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Exam Code: 000-283 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Foundations of IBM Cloud Computing Architecture V3
IBM Architecture plan
Killexams : IBM Architecture plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/000-283 Search results Killexams : IBM Architecture plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/000-283 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IBM Killexams : Astadia Publishes Mainframe to Cloud Reference Architecture Series

The guides leverage Astadia’s 25+ years of expertise in partnering with organizations to reduce costs, risks and timeframes when migrating their IBM mainframe applications to cloud platforms

BOSTON, August 03, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Astadia is pleased to announce the release of a new series of Mainframe-to-Cloud reference architecture guides. The documents cover how to refactor IBM mainframes applications to Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud, and Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI). The documents offer a deep dive into the migration process to all major target cloud platforms using Astadia’s FastTrack software platform and methodology.

As enterprises and government agencies are under pressure to modernize their IT environments and make them more agile, scalable and cost-efficient, refactoring mainframe applications in the cloud is recognized as one of the most efficient and fastest modernization solutions. By making the guides available, Astadia equips business and IT professionals with a step-by-step approach on how to refactor mission-critical business systems and benefit from highly automated code transformation, data conversion and testing to reduce costs, risks and timeframes in mainframe migration projects.

"Understanding all aspects of legacy application modernization and having access to the most performant solutions is crucial to accelerating digital transformation," said Scott G. Silk, Chairman and CEO. "More and more organizations are choosing to refactor mainframe applications to the cloud. These guides are meant to assist their teams in transitioning fast and safely by benefiting from Astadia’s expertise, software tools, partnerships, and technology coverage in mainframe-to-cloud migrations," said Mr. Silk.

The new guides are part of Astadia’s free Mainframe-to-Cloud Modernization series, an ample collection of guides covering various mainframe migration options, technologies, and cloud platforms. The series covers IBM (NYSE:IBM) Mainframes.

In addition to the reference architecture diagrams, these comprehensive guides include various techniques and methodologies that may be used in forming a complete and effective Legacy Modernization plan. The documents analyze the important role of the mainframe platform, and how to preserve previous investments in information systems when transitioning to the cloud.

In each of the IBM Mainframe Reference Architecture white papers, readers will explore:

  • Benefits, approaches, and challenges of mainframe modernization

  • Understanding typical IBM Mainframe Architecture

  • An overview of Azure/AWS/Google Cloud/Oracle Cloud

  • Detailed diagrams of IBM mappings to Azure/AWS/ Google Cloud/Oracle Cloud

  • How to ensure project success in mainframe modernization

The guides are available for get here:

To access more mainframe modernization resources, visit the Astadia learning center on www.astadia.com.

About Astadia

Astadia is the market-leading software-enabled mainframe migration company, specializing in moving IBM and Unisys mainframe applications and databases to distributed and cloud platforms in unprecedented timeframes. With more than 30 years of experience, and over 300 mainframe migrations completed, enterprises and government organizations choose Astadia for its deep expertise, range of technologies, and the ability to automate complex migrations, as well as testing at scale. Learn more on www.astadia.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220803005031/en/

Contacts

Wilson Rains, Chief Revenue Officer
Wilson.Rains@astadia.com
+1.877.727.8234

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/astadia-publishes-mainframe-cloud-reference-140000599.html
Killexams : IBM Uses Power10 CPU As An I/O Switch

Back in early July, we covered the launch of IBM’s entry and midrange Power10 systems and mused about how Big Blue could use these systems to reinvigorate an HPC business rather than just satisfy the needs of the enterprise customers who run transaction processing systems and are looking to add AI inference to their applications through matrix math units on the Power10 chip.

We are still gathering up information on how the midrange Power E1050 stacks up on SAP HANA and other workloads, but in poking around the architecture of the entry single-socket Power S1014 and the dual-socket S1022 and S1024 machines, we found something interesting that we thought we should share with you. We didn’t see it at first, and you will understand immediately why.

Here is the block diagram we got our hands on from IBM’s presentations to its resellers for the Power S1014 machine:

You can clearly see an I/O chip that adds some extra PCI-Express traffic lanes to the Power10 processor complex, right?

