sep 2022 09:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govtech.com/education/higher-ed/ibm-albany-state-university-partner-on-cybersecurity-center
Killexams : New IBM Study Finds Cybersecurity Incident Responders Have Strong Sense of Service as Threats Cross Over to Physical World

-      Sense of duty to protect others cited amongst the top reasons 77% of respondents entered Incident Response (IR)

-      Ransomware has exacerbated the psychological demands of IR for 81% of respondents

-      Majority of respondents have sought out mental health assistance due to their experiences responding to cyberattacks

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Oct 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- IBM Security (NYSE: IBM) today announced the results of a global survey that examines the critical role of cybersecurity incident responders at a time when the physical and digital worlds are increasingly converging. The study, released during National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, found that incident responders surveyed – the frontline responders to cyberattacks – are primarily driven by a strong sense of duty to protect others; a responsibility that's increasingly challenged by the surge of disruptive attacks, from the proliferation of ransomware attacks to the recent rise of wiper malware.

Cybersecurity Awareness Month - IBM Security Sense of Duty

Organizations that are essential to the global economy, supply chains and the movement of goods have become prime targets for disruptive attacks. In 2021 IBM Security X-Force observed cyberattacks against energy companies quadrupling from the year prior, while manufacturers saw more ransomware attacks than any other industry – from food manufacturers to medical devices, cars and steel manufacturers. As cyberattacks threaten essential services to our daily needs, incident responders in these industries are faced with more pressure to defend the digital front line. In fact, 81% of respondents stated that the rise of ransomware has exacerbated the psychological demands associated to cybersecurity incidents.

The global survey of over 1,100 cybersecurity incident responders in 10 markets, conducted by Morning Consult and sponsored by IBM Security, revealed trends, and challenges that incident responders experience due to the nature of their profession. Some key highlights include:

  • A Sense of Service – Over a third of incident responders were attracted to the field by a sense of duty to protect and opportunity to help others and businesses. For nearly 80% of respondents, this was one of the top reasons attracting them to IR.

  • Fighting Multiple Battlefronts – Amid a growing number of cyberattacks in recent years, 68% of incident responders surveyed stated it's common to be assigned to respond to two or more overlapping incidents simultaneously.

  • Impact on Daily Life – The high demands of cybersecurity engagements also affect incident responders' personal lives, with 67% experiencing stress or anxiety in their daily lives. Insomnia, burnout and impact on social life or relationships followed as effects respondents cited. Despite these challenges, the vast majority acknowledged they have a strong support system in place.

"The real-world repercussions that cyberattacks now have are causing public safety concerns and market-stressing risks to grow," said Laurance Dine, Global Lead, IBM Security X-Force Incident Response. "Incident responders are the frontline defenders standing between cyber adversaries causing disruption and the integrity and continuity of critical services. IBM salutes all IR teams  across the cybersecurity community, and the essential role they play in defending the digital front line."

An Uneven Battlefield

In recent years, not only have cyberattacks become more disruptive, but their sheer volume has increased. X-Force saw a nearly 25% rise in cybersecurity incidents its IR team engaged in from 2020 to 2021. Add to that, Check Point Software Technologies research indicates  a 50% increase in overall network attacks per week in 2021 compared to 2020. But as the industry is called to respond to a growing number of cyberattacks, there's only a finite number of security professionals specifically trained and skilled to respond to cybersecurity incidents.

As a result, while many IR teams are forced to take on multiple battlefronts, businesses could be left without the necessary resources to mitigate and recover from cyberattacks. The IBM study found that 68% of incident responders surveyed find it common to simultaneously need to respond to two or more cybersecurity incidents, highlighting a field that is constantly engaged. Amongst U.S. respondents 34% said the average length of an IR engagement was 4-6 weeks, while a quarter cited the first week as often the most stressful or demanding period of the engagement. During this period about a third of respondents work more than 12 hours per day on average.

