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Killexams : IBM learn - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=IBM+learn&cc=us&format=RSS Search results Killexams : IBM learn - BingNews http://www.bing.com:80/news/search?q=IBM+learn&cc=us&format=RSS https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : IBM 'continuing to hire' ahead of recession

Read more: Safeguard Global CTO: Tech talent remains highly sought after

But IBM has always carved its own path. For example, the Armonk, NY-based company doesn’t use the term “Great Resignation,” at least internally. Of course, that doesn’t mean the tech giant isn’t aware of the nationwide talent shortage and the highly competitive labor market that’s resulted.

“This is a time to ensure we re-engage our population,” Louissaint says. “By nature of my title, my goal is to continue to transform and pivot our company toward being more growth-minded, transforming it directly through leadership: leadership development, getting people in the right jobs and ensuring we have the right succession plans.”

Like many companies since the COVID-19 pandemic, IBM has relied upon its business resource groups – its label for employee resource groups (ERGs) – to maintain and even boost retention. Traditionally, ERGs consist of employees who volunteer their time and effort to foster an inclusive workplace. Due to their motivations, needs and the general nature of ERG work, employees who lead these groups are more likely to be Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) and oftentimes women. ERGs are a way for underrepresented groups to band together to recruit more talent like them into their companies and make sure that talent feels supported and gets promoted.

“It’s a lot easier to leave a company where you’ve only interacted with colleagues through a screen,” Louissaint says. “Our diversity groups and communities have gotten a lot stronger, which builds commitment to the company and community to each other. We’ve found that through our communities, business resource groups, open conversations and by democratizing leadership by using virtual technologies like Slack, the company has become smaller and the interactions are a lot more personal.”

A major contributor to the Great Resignation has been the push for workers to return to the office. While Apple and Google have ruffled feathers with requesting employees back for at least a couple days a week, Tesla went one step further by demanding employees head to the office five days a week, as if the COVID-19 pandemic never happened.

Ahead of the game, IBM was one of the first major tech firms to embrace remote work, with as much as 40% of its workforce at home during the 2000s. A shift came in 2017, but since the pandemic, only 20% of the company’s U.S. employees are in the office for three days a week or more, according to IBM CEO Arvind Krishna. In June, Krishna added that he doesn’t think the balance will ever get back to more than 60% of workers in the office.

“We’ve always been defined by flexibility, even prior to the pandemic that’s what we were known for and what differentiated us,” Louissaint says. “Continuing to double down on flexibility has been a value to us and to our people.”

IBM has also been defined by its eye toward the future, particularly when it comes to workforce development. Over the past decade, the tech giant has partnered with educational institutions, non-governmental organizations and other companies to discover and nurture talent from untapped pools and alternative channels. Last year, the company vowed to train 30 million individuals on technical skills by 2030.

“Our people crave learning and are highly curious,” Louissaint says, adding that the average IBM employee consumes about 88 hours of learning through its platform each year. Nearly all (95%) employees are on the platform in any given quarter.

“We’ve been building a strong learning environment where employees can build new skills and drive toward new jobs and experiences,” he says. “We also find that the individuals who consume the most learning are more likely to get promoted. It’s 30% more likely for a super learner to be promoted or switch jobs, so the incentive is continued growth and opportunity for advancement.”

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 16:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.hcamag.com/us/specialization/learning-development/ibm-continuing-to-hire-ahead-of-recession/415538
Killexams : Colorado’s P-TECH Students Graduate Ready for Tech Careers (TNS) — Abraham Tinajero was an eighth grader when he saw a poster in his Longmont middle school’s library advertising a new program offering free college with a technology focus.

Interested, he talked to a counselor to learn more about P-TECH, an early college program where he could earn an associate’s degree along with his high school diploma. Liking the sound of the program, he enrolled in the inaugural P-TECH class as a freshman at Longmont’s Skyline High School.

“I really loved working on computers, even before P-TECH,” he said. “I was a hobbyist. P-TECH gave me a pathway.”


He worked with an IBM mentor and interned at the company for six weeks as a junior. After graduating in 2020 with his high school diploma and the promised associate’s degree in computer science from Front Range Community College, he was accepted to IBM’s yearlong, paid apprenticeship program.

IBM hired him as a cybersecurity analyst once he completed the apprenticeship.

“P-TECH has given me a great advantage,” he said. “Without it, I would have been questioning whether to go into college. Having a college degree at 18 is great to put on a resume.”


Stanley Litow, a former vice president of IBM, developed the P-TECH, or Pathways in Technology Early College High Schools, model. The first P-TECH school opened 11 years ago in Brooklyn, New York, in partnership with IBM.

Litow’s idea was to get more underrepresented young people into tech careers by giving them a direct path to college while in high school — and in turn create a pipeline of employees with the job skills businesses were starting to value over four-year college degrees.

The program, which includes mentors and internships provided by business partners, gives high school students up to six years to earn an associate's degree at no cost.

SKYLINE HIGH A PIONEER IN PROGRAM

In Colorado, St. Vrain Valley was among the first school districts chosen by the state to offer a P-TECH program after the Legislature passed a bill to provide funding — and the school district has embraced the program.