Same here with the block diagram of the Power S1022 (2U chassis) machines, which use the same system boards:

There are a pair of I/O switches in there, as you can see, which is not a big deal. Intel has co-packaged PCH chipsets in the same package as the Xeon CPUs with the Xeon D line for years, starting with the “Broadwell-DE” Xeon D processor in May 2015. IBM has used PCI-Express switches in the past to stretch the I/O inside a single machine beyond what comes off natively from the CPUs, such as with the Power IC922 inference engine Big Blue launched in January 2020, which you can see here:

The two PEX blocks in the center are PCI-Express switches, either from Broadcom or MicroChip if we had to guess.

But, that is not what is happening with the Power10 entry machines. Rather, IBM has created a single dual-chip module with two whole Power10 chips inside of it, and in the case of the low-end machines where AIX and IBM i customers don’t need a lot of compute but they do need a lot of I/O, the second Power10 chip has all of its cores turned off and it is acting like an I/O switch for the first Power10 chip that does have cores turned on.

You can see this clearly in this more detailed block diagram of the Power S1014 machine:

And in a more detailed block diagram of the two-socket Power S1022 motherboard:

This is the first time we can recall seeing something like this, but obviously any processor architecture could support the same functions.

In the two-socket Power S1024 and Power L1024 machines

What we find particularly interesting is the idea that those Power10 “switch” chips – the ones with no cores activated – could in theory also have eight OpenCAPI Memory Interface (OMI) ports turned on, doubling the memory capacity of the systems using skinnier and slightly faster 128 GB memory sticks, which run at 3.2 GHz, rather than having to move to denser 256 GB memory sticks that run at a slower 2.67 GHz when they are available next year. And in fact, you could take this all one step further and turn off all of the Power10 cores and turn on all of the 16 OMI memory slots across each DCM and create a fat 8 TB or 16 TB memory server that through the Power10 memory area network – what IBM calls memory inception – could serve as the main memory for a bunch of Power10 nodes with no memory of their own.

We wonder if IBM will do such a thing, and also ponder what such a cluster of memory-less server nodes talking to a centralized memory node might do with SAP HANA, Spark, data analytics, and other memory intensive work like genomics. The Power10 chip has a 2 PB upper memory limit, and that is the only cap on where this might go.

There is another neat thing IBM could do here, too. Imagine if the Power10 compute chip in a DCM had no I/O at all but just lots of memory attached to it and the secondary Power10 chip had only a few cores and all of the I/O of the complex. That would, in effect, make the second Power10 chip a DPU for the first one.

The engineers at IBM are clearly thinking outside of the box; it will be interesting to see if the product managers and marketeers do so.

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 05:34:00 -0500 Timothy Prickett Morgan en-US text/html https://www.nextplatform.com/2022/07/26/ibm-uses-power10-cpu-as-an-i-o-switch/
Killexams : Easdale brothers' Greenock sugar site homes plan

A FORMER sugar factory site is set to be transformed into homes under plans by former Rangers directors the Easdale brothers. 

A plot of land which once formed part of the former Tate & Lyle sugar refinery in Greenock is being proposed as a new private housing development by Sandy and James Easdale.

The 5.2-acre elevated site on Drumfrochar Road was sold by property agents Bowman Rebecchi in October 2021 after the long-term vacant site closed in 1997.

Development plans have since been submitted by Dalglen Investments who jointly purchased the site as part of their £800 million countrywide property portfolio.

Dalglen’s property investment operations are behind several housing projects throughout Scotland, including the former IBM site in Greenock, the former Tullis Russell paper factory in Glenrothes, and a waterside housing development at Dumbarton, creating over 3,000 new homes within the next decade.

HeraldScotland: The site beforeThe site before

This latest proposed £15 million project in Greenock will comprise 46 new homes, with a new double entry point from Lynedoch Street created from the development which will be split across two levels.

It is anticipated that 40 jobs - including at least 15 apprenticeships - will be created through the construction phase which could last up to two years, with the site identified as a priority place as part of Inverclyde Council’s Local Development Plan.

A mixture of three-bed detached, and semi-detached properties are proposed, with the site stretching along the east of Drumfrochar Road, adjacent to M&J Timber and Wellington Park Bowling Club.

HeraldScotland: The site afterThe site after

Rectangular in shape, with short tails at the top east and west sections, the development site occupies an elevated position, with open aspects of the River Clyde and Greenock town centre.

Sandy Easdale said: “We have submitted this new proposal with the intent to create increased housing capacity and to continue to support the future economic prosperity of the Broomhill and Drumfrochar area.