A Strong Support System in Place

As incident responders take on the pressure and high demands associated with cyber response, the overwhelming majority of respondents acknowledged they have a strong support system in place. Specifically, most respondents feel their leadership has a strong understanding of the activities IR involves, while 95% say it provides the necessary support structure for them to be successful. As well, 84% state they have adequate access to mental health support resources, with many respondents (64%) seeking out mental health assistance due to the demanding nature of responding to cyberattacks.

But businesses can further support incident responders, whether in-house Blue Teams or the external IR teams they engage in the event of a cyber crisis, by prioritizing cyber preparedness and creating plans and playbooks that are customized to their environment and resources. This can help enable a more agile and quick response at the onset of an incident and alleviate an unnecessary layer of pressure across the business.

To that end, situational awareness of their infrastructure is important. Businesses can focus on testing their state of readiness through simulation exercises, not only to get a feel of how their teams will react under attack, but to provide opportunities to correctly integrate multiple teams that are engaged during a cyber incident.

Additional Resources

  • Read the complete findings from IBM Security's Incident Responder study

  • Celebrate and recognize incident responders this Cybersecurity Awareness Month here

  • Read a Security Intelligence blog on incident responders holding the digital frontline

  • To register for IBM Security X-Force's incident response webinar, "Tales from the Digital Frontlines," on Wednesday, October 12 at 1:00 pm ET, sign up here

  • Schedule a consult with IBM Security X-Force

About IBM Security
IBM Security offers one of the most advanced and integrated portfolios of enterprise security products and services. The portfolio, supported by world-renowned IBM Security X-Force® research, enables organizations to effectively manage risk and defend against emerging threats. IBM operates one of the world's broadest security research, development, and delivery organizations, monitors 150 billion+ security events per day in more than 130 countries, and has been granted more than 10,000 security patents worldwide. For more information, please check www.ibm.com/security, follow @IBMSecurity on Twitter or visit the IBM Security Intelligence blog.

Contact:
Georgia Prassinos
IBM Security Communications 
gprassinos@ibm.com

IBM Corporation logo. (PRNewsfoto/IBM)

Cision

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SOURCE IBM

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 03:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/ibm-study-finds-cybersecurity-incident-100000009.html
Killexams : Telos Corporation to Help Enterprises Operationalize Cybersecurity Compliance and Regulatory Risks with IBM Security

Ashburn, Va. – September 15, 2022Telos Corporation (NASDAQ: TLS), a leading provider of cyber, cloud and enterprise security solutions for the world’s most security-conscious organizations, is pleased to announce a collaboration with IBM Security as part of IBM’s Active Governance Services (AGS) that allows enterprises to operationalize and automate activities and solve challenges in cybersecurity compliance and regulatory risks.

“The number of global, national and local compliance requirements are increasing, which means enterprises now have massive amounts of security controls to implement, test and report on,” said John B. Wood, Telos CEO and chairman. “Telos and IBM Security are excited to address this issue together by leveraging our combined and extensive expertise in IT risk management and compliance to create efficiency out of chaos and offer effective solutions to the audit fatigue issue.”

AGS helps organizations overcome the challenges and costs associated with regulatory compliance, especially audit fatigue. According to a 2020 study, organizations, on average, must comply with 13 different IT security compliance and privacy regulations, which requires a team of 22 dedicated staff members and results in 58 working days per quarter spent responding to audit evidence requests. Beyond audit fatigue, the study also found that 86% of respondents believed compliance is or will be an issue when moving systems, applications, and infrastructures to the cloud.

The AGS solution, available via IBM Security Services, addresses these challenges by combining IBM’s world-class expertise to plan, design, deploy, operationalize, and accelerate cyber compliance and governance programs, and Telos’ Xacta® IT Risk Management platform that automates the most time-consuming aspects of compliance and audit activities like control selection, validation, reporting, and monitoring.

“Every organization must meet compliance, regulatory, contractual, and privacy obligations – no one is exempt. However, individual organizations have different risk appetites, tolerance levels, missions, and goals,” said Dimple Ahluwalia, VP & global managing partner, IBM. “AGS helps take the guesswork out of managing cybersecurity risk and compliance – all with proven technology, techniques, complete visibility, and ongoing expert support. We are thrilled to be working with Telos on this important challenge that faces today’s enterprises.”