Colorado’s first P-TECH programs started in the fall of 2016 at three high schools, including Skyline High. Over the last six years, 17 more Colorado high schools have adopted P-TECH, for at total of 20. Three of those are in St. Vrain Valley, with a fourth planned to open in the fall of 2023 at Longmont High School.

Each St. Vrain Valley high school offers a different focus supported by different industry partners.

Skyline partners with IBM, with students earning an associate’s degree in Computer Information Systems from Front Range. Along with being the first, Skyline’s program is the largest, enrolling up to 55 new freshmen each year.

Programs at the other schools are capped at 35 students per grade.

Frederick High’s program, which started in the fall of 2019, has a bioscience focus, partners with Aims Community College and works with industry partners Agilent Technologies, Tolmar, KBI Biopharma, AGC Biologics and Corden Pharma.

Silver Creek High’s program started a year ago with a cybersecurity focus. The Longmont school partners with Front Range and works with industry partners Seagate, Cisco, PEAK Resources and Comcast.

The new program coming to Longmont High will focus on business.

District leaders point to Skyline High’s graduation statistics to illustrate the program’s success. At Skyline, 100 percent of students in the first three P-TECH graduating classes earned a high school diploma in four years.

For the 2020 Skyline P-TECH graduates, 24 of the 33, or about 70 percent, also earned associate’s degrees. For the 2021 graduating class, 30 of the 47 have associate’s degrees — with one year left for those students to complete the college requirements.

For the most latest 2022 graduates, who have two years left to complete the college requirements, 19 of 59 have associate’s degrees and another six are on track to earn their degrees by the end of the summer.

JUMPING AT AN OPPORTUNITY

Louise March, Skyline High’s P-TECH counselor, keeps in touch with the graduates, saying 27 are working part time or full time at IBM. About a third are continuing their education at a four year college. Of the 19 who graduated in 2022 with an associate’s degree, 17 are enrolling at a four year college, she said.

Two of those 2022 graduates are Anahi Sarmiento, who is headed to the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, and Jose Ivarra, who will study computer science at Colorado State University.

“I’m the oldest out of three siblings,” Ivarra said. “When you hear that someone wants to supply you free college in high school, you take it. I jumped at the opportunity.”

Sarmiento added that her parents, who are immigrants, are already working two jobs and don’t have extra money for college costs.

“P-TECH is pushing me forward,” she said. “I know my parents want me to have a better life, but I want them to have a better life, too. Going into high school, I kept that mentality that I would push myself to my full potential. It kept me motivated.”

While the program requires hard work, the two graduates said, they still enjoyed high school and had outside interests. Ivarra was a varsity football player who was named player of the year. Sarmiento took advantage of multiple opportunities, from helping elementary students learn robotics to working at the district’s Innovation Center.

Ivarra said he likes that P-TECH has the same high expectations for all students, no matter their backgrounds, and gives them support in any areas where they need help. Spanish is his first language and, while math came naturally, language arts was more challenging.

“It was tough for me to see all these classmates use all these big words, and I didn’t know them,” he said. “I just felt less. When I went into P-TECH, the teachers focus on you so much, checking on every single student.”

They said it’s OK to struggle or even fail. Ivarra said he failed a tough class during the pandemic, but was able to retake it and passed. Both credited March, their counselor, with providing unending support as they navigated high school and college classes.

“She’s always there for you,” Sarmiento said. “It’s hard to be on top of everything. You have someone to go to.”

Students also supported each other.

“You build bonds,” Ivarra said. “You’re all trying to figure out these classes. You grow together. It’s a bunch of people who want to succeed. The people that surround you in P-TECH, they push you to be better.”

SUPPORT SYSTEMS ARE KEY

P-TECH has no entrance requirements or prerequisite classes. You don’t need to be a top student, have taken advanced math or have a background in technology.

With students starting the rigorous program with a wide range of skills, teachers and counselors said, they quickly figured out the program needed stronger support systems.

March said freshmen in the first P-TECH class struggled that first semester, prompting the creation of a guided study class. The every other day, hour-and-a-half class includes both study time and time to learn workplace skills, including writing a resume and interviewing. Teachers also offer tutoring twice a week after school.

“The guided study has become crucial to the success of the program,” March said.

Another way P-TECH provides extra support is through summer orientation programs for incoming freshmen.

At Skyline, ninth graders take a three-week bridge class — worth half a credit — that includes learning good study habits. They also meet IBM mentors and take a field trip to Front Range Community College.

“They get their college ID before they get their high school ID,” March said.

During a session in June, 15 IBM mentors helped the students program a Sphero robot to travel along different track configurations. Kathleen Schuster, who has volunteered as an IBM mentor since the P-TECH program started here, said she wants to “return some of the favors I got when I was younger.”

“Even this play stuff with the Spheros, it’s teaching them teamwork and a little computing,” she said. “Hopefully, through P-TECH, they will learn what it takes to work in a tech job.”

Incoming Skyline freshman Blake Baker said he found a passion for programming at Trail Ridge Middle and saw P-TECH as a way to capitalize on that passion.

“I really love that they supply you options and a path,” he said.

Trail Ridge classmate Itzel Pereyra, another programming enthusiast, heard about P-TECH from her older brother.

“It’s really good for my future,” she said. “It’s an exciting moment, starting the program. It will just help you with everything.”