“Other private housing developments close to the Drumfrochar site previously have proven to be extremely popular and have provided great family homes for locals and long-term ownership."

HeraldScotland: One of the street viewsOne of the street views

He also said: “We see no reason why this wouldn’t be the case with our site, and we expect this to be a highly popular development.”

The application has been prepared and submitted by the planning and design consultancy firm, Rebecchi Architectural.

James Easdale said: "The ongoing development and economic improvement of this part of Greenock is something we are deeply passionate about, and further supports our ongoing investment into nearby areas at Baker Street, Ingliston Street, and Orchard Street."

HeraldScotland: Another street viewAnother street view

He added: “We believe this is a fantastic opportunity to bring this historic site back to life while also creating much-needed homes for locals while creating further repopulation opportunities.”

Sandy and James Easdale, 54 and 50, were new entries in this year’s Sunday Times Rich List, with their fortune, estimated at £1.4billion, made through transport and property.

Both continue to invest heavily into Inverclyde, with the proposed development further complimenting Inverclyde Council’s wider regeneration of the Drumfrochar area, which includes the £3 million B7054 road realignment and a £1.8 million enterprise hub.

HeraldScotland: How the homes might lookHow the homes might look

Bowman Rebecchi has supported both the previous and current owners of the site, with its unique model supporting the sales, acquisition, architectural, and planning processes.

The proposed development is set to be reviewed by Inverclyde Council planners.

The Easdales, through their conglomerate Arranglen and its subsidiary companies, have a wide range of business interests spanning transport, manufacturing, commercial property and land investment.

HeraldScotland: James and Sandy EasdaleJames and Sandy Easdale

The Easdale family also owns McGill's Group, claimed to be the largest independent UK bus operator.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 23:18:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.heraldscotland.com/business_hq/20597459.easdale-brothers-greenock-sugar-site-homes-plan/
Killexams : Businesses confess: We pass cyberattack costs onto customers No result found, try new keyword!Almost 50 percent of the costs of a breach are incurred more than a year after the incident, IBM found. Such numbers show not only that a given organization will likely sustain a data breach, but that ... Thu, 28 Jul 2022 18:35:17 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/other/businesses-confess-we-pass-cyberattack-costs-onto-customers/ar-AA105ESb Killexams : IBM Annual Cost of Data Breach Report 2022: Record Costs Usually Passed On to Consumers, “Long Breach” Expenses Make Up Half of Total Damage

IBM’s annual Cost of Data Breach Report for 2022 is packed with revelations, and as usual none of them are good news. Headlining the report is the record-setting cost of data breaches, with the global average now at $4.35 million. The report also reveals that much of that expense comes with the data breach version of “long Covid,” expenses that are realized more than a year after the attack.

Most organizations (60%) are passing these added costs on to consumers in the form of higher prices. And while 83% of organizations now report experiencing at least one data breach, only a small minority are adopting zero trust strategies.

Security AI and automation greatly reduces expected damage

The IBM report draws on input from 550 global organizations surveyed about the period between March 2021 and March 2022, in partnership with the Ponemon Institute.

Though the average cost of a data breach is up, it is only by about 2.6%; the average in 2021 was $4.24 million. This represents a total climb of 13% since 2020, however, reflecting the general spike in cyber crime seen during the pandemic years.

Organizations are also increasingly not opting to absorb the cost of data breaches, with the majority (60%) compensating by raising consumer prices separate from any other latest increases due to inflation or supply chain issues. The report indicates that this may be an underreported upward influence on prices of consumer goods, as 83% of organizations now say that they have been breached at least once.

Brad Hong, Customer Success Manager for Horizon3.ai, sees a potential consumer backlash on the horizon once public awareness of this practice grows: “It’s already a breach of confidence to lose the confidential data of customers, and sure there’s bound to be an organization across those surveyed who genuinely did put in the effort to protect against and curb attacks, but for those who did nothing, those who, instead of creating a disaster recovery plan, just bought cyber insurance to cover the org’s operational losses, and those who simply didn’t care enough to heed the warnings, it’s the coup de grâce to then pass the cost of breaches to the same customers who are now the victims of a data breach. I’d be curious to know what percent of the 60% of organizations who increased the price of their products and services are using the extra revenue for a war chest or to actually reinforce their security—realistically, it’s most likely just being used to fill a gap in lost revenue for shareholders’ sake post-breach. Without government regulations outlining restrictions on passing cost of breach to consumer, at the least, not without the honest & measurable efforts of a corporation as their custodian, what accountability do we all have against that one executive who didn’t want to change his/her password?”