The AGS solution, available via IBM Security Services, utilizes strategic planning, responsive compliance reporting, proactive monitoring and automation, all while leveraging existing tools to create a more ordered approach to IT risk management and compliance. The solution is scalable across hybrid, multi-cloud, and on-premises architectures and systems, bringing much-needed peace of mind to those on the front lines of the cybersecurity battle. The power of automation is on full display with AGS, reducing system compliance time up to 90% faster, the time to generate regulatory documentation by up to 70%, as well as the time to research vulnerabilities by up to 90%.

To learn more about AGS, please visit https://www.telos.com/offerings/ibm-active-governance-services-xacta.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements which are made under the safe harbor provisions of the federal securities laws. These statements are based on the Company’s management’s current beliefs, expectations and assumptions about future events, conditions and results and on information currently available to them. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. The Company believes that these risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described under the captions “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” set forth from time to time in the Company’s filings and reports with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021, as well as future filings and reports by the Company, copies of which are available at https://investors.telos.com and on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

Although the Company bases these forward-looking statements on assumptions that the Company’s management believes are reasonable when made, they caution the reader that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that the Company’s actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and industry developments, may differ materially from statements made in or suggested by the forward-looking statements contained in this release. Given these risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are beyond its control, the Company cautions the reader not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date of such statement and, except as required by law, the Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement publicly, or to revise any forward-looking statement to reflect events or developments occurring after the date of the statement, even if new information becomes available in the future. Comparisons of results for current and any prior periods are not intended to express any future trends or indications of future performance, unless specifically expressed as such, and should only be viewed as historical data.

About Telos Corporation

Telos Corporation (NASDAQ: TLS) empowers and protects the world’s most security-conscious organizations with solutions for continuous security assurance of individuals, systems, and information. Telos’ offerings include cybersecurity solutions for IT risk management and information security; cloud security solutions to protect cloud-based assets and enable continuous compliance with industry and government security standards; and enterprise security solutions for identity and access management, secure mobility, organizational messaging, and network management and defense. The Company serves commercial enterprises, regulated industries and government customers around the world.

Wed, 14 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/risk/telos-corporation-to-help-enterprises-operationalize-cybersecurity-compliance-and-regulatory-risks-with-ibm-security
Killexams : IBM Teams With 20 Historically Black Colleges and Universities to Address Cybersecurity Talent Shortage

HBCUs will work with IBM to establish Cybersecurity Leadership Centers, giving students and faculty access to IBM training, software, and certifications at no cost.

WASHINGTON, Sept. 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- During the National HBCU Week Conference convened by the U.S. Department of Education and the White House, IBM (NYSE: IBM) announced its collaboration with 20 Historically Black College and Universities (HBCUs) to help them establish Cybersecurity Leadership Centers.

IBM Corporation logo. (PRNewsfoto/IBM)

With 500,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in the U.S., the need for expertise is critical: According to a recent IBM Security study, insufficiently staffed organizations average $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.**

"Collaborations between academia and the private sector can help students prepare for success. That's especially true for HBCUs because their mission is so vital," said Justina Nixon-Saintil, Vice President, IBM Corporate Social Responsibility and ESG. "The Cybersecurity Leadership Centers we're co-creating with Historically Black College and Universities epitomize our commitment to the Black community and STEM education; it also builds on our pledge to train 150,000 people in cybersecurity over three years."