While some of the incoming ninth graders shared dreams of technology careers, others see P-TECH as a good foundation to pursue other dreams.

Skyline incoming ninth grader Marisol Sanchez wants to become a traveling nurse, demonstrating technology and new skills to other nurses. She added that the summer orientation sessions are a good introduction, helping calm the nerves that accompany combining high school and college.

“There’s a lot of team building,” she said. “It’s getting us all stronger together as a group and introducing everyone.”

THE SPARK OF MOTIVATION

Silver Creek’s June camp for incoming ninth graders included field trips to visit Cisco, Seagate, PEAK Resources, Comcast and Front Range Community College.

During the Front Range Community College field trip, the students heard from Front Range staff members before going on a scavenger hunt. Groups took photos to prove they completed tasks, snapping pictures of ceramic pieces near the art rooms, the most expensive tech product for sale in the bookstore and administrative offices across the street from the main building.

Emma Horton, an incoming freshman, took a cybersecurity class as a Flagstaff Academy eighth grader that hooked her on the idea of technology as a career.

“I’m really excited about the experience I will be getting in P-TECH,’ she said. “I’ve never been super motivated in school, but with something I’m really interested in, it becomes easier.”

Deb Craven, dean of instruction at Front Range’s Boulder County campus, promised the Silver Creek students that the college would support them. She also gave them some advice.

“You need to advocate and ask for help,” she said. “These two things are going to help you the most. Be present, be engaged, work together and lean on each other.”

Craven, who oversees Front Range’s P-TECH program partnership, said Front Range leaders toured the original P-TECH program in New York along with St. Vrain and IBM leaders in preparation for bringing P-TECH here.

“Having IBM as a partner as we started the program was really helpful,” she said.

When the program began, she said, freshmen took a more advanced technology class as their first college class. Now, she said, they start with a more fundamental class in the spring of their freshman year, learning how to build a computer.

“These guys have a chance to grow into the high school environment before we stick them in a college class,” she said.

Summer opportunities aren’t just for P-TECH’s freshmen. Along with summer internships, the schools and community colleges offer summer classes.

Silver Creek incoming 10th graders, for example, could take a personal financial literacy class at Silver Creek in the mornings and an introduction to cybersecurity class at the Innovation Center in the afternoons in June.

Over at Skyline, incoming 10th graders in P-TECH are getting paid to teach STEM lessons to elementary students while earning high school credit. Students in the fifth or sixth year of the program also had the option of taking computer science and algebra classes at Front Range.

EMBRACING THE CHALLENGE

And at Frederick, incoming juniors are taking an introduction to manufacturing class at the district's Career Elevation and Technology Center this month in preparation for an advanced manufacturing class they’re taking in the fall.

“This will supply them a head start for the fall,” said instructor Chester Clark.

Incoming Frederick junior Destini Johnson said she’s not sure what she wants to do after high school, but believes the opportunities offered by P-TECH will prepare her for the future.

“I wanted to try something challenging, and getting a head start on college can only help,” she said. “It’s really incredible that I’m already halfway done with an associate’s degree and high school.”

IBM P-TECH program manager Tracy Knick, who has worked with the Skyline High program for three years, said it takes a strong commitment from all the partners — the school district, IBM and Front Range — to make the program work.

“It’s not an easy model,” she said. “When you say there are no entrance requirements, we all have to be OK with that and support the students to be successful.”

IBM hosted 60 St. Vrain interns this summer, while two Skyline students work as IBM “co-ops” — a national program — to assist with the P-TECH program.

The company hosts two to four formal events for the students each year to work on professional and technical skills, while IBM mentors provide tutoring in algebra. During the pandemic, IBM also paid for subscriptions to tutor.com so students could get immediate help while taking online classes.

“We want to get them truly workforce ready,” Knick said. “They’re not IBM-only skills we’re teaching. Even though they choose a pathway, they can really do anything.”

As the program continues to expand in the district, she said, her wish is for more businesses to recognize the value of P-TECH.

“These students have had intensive training on professional skills,” she said. “They have taken college classes enhanced with the same digital credentials that an IBM employee can learn. There should be a waiting list of employers for these really talented and skilled young professionals.”

©2022 the Daily Camera (Boulder, Colo.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 02:41:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govtech.com/education/k-12/colorados-p-tech-students-graduate-ready-for-tech-careers
Killexams : IBM report shows healthcare has a growing cybersecurity gap

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While enterprises are setting records in cybersecurity spending, the cost and severity of breaches continue to soar. IBM’s latest data breach report provides insights into why there’s a growing disconnect between enterprise spending on cybersecurity and record costs for data breaches. 

This year, 2022, is on pace to be a record-breaking year for enterprise breaches globally, with the average cost of a data breach reaching $4.35 million. That’s 12.7% higher than the average cost of a data breach in 2020, which was $3.86 million. It also found a record 83% of enterprises reporting more than one breach and that the average time to identify a breach is 277 days. As a result, enterprises need to look at their cybersecurity tech stacks to see where the gaps are and what can be improved.  

Enhanced security around privileged access credentials and identity management is an excellent first place to start. More enterprises need to define identities as their new security perimeter. IBM’s study found that 19% of all breaches begin with compromised privileged credentials. Breaches caused by compromised credentials lasted an average of 327 days. Privileged access credentials are also bestsellers on the Dark Web, with high demand for access to financial services’ IT infrastructure.  