Breach costs also have an increasingly long tail, as nearly half now come over a year after the date of the attack. The largest of these are generally fines that are levied after an investigation, and decisions or settlements in class action lawsuits. While the popular new “double extortion” approach of ransomware attacks can drive long-term costs in this way, the study finds that companies paying ransom demands to settle the problem quickly aren’t necessarily seeing a large amount of overall savings: their average breach cost drops by just $610,000.

Sanjay Raja, VP of Product with Gurucul, expands on how knock-on data breach damage can continue for years: “The follow-up attack effect, as described, is a significant problem as the playbooks and solutions provided to security operations teams are overly broad and lack the necessary context and response actions for proper remediation. For example, shutting down a user or application or adding a firewall block rule or quarantining a network segment to negate an attack is not a sustainable remediation step to protect an organization on an ongoing basis. It starts with a proper threat detection, investigation and response solution. Current SIEMs and XDR solutions lack the variety of data, telemetry and combined analytics to not only identify an attack campaign and even detect variants on previously successful attacks, but also provide the necessary context, accuracy and validation of the attack to build both a precise and complete response that can be trusted. This is an even greater challenge when current solutions cannot handle complex hybrid multi-cloud architectures leading to significant blind spots and false positives at the very start of the security analyst journey.”

Rising cost of data breach not necessarily prompting dramatic security action

In spite of over four out of five organizations now having experienced some sort of data breach, only slightly over 20% of critical infrastructure companies have moved to zero trust strategies to secure their networks. Cloud security is also lagging as well, with a little under half (43%) of all respondents saying that their security practices in this area are either “early stage” or do not yet exist.

Those that have onboarded security automation and AI elements are the only group seeing massive savings: their average cost of data breach is $3.05 million lower. This particular study does not track average ransom demands, but refers to Sophos research that puts the most latest number at $812,000 globally.

The study also notes serious problems with incident response plans, especially troubling in an environment in which the average ransomware attack is now carried out in four days or less and the “time to ransom” has dropped to a matter of hours in some cases. 37% of respondents say that they do not test their incident response plans regularly. 62% say that they are understaffed to meet their cybersecurity needs, and these organizations tend to suffer over half a million more dollars in damages when they are breached.

Of course, cost of data breaches is not distributed evenly by geography or by industry type. Some are taking much bigger hits than others, reflecting trends established in prior reports. The health care industry is now absorbing a little over $10 million in damage per breach, with the average cost of data breach rising by $1 million from 2021. And companies in the United States face greater data breach costs than their counterparts around the world, at over $8 million per incident.

Shawn Surber, VP of Solutions Architecture and Strategy with Tanium, provides some insight into the unique struggles that the health care industry faces in implementing effective cybersecurity: “Healthcare continues to suffer the greatest cost of breaches but has among the lowest spend on cybersecurity of any industry, despite being deemed ‘critical infrastructure.’ The increased vulnerability of healthcare organizations to cyber threats can be traced to outdated IT systems, the lack of robust security controls, and insufficient IT staff, while valuable medical and health data— and the need to pay ransoms quickly to maintain access to that data— make healthcare targets popular and relatively easy to breach. Unlike other industries that can migrate data and sunset old systems, limited IT and security budgets at healthcare orgs make migration difficult and potentially expensive, particularly when an older system provides a small but unique function or houses data necessary for compliance or research, but still doesn’t make the cut to transition to a newer system. Hackers know these weaknesses and exploit them. Additionally, healthcare orgs haven’t sufficiently updated their security strategies and the tools that manufacturers, IT software vendors, and the FDA have made haven’t been robust enough to thwart the more sophisticated techniques of threat actors.”

Familiar incident types also lead the list of the causes of data breaches: compromised credentials (19%), followed by phishing (16%). Breaches initiated by these methods also tended to be a little more costly, at an average of $4.91 million per incident.