IBM will collaborate with the following 20 HBCUs across 11 states to co-create Cybersecurity Leadership Centers, helping to create talent for employers and opportunities for students. (Six of these collaborations were previously announced in May*)

  • AlabamaAlabama A&M University, Talladega College, Tuskegee University
  • Florida– Edward Waters University, Florida A&M University
  • GeorgiaAlbany State University, Clark Atlanta University*
  • LouisianaGrambling State University, Southern University System*, Xavier University of LA*
  • MarylandBowie State University, Morgan State University*
  • MississippiAlcorn State University
  • North CarolinaNorth Carolina A&T State University*, North Carolina Central University
  • South Carolina South Carolina State University*, Voorhees University
  • TexasTexas Southern University
  • VirginiaNorfolk State University
  • West Virginia– West Virginia State University

Through IBM's collaboration, faculty and students at participating schools will have access to coursework, lectures, immersive training experiences, certifications, IBM Cloud-hosted software, and professional development resources, all at no cost to them. This includes access to:

  • Cybersecurity curricula: IBM will develop for each participating HBCU, a customized IBM Security Learning Academy portal – an IBM client offering – including courses designed to help the university enhance its cybersecurity education portfolio. In addition, IBM will continue to supply access to IBM SkillsBuild.
  • Immersive learning experience: Faculty and students of participating HBCUs will have an opportunity to benefit from IBM Security's Command Center, through which they can experience a highly realistic, simulated cyberattack, designed to prepare them and train them on response techniques. Moreover, HBCUs' faculty will have access to consultation sessions with IBM technical personnel on cybersecurity.
  • Software: Multiple IBM Security premier enterprise security products hosted in the IBM  Cloud
  • Professional development: Forums to exchange best practices, learn from IBM experts, and discover IBM internships and job openings

About IBM Education

As part of the company's Corporate Social Responsibility efforts, IBM's education portfolio takes a personalized, diverse, and deep approach to STEM career readiness. IBM's pro bono programs range from education and support for teens at public schools and universities, to career readiness resources for aspiring professionals and job seekers. IBM believes that education is best achieved through the collaboration of the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors.

IBM SkillsBuild is a free education program focused on underrepresented communities, that helps adult learners, and high school and university students and faculty, develop valuable new skills and access career opportunities. The program includes an online platform that is complemented by customized practical learning experiences delivered in collaboration with a global network of partners. The online platform offers over 1,000 courses in 19 languages on cybersecurity, data analysis, cloud computing and many other technical disciplines — as well as in workplace skills such as Design Thinking. Most important, participants can earn IBM-branded digital credentials that are recognized by the market. The customized practical learning experiences could include project-based learning, expert conversations with IBM volunteers, mentors, premium content, specialized support, connection with career opportunities, access to IBM software, among others. As of February 2022, IBM SkillsBuild operates in 159 counties and is supporting 1.72M learners since its launch.

About IBM Security

IBM Security offers one of the most advanced and integrated portfolios of enterprise security products and services. The portfolio, supported by world-renowned IBM Security X-Force® research, enables organizations to effectively manage risk and defend against emerging threats. IBM operates one of the world's broadest security research, development, and delivery organizations, monitors 150 billion+ security events per day in more than 130 countries, and has been granted more than 10,000 security patents worldwide. For more information, please check www.ibm.com/security, follow @IBMSecurity on Twitter or visit the IBM Security Intelligence blog.

Announced in May 2022
** Cost of a Data Breach Report 2022, conducted by Ponemon Institute, sponsored & analyzed by IBM

Media Contact:

Ari Fishkind
IBM Media Relations
fishkind@us.ibm.com

 

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SOURCE IBM

Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/ibm-teams-with-20-historically-black-colleges-and-universities-to-address-cybersecurity-talent-shortage-1031756319
Killexams : IBM to establish Cybersecurity Leadership Centers at 20 HBCUs to address skills gap

IBM has announced a new partnership with 20 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to address the cybersecurity skills gap by setting up Cybersecurity Leadership Centers. 

According to a recent study by IBM, organizations that don’t have sufficient security teams experience $550,000 more in costs related to data breaches compared to companies with sufficiently staffed security teams. 

Faculty and students at these 20 schools will be able to access coursework, lectures, immersive training experiences, certifications, IBM Cloud-hosted software, and professional development resources, for free. 

This includes access to IBM Security’s Command Center, where students can experience a simulated cyberattack to learn and practice response techniques.