The study also shows how dependent enterprises remain on implicit trust across their security and broader IT infrastructure tech stacks. The gaps in cloud security, identity and access management (IAM) and privileged access management (PAM) allow expensive breaches to happen. Seventy-nine percent of critical infrastructure organizations didn’t deploy a zero-trust architecture, when zero trust can reduce average breach losses by nearly $1 million. 

Enterprises need to treat implicit trust as the unlocked back door that allows cybercriminals access to their systems, credentials and most valuable confidential data to reduce the incidence of breaches. 

What enterprises can learn from IBM’s data on healthcare breaches 

The report quantifies how wide healthcare’s cybersecurity gap is growing. IBM’s report estimates the average cost of a healthcare data breach is now $10.1 million, a record and nearly $1 million over last year’s $9.23 million. Healthcare has had the highest average breach cost for twelve consecutive years, increasing 41.6% since 2020. 

The findings suggest that the skyrocketing cost of breaches adds inflationary fuel to the fire, as runaway prices are financially squeezing global consumers and companies. Sixty percent of organizations participating in IBM’s study say, they raised their product and service prices due to the breach, as supply chain disruptions, the war in Ukraine and tepid demand for products continue. Consumers are already struggling to meet healthcare costs, which will likely increase by 6.5% next year

The study also found that nearly 30% of breach costs are incurred 12 to 24 months after, translating into permanent price increases for consumers. 

“It is clear that cyberattacks are evolving into market stressors that are triggering chain reactions, [and] we see that these breaches are contributing to those inflationary pressures,” says John Hendley, head of strategy for IBM Security’s X-Force research team.  

Getting quick wins in encryption

For healthcare providers with limited cybersecurity budgets, prioritizing these three areas can reduce the cost of a breach while making progress toward zero-trust initiatives. Getting identity access management (IAM) right is core to a practical zero-trust framework, one that can quickly adapt and protect human and machine identities are essential. IBM’s study found that of the zero-trust components measured in the study, IAM is the most effective in reducing breach costs. Leading IAM includes Akamai, Fortinet, Ericom, Ivanti, Palo Alto Networks and others. Ericom’s ZTEdge platform is noteworthy for its combining ML-enabled identity and access management, zero-trust network access (ZTNA), microsegmentation and secure web gateway (SWG) with remote browser isolation (RBI) and Web Application Isolation.

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Mon, 01 Aug 2022 16:20:00 -0500 Louis Columbus en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/2022/08/01/ibm-report-shows-healthcare-has-a-growing-cybersecurity-gap/
Killexams : The right and wrong way to use artificial intelligence

For decades, scientists have been giddy and citizens have been fearful of the power of computers. In 1965 Herbert Simon, a Nobel laureate in economics and also a winner of the Turing Award (considered “The Nobel Prize of computing”), predicted that “machines will be capable, within 20 years, of doing any work a man can do.” His misplaced faith in computers is hardly unique. Sixty-seven years later, we are still waiting for computers to become our slaves and masters.

Businesses have spent hundreds of billions of dollars on AI moonshots that have crashed and burned. IBM’s “Dr. Watson” was supposed to revolutionize health care and “eradicate cancer.” Eight years later, after burning through $15 billion with no demonstrable successes, IBM fired Dr. Watson.

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In 2016 Turing Award Winner Geoffrey Hinton advised that “We should stop training radiologists now. It’s just completely obvious that within five years, deep learning is going to do better than radiologists.” Six years later, the number of radiologists has gone up, not down. Researchers have spent billions of dollars working on thousands of radiology image-recognition algorithms that are not as good as human radiologists.

What about those self-driving vehicles, promised by many including Elon Musk in his 2016 boast that “I really consider autonomous driving a solved problem. I think we are probably less than two years away.” Six years later, the most advanced self-driving vehicles are arguably Waymos in San Francisco, which only operate between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. on the least crowded roads and still have accidents and cause traffic tie-ups. They are a long way from successfully operating in downtown traffic during the middle of the day at a required 99.9999% level of proficiency.

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The list goes on. Zillow’s house-flipping misadventure lost billions of dollars trying to revolutionize home-buying before they shuttered it. Carvana’s car-flipping gambit still loses billions.

We have argued for years that we should be developing AI that makes people more productive instead of trying to replace people. Computers have wondrous memories, make calculations that are lightning-fast and error-free, and are tireless, but humans have the real-world experience, common sense, wisdom and critical thinking skills that computers lack. Together, they can do more than either could do on their own.

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Effective augmentation appears to be finally happening with medical images. A large-scale study just published in Lancet Digital Health is the first to directly compare AI cancer screening when used alone or to assist humans. The software comes from a German startup, Vara, whose AI is already used in more than 25% of Germany’s breast cancer screening centers.

Researchers from Vara, Essen University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center trained the algorithm on more than 367,000 mammograms, and then tested it on 82,851 mammograms that had been held back for that purpose.

In the first strategy, the algorithm was used alone to analyze the 82,851 mammograms. In the second strategy, the algorithm separated the mammograms into three groups: clearly cancer, clearly no cancer, and uncertain. The uncertain mammograms were then sent to board-certified radiologists who were given no information about the AI diagnosis.