Global average cost of #databreach is now $4.35M, up 13% since 2020. Much of that are realized more than a year after the attack, and 60% of organizations are passing the costs on to consumers in the form of higher prices. #cybersecurity #respectdataClick to Tweet

Cutting the cost of data breach

Though the numbers are never as neat and clean as averages would indicate, it would appear that the cost of data breaches is cut dramatically for companies that implement solid automated “deep learning” cybersecurity tools, zero trust systems and regularly tested incident response plans. Mature cloud security programs are also a substantial cost saver.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 10:00:00 -0500 Scott Ikeda en-US text/html https://www.cpomagazine.com/cyber-security/ibm-annual-cost-of-data-breach-report-2022-record-costs-usually-passed-on-to-consumers-long-breach-expenses-make-up-half-of-total-damage/
Killexams : Blockchain revolution meets hard reality in trade finance
blockchain-broken-iStock-960.jpg

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

In 2018, the World Trade Organization asked: can blockchain revolutionize international trade? It reported on possible applications of blockchain and stated that the technology opened interesting opportunities to enhance the efficiency of several processes and cut costs in these areas.

The author of the report said that if the projects under development succeeded, blockchain could become the future of trade infrastructure and the biggest disruptor to the shipping industry and to international trade since the invention of the container.

One of the highest profile ventures in this space was we.trade, which started offering commercial services in 2019. A joint-venture company owned by 12 European banks and IBM, it promised to enhance cash flow by digitizing paper-based processes.

However, the platform struggled to deliver a return on investment for its backers. Even financial support from IBM and a new capital round were not enough to prevent it folding in May.

It is interesting to see a shift away from blockchain for some trade finance-related initiatives, especially since blockchain was positioned as the key differentiator for their solution

Jacco De Jong, Bolero

Just a few weeks later, B2B online trade platform Serai also admitted defeat in its efforts to build a commercially viable business.


Thu, 04 Aug 2022 02:18:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.euromoney.com/article/2ag4usqpiwas5ox8wf0g0/treasury/blockchain-revolution-meets-hard-reality-in-trade-finance
Killexams : IBM Eagle Has A Lot Of Qubits

How many qubits do you need in a quantum computer? Plenty, if you want to anything useful. However, today, we have to settle for a lot fewer than we would like. But IBM’s new Eagle has the most of its type of quantum computer: 127-qubits. Naturally, they plan to do even more work, and you can see a preview of “System Two” in the video below.

The 127 qubit number is both impressively large and depressingly small. Each qubit increases the amount of work a conventional computer has to do to simulate the machine by a factor of two. The hope is to one day produce quantum computers that would be impractical to simulate using conventional computers. That’s known as quantum supremacy and while several teams have claimed it, actually achieving it is a subject of debate.

Like any computer, more bits — or qubits — are better than fewer bits, generally speaking. However, it is especially important for modern quantum systems since most practical schemes require redundancy and error correction to be reliable in modern implementations of quantum computer hardware. What’s in the future? IBM claims they will build the Condor processor with over 1,000 qubits using the same 3D packaging technology seen in Eagle. Condor is slated for 2023 and there will be an intermediate chip due in 2022 with 433 qubits.

Scaling anything to a large number usually requires more than just duplicating smaller things. In the case of Eagle and at least one of its predecessors, part of the scaling was to use readout units that can read different qubits. Older processors with just a few qubits would have dedicated readout hardware for each qubit, but that’s untenable once you get hundreds or thousands of qubits.

Qubits aren’t the only measure of a computer’s power, just like a conventional computer with more bits might be less capable than one with fewer bits. You also have to consider the quality of the qubits and how they are connected.

Who’s going to win the race to quantum supremacy? Or has it already been won? We have a feeling if it hasn’t already been done, it won’t be very far in the future. If you think about the state of computers in, say, 1960 and compare it to today, about 60 years later, you have to wonder if that amount of progress will occur in this area, too.

Most of the announcements you hear about quantum computing come from Google, IBM, or Microsoft. But there’s also Honeywell and a few other players. If you want to get ready for the quantum onslaught, maybe start with this tutorial that will run on a simulator, mostly.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Al Williams en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2022/02/08/ibm-eagle-has-a-lot-of-qubits/
Killexams : Cybersecurity - what’s the real cost? Ask IBM
(Pixabay)

Cybersecurity has always been a concern for every type of organization. Even in normal times, a major breach is more than just the data economy’s equivalent of a ram-raid on Fort Knox; it has knock-on effects on trust, reputation, confidence, and the viability of some technologies. This is what IBM calls the “haunting effect”.

A successful attack breeds more, of course, both on the same organization again, and on others in similar businesses, or in those that use the same compromised systems. The unspoken effect of this is rising costs for everyone, as all enterprises are forced to spend money and time on checking if they have been affected too.