“Collaborations between academia and the private sector can help students prepare for success. That’s especially true for HBCUs because their mission is so vital,” said Justina Nixon-Saintil, vice president of IBM corporate social responsibility and ESG. “The Cybersecurity Leadership Centers we’re co-creating with Historically Black College and Universities epitomize our commitment to the Black community and STEM education; it also builds on our pledge to train 150,000 people in cybersecurity over three years.”

The HBCUs that are part of this partnership include Alabama A&M University, Talladega College, Tuskegee University, Edward Waters University, Florida A&M University, Albany State University, Clark Atlanta University, Grambling State University, Southern University System, Xavier University of LA, Bowie State University, Morgan State University, Alcorn State University, North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina Central University, South Carolina State University, Voorhees University, Texas Southern University, Norfolk State University, and West Virginia State University.

Mon, 26 Sep 2022 03:43:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://sdtimes.com/security/ibm-to-establish-cybersecurity-leadership-centers-at-20-hbcus-to-address-skills-gap/
Killexams : Out front in cybersecurity: SC State partners with IBM to launch leadership center

South Carolina State University is launching a Cybersecurity Leadership Center in a collaboration with IBM, giving SC State students and faculty access to evolving technology and personnel in the growing field of protecting information.

"South Carolina State University has a number of cybersecurity programs aimed at preparing next generation cybersecurity leaders through education, research, outreach, and collaborations,” said Dr. Nikunja Swain, chair and professor of SC State’s Computer Science and Mathematics Department. “We have ongoing collaborations with academia and industry, and this Cybersecurity Leadership Center builds upon our existing relationship with IBM through the IBM SkillsBuildprogram.”

South Carolina State University will offer a bachelor’s degree in the rapidly growing field of cybersecurity beginning with the fall semester …

SC State is host to one of 20 Cybersecurity Leadership Centers that IBM is developing with historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to fill the need for trained personnel. In 2021, IBM Chairman and CEO Arvind Krishna pledged for IBM to partner with HBCUs to establish Cybersecurity Leadership Centers, with the goal of building a more diverse U.S. cyber workforce.

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The opportunity arrived as SC State began offering a full bachelor’s degree in cybersecurity this fall semester in addition to the minor already in place. Since 2019, SC State has been a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

SC State was one of six HBCUs that IBM initially announced as partners in the SkillsBuild effort last spring. On Wednesday, another 14 partnerships were announced, bringing the total to 20 in 11 states. Voorhees University became South Carolina’s second HBCU in the program after SC State.

DENMARK – Voorhees College is part of the 2022 South Carolina Relentless Challenge grant program, Expanding SC Underrepresented Minorities Foo…

Swain said IBM provides no-cost access to SC State students and faculty to customized cybersecurity curricula, innovative learning access to real world simulated cyber-attacks, access to multiple Software as a Service (SaaS) models in the IBM Cloud, and opportunities for faculty to consult with IBM cybersecurity personnel.

“This will help us to provide our students with practical skills and experience needed to be successful in ever changing landscape of cybersecurity,” Swain said.

Jordan Brown graduated from SC State in May with a degree in computer science, but he stayed on this fall to be one of the first Bulldogs to complete a bachelor’s degree in cybersecurity.

“The software and courses that IBM have brought to SC State has helped both my academic and professional career tremendously,” Brown said. “I had the honor of earning an IBM Data Science Practitioner's and Design Thinking Badge through the partnership here on campus.

“IBM offers modules that break down subjects that are usually too hard to understand studying independently into interactive projects and real-world situations that relate the information to what we may experience after college. Since I earned the badges, hiring interests have increased tremendously due to the use of data scientists across almost every career field.

“I believe maintaining a partnership with IBM and SCSU will continue to allow IT and STEM students to acquire extra skills needed to get an edge in such a competitive field of work,” Brown said.

IBM staff visited the SC State campus in July for a series of workshops intended to make sure the center brings the best benefit to faculty and students at SC State. IBM’s relationship with SC State has included deployment of assets in the student labs over $1 million in estimated value. Faculty also have been being trained to teach students to use the assets maintained by IBM subject matter experts.

With 500,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in the U.S., the need for expertise is critical. According to a recent IBM Security study, insufficiently staffed organizations average $550,000 more in breach costs than those that state they are sufficiently staffed.