Doctors and AI working together turned out to be better than either working alone. The AI pre-screening reduced the number of images the doctors examined by 37% while lowering the false-positive and false-negative rates by about a third compared to AI alone and by 14%-20% compared to doctors alone. Less work and better results!

As machine learning improves, the AI analysis of X-rays will no doubt become more efficient and accurate. There will come a time when AI can be trusted to work alone. However, that time is likely to be decades in the future and attempts to jump directly to that point are dangerous.

We are optimistic that the productivity of many workers can be improved by similar augmentation strategies — not to mention the fact that many of the tasks that computers excel at are dreadful drudgery; e.g., legal research, inventory control and statistical calculations. But far too many attempts to replace humans entirely have not only been an enormous waste of resources but have also undermined the credibility of AI research. The last thing we need is another AI winter where funding dries up, resources are diverted and the tremendous potential of these technologies are put on hold. We are optimistic that the accumulating failures of moonshots and successes of augmentation strategies will change the way that we think about AI.

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Funk is an independent technology consultant who previously taught at National University of Singapore, Hitotsubashi and Kobe Universities in Japan, and Penn State, where he taught courses on the economics of new technologies. Smith is the author of ”The AI Delusion” and co-author (with Jay Cordes) of ”The 9 Pitfalls of Data Science” and ”The Phantom Pattern Problem.”

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 21:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-the-right-and-wrong-way-to-use-artificial-intelligence-20220806-txybtmlcwfgddnfdozvynz5u64-story.html
Killexams : IBM’s gobbling up AI companies left and right — and we love it

Big Blue’s been on a buying spree lately with Databand.ai, a big data startup, becoming its latest acquisition. Don’t blink. If you do, you might miss another huge IBM buyout.

Up front: Big data is a big deal. Less than a decade ago, many businesses were manually entering data into spreadsheets to meet their insight needs. Today, even the most modest startups can benefit from deep analytics.

Unfortunately, the landscape of companies that provide targeted services for a spectrum of industries is somewhat barren.

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Simply put, you can’t just integrate a bunch of generic AI models into your IT stack and hope to magically pipeline solutions to your company’s problems.

It takes infrastructure and expertise to turn your hoard of data into action points.

Background: IBM’s spent over a century developing the infrastructure. But expertise is a moving target. To keep up with the modern influx of deep learning and data solutions in a period of technological turbulence, the company’s new CEO has opened up the corporate wallet in hopes of building a data-parsing juggernaut.

Per a latest IBM blog post:

Databand.ai is IBM’s fifth acquisition in 2022 as the company continues to bolster its hybrid cloud and AI skills and capabilities. IBM has acquired more than 25 companies since Arvind Krishna became CEO in April 2020.

This particular acquisition shores up IBM’s ability to provide “data observability” solutions for its clients and customers.

In other words, Databand.ai comes with a suite of products and a team of employees who know how to turn giant troves of data into useful insights.

According to IBM:

A rapidly growing market opportunity, data observability is quickly emerging as a key solution for helping data teams and engineers better understand the health of data in their system and automatically identify, troubleshoot and resolve issues, like anomalies, breaking data changes or pipeline failures, in near real-time.

Quick take: There’s a lot more to the world of big data than you might think. With this acquisition, IBM not only gets software solutions it can integrate to its current cornucopia of management and analytics tools, but it also gets a team that’s ready to hit the ground running for the company’s clients.

Databand.ai just finished a funding round prior to the acquisition wherein it raised over $14 million — that’s a pretty good indication the company’s on solid footing.

Here at Neural, we love it. Databand’s joining a company whose CEO has their finger firmly on the pulse of big data and IBM’s expanding its already industry-leading portfolio of AI-powered solutions.

Sun, 17 Jul 2022 05:58:00 -0500 en text/html https://thenextweb.com/news/ibm-positions-itself-as-global-big-data-boss-with-latest-acquisition
Killexams : IBM Annual Cost of Data Breach Report 2022: Record Costs Usually Passed On to Consumers, “Long Breach” Expenses Make Up Half of Total Damage

IBM’s annual Cost of Data Breach Report for 2022 is packed with revelations, and as usual none of them are good news. Headlining the report is the record-setting cost of data breaches, with the global average now at $4.35 million. The report also reveals that much of that expense comes with the data breach version of “long Covid,” expenses that are realized more than a year after the attack.

Most organizations (60%) are passing these added costs on to consumers in the form of higher prices. And while 83% of organizations now report experiencing at least one data breach, only a small minority are adopting zero trust strategies.

Security AI and automation greatly reduces expected damage

The IBM report draws on input from 550 global organizations surveyed about the period between March 2021 and March 2022, in partnership with the Ponemon Institute.

Though the average cost of a data breach is up, it is only by about 2.6%; the average in 2021 was $4.24 million. This represents a total climb of 13% since 2020, however, reflecting the general spike in cyber crime seen during the pandemic years.

Organizations are also increasingly not opting to absorb the cost of data breaches, with the majority (60%) compensating by raising consumer prices separate from any other latest increases due to inflation or supply chain issues. The report indicates that this may be an underreported upward influence on prices of consumer goods, as 83% of organizations now say that they have been breached at least once.