But in our new world of COVID-19, disrupted economies, climate change, remote working, soaring inflation, and looming recession, all such effects are all amplified. Throw in a war that’s hammering on Europe’s door (with political echoes across the Middle East and Asia) and it’s a wonder any of us can get out of bed in the morning.

So, what are the real costs of a successful cyberattack – not just hacks, viruses, and Trojans, but also phishing, ransomware, and concerted campaigns against supply chains and code repositories?

According to IBM’s latest annual survey, breach costs have risen by an unlucky 13% over the past two years, as attackers, which include hostile states, have probed the systemic and operational weaknesses exposed by the pandemic.

The global average cost of a data breach has reached an all-time high of $4.35 million – at least, among the 550 organizations surveyed by the Ponemon Institute for IBM Security (over a year from March 2021). Indeed, IBM goes so far as to claim that breaches may be contributing to the rising costs of goods and services. The survey states:

Sixty percent of studied organizations raised their product or services prices due to the breach, when the cost of goods is already soaring worldwide amid inflation and supply chain issues.

Incidents are also “haunting” organizations, says the company, with 83% having experienced more than one data breach, and with 50% of costs occurring more than a year after the successful attack.

Cloud maturity is a key factor, adds the report:

Forty-three percent of studied organizations are in the early stages [of cloud adoption] or have not started applying security practices across their cloud environments, observing over $660,000 in higher breach costs, on average, than studied organizations with mature security across their cloud environments.

Forty-five percent of respondents run a hybrid cloud infrastructure. This leads to lower average breach costs than among those operating a public- or private-cloud model: $3.8 million versus $5.02 million (public) and $4.24 million (private).

That said, those are still significant costs, and may suggest that complexity is what deters attackers, rather than having a single target to hit. Nonetheless, hybrid cloud adopters are able to identify and contain data breaches 15 days faster on average, says the report.

However, with 277 days being the average time lag – an extraordinary figure – the real lesson may be that today’s enterprise systems are adept at hiding security breaches, which may appear as normal network traffic. Forty-five percent of breaches occurred in the cloud, says the report, so it is clearly imperative to get on top of security in that domain.

IBM then makes the following bold claim :

Participating organizations fully deploying security AI and automation incurred $3.05 million less on average in breach costs compared to studied organizations that have not deployed the technology – the biggest cost saver observed in the study.

Whether this finding will stand for long as attackers explore new ways to breach automated and/or AI-based systems – and perhaps automate attacks of their own invisibly – remains to be seen. Compromised digital employee, anyone?

Global systems at risk

But perhaps the most telling finding is that cybersecurity has a political dimension – beyond the obvious one of Russian, Chinese, North Korean, or Iranian state incursions, of course.

Concerns over critical infrastructure and global supply chains are rising, with threat actors seeking to disrupt global systems that include financial services, industrial, transportation, and healthcare companies, among others.

A year ago in the US, the Biden administration issued an Executive Order on cybersecurity that focused on the urgent need for zero-trust systems. Despite this, only 21% of critical infrastructure organizations have so far adopted a zero-trust security model, according to the report. It states:

Almost 80% of the critical infrastructure organizations studied don’t adopt zero-trust strategies, seeing average breach costs rise to $5.4 million – a $1.17 million increase compared to those that do. All while 28% of breaches among these organizations were ransomware or destructive attacks.

Add to that, 17% of breaches at critical infrastructure organizations were caused due to a business partner being initially compromised, highlighting the security risks that over-trusting environments pose.

That aside, one of the big stories over the past couple of years has been the rise of ransomware: malicious code that locks up data, enterprise systems, or individual computers, forcing users to pay a ransom to (they hope) retrieve their systems or data.

But according to IBM, there are no obvious winners or losers in this insidious practice. The report adds:

Businesses that paid threat actors’ ransom demands saw $610,000 less in average breach costs compared to those that chose not to pay – not including the ransom amount paid.

However, when accounting for the average ransom payment – which according to Sophos reached $812,000 in 2021 – businesses that opt to pay the ransom could net higher total costs, all while inadvertently funding future ransomware attacks.”

The persistence of ransomware is fuelled by what IBM calls the “industrialization of cybercrime”.

The risk profile is also changing. Ransomware attack times show a massive drop of 94% over the past three years, from over two months to just under four days. Good news? Not at all, says the report, as the attacks may be higher impact, with more immediate consequences (such as destroyed data, or private data being made public on hacker forums).