“Collaborations between academia and the private sector can help students prepare for success. That’s especially true for HBCUs because their mission is so vital,” said Justina Nixon-Saintil, vice president, IBM Corporate Social Responsibility and ESG. “The Cybersecurity Leadership Centers we’re co-creating with Historically Black College and Universities epitomize our commitment to the Black community and STEM education; it also builds on our pledge to train 150,000 people in cybersecurity over three years.”

Flying a drone was nothing new to JROTC Cadet Joseph Soto, but practicing his skills on the South Carolina State University campus got him thi…

IBM Cybersecurity Leadership Centers

  • Alabama – Alabama A&M University, Talladega College, Tuskegee University
  • Florida – Edward Waters University, Florida A&M University
  • Georgia – Albany State University, Clark Atlanta University
  • Louisiana – Grambling State University, Southern University System, Xavier University of LA
  • Maryland – Bowie State University, Morgan State University
  • Mississippi – Alcorn State University
  • North Carolina – North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina Central University
  • South Carolina – South Carolina State University, Voorhees University
  • Texas – Texas Southern University
  • Virginia – Norfolk State University
  • West Virginia – West Virginia State University.
Sun, 02 Oct 2022 12:26:00 -0500 en text/html https://thetandd.com/news/local/out-front-in-cybersecurity-sc-state-partners-with-ibm-to-launch-leadership-center/article_1116e7c8-3fbe-5957-89fe-2b3ee13ff723.html
Killexams : IBM Canada is addressing ‘skill security’ by giving universities and colleges a class-ready curriculum

Photo by Desola Lanre-Ologun on Unsplash

Everywhere you turn, in nearly every industry, there are labour challenges. 

In manufacturing 82% of businesses are looking for help, and for the first time since 2015 there are more jobs available than there are people.

In Ontario the Chamber of Commerce reports that 60% of its members are having trouble filling roles in health care, retail, construction, tourism, and financial services.

And despite recent layoffs with technology companies, a 2021 Information and Communications Technology Council report forecasts 11% of all employment in Canada will be in the digital economy by 2025, requiring 250,000 more people to fill roles.

Labour shortages are being fuelled by a growing number of people retiring, combined with a decline in immigration during the pandemic. The problem is exacerbated by a mismatch between available jobs and skills. Digital transformation — especially the rush to digital-first initiatives during the COVID-19 pandemic — has meant that technology and related jobs are in high-demand. A whopping 80% of businesses surveyed by KPMG say they need more workers with digital skills. 

So where does one look to help fix the talent shortage and skills gap? 

Education.

“Upskilling, reskilling, and teaching students digital and technical skills is going to be a critical step in meeting growing demand in Canada,” says Lila Adamec, Leader of Academic Integration and Innovation at IBM Canada Lab. “Young students have a huge opportunity to help lead a new digital generation, and many skilled people already in the workforce can look to have their skills upgraded to learn more about cloud, or AI, or analytics, for example.”

Photo courtesy Lila Adamec

Adamec has been working on this problem for years. 

In 2017 she developed a program at IBM to address this skills gap. The approach her team took was to deliver turnkey curriculum solutions to universities across Canada. Essentially a “complete curriculum solution” as Adamec calls it, IBM provides higher-ed institutions with a complete toolkit, including curriculum material, access to IBM’s enterprise software, tests, and microcredentials. The curriculum is designed to address skills gaps commonly found in the tech sector by delivering and providing learners with “skill security.”

“With the gig economy, skill security is important, so that you can move from one gig to the next,” Adamec says. “Or if you need to upskill in an area or level up your education, and quickly get the skills you need. So much of this is becoming an agile service offering.”

With this solution, everyone wins: students get upskilling potential, and colleges and universities meet academic criteria with a curriculum that’s approved by government ministries and professional associations.

Adamec rolled out the [email protected] program in 2018, and since then it’s been adopted by dozens of institutions including York University, Mohawk College, Bow Valley College, SAIT, NAIT, Holland College, and Vanier College, to name a few. Classes are often filled to capacity or over-subscribed, and students credit the courses for helping them land their dream jobs.