Brad Hong, Customer Success Manager for Horizon3.ai, sees a potential consumer backlash on the horizon once public awareness of this practice grows: “It’s already a breach of confidence to lose the confidential data of customers, and sure there’s bound to be an organization across those surveyed who genuinely did put in the effort to protect against and curb attacks, but for those who did nothing, those who, instead of creating a disaster recovery plan, just bought cyber insurance to cover the org’s operational losses, and those who simply didn’t care enough to heed the warnings, it’s the coup de grâce to then pass the cost of breaches to the same customers who are now the victims of a data breach. I’d be curious to know what percent of the 60% of organizations who increased the price of their products and services are using the extra revenue for a war chest or to actually reinforce their security—realistically, it’s most likely just being used to fill a gap in lost revenue for shareholders’ sake post-breach. Without government regulations outlining restrictions on passing cost of breach to consumer, at the least, not without the honest & measurable efforts of a corporation as their custodian, what accountability do we all have against that one executive who didn’t want to change his/her password?”

Breach costs also have an increasingly long tail, as nearly half now come over a year after the date of the attack. The largest of these are generally fines that are levied after an investigation, and decisions or settlements in class action lawsuits. While the popular new “double extortion” approach of ransomware attacks can drive long-term costs in this way, the study finds that companies paying ransom demands to settle the problem quickly aren’t necessarily seeing a large amount of overall savings: their average breach cost drops by just $610,000.

Sanjay Raja, VP of Product with Gurucul, expands on how knock-on data breach damage can continue for years: “The follow-up attack effect, as described, is a significant problem as the playbooks and solutions provided to security operations teams are overly broad and lack the necessary context and response actions for proper remediation. For example, shutting down a user or application or adding a firewall block rule or quarantining a network segment to negate an attack is not a sustainable remediation step to protect an organization on an ongoing basis. It starts with a proper threat detection, investigation and response solution. Current SIEMs and XDR solutions lack the variety of data, telemetry and combined analytics to not only identify an attack campaign and even detect variants on previously successful attacks, but also provide the necessary context, accuracy and validation of the attack to build both a precise and complete response that can be trusted. This is an even greater challenge when current solutions cannot handle complex hybrid multi-cloud architectures leading to significant blind spots and false positives at the very start of the security analyst journey.”

Rising cost of data breach not necessarily prompting dramatic security action

In spite of over four out of five organizations now having experienced some sort of data breach, only slightly over 20% of critical infrastructure companies have moved to zero trust strategies to secure their networks. Cloud security is also lagging as well, with a little under half (43%) of all respondents saying that their security practices in this area are either “early stage” or do not yet exist.

Those that have onboarded security automation and AI elements are the only group seeing massive savings: their average cost of data breach is $3.05 million lower. This particular study does not track average ransom demands, but refers to Sophos research that puts the most latest number at $812,000 globally.

The study also notes serious problems with incident response plans, especially troubling in an environment in which the average ransomware attack is now carried out in four days or less and the “time to ransom” has dropped to a matter of hours in some cases. 37% of respondents say that they do not test their incident response plans regularly. 62% say that they are understaffed to meet their cybersecurity needs, and these organizations tend to suffer over half a million more dollars in damages when they are breached.

Of course, cost of data breaches is not distributed evenly by geography or by industry type. Some are taking much bigger hits than others, reflecting trends established in prior reports. The health care industry is now absorbing a little over $10 million in damage per breach, with the average cost of data breach rising by $1 million from 2021. And companies in the United States face greater data breach costs than their counterparts around the world, at over $8 million per incident.

Shawn Surber, VP of Solutions Architecture and Strategy with Tanium, provides some insight into the unique struggles that the health care industry faces in implementing effective cybersecurity: “Healthcare continues to suffer the greatest cost of breaches but has among the lowest spend on cybersecurity of any industry, despite being deemed ‘critical infrastructure.’ The increased vulnerability of healthcare organizations to cyber threats can be traced to outdated IT systems, the lack of robust security controls, and insufficient IT staff, while valuable medical and health data— and the need to pay ransoms quickly to maintain access to that data— make healthcare targets popular and relatively easy to breach. Unlike other industries that can migrate data and sunset old systems, limited IT and security budgets at healthcare orgs make migration difficult and potentially expensive, particularly when an older system provides a small but unique function or houses data necessary for compliance or research, but still doesn’t make the cut to transition to a newer system. Hackers know these weaknesses and exploit them. Additionally, healthcare orgs haven’t sufficiently updated their security strategies and the tools that manufacturers, IT software vendors, and the FDA have made haven’t been robust enough to thwart the more sophisticated techniques of threat actors.”

Familiar incident types also lead the list of the causes of data breaches: compromised credentials (19%), followed by phishing (16%). Breaches initiated by these methods also tended to be a little more costly, at an average of $4.91 million per incident.