My take

The key lesson in cybersecurity today is that all of us are both upstream and downstream from partners, suppliers, and customers in today’s extended enterprises. We are also at the mercy of reused but compromised code from trusted repositories, and even sometimes from hardware that has been compromised at source.

So, what is the answer? Businesses should ensure that their incident responses are tested rigorously and frequently in advance – along with using red-, blue-, or purple-team approaches (thinking like a hacker, a defender, or both).

Regrettably, IBM says that 37% of organizations that have IR plans in place fail to test them regularly. To paraphrase Spinal Tap, you can’t code for stupid.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 BRAINSUM en text/html https://diginomica.com/cybersecurity-whats-real-cost-ask-ibm
Killexams : Easdale brothers unveil homes plan for former sugar refinery site

Site images: Rebecchi Architectural

A FORMER sugar factory site is set to be transformed into homes under plans by former Rangers directors the Easdale brothers.

A plot of land which once formed part of the former Tate & Lyle sugar refinery in Greenock is being proposed as a new private housing development by Sandy and James Easdale.

The 5.2-acre elevated site on Drumfrochar Road was sold by property agents Bowman Rebecchi in October 2021 after the long-term vacant site closed in 1997.

Development plans have since been submitted by Dalglen Investments who jointly purchased the site as part of their £800 million countrywide property portfolio.

Dalglen’s property investment operations are behind several housing projects throughout Scotland, including the former IBM site in Greenock, the former Tullis Russell paper factory in Glenrothes, and a waterside housing development at Dumbarton, creating over 3,000 new homes within the next decade.

HeraldScotland: The site before

The site before

This latest proposed £15 million project in Greenock will comprise 46 new homes, with a new double entry point from Lynedoch Street created from the development which will be split across two levels.

It is anticipated that 40 jobs - including at least 15 apprenticeships - will be created through the construction phase which could last up to two years, with the site identified as a priority place as part of Inverclyde Council’s Local Development Plan.

A mixture of three-bed detached, and semi-detached properties are proposed, with the site stretching along the east of Drumfrochar Road, adjacent to M&J Timber and Wellington Park Bowling Club.

HeraldScotland: The site after

The site after

Rectangular in shape, with short tails at the top east and west sections, the development site occupies an elevated position, with open aspects of the River Clyde and Greenock town centre.

Sandy Easdale said: “We have submitted this new proposal with the intent to create increased housing capacity and to continue to support the future economic prosperity of the Broomhill and Drumfrochar area.

“Other private housing developments close to the Drumfrochar site previously have proven to be extremely popular and have provided great family homes for locals and long-term ownership."

HeraldScotland: One of the street views

One of the street views

He also said: “We see no reason why this wouldn’t be the case with our site, and we expect this to be a highly popular development.”

The application has been prepared and submitted by the planning and design consultancy firm, Rebecchi Architectural.

James Easdale said: "The ongoing development and economic improvement of this part of Greenock is something we are deeply passionate about, and further supports our ongoing investment into nearby areas at Baker Street, Ingliston Street, and Orchard Street."

HeraldScotland: Another street view

Another street view

He added: “We believe this is a fantastic opportunity to bring this historic site back to life while also creating much-needed homes for locals while creating further repopulation opportunities.”

Sandy and James Easdale, 54 and 50, were new entries in this year’s Sunday Times Rich List, with their fortune, estimated at £1.4billion, made through transport and property.

Both continue to invest heavily into Inverclyde, with the proposed development further complimenting Inverclyde Council’s wider regeneration of the Drumfrochar area, which includes the £3 million B7054 road realignment and a £1.8 million enterprise hub.

HeraldScotland: How the homes might look

How the homes might look

Bowman Rebecchi has supported both the previous and current owners of the site, with its unique model supporting the sales, acquisition, architectural, and planning processes.

The proposed development is set to be reviewed by Inverclyde Council planners.

The Easdales, through their conglomerate Arranglen and its subsidiary companies, have a wide range of business interests spanning transport, manufacturing, commercial property and land investment.

HeraldScotland: James and Sandy Easdale

James and Sandy Easdale

The Easdale family also owns McGill's Group, claimed to be the largest independent UK bus operator.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 23:18:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/easdale-brothers-unveil-homes-plan-111204491.html
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