Since its rollout, Adamec says IBM Canada has delivered more than 3,000 microcredentials to students who have taken their courses.

Meeting the needs of higher education

The education space has undergone a radical transformation in the last five years. First because of evolving student needs and increased demand for newer tech-focused curriculum, then because the pandemic forced a rethink of how and where people attend post-secondary institutions.

While the hybrid classroom is now more commonplace, colleges and universities still face pressure to deliver curriculum that is in line with what students need in today’s workforce, and that is a real challenge.

This stems from the fact that a university or college course needs to be approved by a government ministry, which can take years. The process typically requires at least one full-time person to prepare a curriculum for ministry approval, and it can cost more than $1 million per course when all is said and done. As a result, some colleges and university programs opt for a standardized approach so students achieve a minimum set of skills that correspond to the industry or sector. 

It’s no wonder that many professors will teach the same material, without extensive updates, for 5-7 years.

When Adamec designed the [email protected] program, she knew it had to meet ministry approval, it needed to provide students with real-world skills that are current, and it had to be done faster and cheaper than traditional means.

Adamec and her team positioned IBM to be more of a business partner than just a solutions provider. With on-staff personnel who develop course curriculum for higher ed, academic partners don’t need to bear the cost or burden of full-time staff to manage curriculum development. And because IBM has a team of technical experts, the enterprise-level software offering can be paired with curriculum to deliver a cutting-edge, up-to-date learning experience.

These academic solutions are updated frequently, and delivered to universities at a huge cost savings, functioning more like a Software as a Service (SaaS) offering. By flipping the standard, slower model of curriculum development on its head, Adamec and her team deliver subscription-based, digital solutions that’ll help schools and learners better access tech skills to fill a desperate workforce need.

Bringing the classroom to WeaveSphere

With huge success across the Canadian academic landscape, Adamec will bring the [email protected] experience to the WeaveSphere technology conference happening in November.

Attracting industry leaders, academics and developers, WeaveSphere is an innovation event taking place Nov 15-17 in Toronto. 

As part of the conference’s Education Day, developed by Adamec, high school, undergraduate, and graduate students will have the opportunity to participate in a full day bootcamp on Design Thinking, a problem-solving methodology that first identifies the end result and stakeholders. Even more, students will earn an IBM MyLearning microcredential at the end of the course. The course will be open twice, with 80 spots each session.

“We are excited about giving students and academics the opportunity to weave ideas and research with challenges of the business world,” says Adamec. “With Enterprise Design Thinking, everyone is welcome to the problem-solving table and we find these moments are incredible opportunities for young people to engage with, and learn from people in the workforce.”

The WeaveSphere Education Day and IBM’s Design Thinking course allows students to leverage a valuable learning experience that’ll supply them a leg up in both their professional and personal lives. 

“It’s the type of course that is open to all learning disciplines,” she elaborates. “Whether you’re in finance, liberal arts, tech, engineering, medicine — whatever you’re studying, you don’t have to be an IT guru to do Design Thinking.”

And it’s these opportunities that make WeaveSphere an impactful experience for students. The opportunity to ‘weave’ with and learn from experts and industry leaders is, simply put, unforgettable. 

As student and passionate “weaver” Ali Hamdy explained, “it was cool having a voice among people who are way more experienced than me and way more educated than me. And it was cool for them to actually sit down and listen to me and respond.”

Interested in earning a Design Thinking microcredential? Visit WeaveSphere for more information and to register for Education Day.


Digital Journal is an official media partner for WeaveSphere. We will share updates leading up to the event, and we’ll be live on location from November 15-17,2022. Join us and get your tickets at weavesphere.co.

Thu, 06 Oct 2022 03:22:00 -0500 Digital Journal Content Studio en-US text/html https://www.digitaljournal.com/tech-science/ibm-canada-is-addressing-skill-security-by-giving-universities-and-colleges-a-class-ready-curriculum/article
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