Global average cost of #databreach is now $4.35M, up 13% since 2020. Much of that are realized more than a year after the attack, and 60% of organizations are passing the costs on to consumers in the form of higher prices. #cybersecurity #respectdataClick to Tweet

Cutting the cost of data breach

Though the numbers are never as neat and clean as averages would indicate, it would appear that the cost of data breaches is cut dramatically for companies that implement solid automated “deep learning” cybersecurity tools, zero trust systems and regularly tested incident response plans. Mature cloud security programs are also a substantial cost saver.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 10:00:00 -0500 Scott Ikeda en-US text/html https://www.cpomagazine.com/cyber-security/ibm-annual-cost-of-data-breach-report-2022-record-costs-usually-passed-on-to-consumers-long-breach-expenses-make-up-half-of-total-damage/
Killexams : Edology partners with IBM to launch Post Graduate Certificate Program in Data Science

Gurugram (Haryana) [India], July 30 (ANI/NewsVoir): Edology has announced a partnership with IBM, one of the world's top leading and reputed corporations, to introduce its Post Graduate Certificate Program in Data Science for working professionals and everyone wanting to enter the field of Data Science. Developed by IBM inventors and experts who hold numerous patents in the field of Data Science, this is the first IBM programme that has been completely designed by IBM and is being delivered by its faculty.

"The programme for the Edology x IBM Data Science course is a very special offering from IBM, and this is one-of-a-kind initiative," according to Hari Ramasubramanian, Leader, Business Development and Academia Relationships, IBM Expert Labs, India/South Asia. He further added, "There is a strong demand for skilled technology and trained professionals across the industry. Data science is not confined to IT. It includes all the verticals one can imagine-from board meetings to sports, data science brings a lot of value to organizations worldwide. For students, as well as professionals with experience, if you want to fast track your career on to the next level, this is the course you should be doing."

"The IBM Data Science certificate program through the Edology platform, will equip to adapt to the dynamics in the industry and drive technology innovation," said, Vithal Madyalkar, Program Director, IBM Innovation Centre for Education, India/South Asia. "The Data Science course modules will provide deep practical knowledge, coupled with broad-based industry alignment, interaction, talent discoverability as well as excellence in their professional practice."

A global Ed-Tech company, Edology helps students and professionals all around the world advance their careers in a variety of subjects, including data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, cyber security, and more.

Unique Offerings of the IBM x Edology PG Certificate Programme in Data Science:

- 100+ hours of Live classes by IBM experts

- Globally recognized IBM digital badge

- Job opportunities with 300+ corporate partners

- Edology-IBM Award for Top Performers

- 1 on 1 mentorship from industry experts

- 1 day networking session with IBM team

- Guaranteed interview with IBM for top performers in each cohort

- Dedicated career assistance team

Sumanth Palepu, the Business Head at Edology, states, "Statistical estimates reveal that the worldwide market size for Data Science and analytics is anticipated to reach around a whopping $450 billion by 2025, which also means that the rivalry would be quite severe at the employee level, the competition will be very fierce. Thus, this collaboration with IBM is now more essential than ever, so that we are collectively able to deliver advanced level teaching to the students and working professionals and they get first-hand industry knowledge with our IBM experts."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjWGU_k2Dhg

Edology is a Global Ed-Tech Brand that provides industry-powered education and skills to students and professionals across the world, to help them achieve fast-track career growth. Launched in 2017, Edology connects professionals from across the globe with higher education programmes in the fields of law, finance, accounting, business, computing, marketing, fashion, criminology, psychology, and more.

It's a part of Global University Systems (GUS), an international network of higher-education institutions, brought together by a shared passion of providing industry-driven global education accessible and affordable. All the programs of Edology are built with the objective of providing its learners career enhancement and strong CV credentials, along with a quality learning experience.

The courses offered by Edology include Data Science, Certification in AI and Machine Learning, Data Analytics, PGP in International Business, PGP in Renewable Energy Management, PGP in Oil and Gas Management among others. These offerings are done through hands-on industry projects, interactive live classes, global peer-to-peer learning and other facilities.

This story is provided by NewsVoir. ANI will not be responsible in any way for the content of this article. (ANI/NewsVoir)

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 21:31:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.bignewsnetwork.com/news/272637512/edology-partners-with-ibm-to-launch-post-graduate-certificate-program-in-data-science
Killexams : IBM hopes a new error mitigation technique will help it get to quantum advantage

It felt like for a long time, the quantum computing industry avoided talking about “quantum advantage” or “quantum supremacy,” the point where quantum computers can solve problems that would simply take too long to solve on classical computers. To some degree, that’s because the industry wanted to avoid the hype that comes with that, but IBM today brought back talk about quantum advantage again by detailing how it plans to use a novel error mitigation technique to chart a path toward running the increasingly large circuits it’ll take to reach this goal — at least for a certain set of algorithms.

It’s no secret that quantum computers hate nothing more than noise. Qubits are fickle things, after all, and the smallest change in temperature or vibration can make them decohere. There’s a reason the current era of quantum computing is associated with “noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) technology.”

The engineers at IBM and every other quantum computing company are making slow but steady strides toward reducing that noise on the hardware and software level, with IBM’s 65-qubit systems from 2020 now showing twice the coherence time compared to when they first launched, for example. The coherence time of IBM’s transmon superconducting qubits is now over 1 ms.

But IBM is also taking another approach but betting on new error mitigation techniques, dubbed probabilistic error cancellation and zero-noise extrapolation. At a very basic level, you can almost think of this as the quantum equivalent of the active noise cancellation in your headphones. The system regularly checks the system for noise and then essentially inverts those noisy circuits to enable it to create virtually error-free results.

IBM has now shown that this isn’t just a theoretical possibility but actually works in its existing systems. One disadvantage here is that there is quite a bit of overhead when you constantly trial these noisy circuits and that overhead is exponential in the number of qubits and the circuit depths. But that’s a trade-off worth making, argues Jerry Chow, the director of Hardware Development for IBM Quantum.

“Error mitigation is about finding ways to deal with the physical errors in certain ways, by learning about the errors and also just running quantum circuits in such a way that allows us to cancel them,” explained Chow. “In some ways, error correction is like the ultimate error mitigation, but the point is that there are techniques that are more near term with a lot of the hardware that we’re building that already provide this avenue. The one that we’re really excited about is called probabilistic error cancellation. And that one really is a way of trading off runtime — trading off running more circuits in order to learn about the noise that might be inherent to the system that is impacting your calculations.”

The system essentially inserts additional gates into existing circuits to trial the noise inherent in the system. And while the overhead increases exponentially with the size of the system, the IBM team believes it’s a weaker exponential than the best classical methods to estimate those same circuits.

As IBM previously announced, it plans to introduce error mitigation and suppression techniques into its Qiskit Runtime by 2024 or 2025 so developers won’t even have to think about these when writing their code.

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 00:27:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://techcrunch.com/2022/07/19/ibm-hopes-a-new-error-mitigation-technique-will-help-it-get-to-quantum-advantage/
Killexams : IBM’s Cost of a Data Breach Report finds invisible ‘cyber tax’

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When it comes to operational challenges, few mistakes are as costly as data breaches. Just one exploited vulnerability can lead to millions in damages, not just due to upfront disruption, but a loss of respect from consumers and potential compliance liabilities. 

Unfortunately, the cost of a data breach is only going up. Today, IBM Security released its annual “Cost of a Data Breach” report conducted by Ponemon Institute, which found that the cost of a data breach in 2022 totaled $4.35 million, an increase of 2.6% since last year’s total of $4.24 million. 

The research also found that organizations that fell victim to cyberattacks were prime target for follow-up attacks as part of a “haunting effect”, with 83% of organizations studied having had more than one data breach. 

For enterprises, the report highlights that new approaches are required to mitigate the impact of data breaches, particularly in the face of a growing number of sophisticated attacks, which can’t always be prevented. 

The hostile reality of the threat landscape 

As the cost of a data breach continues to rise amid a threat landscape of rampant double and triple extortion ransomware attacks and identity-related breaches, it’s becoming increasingly clear that traditional approaches to enterprise security need to be reevaluated. 

In the last week alone, T Mobile and Twitter found out the cost of a data breach first hand with the former agreeing to pay customers $350 million as part of a post-breach settlement, and the latter having to deal with the negative fallout after a hacker claimed to have accessed data on 5.4 million users. 

With the impact of such breaches causing millions in damage, many organizations decide to pass costs onto consumers, as part of an invisible cyber tax. In fact, IBM found that for 60% of organizations, breaches led to price increases passed on to customers. 

“What stands out most in this year’s finding is that the financial impact of breaches is now extending well beyond the breaches organizations themselves,” said Head of Strategy, IBM Security X-Force, John Hendley. 

“The cost is trickling down to consumers. In fact, if you consider that two or three companies within a supply chain may have suffered a breach and increased their prices, there’s this multiplier effect that’s ultimately hitting the consumer’s wallet. Essentially, we’re now beginning to see a hidden “cyber tax” that individuals are paying as a result of the growing number of breaches occurring today compounded with the more obvious disruptive effects of cyberattacks,” Hendley said. 

When asked why the cost of data breaches continued to grow, Hendley explained that there’s a high volume of attacks occurring, but only a limited number of skilled security professionals available to respond to them.

This is highlighted in the research with 62% of organizations saying they weren’t sufficiently staffed to meet their security needs.

What are the implications for CISOs and security leaders 

Although the report highlights the bleakest of the current threat landscape, it also points to some promising technologies and methodologies that enterprises can use to reduce the cost of data breaches. 

For instance, one of the most promising findings was that organizations with fully deployed security AI and automation can expect to pay $3.05 million less during a data breach, and on average cut the time to identify and contain a breach by 74-days. 

At the same time, organizations that implement zero trust can expect to pay 1 million less in breach costs than those that don’t. 

Finally, those organizations maintain an incident response team and regularly tested IR plans can expect to cut the cost by $2.66 million.

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Tue, 26 Jul 2022 23:01:00 -0500 Tim Keary en-US text/html https://venturebeat.com/2022/07/26/cost-of-a-data-breach/
Killexams : Ex-Dividend Reminder: International Business Machines, Kennametal and Mueller Water Products No result found, try new keyword!Looking at the universe of stocks we cover at Dividend Channel, on 8/9/22, International Business Machines Corp (Symbol: IBM), Kennametal Inc. (Symbol: KMT), and Mueller Water Products Inc (Symbol: ... Fri, 05 Aug 2022 02:21:00 -0500 text/html https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/ex-dividend-reminder%3A-international-business-machines-kennametal-and-mueller-water-0
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